LaGrange College, Undergraduate Bulletin, LaGrange, Georgia, Catalogue Issue, 2010-2011, June 2010

Collection:
LaGrange College collections in the Internet Archive
Title:
LaGrange College, Undergraduate Bulletin, LaGrange, Georgia, Catalogue Issue, 2010-2011, June 2010
Creator:
LaGrange College
Contributor to Resource:
LaGrange College
Date of Original:
2010
Subject:
LaGrange College (LaGrange, Ga.)
LaGrange Female College (LaGrange, Ga.)
LaGrange Female Institute (LaGrange, Ga.)
LaGrange Female Academy (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange College (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange Female College (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange Female Institute (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange Female Academy (LaGrange, Ga.)
Women's Colleges--Georgia
Women--Education (Higher)--Georgia
Education--History--Georgia
Location:
United States, Georgia, Troup County, LaGrange, 33.03929, -85.03133
Type:
Text
Format:
application/pdf
Description:
College officially known as LaGrange Female Academy 1831-1847, LaGrange Female Institute 1847-1851, LaGrange Female College 1851-1934, LaGrange College 1934-. College name appears as La Grange in some college publications. Since 2011 the Undergraduate Catalogs (Bulletins) have been produced in electronic form only. The Catalogs (Bulletins) contain details about the faculty, curriculum, student body, physical plant and more from 1848. Catalogs (Bulletins) published as separate itemuments include: Graduate Catalog (Bulletin) from 1992, Evening College Bulletin from 2000, LaGrange College at Albany (Georgia) from 2000-2010, Interim Term from 2001-2010.
Local Identifier:
laGrangecollegeu2010lagr
Metadata URL:
https://archive.org/details/lagrangecollegeu2010lagr
Language:
eng
Original Collection:
LaGrange College Americana
LaGrange College
Holding Institution:
LaGrange College (LaGrange, Ga.)
Rights:
Rights Statement information

1 1 $**$

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2010-2011

-> VOLUME CLXIX JUNE 2010

LAGRANGE COLLEGE

UNDERGRADUATE
BULLETIN

LAGRANGE, GEORGIA

CATALOGUE ISSUE 2010-2011

Communications Directory

LaGrange College

601 Broad Street

LaGrange, Georgia 30240-2999

(706) 880-8000 Fax: (706) 880-8358 www.lagrange.edu

For prompt attention, please address inquiries as indicated below.

The Area Code of 706 is required when dialing.

LaGrange College (general information) 880-8000

Office of the President 880-8230

Executive Director of Instructional and Information Tech 880-8050

Provost 880-8236

Registrar 880-8997

Dean of Student Affairs 880-8004

Director of Career Planning and Placement 880-8286

Vice President for Enrollment Management 880-8736

Director of Admission 880-8253

Director Financial Aid 880-8229

Vice President for Finance and Operations 880-8267

Controller 880-8232 .

Vice President for Advancement 880-8257

Director of Communications and Marketing 880-8246

Visitors are welcome at LaGrange College throughout the year. The

administrative offices in the Banks Building are open Monday through Friday from
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday visits may be arranged by appointment. Visitors
desiring interviews with members of the staff are urged to make appointments in advance.
LaGrange College admits qualified students of any race, color, national and ethnic
origin to all rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made
available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race,
color, national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions
policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other schcol-administered programs.

LaGrange College Bulletin, Volume CLXVIII

President: Dr. Dan McAlexander Editor: Dr. Sharon Livingston

LaGrange College Bulletin, the official publication of LaGrange College for current
and future students, is published annually. Correspondence should be directed to the
Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, LaGrange College, 601 Broad Street, LaGrange,
GA 30240-2999. E-mail correspondence to slivingston@lagrange.edu or fax to
(706) 880-8358.

Challenging the mind. Inspiring the soul.

Contents

Communications Directory 2

Calendar 4

About LaGrange College, Mission, and History 13

LaGrange College at Albany 16

The LaGrange College Campus 17

Admission and Enrollment 23

Financial Information 29

Financial Aid 36

Student Life 50

Information Technology and Academic Support 68

Academic Policies 76

Academic Programs 96

Departments 1 19

Academic Divisions, Departments and Courses 121

Faculty 314

Board of Trustees 324

Administrative Officers 326

Administrative Staff 327

Index 333

Change of Regulations

The College reserves the right to make modifications in the degree
requirements, courses, schedules, calendar, regulations, fees and other
changes deemed necessary or conducive to the efficient operation of the
College. Such changes become effective as announced by the proper
college authorities.

Note: For information, regulations and procedures for graduate study,
please see the Graduate Bulletin. For information, regulations and
procedures for evening courses, please see the Evening College Bulletin.
For information, regulations and procedures of the Albany campus, please
see the Albany Bulletin.

3

2010 -2011

Academic Calendar
Day Program

August 2010 Fall Semester

18 Opening Session

18 Faculty Institute begins

President's buffet for faculty, administration, staff, and their
spouses

20 Faculty Institute ends

20 Departmental and/or Division meetings

23 New students move in - First Week begins

Math placement test for all new students, Jolly Room,
Science Building

23-27 First Week

24 First-year student assessment

26 First-year student assessment

30 First-year student assessment

28-30 Residence halls open - returning students move-in

Final registration for returning Day students begins.

30 Advisors are available in their offices during posted office
hours..

3 1 First-year student assessment
31 Fair on the Hill

3 1 Work aid and work study time sheets due

September 2010

1 All classes begin

1 Opening Convocation

6 Labor Day - College closed

s

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual classes
dropped after this date.

All Incomplete grades should be changed to permanent
grades.

Syllabi and office hours due in Provost's Oft ice

16 Administrative Council meeting

17 Day of Record

18 Fall Visitation Day 1
24-26 Fall Family Weekend

27

Spring & Summer 201 1 class schedules due in the
Registrar's Office

30 Faculty Assembly

30 Work aid and work study time sheets due

October 2010

7 Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

14 Administrative Council meeting

14-15 Fall Break No Classes

Mid-Term. Faculty submit deficiency reports
electronically to the Provost's Office by 5:00 p.m.

Last day to withdraw from class with an automatic "W

Faculty Advising Week

Senior assessment

Faculty Assembly

Board of Trustees meeting

2010 Homecoming

Work aid and work study time sheets due

-

20

*

25-29

+
*

26

i

28

4

28-29

*

29-31

*

29

*

November 2010

1-5

Pre-registration for Day students. Students completing
degree requirements by end of Fall, Interim, or Spring
terms should file petitions for graduation with the
Registrar. Advisors available.

4 Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

4 Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

4 Proposals for Interim 2012 travel courses due

7 Daylight Savings Time ends

13 Fall Visitation Day 2

18 Administrative Council meeting

18 Faculty Assembly

23 Last day of classes before Thanksgiving break

24 Administrative offices close at Noon
24-26 Thanksgiving break - no classes
25-26 Administrative offices closed

29 Classes resume after Thanksgiving break

29-Dec.3 Celebrate the Servant

29 Celebration of Servant-Leadership, Assembly Room

30 Service of Celebration and Recognition, Chapel
30 Work aid and work study time sheets due

December 2010

2 Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

2 Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols, Callaway
Auditorium

6 Last day of Fall-Term classes for Day students

7- 1 1 Exams

1 1 Begin term break at 5:00 pm

13 Summer research proposals due in Provost's Office

16 Administrative Council meeting

1 7 Grades due

22 Work aid and work study time sheets due.

23-3 1 Holidays for administration and staff - College closed

January 201 1 Interim Term

1 New Year's Holiday - College closed

2 Residence halls open

3 Registration for new and returning Day students.

4 Mandatory first meeting for classes.

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual classes
dropped after this date.

5 All Incomplete grades should be changed to permanent

6 Syllabi and office hours due in Provost's Office by email.
6 Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

6 Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

13 Mid-Term

14 Last day to withdraw from class with an automatic "W"
14 Day of Record

17 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - College closed

20 Administrative Council meeting

27 Last day of class

27 Faculty Assembly

Math placement test for all new students. Jolly Room.

28

Science Building

7

28
31

Final registration for all Day students begins. Advisors
are available in their offices during posted office hours.

Work aid and work study time sheets due

February 201 1 Spring Semester

Interim-Term grades due

Classes begin

Spring -Term new first-year student assessment

Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual

classes dropped after this date.

All Incomplete grades should be changed to permanent

10

grades.

Syllabi and office hours due in Provost's Office by email.

11

Fall-Term 201 1 and Spring-Term 2012 schedules are due
in the Registrar's Office.

11

Day of Record

12

Presidential Scholarship Competition Day

17

Administrative Council meeting

19

Make-up for snow, if necessary, for Day and Evening
classes

24

Faculty Assembly

26

Fine Arts Scholarship Day

28

Work aid and work study time sheets due

March 2011

3

Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

3

Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

5

Spring Visitation Day 1
8

13 Daylight Savings Time begins

14 Proposals for Interim 2012 non-travel courses due
14-18 Academic Integrity Week

15 Interim 2012 travel applications due

6

Mid-Term. Faculty submit deficiency reports
electronically to the Provost's Office by 5:00 p.m.

17 Administrative Council meeting

21-25 Faculty Advising Week

2 1 -25 Senior Assessment Week

22 Last day to withdraw from class with an automatic "W"
24 Faculty Assembly

26 Accepted Student Day

Pre-registration for Day students. Students completing

28 April 1 degree requirements in summer or fall should file petitions
for graduation with the Registrar. Advisors available.

31 Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

3 1 Work aid and work study time sheets due

April 2011

4-8 Spring Break - No Classes

14 Administrative Council meeting
14-15 Board of Trustees meeting

15 Interim 2012 travel deposits due

16 Spring Visitation Day 2

21 Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

22 Good Friday - College closed
24 Easter

28 Faculty Assembly

29 Honors Day

29 Work aid and work study time sheets due

30 May Day
May 2011

5 Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

5 Faculty meeting, Dickson Assembly Room

5 National Day of Prayer

9-10 Student room lottery, Dickson Assembly Room

9 Last day of classes for Day students

10 Reading Day
11-17 Exams

19 Grades for Graduating Seniors Due by Noon

19 Administrative Council meeting

19 Nurses' Pinning Ceremony

20

20

21

Graduation rehearsal, faculty marshals and student
marshals attend

Baccalaureate at First United Methodist Church. All faculty,
should plan to attend.

20 Grades for those not graduating due at 5:00 p.m.

Graduation on residential quadrangle. All faculty should
plan to attend.

K)

May 2011 Summer I Term 201 1

30 Memorial Day Holiday - College Closed

31 Residence halls open

Math placement test tor all new students. Jolly Room,
Science Building

3 1 Registration

3 1 Work aid and work study time sheets

June 2011

1 All classes meet

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual classes
dropped after this date.

All Incomplete grades should be changed to permanent
grades.

2 Syllabi and office hours due in Provost's Office by email.
2 Staff Council meeting, Bailey Room

1 5 Mid-Term

16 Last day to withdraw from class with an automatic "W"
30 Last day of classes

30 Work aid and work study time sheets due.

30 Departmental Annual Reports due in Provost's Office

July 2011

1 Exams for all classes

4 July 4th Holiday - College Closed

5 Summer I Grades due by Noon

11

July 201 1 Summer II Term 2010

5 Math placement test for all new students, Jolly Room,

Science Building
5 Registration

5 Residence halls open

6 All classes meet

7 End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual classes
dropped after this date.

7 All Incomplete grades should be changed to permanent

grades.
7 Syllabi and office hours due in Provost's Office by email.

20 Mid-Term

21 Last day to withdraw from class with an automatic "W"
29 Work aid and work study time sheets due.

August 2011

4 Last day of classes

5 Exams for all classes

9 Summer II grades due by Noon

12

; About LaGrange College

LaGrange College is called through the United Methodist Church to
a challenge the minds and inspire the souls of students by improving their

creative, critical and communicative abilities in a caring and ethical community.

Mission

A LaGrange College, established in 1831, is owned by the North Georgia

Conference of the United Methodist Church. LaGrange College is proud of
this relationship and believes that its mission is an extension of the work of

A The United Methodist Church. LaGrange College is committed to the free,
uninhibited pursuit of truth. Academic freedom and free expression of
faculty and students are integral to the LaGrange College ethos. LaGrange
College is committed to challenging the minds and inspiring the souls of
students by improving their creative, critical and communicative abilities.
Faculty recognize the part they play in a student's development by serving
as mentors and role models. The total LaGrange College program -
curricular and co-curricular - is designed to challenge and support students

* as they deal with fundamental issues of self, world, and God.

* The principal curricular methods by which the College assists students in
the improving of their creative, critical, and communicative abilities are an
interdisciplinary, technologically sophisticated liberal arts program (A. A.,

* B.A., B.S., B.M.), programs in Organizational Leadership (B.A., M.A.),
professional programs in business, nursing (B.S.N.) and education (B.A.,
M.Ed., M.A.T.) The principal co-curricular means is through a

* comprehensive program of student life and athletics.

" LaGrange College strives to be a caring and ethical community. The
hallmark of the LaGrange College community is the quest for civility,
diversity, service, and excellence.

Adopted by Faculty, Administration, and Board of Trustees, 1997;

* reaffirmed by Board of Trustees on October 20, 2000.

13

History and Description

The history of LaGrange College is closely associated with the history of
the City of LaGrange and Troup County. When the vast tract of land lying
between the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers was secured by the Indian
Springs Treaty of 1825 and was opened for settlement in 1827, one of the
five counties formed on the western border of the state was named Troup in
honor of Governor George Michael Troup.

An act was passed by the Georgia Legislature on December 24, 1827,
providing for the selection of a county seat. It was named LaGrange after
the country estate of the Marquis de Lafayette, American Revolutionary
War hero who had visited the region in 1 825 as the guest of Governor
Troup. The site for the town of LaGrange was purchased in 1 828 and the
town was incorporated on December 18, 1828. On December 26, 1831, the
charter for the LaGrange Female Academy was granted at the state capitol,
then in Milledgeville.

In 1831 Andrew Jackson was president of the United States. Abraham
Lincoln was 22 years old. The Creek Indians had been moved out of this
area of the state only six years earlier. The only other college in the state
was Franklin College, now The University of Georgia.

In 1 847 the charter for the school was amended and the school became the
LaGrange Female Institute with power to confer degrees. The name was
changed to LaGrange Female College in 1851 and in 1934 it was changed
to LaGrange College. The College became officially coeducational in
1953.

The first location of the school was in a large white building at what is now
406 Broad Street. The school moved to its present location "On the Hill,"
the highest geographical point in LaGrange, after the construction of the
building now known as Smith Hall in 1842.

The College was sold to the Georgia Conference of the Methodist
Episcopal Church South in 1856. Today it is an institution of the North
Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church.

Strong in the liberal arts, LaGrange College has an outstanding reputation
in pre-professional programs, including pre-medical and allied fields, pre-
law, pre-theology, and pre-engineering.

LaGrange College offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with sixteen majors,
the Bachelor of Science degree in six areas, the Bachelor of Music and the
Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The Master of Arts in Teaching,
and the Master of Education degree in Curriculum and Instruction are
offered. The Evening program offers an Associate of Arts degree in
General Studies.

14

LaGrange College operates on the modified (4-1-4) semester system for
day elasses. In addition there is an evening session during the regular year
and in the summer. During the regular school year, the night classes follow
a modified quarter system. The summer is divided into two sessions o( day
classes and one seven-week session in the evening. For all day classes.
credits earned are semester hour credits.

The College draws more than half of its student body from Georgia.
However, students from at least one-third of the other states in the U.S. and
from abroad nourish a rich cosmopolitan and international community
which includes various religious and ethnic backgrounds.

Students also are provided diversity opportunities through travel courses,
field study programs, service-learning, and internships. Students in the
college's education and nursing departments receive supervised learning
experiences in many area schools and medical facilities, respectively.
Campus art exhibitions, lectures, concerts, and varsity and intramural
sports add to the cultural enrichment and recreational opportunities offered
by the College.

The College is located in the town of LaGrange, Georgia, which has a
population of 26,000. Nearby are Callaway Gardens, the Warm Springs
Foundation and Franklin D. Roosevelt's Little White House. The West
Point Dam on the Chattahoochee River provides one of the largest lakes in
the region, with waterfronts and a marina within the city limits of
LaGrange.

Accreditation

LaGrange College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the degrees o['
Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of
Science, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Education, Master o(
Arts in Teaching, the Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership, and
Education Specialist. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866
Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679^500 for
questions about the accreditation of LaGrange College.

LaGrange College is also approved by the United Methodist University
Senate. It has membership in the National Association o\' Independent
Colleges and Universities and the Georgia Foundation for Independent
Colleges.

LaGrange College's teacher education undergraduate and graduate
programs are accredited by the Georgia Professional Standards
Commission to recommend candidates for certification in the areas of early
childhood, middle grades, or secondary education.

\5

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program is accredited by the National
League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 3343 Peachtree Road NE,
Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326; Sharon Tanner, Ed.D., RN, Executive
Director; 404-975-5000; sjtanner@nlnac.org

The undergraduate program in business administration is accredited by the
Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The
Albany programs in Organizational Leadership are not included in this
accreditation.

Other Sessions
Evening College

Recognizing the unique needs of the nontraditional learner who may be
managing personal, professional, and collegiate careers, the Evening
College structure supports full-time or part-time evening study for qualified
adult students. Classes are scheduled Monday-Thursday evenings during
four academic quarters; students may enroll in September, January, March,
or June. Degrees offered include the Bachelor of Arts degree in Business
Administration, the Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Development, and"
the Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Studies. Students in the above
programs may also earn a minor in Sociology or Human Resource
Management. Transfer students with 60 hours of acceptable credit are
eligible to enroll in the 23-month Public Health Degree Completion
Program.

View the Evening College Bulletin online at www.lagrange.edu. Call
(706) 880-8298 or email evening@lagrange.edu for additional information.

LaGrange College at Albany

The LaGrange College at Albany's undergraduate and graduate programs
have been created in direct response to community and area needs. An
extensive needs assessment in southwest Georgia was initiated prior to the
planning and development of the programs for LaGrange College at
Albany. The research results stressed the need for programs for non-
traditional students that would enable them to complete a baccalaureate
degree as well as a Master of Arts degree in Organizational Leadership.
Each program offers a modular course schedule with a predictable structure
of course offerings, costs, and outcomes. The programs emphasize
leadership knowledge and skills in the workplace and in the community.
As the Albany program is not intended to be a Business Administration
degree, it does not have specialized business program accreditation through
the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

View the Albany Bulletin online at www.lagrange.edu or call
(229) 42()-8()()() for additional information.

16

The Lagrange College Campus

The Banks Building

Originally built in 1963, the building served the campus as its library until
the Frank and Laura Lewis Library opened in February 2009. Renovated
in 2009, the building now houses Admissions, Financial Aid, Business
Office, Registrar's Office, the Vice President for Enrollment Management,
Provost, Vice President for Advancement, Vice President for Finance and
Operations, and the President.

J. K. BOATWRIGHT HALL

Completed in 1962, this three-story brick building serves as a men's
dormitory. J. K. Boatwright Hall is named in memory of a longtime
member of the College's Board of Trustees and chairman of the board's
executive committee from 1956-1962. New designs were incorporated in
renovations to the building in 2003.

Fuller E. Callaway Academic Building

Completed in 1981 and renovated in 2000, the Fuller E. Callaway
Academic Building houses the Departments of Nursing, Psychology,
History, Political Science, and Sociology and Anthropology.

Callaway Auditorium

Built in 1941, Callaway Auditorium was originally designed as a
multipurpose venue, and it served ably in that capacity for well over halt a
century, hosting countless basketball games, volleyball matches, dances,
children's recitals, luncheons and other varied events. Though versatile, the
facility was severely limited in its ability to provide an accommodation
that was greatly needed by the community and LaGrange College: an
acoustically pleasing music performance venue.

The demand for such a facility was satisfied in 2005 with the auditorium's

transformation from a "gym with a stage" to a state-of-the-art concert hall.
Funded jointly by LaGrange College and Callaway Foundation, Inc.. the
$5.5 million renovation called for an almost complete internal makeover
and a new roof. And while the hall's visual appearance has changed
dramatically, the single most important improvement is the superior sound
quality the Auditorium now delivers.

17

Callaway Campus

Acquired by the College in 1992 as a gift from Callaway Foundation, Inc.,
the campus includes three buildings of brick and concrete construction.
Callaway Foundation, Inc., donated funds to build a state-of-the-art lighted
soccer field there in 1995, and the Callaway Campus also includes a
softball complex, tennis courts, swimming pools, and a football practice
field.

Callaway Education Building

Built in 1965, renovated in 1994, and given a $2 million, 17,000 square-
foot addition in 2006, the building houses the Music Department, Offices
of Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics, Offices of the Department of
Health and Physical Education, a weight room, an athletic training room
and a football locker room.

Cason J. Callaway Science Building

Built in 1972, this three-story brick building provides for instruction in
general science, biology, chemistry, math, and physics. The building is
named in memory of a former member of the College's Board of Trustees.

Warren A. Candler Cottage

Completed in 1929 as a home for the College president, Candler Cottage
now houses the Advancement Division.

Lee Edwards Candler and Hawkins Residence
Halls

Lee Edwards Candler and Hawkins Residence Halls were completed in
2002. Each apartment-style hall houses 124 students. Arranged in either
two or four bedroom floor plans with one bathroom per two students, the
apartments are fully furnished and have a full kitchen. A community room
also is located at the end of one wing in each building. Candler Hall is
named in memory of Mrs. Lee Edwards Candler. Hawkins Hall is named
in honor of Annie Carter Hawkins and in the memory of Allen Willard
Hawkins, Sr., parents of Scott Hawkins '74.

18

The Chapel

The materials used in the construction of the Chapel in 1965 link it with
Christian worship in LaGrange and other parts of the world. Included in
the structure are two stained glass windows made in Belgium more than
100 years ago; a stone from the temple of Apollo at Corinth, Greece; a
stone from the Benedictine Monastery, Iona, Scotland; and a stone from St.
George's Chapel, Windsor, England. Regular worship services are held
when the College is in session.

Cleaveland Field

Cleaveland Field opened in 2000 as LaGrange College's new $2.21 million
baseball facility. Callaway Foundation, Inc., gave a challenge grant as well
as the land to honor Philip Cleaveland, who served the College as a trustee
for 19 years.

Hawkes Hall

Completed in 1911, this four-story brick building is named in memory of
Mrs. Harriet Hawkes, mother of College benefactor, the late A.K. Hawkes.
Following a $1.4 million renovation, the building now houses women
students on second, third, and fourth floors. Faculty offices and classrooms
for the Education Department occupy the ground floor. Also on the second
floor is the Nixon Parlor, named in honor of longtime supporter of the
College Winifred Adams Nixon '33.

Waights G. Henry, Jr., Residence Hall

Completed in 1970, this five-story brick building provides student housing.
The structure is named in honor of the late Dr. Waights G. Henry, Jr., who
served as president of the College from 1948-1978 and as chancellor from
1978 until his death in 1989. The building also houses a 24-hour computer
lab open to all students.

Charles D. Hudson Natatorium

The swimming pool was constructed in 1947 as an oversized pool with
dimensions i)\' 80 by 150 feet. The cabana and bathhouse were built in
1956. Today, the oversized pool has been divided into an outdoor pool and a
natatorium, and the complex is now equipped for a year-round aquatics
program. The Natatorium is named in honor of Dr. Charles D. Hudson,
longtime chair o\' the Board of Trustees and retired chair of the Board's
Executive Committee.

19

Lamar Dodd Art Center

Completed in 1982, this building provides a physical environment and the
equipment needed for art instruction as well as gallery space for the
College's outstanding art collection. The building is named in honor of the
late Lamar Dodd, a Georgia artist who was reared in LaGrange and whose
paintings won international recognition.

Frank and Laura Lewis Library

January 2009 saw the opening of the new 45,000 square foot Frank and
Laura Lewis Library at LaGrange College. Named for two former
librarians, the new library includes numerous small and large group study
rooms; a 24-hour study room with a coffee bar/snack bar area; an
auditorium; a multi-media classroom; a multi-media production center;
student and faculty research carrels; and state-of-the art audio-visual
equipment including video and audio conferencing, a SMART board,
video-editing equipment and software, presentation projectors, document
cameras, and digital signage. The Frank and Laura Lewis Library is
located at the center of the campus in close proximity to the dining hall,
dorms, and classrooms.

Louise Anderson Manget Building

Built in 1959 and completely renovated in 2001, the Louise Anderson
Manget Building houses the Division of Humanities, including the
Departments of English, Latin American Studies and Modern Languages,
and Religion and Philosophy.

Alfred Mariotti Gymnasium

Built in 1959, the Mariotti Gymnasium houses physical education
classrooms and facilities for indoor athletics. The facility is named in
memory of Coach Alfred Mariotti, the College's basketball coach from
1962 until 1974 and a member of the faculty until his retirement in 1979.

Mitchell Building

The Mitchell Building is located on the grounds of Sunny Gables Alumni
House. It was named in memory of Evelyn Mitchell, a trustee of The
Arthur Vining Davis Foundations.

20

Margaret Adger Puts Dining Hall

Completed in 1962 and renovated in 1998, this two-story brick building
houses the dining area and kitchen on the main floor, and the College
Bookstore, post office and copy center on the bottom floor. The building is
dedicated in honor of the late Margaret Adger Pitts, a former College
trustee.

Pitts Residence Hall

Completed in 1941, this two-story brick women's dormitory was renovated
in 1990. Pitts Hall was rededicated in memory of Mr. and Mrs. W. I. H.
Pitts and in honor of their daughter, the late Margaret Adger Pitts, a former
College trustee. The Pitts were longtime supporters of the College.

President's Home

Acquired by the College in 1964, this home originally was occupied by
local attorney and former trustee Hatton Lovejoy. The first College family
to live in the house was that of Dr. Waights G. Henry, Jr., who moved from
the former president's residence in Candler Cottage. Designed in 1934, the
home represents a combination of Georgian and Neoclassical elements.

Price Theater

Completed in 1975, this building features a 280-seat proscenium theatre
with 36 fly lines, 8 electrics (including 4 beam positions over the
auditorium) and a hydraulic orchestra pit. It also houses the Department of
Theatre Arts, including faculty offices, a scenery workshop, dressing
rooms, a costume shop, an actors' lounge and a Black Box Theatre.

Quillian Building

Built in 1949 and named in memory of a former president Hubert T.
Quillian, who served from 1938-1948, this building currently provides
offices for the Director of the Interim Term and Core Curriculum, the Vice
President for Spiritual Life and Church Relations, and the Department of
Information Technology.

21

Smith Hall

Smith Hall is the oldest building on the campus. The main portion of the
building was constructed in 1842 of handmade brick formed from native
clay. An addition was built in 1887 and a major renovation was completed
in 1989 at a cost of over $2.5 million. The building now houses offices,
classrooms and seminar rooms. Smith Hall was named in memory of Mrs.
Oreon Smith, wife of former College president Rufus W. Smith, who
served from 1885 until his death in 1915. The building is on the National
Register of Historic Places.

Turner Hall

Built in 1958 not long after the institution became co-educational, this
three-story brick building was first used to provide campus housing for
men, and later, women. In 2003, the structure was renovated and enlarged.
The Mabry Gipson Student Center features large and small meeting rooms,
a student grill, and the Jones Zone on the first two floors. Student housing
on the third floor is known as the William H. Turner, Jr., Residence Hall. It
is named in memory of Mr. Turner, a textile executive of LaGrange, who
was a benefactor of the College, a longtime member of the Board of
Trustees and chairman of the board's executive committee from 1929 until
1950.

Sunny Gables Alumni House

Built by Mary and Julia Nix in 1925, Sunny Gables Alumni House is an
outstanding example of early 20th century Tudor Revival architecture.
Designed by P. Thornton Marye, it is now part of the National Register of
Historic Places' Vernon Road Historic District. This multipurpose facility
serves as the permanent home for alumni. The facility extends entertainment
space to the College's constituents for specific programming purposes.

22

Admission And Enrollment

The application process at LaGrange College is selective and designed
to carefully consider each candidate's personal qualities and readiness
for college. We seek applicants who have the potential to be successful
academically and who will contribute to our community in meaningful
ways. We will evaluate the application, transcripts ), course selection,
SAT or ACT scores, essay and recommendation when making our
decision. An admission counselor will assist each prospective student
throughout the application and matriculation process. We encourage
prospective students to visit campus for a personal interview as part of
the application process.

Students interested in attending LaGrange College must submit an
application for admission. March 1 is the preferred deadline for best
consideration for admission, financial aid, and housing for the fall
semester. Students interested in scholarship consideration should apply
before January 1 or the published deadline for the scholarship,
whichever is earlier. Students applying for admission to the January or
Summer terms should submit the application and supporting documents
at least one month prior to the beginning of the term for which
admission is desired.

Applying for Admission

Applicants for first-year admission must submit the following items: the
application form, application fee, official high school transcripts, official
SAT or ACT scores, essay and recommendation. The Office of
Admission reserves the right to request or waive documentation as
appropriate.

Applicants who have attended a college or university following high
school graduation must submit the following items: application form,
fee, college or university transcripts, essay, and recommendation. It the
applicant has completed fewer than 30 semester hours or 40 quarter
hours of college level work, a SAT or ACT score and official high school
transcripts will also be required.

To be considered an official document, a transcript should be submitted
directly to LaGrange College in a sealed envelope from the sending
institution. Institutional records personally delivered to LaGrange
College by a student must also be in a sealed envelope to he considered
official. Photocopies, faxes, or transcripts in unsealed envelopes
are not considered official.

23

LaGrange College prefers SAT scores but will accept ACT scores. Test
results should be sent directly to LaGrange College, preferably by March
of the student's senior year of high school.

The Admission Committee may request additional materials from an
applicant or require an interview to gain a better understanding of the
student's potential for success in a challenging academic environment.
The Office of Admission notifies applicants of their application status
shortly after review by the Admission Committee. Admission to the
College requires satisfactory completion of academic work in progress.

LaGrange College values personal integrity in our community. Our
students sign an Honor Code statement pledging not to lie, cheat, steal, nor
tolerate these unethical behaviors in others. Recognizing the importance of
adherence to the Honor Code, the Office of Admission extends this
principle to our application process. Any student who omits or falsifies
material details in the application for admission will not be admitted or
their offer of admission may be revoked.

After an offer of admission is extended, candidates wishing to accept the
offer of admission are asked to submit a tuition deposit. The tuition
deposit reserves space for the student in the incoming class. The amount of
the tuition deposit is $100 for commuting students and $200 for residential
students. The $100 deposit will be placed on the student's account for the
first semester. The additional $100 for residential students serves as a
room reservation deposit and will reserve a space in the residence halls for
the student. The tuition deposit is fully refundable provided the student
submits a written request to the Office of Admission by the following
dates: May 1 for Fall Semester, December 1 for the Interim (January)
Term, and Spring Semester.

LaGrange College encourages interested students to visit the campus.
Individual appointments may be scheduled by contacting the Office of
Admission at 1-800-593-2885 or by e-mail at admissionC^lagrange.edu.
Please contact the Office of Admission at least one week prior to the day the
student plans to visit.

24

Academic Requirements i or Admission

First-year Admission: Prior to enrollment, an applicant is expected to
complete graduation requirements from an approved high school. Students
graduating from Georgia high schools are normally expected to complete
the requirements for the College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) diploma.

LaGrange College students come from a variety of public and private
secondary school backgrounds. Preference is given to applicants who have
strong academic preparation in high school. To qualify for regular
admission to the college, an applicant should complete at least the
following number of units, comparable to the Georgia College Preparatory
Curriculum:

Subject Area Units

College Preparatory English 4

Social Studies (including American and world studies) 3

College Preparatory Mathematics 4

(Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, etc.)
Science (including lab courses for life and physical sciences) 3

Desirable electives include additional academic courses in languages,
mathematics, and the sciences. A basic understanding of computer science
is also encouraged.

LaGrange College invites home-schooled students to apply for admission.
In addition to the items requested for first-year admission, home-schooled
students are asked to provide two letters of recommendation. Please note
family members may not submit letters of recommendation.

Students holding a General Education Development (GED) (High School
Level) may be considered for admission although they will generally not
be accepted to the college prior to the year in which their class would have
normally been eligible for admission to the college. Applicants must
submit GED scores in addition to the certificate. Students possessing a
GED must also submit either SAT or ACT scores as a part o( the
application process. The SAT or ACT requirement may be waived for
students who are at least 24 years o( age. Submission of a GED certificate
and scores do not automatically guarantee admission to the college.

Z5

Admission Status

A number of factors are considered in making an admission decision,
including a student's grade point average, difficulty of course work,
standardized test scores, extracurricular and co-curricular activities,
recommendations and admission essay. Students may be accepted to
LaGrange College in one of several categories.

Regular Admission: Most students offered admission to LaGrange
College are accepted with no stipulations, other than successful completion
of their current academic course work and proof of high school graduation.

Conditional Admission: In some cases a candidate who appears to meet
the standard requirements for admission may experience delays in
obtaining required documents. At the discretion of the Admission
Committee, a student may be granted Conditional Admission pending
receipt of required documents. Upon submission of the documents, the
student will be granted regular status. All documents must be submitted
within 30 days of matriculation.

Probation: In some cases candidates for admission may meet most of the
criteria for admission but still not qualify for regular admission. At the
discretion of the Admission Committee, such students may be admitted on
probation. Students admitted on probation must meet the minimum stated
grade point average requirement based on their class level in order to be
removed from probationary status.

Joint Enrollment: LaGrange College encourages qualified twelfth grade
students to consider simultaneous enrollment in LaGrange College and
their high school. Georgia high school seniors may also wish to consider
participating in the Georgia Ace Program. Students wishing to apply for
the joint enrollment program or Georgia Ace Program must submit the
following materials: an application for admission, application fee,
recommendation letter from the student's principal or headmaster, SAT or
ACT scores, and a high school average that indicates that the student has
the academic ability to be successful in the program.

Transfer Admission: Students attending another institution may apply for
transfer to LaGrange College provided they are eligible to return to their
current institution at the time of entry to LaGrange College. A student
may be accepted on probation under the standard probation regulations.
Prior to admission to LaGrange College, the Office of Admission must
receive all necessary documents, including official transcripts of all college

26

course work. Any applicant who intentionally withholds information about
college coursework previously attempted, either by failing to report that
coursework or by failing to provide an appropriate transcript, will be
subject to a revocation of any admission or scholarship offer(s) extended
by LaGrange College. Accepted applicants may enroll at the beginning of
any semester.

LaGrange College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools ( 1866 Southern Lane,
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501 ) to award
degrees of Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music,
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor oi'
Science in Nursing, Master of Education, and Master of Arts in Teaching.
Accordingly, the college accepts course work from similarly regionally
accredited colleges and universities.

Academic credit is normally given to students for grades of "C-" or above.
Acceptable credit from a junior college is limited to 60 semester hours.
Students enrolling from other senior colleges may be able to receive up to
80 semester credits but LaGrange College residency requirements, the core
curriculum, and appropriate major course work must be satisfied. Transfer
students who have attempted any developmental-level course work must
provide evidence that they have completed all requirements and
successfully exited the program prior to evaluation by the Admission
Committee. Members of Phi Theta Kappa may qualify for academic
scholarships reserved for members of this society.

Transient Admission: Students currently enrolled in good standing at
another college may enroll at LaGrange College as transient students.
Approval of course work must be authorized by the primary institution on
the Transient Application for Admission, which is available in the
Admission Office. A permission letter from the student's home institution
certifying status and granting permission for specific transient course work
may also be sent.

Non-degree Undergraduate Admission: Students not working toward a
degree may register as non-degree undergraduate students in any course tor
which they have the necessary prerequisites. An application lor non-
degree undergraduate student status may be obtained through the
Admission Office. Students classified as non-degree undergraduate
students may become regular, degree-seeking, students by meeting
requirements for regular admission. No more that 6 credit hours earned
under this classification may be applied tow did a degree.

27

Readmission to LaGrange College: Following an absence from LaGrange
College of 3 or more semesters, or following any period of time during
which a student was not in good standing during the last term in attendance
at LaGrange College, or in the case of any student wishing to return to
attempt additional coursework, submission of an Application for
Readmission is required. This form is available in the Office of
Admission. Any student absent from LaGrange College for 2 semesters or
less, who was in good standing when he/she last attended LaGrange
College, may re-activate his/her file in the Registrar's Office. These
students do not need to apply for readmission.

In the event that a student seeking readmission has attended another
institution as a transfer student (not transient) since he/she left LaGrange
College, then the student, if readmitted, is treated as a new transfer student.
Students fitting this description are subject to the Bulletin in force at the
time of transfer back to LaGrange College. Students who have not
attended another institution are generally governed by the catalog in force
at the time of their initial admission. However, students who have been out
of school for four calendar years or more re-enter LaGrange College under
the Bulletin in force at the time of readmission and resumption of study.

International Student Admission: Admission to LaGrange College
requires submission of the international student application, application fee,
and translated and certified documents attesting to the student's academic
performance in secondary and/or university studies. Students seeking
admission may be required to submit one or more of the following to prove
English proficiency:

Minimum TOEFL score of 500 ( 1 73 computer-based, or 61 internet-
based);

Certificate of completion of level 1 12 from the ELS Centers, Inc.;

Grades of "C" or better on G.C.E., G.S.C.E, or C.X.C. English
examinations or equivalent tests;

Minimum SAT verbal score of 450;

Minimum ACT English section score of 2 1 .

International students must submit an affidavit of support and financial
statements demonstrating the ability to pay the cost o\' attendance for at
least one year of study.

If the prospective student is in the United States, an interview at the college
is desirable. The Director of Admission should be contacted for an
appointment as well as for the current interpretation of regulations with
regard to obtaining an F-l student visa.

28

Financial Information

expenses

Payment of Charges

All charges for the semester are due and payable at the beginning of the
term, and each student is expected to make satisfactory arrangements at
that time. Students who pre-register and pay in advance of the deadline
each semester are not required to attend final Registration. Students
completing Registration after the posted deadline will be assessed a Late
Registration Fee as enumerated below. Realizing that some families prefer
to pay on a monthly basis, the College provides an arrangement with
Tuition Pay to offer families this option. This plan is between the family
and the company and there is no involvement by LaGrange College in the
agreement. For additional information on this plan, contact the Business
Office. The College also offers a deferred payment option that allows
students to make monthly payments to cover educational costs. Interest
will be assessed to students utilizing this option.

The College accepts American Express, Discover, MasterCard, and VISA
as payment on a student's account. Online payments are accessed through
the Quick Links on the College's website.

Charges

1. Admission

Application for admission (non-refundable) $30.00

2. Tuition

A. Undergraduate

(1) Part-time per semester hour

(1-11 or greater than 16) $912.00

(2) Full-time (12-16 semester hours) SI 1.074.00

(3) Nursing (NSG) courses per semester hour $91 -.<><)

B. Summer Term charges are provided separately.

Students may request information regarding course offerings
and charges from the Registrar's Office.

C. Audit (per semester hour) $9 1 2.00

29

3. Room

Boatwright, Hawkes, Henry, Pitts, and Turner

(per semester) $2,637

Candler and Hawkins (per semester) $3,013

Board

Boatwright, Hawkes, Henry, Pitts, and Turner

1 5-meal plan (per semester) $ 1 ,866

Candler and Hawkins 10-meal plan (per semester) $1,778

Unlimited meal plan (per semester) $1,978

{Note: All residential students must have a board

plan appropriate to their type of housing.)

4. Private Room

Private rooms are available at an additional charge

(per semester) $720

After the beginning of the semester, any student occupying a double room
alone will be charged the private rate. If a student occupying a double room
alone does not wish to pay the private room rate, it is the student's
responsibility to find a suitable roommate. Willingness to accept a
roommate does not constitute grounds for waiving the single room charge.

Fees - Miscellaneous

Late Payment Fee $50

Graduation Fee $100

Personal checks failing to clear $25

Student Identification Card replacement fee $ 1 5

Document Fee (International Students) $175

Parking Permit $15

Testing Fee (All New Students) $60

Room Deposit (Refundable) $100

Admission Deposit (New Students) $100

30

$11,074

$22,148

$ 2,637

$ 5,274

$ 1,866

$ 3,732

$15,577

$31,154

$11,074

$22,148

$ 3,013

$ 6,026

$ 1,778

$ 3,556

$15,865

$31,730

Summary of Standard Charges Per Semester Per Year

Non-Dormitory Students:

Tuition (lull-time with 12-16 hours) $1 1,074 $22,148

Dormitory Students:

Boatwright, Hawkes, Henry, Pitts, and Turner residents

Tuition (lull-time with 12-16 hours)

Semi-private Room

Board Plan (15-meals)

Apartment Students:

Candler and Hawkins residents
Tuition (full-time with 12-16 hours)
Apartment
Board Plan (10-meals)

Fees relating to the Albany, Evening College and Graduate Programs are
included in separate bulletins. You may eontaet the College to receive a
copy of these publications.

Federal Tax Credits

The Tax Reform Act of 1997 provided two tax credits for higher education.
The Hope Scholarship Credit provides up to an $1,800 tax credit ( 100% of
the first $1,200 of qualified tuition and 50% of the second $1,200 o\'
qualified tuition) for the first two years of postsecondary education in a
program leading to a degree, certificate, or other recognized educational
credential. The student must be enrolled at least halftime. Qualified
expenses are tuition and fees, and do not include room, board, books,
insurance, and other similar expenses. The American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009 temporarily amended the tax code pertaining to
the Hope Credit. The enhancement, called the American Opportunity Tax
Credit, now offers a tax credit up to $2,500 in qualified tuition and related
expenses, and now covers required course materials. In addition, the
availability of the credit is extended for the first four years of
postsecondary education. The temporary provision will expire at the end
of 2010.

31

The Lifetime Learning Credit provides up to a $2,000 per year tax credit
(20% of the amount paid on the first $10,000 of qualified tuition) per
family after the first two years of higher education. These tax credits are
phased out as the modified adjusted gross income exceeds certain limits.
Please check with your tax advisor regarding these limits. For additional
information about these credits, please consult the Business Office or your
tax preparer.

Miscellaneous

Depending upon individual requirements, a student may expect to spend
$1 ,000 per year on books. Bookstore charges for the fall term are normally
higher than for the spring term.

The above charges are applicable to an academic year of two semesters.
Summer charges and Interim Term fees, and curricula, are available
separately.

Nursing students should consult the Nursing Department concerning
required nursing supplies and their projected costs.

All students must present the College with proof of health insurance at the
time of registration by submitting a Waiver Form electronically, including
provider name and policy number. If the student does not have insurance,
the College will assess the student for a limited coverage group sickness
and accident insurance policy. Residential students must also submit a
Health Form, completed by the family physician, to the Admission Office
prior to moving into the residential halls. Failure to provide the Health
Form will prevent the student from being allowed to move onto campus,
and may result in work-study checks being withheld, pending receipt of the
form.

Official transcripts and diplomas are withheld for any student who owes a
financial obligation to the College.

Credit Balances

Students who have a credit balance on their student accounts may obtain a
credit balance refund within fourteen (14) calendar days, whichever is the
latest of:

the date the balance occurs;

the first day of classes of a payment period or enrollment period, as
applicable; or

the date the student rescinds authorization given the school to
hold the funds.

32

Refund and Repayment Policies

No refund of any nature will be made to any student who is suspended or
dismissed for disciplinary reasons.

No refund will be made for individual courses dropped alter the end o( the
drop/add period as established by the school calendar.

Refunds will be processed within thirty (30) days of notification of a

Complete Withdrawal. A Complete Withdrawal date is defined by:

the earlier of date student began school's withdrawal process or
date student otherwise provided "official" notice; or

if student did not notify school, the midpoint in the term, or the
date of student's last attendance at documented academically-
related activity; or

if student did not notify due to circumstances beyond student's
control, date related to that circumstance.

Refund Policies - Tuition and Fees

A student withdrawing from the College must submit a Complete
Withdrawal Form, which may be obtained through the Registrar's Office.
The student should also consult the Financial Aid Office and the Business
Office to determine the financial consequences of a Complete Withdrawal.

The U.S. Department of Education requires all unearned Title IV funds to
be returned to the program from which such aid was awarded. The College
will credit a student's account for all unearned institutional charges. The
Department of Education defines institutional charges as "all charges for
tuition, fees, and room and board, and expenses for required course
materials, if the student does not have a real and reasonable opportunity to
purchase the required course materials from any place but the school."

In the event of a Complete Withdrawal from the College, refunds oi'
institutional charges will be calculated using the number of days attended.
The College will calculate the dollar amount n[' federal grant and loan
funds the student has earned during the term by dividing the number of
days a student actually completed by the total number o\' days \a ithin the
term (excluding breaks i)\' five days or more). The resulting percentage is
then multiplied by the amount of federal funds that were applied to the
student's account. This is the amount of Title IV funding the student
actually earned. The remainder will be returned to the originating program.
If the resulting percentage exceeds 60 percent, the student would be
entitled to 100 percent of the federal funds. Refunds of tuition will be

33

applied to the student's account in the same manner as the return of federal
funds. After the student has completed 60 percent of the term, there are no
refunds of institutional charges.

In certain cases, these refund requirements may leave indebtedness on the
student's account. This may also require the student to reimburse the U.S.
Department of Education for some or all of the applicable Federal Pell and
SEOG funds. It is, therefore, imperative that students fully discuss the
ramifications of a Complete Withdrawal with the Financial Aid Office
prior to making a final decision.

A student will not receive a refund until all financial aid programs have
been reimbursed. Refunds will be returned in the order indicated below:

Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan Program

Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan Program

Federal Perkins Loan Program

Federal PLUS Graduate Program

Federal PLUS Parent Program

Federal Pell Grant Program

Academic Competitiveness Grant

National SMART Grant

Federal SEOG Program

TEACH Grant Program

Other Title IV Programs

Other State, private, or institutional assistance programs

Student

Refund Policies - Room and Board

If a student does not enroll, the room deposit is refundable if the student
notifies the College in writing of his/her cancellation no later than May 1st.
There is no refund of room deposits after this date. No refund of room or
board will be made if a student withdraws from the dormitory after
Registration. In the event of a Complete Withdrawal from the College,
there is no refund of ROOM charges. The BOARD charges will be
prorated at the rate of $15 per day from the move-in date.

34

Student Repayment Policy

Students who receive cash disbursements alter Registration for that
enrollment period will be assessed liability for repayment of the
appropriate percentage of the refund due the Title IV programs upon
withdrawal, expulsion, or suspension.

Students who receive cash disbursements that are attributable to Federal
Pell or SEOG programs may owe a repayment oi' these funds to the College
to prevent an overpayment. A student who owes a repayment will be
deemed ineligible for any financial assistance from any source until the
student has resolved the overpayment. Repayments will be allocated to the
student aid programs in the following order: Pell Grant, Academic
Competitiveness Grant (ACG), National SMART Grant, SEOG, TEACH
Grant, other Title IV programs, and then to the institution.

Students have 45 days from the date of their notification to make
arrangements for repayment of the aid received. If they fail to make
satisfactory arrangements within the 45 -day time period, the account will
be submitted to the U.S. Department of Education and the student could
lose future eligibility for financial aid programs.

35

Financial Aid

Philosophy

Recognizing the significant investment students and families make when
choosing a private college, LaGrange College offers a variety of assistance
and payment options. We expect students and families to use a combination
of scholarships, grants, loans and work to meet college costs. These
resources may come from family, college, community, and state or federal
sources. Payment plans are available to distribute required payments over
the course of an academic year or for longer terms using Federal loan
programs. We encourage students to apply for financial aid and
scholarships as early as possible to maximize eligibility access to all
available types of assistance.

Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements

In general, to be eligible for financial assistance, the applicant must:

Be a U.S. Citizen or permanent resident alien of the United States;

Be admitted or currently enrolled in an approved degree-seeking or
teacher certification program;

Have a high school diploma or a General Education Development
(GED) Certification, or pass an approved Ability-to-Benefit test;

Be making Satisfactory Academic Progress towards the completion
of their degree program;

Not be in default on any federal educational loan or have made
satisfactory arrangements to repay the loan;

Not owe a refund on a federal or state grant;

Not have borrowed in excess of federal loan limits;

Be registered with Selective Service, if required.

Financial Aid Application Procedures

Applicants for financial aid must:

Complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) annually.

Complete a Georgia HOPE and Tuition Equalization Grant

Application, if applicable.

Submit all required documents for verification, if selected.

36

DETERMINING FINANCIAL NEED

Students seeking financial assistance must complete the federal need
analysis form, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The
FAFSA collects parental and student income and asset information needed
to determine eligibility for financial aid. This information is used in a
federal need analysis formula to determine the Expected Family
Contribution (FFC).

The Financial Aid Office establishes Cost of Attendance Budgets each
year. A Cost of Attendance Budget includes tuition, fees, room, board,
books, supplies, and living expenses. Other components of the Cost of
Attendance, which is applied on an individual basis, are childcare
expenses, study abroad, and the purchase of a computer. These items may
require documentation from the student. Below are the Cost of Attendance
Budgets for the 2010-201 1 academic year.

Undergraduate dependent residing on campus $34,943

Undergraduate dependent residing with parents $30,698

Undergraduate independent residing off campus $36,696

Undergraduate nursing dependent residing on campus $42,939

Undergraduate nursing dependent residing with parents S37.940

Undergraduate nursing independent residing off campus $43,945

The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is deducted from the Cost o\
Attendance at LaGrange College to determine whether a need for financial
assistance exists. If the family's EFC is less than the Cost of Attendance, a
financial need is established. The Financial Aid Office attempts to meet
the demonstrated financial need of applicants with federal, state, and
institutional grants and scholarships, work programs, and student loans.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY

Federal and State regulations require institutions o( higher education to
establish Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards for recipients o\
financial aid. The purpose of satisfactory academic progress standards is to
measure a student's progress toward the completion of their educational
program. The Financial Aid Office is responsible for ensuring that all
students receiving federal, state, and institutional financial aid are meeting
these standards by conducting an annual evaluation at the end nl the spring
semester.

37

The satisfactory academic progress standards established in this Policy
apply to all financial aid programs including, but are not limited to, Federal
Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
(FSEOG), Academic Competitiveness Grant, National SMART Grant,
TEACH Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Loan, Federal Direct
Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), Federal Work Study,
HOPE Scholarship, Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant (GTEG), Georgia
LEAP, State Service Cancelable Loans, LaGrange College grants,
academic scholarships, and LaGrange College Work Aid.

A satisfactory academic progress policy is comprised of two standards:
qualitative and quantitative. The qualitative standard measures the
cumulative LaGrange College grade point average. The quantitative
standard measures the percentage of courses successfully completed
(completion rate) and establishes the maximum time frame, measured by
semester hours, for completion of an educational program. Financial aid
recipients must meet all of these standards to receive financial aid.

Qualitative Standard

A student must be in "good academic standing" based on the cumulative
grade point average of all courses taken at LaGrange College to meet the
qualitative standard. Good academic standing is as follows: a student
with less than 30 earned hours must maintain a minimum of a 1.75
cumulative GPA; a student with 30-59 earned hours must maintain a 1.90
cumulative GPA; a student with 60 or more earned hours must maintain a
minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. The Provost monitors the grade point
average component of the SAP policy each semester. Any student whose
grade point average is below the established minimum standard may be
placed on academic probation or academic suspension. It should be noted
that these minimum GPA requirements do not apply to the renewal of
academic scholarships, HOPE Scholarship, and other grant programs that
have specific GPA renewal criteria.

QUANTITATIVE STANDARD

Completion Rate

A student receiving financial aid from any of the programs covered under
this policy must demonstrate measurable progress toward the completion oi'
the degree program by maintaining an overall completion rate of 67
percent. This standard applies to all financial aid recipients, regardless o\'
full-time or part-time enrollment status. Attempted hours are those credit
hours for which the student is registered on or after the conclusion o\~ late
registration (drop/add). Earned hours are successfully completed courses

38

in which grades of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, or P arc
awarded, as long as credit is earned. Grades of F, W, WF, NC, NR, AU,
AW, or I do not count as successful completion of a course. The formula
for calculating a completion rate is: Earned hours divided by attempted
hours. For example, the completion rate tor a student who attempts 30
hours and successfully passed 24 credit hours is SO percent--24 earned
hours divided by 30 attempted hours.

The following are considered when evaluating the completion rate

standard:

Withdrawals, incompletes, and failed courses are considered
attempted hours but not earned hours. If an incomplete course
impacts a student's satisfactory academic progress standing, it is
the student's responsibility to notify the Financial Aid Office when
a grade is reported for the course.

Audited courses are not considered attempted or earned credit
hours.

Transfer credits, including courses taken as a transient student, do
not count in the calculation of LaGrange College GPA, but are
included in the maximum time frame standard.

Repeated courses, for which a passing grade was awarded, are
included in attempted hours but not earned hours.

Maximum Time Frame

Federal regulations allow a student to receive financial assistance for no
more than 150 9c of the credit hours required to complete the degree
program. Most students pursuing a bachelor's degree may attempt up to a
maximum of ISO semester hours towards the completion of a 120 semester
hour program. Students in programs of study that require more than 120
hours will have their time frame extended proportionally based on the
length of the program. Frequent withdrawals from courses or school,
changes of major, failed or repeated courses, or taking courses that are not
related to the degree program could jeopardi/e financial aid eligibility. All
attempted hours at LaGrange College and those credits accepted on transfer
toward the student's degree program will count toward the maximum time
frame. Students who have completed sufficient hours to complete their
degree program are no longer eligible for financial aid. Also, if it is
determined that a student will not be able to complete the degree w ithin the
maximum time frame, eligibility for student financial aid can be revoked.

M)

The following are considered when evaluating the time frame standard:

A student pursuing two bachelors' degree programs at the same
time must adhere to the 150% time frames. The maximum
attempted hours allowable for financial aid will be based on the
degree that requires the most hours.

All attempted hours from all degree programs sought are
considered when reviewing the maximum time frame standard.
Students who decide to change majors or degree programs are
advised to do so early in their academic program so as not to
jeopardize eligibility for financial aid.

Students returning to school to pursue another bachelor's degree
are allowed an additional 60 semester hours to complete the
degree. All other standards established in the satisfactory
academic progress policy apply to subsequent bachelor's degrees.

A transfer student's compliance with the time frame component of
the satisfactory academic progress policy will be based on the sum
of the attempted hours at LaGrange College plus the credit hours
accepted on transfer from previous institutions toward the
student's degree program. For example, if a student has 70 credit
hours acceptable towards the degree program, the student may
receive financial assistance for up to 1 10 additional credit hours.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Evaluation
Process

The academic history from all periods of enrollment, regardless of full-time
or part-time enrollment status, will be reviewed annually at the end of the
spring semester to determine if the student is maintaining the standards
established in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. This includes all
courses attempted regardless of whether financial aid was received.
Transfer grade point averages are not considered in either of these
standards; however, accepted transfer credit hours will be considered in
the maximum time frame for completion of the degree program. Students
who fail to meet the satisfactory academic progress standards will be
placed oil financial aid probation for the next academic year. Students
placed on financial aid probation are eligible for financial aid during the
probationary year. If the student does not meet the satisfactory academic
progress standards by the next SAP evaluation, future financial aid will be
terminated effective with the next term of enrollment. Students whose
financial aid is terminated may appeal to the financial Aid Appeals
Committee for reinstatement o\' financial aid.

40

Appeal Procedures

A student financial aid recipient who loses eligibility for financial aid may
appeal to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee, except for loss of
eligibility due to time frame. Appeals must be submitted in writing to the
Director o\' Financial Aid outlining any mitigating circumstance! s) that
influenced the student's academic performance. Mitigating circumstances
are those events that are beyond the student's control such as serious
injury, illness or mental health condition involving the student or an
immediate family member, death of an immediate family member, and
other extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control. The appeal
must include a description of the mitigating circumstance, documentation
of circumstance, and the manner by which the deficiency will be resolved.
Appeal without supporting documentation will not be considered.

The Director of Financial Aid will convene the Financial Aid Appeals
Committee to evaluate the request for reinstatement of financial aid
eligibility. The Director of Financial Aid will notify the student in writing
at the student's home address or campus e-mail account of the decision of
the Committee and any conditions associated with reinstatement within two
weeks of receiving the appeal. A student whose appeal is approved will
receive financial aid on probationary status for the next term of enrollment
and the academic performance will be reviewed at the end of that term for
continued financial aid eligibility. The student is encouraged to take
advantage of counseling, tutoring, and study skills resources available
through the College's Counseling Center.

Reestablishing Financial Aid Eligibility

A student who is unsuccessful in appealing for reinstatement of the
financial aid or a student who does not have a mitigating circumstance that
warrants an appeal can only regain eligibility by complying with the
satisfactory academic progress policy. It should be noted that taking
courses at the student's expense, sitting out a semester, or taking courses at
another institution does not automatically restore a student's eligibility for
financial aid. If the student has resolved the satisfactory academic progress
deficiencies that resulted in the termination of financial aid eligibility, the
student should contact the financial aid office and request a satisfactory
academic progress evaluation.

41

Student Financial Aid Policies

Financial aid applications for the upcoming academic year are
available beginning January 1 in the financial aid office.

LaGrange College awards aid to eligible students on a first-come,
first-serve basis. In awarding, first priority is given to students
pursuing their first undergraduate degree. Transient, non-degree
seeking, and unclassified students are not eligible for financial
assistance.

All financial aid applications and documentation for verification
must be submitted before an official financial aid award letter is
mailed.

In constructing a financial aid award, funding is awarded in this order:
grants and scholarships, student loans, and student employment.

External sources of financial aid available to a financial aid
recipient must be considered in the awarding of Federal, State, and
LaGrange College need-based financial aid programs. LaGrange
College reserves the right to cancel or reduce financial aid awards
in the event that these resources result in financial aid in excess of
financial need.

Financial aid awards are made assuming full-time enrollment. Most
LaGrange College and State financial aid programs require full-
time enrollment, however, financial assistance is available to
students who enroll half-time.

A student's enrollment status will be based on the credit hours for
which the student is registered at the conclusion of late registration.
All financial aid awards will be calculated using final registration
information. If it is later determined that attendance in all or some
courses cannot be documented, financial aid awards will be
adjusted. The student will be responsible for repaying any ineligible
funds received.

Financial aid awards will be disbursed on the first day o( classes
provided all required documents and eligibility requirements are
met.

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Sources of Financial Aid

There are a variety of financial aid resources available to assist students
with funding their college education. These resources are in the form of
scholarships, grants, loans, or student employment and are made possible
by funding from federal, state, and institutional sources. Although
financial need is a primary factor in financial aid eligibility, there are
financial aid programs available to students who do not demonstrate
financial need. These programs may be awarded based on resideney,
merit, academic exeellenee, talent, and other criteria.

LaGrange College Academic Scholarships

LaGrange College reeognizes the academie exeellenee of outstanding
entering freshmen and transfer students by awarding seholarships ranging
from $4,000 to full tuition, room and board. These merit seholarships are
made possible by generous gifts and endowments of alumni and supporters
of LaGrange College. All entering new first-year students are evaluated
for academic scholarships during the admission process. The top new first-
year student applicants who are accepted for admission by January 15 are
invited to compete for a Presidential Scholarship. Scholarships are awarded
at the following levels:

Presidential Scholarship is a competitive four-year, renewable academic
scholarship awarded to incoming first-year students on the basis oi'
academic achievement in high school, SAT or ACT test scores, and
participation in the Presidential Scholar Competition. Recipients of this
prestigious award receive full tuition, mandatory fees, room, and board.
Presidential Scholarships of Georgia residents eligible for the HOPE
Scholarship and Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant will be reduced by the
value of these State programs. If selected to receive a Presidential
Scholarship, it will supersede all other LaGrange College scholarship and
aid.

Dean's Scholarship is a competitive, four-year, renewable, $14,000
academic scholarship awarded to incoming first-year students on the basis
of academic achievement in high school, SAT or ACT test scores, and the
Scholar Weekend Competition. If selected to receive one oi the awards, the
scholarship will replace any previous scholarship award.

43

Fellows Scholarship is a four-year, renewable, $12,500, academic
scholarship awarded to entering first-year students who have a minimum
SAT combined Critical Reading and Math score of 1200 or higher (or a
minimum ACT composite score of 26 or higher) and a 3.6 recalculated
high school GPA or higher in the college preparatory courses taken in
English, Foreign Language, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Laboratory
Sciences. Fellows Scholarship recipients may be eligible to compete for a
Presidential or Dean's Scholarship. If selected to receive one of the awards,
the scholarship will replace any previous scholarship award.

Founders Scholarship is a four-year, renewable, $10,000 academic
scholarship awarded to entering first-year students who have a minimum
SAT combined Critical Reading and Math score of 1 100 or higher (or a
minimum ACT composite score of 24 or higher) and a 3.4 recalculated
high school GPA or higher in the college preparatory courses taken in
English, Foreign Language, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Laboratory
Sciences.

Gateway Scholarship is a four-year, $5,000, renewable academic
scholarship awarded to entering first-year students who have a minimum
SAT combined Critical Reading and Math score of 900 or higher (or a
minimum ACT composite score of 19 or higher) and either ranked in class
in the top 50% or a cumulative college preparation high school GPA of 3.0
or higher.

Hilltop Scholarship is a four-year, $7,500 renewable academic
scholarship awarded to entering first-year students who have a minimum
SAT combined Critical Reading and Math score of 1000 or higher (or a
minimum ACT composite score of 21 or higher) and either ranked in class
in the top 25% or a cumulative college preparatory high school GPA of 3.2
or higher.

Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship is a two-year, renewable $7,000 academic
scholarship awarded to qualified transfer students who are U.S. citizens or
permanent resident aliens fully inducted into Phi Theta Kappa Honor
Society. Recipients must hold Associate of Arts or Associate of Science
degrees from an accredited two-year college and have earned a 3.5 or better
grade point average.

Transfer Scholarship is awarded to students transferring to LaGrange

College from a college or university with a minimum o( 30 semester hours
and a minimum grade point average of 2.5 or higher. Scholarship awards
range from $4,000 to $6,000.

44

Fine Arts Scholarships

LaGrange College's Theatre Arts, Music, and Art and Design Programs,
through the generous support of alumni and supports of LaGrange College
Fine Art program, award the exeeptional talents of prospective and current
students with departmental scholarships. These scholarships are
competitive and are awarded based on academic promise, audition,
portfolio, and departmental interviews. For a listing of these scholarships,
please visit the Financial Aid section of our website.

General Grants and Scholarships

Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG Grant) is a federal grant
program for undergraduate students who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-
citizens who are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant. Recipients must have
completed a rigorous secondary school program as defined by the U.S.
Department of Education. This grant is for the freshman and sophomore
years oi' undergraduate study. The freshman year ACG award is $750 with
the sophomore award being $1,300.

Federal Pell Grant is awarded to undergraduate students pursuing a fust
bachelor's degree. The student's Expected Family Contribution (EFC) as
determined by the results of the FAFSA, Cost of Attendance, and
enrollment status determines the Pell award. Students enrolling less than
full-time may qualify for a prorated amount of Pell Grant based on their
enrollment status and EFC.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant is awarded to

undergraduate students with exceptional financial need. Priority is given to
students eligible for Federal Pell Grant.

Georgia LEAP Grant is a State of Georgia need-based grant awarded to
v Georgia residents who qualify for Federal Pell Grant and have substantial
financial need. The annual amount is contingent upon appropriations by
Congress and the Georgia Legislature.

4

Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant is a State of Georgia non-need-
based grant awarded to Georgia residents attending a private college or
university as a full-time student. The annual amount is contingent upon
funding by the Georgia Legislature.

45

HOPE Scholarship is a State of Georgia non-need-based lottery funded
scholarship awarded to Georgia residents who graduate from an eligible
high school with a minimum of a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in the
college preparatory core-curriculum subjects or a 3.2 minimum grade point
average in the career/technology core-curriculum subjects. HOPE Scholars
attending a private college or university are eligible for $1,750 per
semester as a full-time student or $875 per semester as a half-time student.

LaGrange College Grants offer a variety of need-based institutional
grants made possible by the generosity of alumni, foundations, and
individuals. These grants are available to undergraduate degree seeking
students enrolled full-time. Recipients must be in good academic standing.
A list of LaGrange College grants and their eligibility requirements are
available on our website.

National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant
(National SMART Grant) is a new federal grant program for full-time
undergraduate students who are enrolled in the third or fouith academic
year of an eligible program, who receive Federal Pell Grants and are U.S.
citizens. An eligible program in the National SMART Grant is one that
leads to a bachelor's degree in an eligible major in physical, life, or
computer sciences, engineering, technology, mathematics, or a critical-
need foreign language. SMART Grant recipients must maintain a 3.0
grade point average for each semester of eligibility. The SMART Grant
award is up to $4,000 each of the third and fourth academic years as
defined by the student's institution.

Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education

(TEACH) Grant Program provides grants assistance of up to $4000 per
year to full-time undergraduate and graduate students who intend to teach
in a public or private elementary or secondary school that serves students
from low-income families in a designated high-need field. In exchange for
the TEACH Grant award, the recipient agrees to serve as a full-time
teacher for four academic years within in eight calendar years of
completing the program for which the TEACH Grant was received. For
more information on this program, contact the Financial Aid Office or the
LaGrange College Education Department.

46

Loans

Federal Perkins Loan is a low interest, repayable loan awarded to

* undergraduate and graduate students with exceptional financial need. The
interest rate is 5% and no interest accrues on the loan while the borrower is
enrolled half-time and during the grace period. Repayment begins nine

* months alter graduating or withdrawal from school. This loan program has
cancellation provisions tor critical fields of study. Contact the Financial
Aid Office for more information.

Federal William I). Ford Direct Loan is a low interest, repayable loan

* available to undergraduate and graduate degree-seeking students made

fc through the U.S. Department of Education, the lender. The Federal Direct
Loan Program consists o( a subsidized and an unsubsidized loan.

Subsidized loans are awarded on the basis of financial need with the

* federal government paying interest on the loan until repayment begins and
fc has a fixed interest rate of 4.5% for loans disbursed between 07/01/2010

and 06/30/201 1. An unsubsidized loan is available to students regardless

* oi' financial need. However, interest accrues from the time the loan is
^ disbursed until it is paid in full. The borrower has the option to pay the

accruing interest or to allow the interest to accrue and capitalize. The
interest rate on an unsubsidized Direct Loan is a fixed rate of 6.895 .
^ Federal Direct Loans are subject to an origination fee of \ c k that will be
deducted from the loan amount.

The annual subsidized/unsubsidized Direct Loan limit for a dependent
undergraduate is $5,500 for freshman, $6,500 for sophomores, and $7,500
for juniors or seniors. The annual loan limits for an independent
undergraduate is $9,500 for freshman, $10,500 for sophomores, and
$12,500 for juniors and seniors. Federal Direct Loans are delivered to the
borrower in two separate disbursements, one at the beginning of the
enrollment and the second at the middle of the loan period.

Repayment of a Federal Direct Loan begins six months after the borrower
graduates, withdraws, or ceases enrollment as at least a half-time student.
The standard repayment period for a Federal Direct Loan is 10 years; however,
there are longer and more flexible repayment options available to borrowers.
4

4

*

47

Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) is

available to the parents of a dependent student to defray remaining
educational expenses after all other financial aid resources are exhausted.
Eligible applicants may borrow up to the cost of attendance less other
financial aid. The interest rate is a fixed rate of 7.9% and interest accrues
from the time of disbursement until the loan is paid in full. Unlike the
Federal Direct Loan program, PLUS borrowers must be credit-worthy to
qualify for this loan and repayment begins within 60 days of the loan
disbursement. Federal Direct PLUS Loans are subject to an origination fee of
4%, which will be deducted from the loan amount before disbursement.

Student Employment

There are part-time job opportunities available to eligible students through
the Federal Work Study Program and LaGrange College's Work Aid
Program. Jobs are available on campus and off-campus in community
service activities. Funding in these programs is limited. Students
interested in student employment must complete the FAFSA. The average
student assignment is 10 to 15 hours per week. Student employment
awards are made on a first-come, first-serve basis until funds are depleted.

Federal Work-Study, a federally funded student employment program,
provides employment opportunities for undergraduate and graduate
students with financial need to defray educational expenses through
employment in on-campus departments or off-campus community service
activities.

LaGrange College Work Aid Program, an institutionally funded student
employment program, provides students with opportunities to earn
additional money for school through employment in on-campus
departments or off-campus community service activities. Although a non-
need-based program, first priority will go to students who demonstrate
financial need.

48

Student Financial Aid and Federal Tax
Implications

Students receiving scholarships and grants that exceed their tuition, tees.
books and supplies should be aware that these funds are taxable under
federal and state tax law. It is important that students maintain records of
their grants and scholarships and documentation of educational expenses
for reporting purposes.

Federal tax law allows for only qualified scholarships and grants to be
excluded from income. Qualified scholarships are any amount of grant and
scholarship received that is used for tuition, fees, books, supplies and
equipment required for course instruction. Scholarships and grants that
are specifically designated for educational expenses other than those
described under qualified scholarships (room, board, transportation, or
living expenses) are taxable.

For information, please read IRS Publication 970, Tax Benefits for
Education, for more details on reporting requirements or consult a tax
professional.

Suspected Fraud

Institutions are required to report cases of suspected fraud to the Office o\
the Inspector General of the Department of Education, or, if more
appropriate, to the state or local law enforcement agency having
jurisdiction to investigate these allegations. Fraud may exist if the
institution believes the applicant misreported or altered information in
order to increase their financial aid eligibility or fraudulently obtained
federal funds.

49

Student Life

The Student Life staff is concerned with providing those services which
assist individuals in their personal growth. Their purpose is to provide
assistance which facilitates the development of the total person. At
LaGrange College, the emphasis is upon the intellectual, social, physical and
spiritual development of each student.

Student Life involves a wide variety of programs and activities. The broad
range of available services is an outgrowth of complex student needs:
orientation, activities, student government, organizations, health services,
wellness programs, parking, food service, discipline, leadership
development, personal counseling, career development and placement,
fraternities and sororities, and all residence programming. The Student Life
staff is committed to creating a positive climate within which personal
growth and development occur.

Student Conduct / Social Code

LaGrange College, as a church-related college, is committed to an
honorable standard of conduct. As an educational institution the College is
concerned not only with the formal in-class education of its students, but
also with their welfare and their growth into mature men and women who
conduct themselves responsibly as citizens.

Like the Honor Code, the Social Code is the responsibility of every
student, faculty member, and staff member at LaGrange College. The
Social Code attempts to instill in every member of the student body a sense
of moral and community responsibility. As such, LaGrange College
expects its students to adhere to community standards. Likewise, if some
fail to live up to these codes of conduct, the College expects students to
report violations of the Social Code to the Social Council. In this way,
students assume the obligation of upholding the integrity of their
community and of ethically preparing themselves for the world beyond
college.

The College has established guidelines and policies to assure the well-
being of the community. In general, the College's jurisdiction is limited to
events that occur on College property; however, the College and the Social
Council reserve the right to hear cases that concern students 1 behavior
when they are off-campus in the name of the College (e.g., with a Jan Term
travel course, an academic fieldtrip, or a campus organization social),
especially when such situations could be regarded as an adverse reflection
on the College's mission.

50

(For a complete description of the Social Code, its policies and processes,

* please see the Student Handbook.)

P The College reserves the right to dismiss at any time a student who, in its
judgment, is undesirable and whose continuation in the school is
detrimental to himself or his fellow student.

Furthermore, students are subject to federal, state and local laws as well as

* College rules and regulations. A student is not entitled to greater
immunities before the law than those enjoyed by other citizens generally.
Students are subject to such disciplinary action as the administration oi' the

* College may consider appropriate, including possible suspension and
expulsion for breach o\' federal, state or local laws, or College regulations.
This principle extends to conduct off campus which is likely to have

* adverse effect on the College or on the educational process or which
fc stamps the offender as an unfit associate for the other students. A complete
description of student conduct policies, rules and regulations can be found

* in the Student Handbook. Copies of the Handbook are available in the

^ Student Life Office as well as on the College's PantherNet web site under
"Campus Resources/'

Statement of Policy on Harassment

^ All members of the college community have the right to be free from

discrimination in the form of harassment. Harassment may take two forms:
(1) creating a hostile environment, and (2) quid pro quo .

A hostile, demeaning, or intimidating environment created by harassment
+. interferes with an individual's full and free participation in the life oi the
College.

Quid pro quo occurs when a position of authority is used to threaten to
impose a penalty or to withhold a benefit in return for sexual favors,
whether or not the attempt is successful. Sexual harassment may involve
behavior by a person of either gender against a person o\' the same or
opposite gender. It should be noted that the potential o\ sexual harassment
exists in any of the following relationships: student/student,
faculty/student, student/faculty, and faculty/faculty. Here and subsequent!)
"faculty" refers to faculty, staff, and administration. Because of the
inherent differential in power between faculty and students, sexual
relationships between faculty and students are prohibited.

Sexual harassment may result from many kinds of behavior. These
behaviors may range from the most egregious forms, such as sexual
assault, to more subtle forms. Explicit behaviors include but are not
limited to requests for sexual favors, physical assaults of a sexual nature,
sexually offensive remarks, and rubbing, touching or brushing against

51

another's body. More subtle behaviors may be experienced as intimidating
or offensive, particularly when they recur or one person has authority over
another. Such behaviors may include but are not limited to unwelcome
hugs or touching, inappropriate staring, veiled suggestions of sexual
activity, requests for meetings in non-academic settings, and risque jokes,
stories, or images.

Accusations of harassment which are made without good cause shall not be
condoned. Such accusations are indeed grievous and can have damaging and
far-reaching effects upon the careers and lives of individuals.

Any member of the college community having a complaint of harassment
may raise the matter informally and/or file a formal complaint. The
informal process is an attempt to mediate between the parties in order to
effect a mutually agreeable solution without entering into the formal
hearing process.

A. Informal Procedures

The following informal procedures may be followed:

Clearly say "no" to the person whose behavior is unwelcome.

Communicate either orally or in writing with the person whose
behavior is unwelcome. The most effective communication will
have three elements:

a factual description of the incident(s) including the time,
place, date, and specific behavior,

a description of the complainant's feelings, including any
consequences of the incident,

a request that the conduct cease.

Speak with a department chair, dean, director, counselor, or
chaplain who may speak to the person whose behavior is
unwelcome. The name of the complainant need not be disclosed.
The purpose of such conversation is the cessation of the
unwelcome behavior.

In the case of harassment of a student, it may be appropriate first
to seek the advice of his or her advisor.

52

V

B. Formal Procedures

To initiate a formal grievance procedure the complainant shall submit a
written statement to the President of the College. The President, alter such
consultation as is deemed appropriate, will appoint a three-member Review
Committee from among the membership of the Institutional Planning
Council, the Academic Council, or other College committees as the
President deems appropriate. Members of the Review Committee will then
meet to discuss the complaint. Unless the Committee concludes that the
complaint is without merit, the parties to the dispute will be invited to
appear before the Committee and to confront any adverse witnesses. The
Committee may conduct its own inquiry, call witnesses, and gather
whatever information it deems necessary to assist in reaching a
determination as to the merits of the accusation. Once a determination has
been reached, the Committee shall report its findings to the President of the
College.

Possible outcomes of the investigation are ( 1 ) that the allegation is not
warranted and cannot be substantiated, (2) a negotiated settlement of the
complaint, or (3) that the allegation is substantiated requiring a
recommendation to the President that disciplinary action be taken.

C. Faculty

In the case of a faculty member subject to the provisions of the Parts A or
B of the 1977 tenure settlement, the Tenure Committee will be involved.
Discipline or dismissal of a faculty member will follow the procedure
outlined in the LaGrange College Tenure Regulations.

For those faculty members subject to the provisions of the 1999 tenure
policy, the Promotion and Tenure Committee will be involved according to
the procedures defined in the 1999 tenure policy.

I). Appeals

Faculty, staff, administration, and students can appeal a final decision
regarding a complaint to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees.

F. Special Circumstances

If the President of the College is the accused, the case is referred to the
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees.

If the chairperson of the Review Committee is the accused, the complaint
shall be submitted to the President o\ the College. If an\ member o\ the
Review Committee is the accused or for reason of prejudice must be

recused, the President of the College shall appoint another member.

si

F. Confidentiality

The right to confidentiality of all members of the college community will
be respected in both formal and informal procedures insofar as possible.

LaGrange College is committed to preventing harassment. To that end,
this policy and these procedures will be printed in appropriate College
publications. In addition, educational programs will be conducted annually
by the College to (1) inform students, faculty, staff, and administration
about identifying harassment and the problems it causes; (2) advise
members of the college community about their rights and responsibilities
under this policy; (3) train personnel in the administration of this policy.
The Harassment Policy and Procedures will be issued to all incoming
students and personnel.

Aims of Student Life Services

To facilitate the transition from high school to college.

To develop and sustain through student-involvement activities,
organizations and services a campus life encouraging the cultural,
intellectual, social, physical and religious development of all students.

To assist students in discovering life goals and exploring career
opportunities.

To create an environment which stimulates qualities of self-discipline
and personal responsibility.

To provide a suitable context whereby the student can explore new
ideas, skills and lifestyles, thus gaining the insight and experience
necessary to make intelligent choices.

To provide opportunity for the student to develop the understanding
and skills required for responsible participation in a democratic
community through involvement in self-government.

To serve a supervisory role in campus disciplinary concerns; to
develop, with campus community involvement, and to distribute the
necessary rules and regulations for a harmonious and productive
college community.

To mediate, where necessary, conflicts between individuals and
campus community standards.

To provide a comfortable, clean, safe environment that enhances the
personal growth as well as the academic pursuits o\' resident students.

To collect retention data and to suggest/plan programs and strategies
to increase retention based on data collected.

54

*

Residence Life
Residency Requirement

a\11 traditional day students taking twelve or more hours are required to live
in college housing, so long as appropriate campus housing is available.
The Dean of Student Affairs may exempt a student for one of the following
reasons:

The student is 23 years oi' age or older.

The student is married and living with spouse.

The student is responsible for a dependent child.

The student resides exclusively with parents or legal guardians in
the parent's primary residence within a thirty-mile radius of the
College.

The student is a veteran with at least two years of active military
service.

Students are assigned rooms of their choice in so far as facilities
permit. Generally, first-year students are assigned to double rooms in
Boatw right (men), Pitts, or Hawkes Hall (women). Roommates are
assigned by mutual preference whenever possible. The College
reserves the right of approval of all room and residence hall
assignments. Also, the College reserves the right to move a student
from one room or residence hall to another room or residence hall
during the year. Resident students are required to subscribe to the
board plan.

Room Deposit

A room and tuition deposit of $200 is required of all resident students. The
room deposit ($100) is not a prepayment to be applied to residence hall
charges but will remain on deposit with the College to be refunded.
provided the student's account with the College is cleared, upon one i)\ the
following: ( 1 ) change of status from resident student to commuter student.
(2) formal withdrawal, or (3) graduation. The room reservation/damage

4 deposit serves as a room reservation while the student is not occupying

college housing and is refundable if a student cancels his/her reservation b>
the following dates: May 1 for tall semester. December 1 for spring

w semester. It serves as a damage deposit while the student is occupy Ing

J college housing and is refundable when the student leaves the College
housing minus any unpaid assessments and/or any debt owed to the

v College. Complete residence information and regulations can be lound in

' v the Student Handbook.

^-

* 55

^

v

Residence Hall Activities

Residence Advisors also function as a governing body and coordinating
committee. They plan activities within the residence halls such as cookouts,
movie nights, decorating contests and other special events.

Vehicle Registration

To insure efficient control of traffic and parking on campus and the safety
of all persons and vehicles, every vehicle must be registered and must have
a parking permit. These permits are issued to students, along with a copy of
existing parking regulations. A parking fee is included in tuition. Failure
to adhere to published policies may result in vehicles being ticketed and/or
towed.

Office of Student Activities and Service

The Office of Student Activities and Service works closely with the
students, faculty, and staff of LaGrange College to bridge the curricular and
co-curricular experiences of students at LaGrange College. Located on the
first floor of Smith Hall, the Director of Student Activities and Service
strives to provide a diverse array of social, multicultural, political, service,
and leadership activities for the campus community.

The Director of Student Activities and Service is responsible for advising
the Student Government Association (SGA) and the President's Council as
well as overseeing the activities and operations of all Lagrange College
student organizations. With over 30 active student organizations at
LaGrange College there is a club or organization for every student. If
students do not feel as though there is something available of interest to
them there is always the option of creating and beginning a new
organization on campus. Student Organizations are divided into six
categories: Athletic, Greek, Honorary, Interest/ Independent, Religious
Life, and Service. Please see the Office of Student Activities and Service
for a complete listing of student organizations.

The Office of Student Activities and Service also offers a Leadership
Certificate Program for students interested in developing their leadership
skills and abilities. Through leadership development, students will be
challenged to enhance their involvement and inspired to seek their full
potential. The Leadership Certificate Program consists of four certificate
levels - Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. Please see the Office of
Student Activities and Service for more information about the Leadership
Certificate Program.

56

Community Service is another large component of the Office of Student
Activities and Service. The Director of Student Activities and Service
works closely with the SGA's Service Council, the Graduate Assistant for
Service and the Servant Leadership Program to provide LaGrange College
students with a variety of service projects throughout the academic year.
The traditional service activities offered at LaGrange College include, hut
are not limited to the following: the lust-Week Service Project, Service
Saturday, the Annual Downtown LaGrange Chili Cook-Off Halloween
Carnival, the Annual West Point Lake Clean-up, Panther Toy Store. Blood
Drives, and the American Cancer Society's Relay lor Life. In addition to
these activities, other service activities occur which are often associated
with one or more of the following local agencies and organizations:

American Cancer Society
Angels of Hope

Boys' and Girls' Club oi' West GA
Care Link Programs of Troup County
CAS A of Troup County
Consumer Credit Counseling
DASH for LaGrange
Girl Scouts of Great Atlanta, Inc.
Good Shepherd Programs
Habitat for Humanity ReStore
Hillcrest Elementary, After
Class Lnrichment

American Red Cross
Big Brothers B ig Sisters
Boy Scouts of America,

Chattahoochee Council
Communities in Schools oi'

Troup County
Franklin Forest Elementary,

After-Class Enrichment
Goodwill
Harmony House
Junior Achievement oi Lust

Alabama & West GA

LaGrange Troup County Humane Society LaGrange Housing Authority
LaGrange Personal Aid Association, Inc. LaGrange Senior Center
LaGrange/Troup Council oi'

Church Women Clothing Center
Long Cane Middle School

Troup County Parks and Recreation
Troup County Special Olympics
Turnaround Christian Center
United Way oi' West Georgia
Whitesville Road Elemental)
School

Literacy Volunteers Troup

County. Inc.
Salvation Army LaGrange

Corps
Twin Cedars Youth Services
West Georgia Hospice
West Point Lake Coalition. Inc.

The Lagrange College Game Room, located in the basement of the Mabr\
Gibson Student Center, is also supervised by the Office of Student
Activities and Sen ice. The ( lame Room is open to students at all times and
provides students with the Opportunity to pla\ pool, ping pong, cards,
board games, watch television, and listen to music.

51

Student Government and Other
Organizations

The Student Government Association exists to serve as a medium for
student expressions, to coordinate campus activities, to promote good
citizenship and to govern within the parameters granted by the President of
the College. The SGA is an important part of student life. Upon acceptance
into the College, a student automatically becomes a member of the
association. All students are encouraged to become active members, so
that the association is a truly representative body of student thought and
opinion, voicing the needs and concerns of the student body.

The SGA, as a voice of the student body, promotes diversity and
involvement through activities, entertainment, and service at LaGrange
College and in the surrounding community.

Traditional Activities

Fair on the Hill Activities fair where students can become familiar
with LC student organizations and how to become
more involved. Community businesses and
organizations also participate in the Fair on the
Quad.

Homecoming Fall weekend featuring a concert, a

parade, various alumni activities, and
culminating with crowning of Queen.

Greek Week Week of activities centering around campus Greek life

Vegas on the Hill A casino night that allows students the opportunity
to play for a chance to win prizes.

Quadrangle Formal A formal dance that is typically held during the
Spring Semester.

May Day A long tradition including Step Sing, crowning of the

May Day King and Queen, installation of the new
SGA executive council, and activities on the
Residential Quad.

In addition, Student Life, through the Student Activities Office, works with
numerous on-campus organizations in order to foster student growth,
leadership, and involvement.

58

Social Sororities

Social Fraternities

Alpha Omicron Pi

Kappa Delia

Phi Mu

Panhellenic Council *

;: Sorority Governing Body

Alpha Delta Gamma
Delta Tan Delta
Pi Kappa Phi
[nterfraternal Council '
' Fraternity Governing Body

Student Publications

Citations ( research journal |
The Hilltop News (newspaper)
The Scroll (!iterar\ magazine)

Religious Life

Anti-Apathetics

Baptist Collegiate Ministries

Fellowship of Christian Athletes

Interfaith Council

LaGrange College House of Prayer

Pray Until Something Happens

Reformed Bible Fellowship

Servant-Fellows

Wesley Fellowship

Various Bible study groups

Service Clubs

Evening College Advisory Com.
Panther Tov Store

Interest/Independent

Art Student League
Chess Club

GA Assoc, of Nursing Students
International Rotaract Group
Japanese Culture Club
LaGrange College Hilltoppers
Phi Eta Omega (Pre-Healtln
President's Council (SGA)
Society of Human Resource Mgrs.

Honor Societies

Alpha Psi Omega (Drama)

Alpha Sigma Lambda (Adult)

Delta Mu Delta (Business)

LaGrange College Honor Council

Nursing Honor Society

Phi Alpha Theta (History)

Pi Gamma Mu (Social Science)

Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science)

Psi Chi (Psychology)

Sigma Tau Delta (English)

Theta Alpha Kappa (Religious Studies)

Athletic

Intramurals

LaGrange College Bass Fishing

Student Athletic Advison Comm

59

Programs, Exhibitions and Forum
Lectures

A balanced and comprehensive program of lectures, music performances,
dramatic presentations, workshops and other activities contribute to student
enrichment. Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:15 a.m. until 12:20 p.m. are
reserved for programs, exhibitions, and forum lectures.

Athletic Program

LaGrange College is a member of the NCAA Division III and the Great
South Athletic Conference. College colors are red and black.
Intercollegiate teams compete in women's soccer, basketball, cross country,
volleyball, softball, swimming, lacrosse, and tennis; and men's baseball,
football, basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, swimming and tennis. It is
the philosophy of LaGrange College that the team participants are
attending college primarily for a quality education, and no athletic
scholarships are offered. The coaching staff is a group of highly qualified
teachers who stress the educational aims of the College.

LaGrange College is committed to a full program of non-scholarship
athletics that encourages the student-athlete to reap the benefits of
educationally sound activity that encourages and promotes a strong
academic regime. Students are given the opportunity to participate fully in
their given sport and to compete with other teams locally, statewide, and
regionally.

Philosophy Statement for Intercollegiate
Athletics

Intercollegiate athletics at LaGrange College provide students with an
integral complement to their total educational experience. Recognizing the
importance of athletics to the individual student while seeking to strike an
appropriate balance between the life of the mind and participation in co-
curricular offerings, the College is committed to providing a program of
intercollegiate athletics that is student-centered for both participants and
spectators. The College believes that the primary function of intercollegiate
athletics at a small church-related, liberal arts college is one of a high
quality co-curricular complement to its overall mission. As such,
academics have priority over athletic or other co-curricular pursuits.

LaGrange College seeks to recruit and retain student athletes who
understand the balance of priorities between academics and co-curricular
programs, whether the latter are athletics, the performing arts, or other
student activities. The College employs coaches who understand that

60

balance of priorities, and its coaches seek to recruit students who will he
successful student-athletes. Because the College awards no financial aid
based upon athletic ability, the aim of student-athlete recruitment by
coaches is not solely for athletic success but rather for student contribution
to the College's enrollment goals, although by no means do those have to
be mutually exclusive.

The College embraces a commitment to instill and develop the values of
superlative ethical conduct and fair play among its athletes, coaches,
spectators, and other constituents. Further, LaGrange College recognizes
that student-athletes are role models to their peers as well as representatives
of the College, and the College actively encourages student-athletes to
conduct themselves in a manner which befits those roles.

LaGrange College is committed to gender equity and values cultural
diversity. The College will invest sufficient resources to ensure that
medical and athletic training services are available to all athletes at
appropriate times. It shall strive to ensure that all individuals and all teams
are treated with the same level oi' fairness, resources, and respect so that all
athletes are afforded an equal opportunity to develop their potential as a
student-athlete.

Intramural sports

Intramurals provide opportunities for wholesome recreation and
competition among members of the campus community. Teams
representing campus organizations and independents compete in organized
tournaments and events throughout the year. Competitive events include
Hag football, volleyball, basketball, Softball, dodgeball, and Ultimate
Frisbee. Special awards are presented to the men and women's groups with
the highest participation rates and best records o[ the entire year. In
addition, male and female "Athletes of the Year" are selected.

Many opportunities are available for recreational use of the facilities m the
LaGrange College Aquatics Complex: recreational swimming and lap
swimming all year round in the indoor pool; the aquarius water work-out
stations, water aerobics or aqua exercise or aqua exercise class (non-credit).

The facilities and equipment of the Physical Education Department also are
available for student recreational use when these are not scheduled for
instructional, athletic, or intramural sports use. The use of outdoor
equipment (backpacks, tents, sto\es. lanterns) requires the payment of a
small deposit which is refunded upon the safe return of the equipment The
fitness center, gymnasium, and pools are available for student/faculty/staff
use during posted hours. A valid LaGrange College II) is necessar) for
admittance to all facilities.

61

Spiritual Life

College is a point of transition. Regardless of the student's age or reason
for being on campus, college is a turning point. It is a time of exciting
intellectual and social growth. During their collegiate experiences,
students will wrestle with new ideas, discover new interests, and explore
relationships and issues of identity. The struggles to define identity and
personal values are opportunities for spiritual growth and faith
relationships. Therefore, Spiritual Life programs at LaGrange College
offer students a chance to examine their faith and determine how it relates
to their educational experiences, to assess what is important, and to forge a
system of values that will sustain them through their adult years.

Growing out of its history of service and its connection to The United
Methodist Church, LaGrange College is committed to creating a caring and
ethical community that challenges students' minds and inspires their souls-.
As a result, the College offers a number of opportunities for students,
faculty and staff members to celebrate life and explore God's intention for
human living.

Office of Spiritual life and Church relations

The most common problems experienced by college students focus on
figuring out an identity, forming and maintaining relationships, and the
difficulties of making the transition from adolescence to young adulthood.
Students need a friend, and someone who will have the time to listen to
them. To help students during their faith struggles when their spiritual
outlooks and understandings of God are challenged, the College has a Vice
President for Spiritual Life and Church Relations who serves as the
College's chaplain to care for the spiritual needs of the institution.

The word "chaplain" describes the ministry style of an ordained minister
who devotes the majority of his or her time and effort to developing and
maintaining a relational environment for a small congregation. LaGrange' s
Vice President for Spiritual Life and Church Relations is an ordained
United Methodist minister who is available to persons of all faiths to help
them sort out and make sense out of life crises. As chaplain, the Vice
President provides support and counseling for students, faculty and staff
members in times of crisis or transition. Through worship programs, group
activities, and community service, the chaplain invites students, faculty and
staff members to explore their faith.

As spiritual advisor to students, faculty, and administration, the chaplain is
responsible for providing and supervising all aspects of religious life on
campus, which include: community worship and prayer; advising and
coordinating the activities of Student religious groups.

62

In all the Vice President for Spiritual Life and Chinch Relations does, the
goal is to help people get a clearer understanding o( what they believe and
how the> relate their faith to everyday lite. Because of this, much of the
work is done in talking and listening with people for questions on matters
of faith, life, family, God, ethical issues, spirituality, and personal crises.
The Office of Spiritual Life and Church Relations offers liturgical/
sacramental services such as communion and an Ash Wednesday service,
and is available to assist faculty and students cope with stress and to
discern Clod's call for their lives in an academic environment, which
includes questions of purpose, values, ethics, and questions about life.

Moshell Learning Center

Located in the 24-Hour Study Area on the main (2 ) floor of the Frank and
Laura Lewis Library, this facility includes the Writing and Tutoring Center
to serve students currently enrolled at LaGrange College. Our staff consists
of undergraduate work-study employees who have been nominated for this
program by professors in their respective disciplines. Dr. Laine Scott
supervises and trains these peer tutors to conduct one-on-one or group
tutoring sessions. Although the subjects tutored may vary from semester to
semester, the Moshell Learning Center typically provides at least one peer
tutor in each of the following areas:

Biology (including Anatomy) Political Science

Chemistry Psychology

Computer Science & Applications Religion

French Spanish

Math & Problem Solving (multiple tutors) Statistics

Physics

Writing (multiple tutors)

During the Fall and Spring semesters, these tutors die available Sundaj
through Thursday evenings, from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and. in some
cases, by appointment as well.

Student who would like to serve as peer tutors but are ineligible tor work-
study funding may enroll in K HA 4492 (On-Campus Tutoring Internship)

and thus earn one to three I 1-3) semester hours ol academic credit for their
service. Note that these hours do not count toward any major or minor
program. This course ma\ be repeated for credit. Grading is on a "Pass/
No credit" basis. Prerequisites: Recommendation from a full-time faculty
member in the subject to be tutored and approval b> the Director of the
Writinc and Tutoring Center.

63

Student Health Services

All students must have proof of medical insurance. For those not having
coverage through individual or group plans, LaGrange College makes
available accident and sickness coverage through a private carrier at
reasonable rates. Application forms are available at registration or through
the Business Office. In order to register for classes, students must have a
medical history form on file with the Saident Life Office.

For a description of health services available to LaGrange College students,
refer to the Student Handbook.

Career Development Center

Located on 1 st Floor of Smith Hall, the LaGrange College Career
Development Center is available to students, alumni, faculty, and staff.

Students are encouraged to use the LaGrange College Career Development
Center's resources starting their freshman year in college. The Career
Development Center assists students in researching and locating part- and
full-time employment while in school, internships, scholarships,
fellowships, graduate assistantships, summer jobs, and full-time jobs
following graduation. Additional resources and training provide students
with job-search skills, including resume/cover letter preparation, interview
skills, as well as assistance with graduate school applications, test
preparation, and online resources.

The Career Development Center offers workshops such as 'The Art of
Cross-cultural Business Dining," "Backpack to Briefcase" as well as events
such as the Graduate School Forum, Mock Interviews, one on-campus
Career Fair, and three off-campus Career Fairs.

The Internship program at LaGrange College utilizes employers from
different areas of study. These internships will aide students in obtaining
valuable experience as a prelude to future employment. Students are
eligible their sophomore year to apply and must have permission from their
academic department.

To apply for an internship:

Pick up an "Internship Application" from the LaGrange College Career
Development Center and obtain signature from the major department
chair for approval for Major Credit

Resume that has been approved and proofed by the Career
Development Center (books, packets, and staff are available for
assistance)

64

Signed "Release of Liability for Interns" and the "Internship
Polices" (included in the Internship Application)

Packet must be turned back into the Career Development Center and
student must meet with the Director of the Career Development Center

The LaGrange College Career Development Center is a member of several
organizations. Some of the memberships include the Georgia Consortium

of Colleges, the Georgia Association of Colleges and Employers, the
National Association of Colleges and Employers, the National Society of
Human Resource Management, West Georgia Society of Human Resource
Management, and the Department o\' Labor's Employers Committee.

Personal and Academic Counseling

An important pan of the philosophy of LaGrange College is that each

student should have access [o personal and academic counseling
throughout his or her academic career. The Counseling office, located on
the fust floor in Smith Hall oilers a variety of counseling services to assist
students in reaching their academic and personal goals. The Counseling
o\\\L-c does this by providing short-term personal counseling in the
follow ing areas:

Conflict resolution

Adjustment to college life

Relationships Issues

Stress Reduction

Depression

Eating disorders

Alcohol or substance abuse

Healthy lifestyle choices

Gender identity issues

The counseling oft ice also provides Study skills workshops and offers one-
on-one academic coaching. In addition, the counseling office works to
ensure that educational programs are accessible to all qualified students in
accordance with the provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act ^\
1973 and expanded by Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act ol

* 1990. Reasonable and appropriate accommodations, academic

adjustments, and/or auxiliary aids are determined on a case-by-case h.
for Otherwise qualified Students who have a demonstrated need tor these

<# sen ices. Pamela Trcmbla\ is the Section 504 coordinator a\k\ she can be

Contacted at 706-880-83 1 3 or b\ email at ptrembla) ( lagrange.edu. She

65

will receive proper documentation for learning and attention disorders,
psychiatric disorders, chronic health impairments, physical disabilities, and
any other physical or mental condition that substantially limits a major life
activity prior to the academic term when accommodations are desired.

The Counseling office strives to help students make the most of themselves
as developing individuals along with creating successful relationships with
others. Additionally, it is important that students find balance in their daily
life which can be accomplished by practicing healthy lifestyle choices.
Some of these goals can be challenging to attain. It is during these times
that the Counseling office can be extremely useful. Students can call the
Counseling office (880-8177) and set up weekly appointments to resolve
personal and academic issues when time slots are available. All
discussions are confidential in keeping with professional standards.

International Student Advising

International Student Advising Staff:

Diana Celorio Goldwire, International Advisor and DSO

(Handles CPT's and OPT's)

Katie Porter, Assistant International Advisor

Cindy Saines, PDSO (Handles I-20s)

The International Student Advising Staff is here to assist international
students during their stay at LaGrange College. We assist with integration
into America and college life as well as assist with international
paperwork. (SEVIS, I-20s, etc.) Katie Porter oversees the
International/Rotaract Group which offers a network of International and
American Students. Every year in March the International/Rotaract Group
dedicates a week to teaching campus faculty, staff, and students about the
countries represented at LaGrange College.

66

Student Appeal oi Decisions

Recognizing that decisions must be made and that some students may feel
aggrieved by some decisions, LaCirange College provides the following

procedures:

A student must first attempt to resolve an issue with the college staff
member first rendering a decision. It" this does not resolve the issue, a
decision rendered by a college staff member may be appealed by a student
as follows:

I. Student Life

A disciplinary decision rendered by the Social Council may be
appealed according to the Social Code appellate procedure. The
Social Code may be found in full in the Student Handbook.

Disciplinary decisions rendered originally by the Dean of Student
Affairs may be appealed in writing to the Provost who shall seek,
in an informal conference, to settle the grievance to the satisfaction
of the two parties involved. If no resolution can be found, the
Provost will deliver the appeal to the Student Affairs Committee o\
the faculty for its determination.

Other grievances in the area o( Student Life may be appealed to
the Dean o\' Student Affairs. If the grievance involves an original
decision rendered by the Dean o( Student Affairs, the decision
may be appealed as above.

II. Financial Aid. See the Financial Aid Section.

III. Academic Matters. See the Academic Policy Section.

67

Information Technology and
Academic Support

LaGrange College Policy for the Responsible Use
of Information Technology

The purpose of this policy is to ensure a computing environment that will
support the academic, research, and service mission of LaGrange College.
Simply stated, continued and efficient accessibility of campus computing
and network facilities depends on the responsible behavior of the entire
user community. The College seeks to provide students, faculty, and staff
with the greatest possible access to campus information technology
resources within the limits of institutional priorities and financial
capabilities and consistent with generally accepted principles of ethics that
govern the College community. To that end, this policy addresses the many
issues involved in responsible use of the College's information technology
resources, including systems, software, and data. Each authorized user of
information technology assumes responsibility for his or her own behavior
while utilizing these resources. Users of information technology at
LaGrange College accept that the same moral and ethical behavior that
guides our non-computing environments also guides our computing and
networking environment. Any infraction of this policy may result
minimally in loss of computer and network access privileges, or may result
in criminal prosecution.

Use

All users of the College's information technology resources agree to abide
by the terms of this policy. Information technology resources include, but
are not limited to, College owned computers and information technology
hardware, the College campus network, information sources accessible
through the campus network, and Internet access. When accessing any
remote resources utilizing LaGrange College information technology, users
are required to comply with both the policies set forth in this document and
all applicable policies governing the use and access of the remote resource.
The College, through a review and amendment process directed by the
Instructional and Information Technology Round Table (IITR), reserves
the right to amend this policy. For the most up-to-date version of this
responsible use policy, see the information technology helpdesk
(helpdesk.lagrange.edu). As far as possible, changes will be made only

68

after consulting with the user community. LaGrange College computing

resources and associated user accounts are to he used only for the College
activities for which they are assigned or intended. The computing systems
are not to he used for any non-college related commercial purpose, public
or private, either tor profit or non-profit. Unless placed in public domain
by its owners, software programs are protected by Section 1 17 of the 1976
Copyright Act. It is illegal to duplicate, copy, or distribute software or its
documentation without the permission of the copyright owner. Copyright
protection of text, images, video and audio must also be respected in all
uses of College technology resources. The LaGrange College Campus
Network must not be used to serve information outside of LaGrange
College without written permission approved by the IITR.

User Accounts

Many technology resources at LaGrange College are accessed through user
accounts. No user accounts should be used to execute computer software
or programs or attempt to gain access to resources other than software.
programs or resources specifically granted and offered for use by
LaGrange College. All users are responsible for both the protection of
their account passwords and the data stored in their user accounts. Sharing
a password is prohibited. Users must change their password periodically to
help prevent unauthorized access o\' their user account. When working on
computers that are in general access areas (laboratories and public access .
users must log off or lock the computer before leaving to protect the
security of their data and the network. Leaving the web-based email page
(Outlook Web-Client) open on an accessible computer, especially outside
of campus, leaves the account available to anyone who passes by, and
allows the changing of the user's password giving the passerby access to
the LaGrange College Network. Before leaving a computer, users must log
o\[' the web-based email. If students become locked out i)\ their accounts
or for other reasons needs to have their passwords reset, the) must make
the request in person to an Information Technology staff member and
present a valid LaGrange College II). Any suspected unauthorized access
of a user's account should be reported immediately to the Executive
Director o\ Instructional and Information Technology or another College
authority. I'ser accounts will be deactivated when the user's affiliation
with the College is terminated and all files and other data will be removed
from those accounts.

69

College Email Accounts

The College provides email accounts for students, faculty and staff. All
course and advising related email and other official College electronic
communication with students must be sent to the student's campus email
address or via Mentor. Official College email communications with
faculty and staff will use their College email address. Email must not be
used for purposes inconsistent with the mission of the College. Users may
not conceal, mask or misrepresent their identity when sending email or
other electronic messages. Transmission of abusive, harassing or libelous
electronic messages is forbidden. Deliberate transmission or propagation
of malicious programs such as viruses, worms, Trojan Horses, data mining
programs or participation in denial of service attacks are subject to
disciplinary and possible criminal action.

LaGrange College maintains faculty and staff mail groups (distribution lists
or aliases) for the purposes of communications concerning the operation of
the College. The College maintains a Community mail-list for
communications of a less formal nature. Users must make appropriate use
of the subject line in postings to all College related mail groups
(distribution lists or aliases) and mail-lists (list servers). Announcements to
faculty and staff about campus events should be made through FYI. These
announcements should be sent to the Communications and Marketing staff
for inclusion in FYI. A single reminder close to the date of the event may
be made to the faculty and staff mail groups. Exceptions to this policy may
be made by approval of the Instructional and Information Technology
Round Table. Daily reminders of an upcoming event are inappropriate.
Examples of messages appropriate for the FYI/email reminder procedure
are Cultural Enrichment Events, Faculty Meetings, Staff Council Meetings,
Faculty-Staff Coffees, and Sports Events. Messages not directly related to
the operation of the College should be posted to the Community mail-list.
For example, items for sale, contests, fund-raisers, sports scores, humorous
items and commentaries belong on the Community mail-list rather than
being sent to the faculty and staff mail groups. Users can unsubscribe from
and re-subscribe to the Community mail list as they desire. Instructions for
subscribing and unsubscribing are available on the helpdesk
(helpdesk.lagrange.edu).

70

Posting of messages to the email group containing all students must be
cleared through the appropriate Vice President's Office or their delegates.

I Fse of the electronic signs in the Dining Hall, posters and risers are
suggested alternative means of icaching all students. Messages to the
student body should not be made through the faculty mail group. Messages
to faculty containing variations on "Please announce to your class" are
ineffective in reaching all students.

Campus Computing Facilities

Computer labs on the LaGrange College campus are available lor general

use by students, faculty and staff except during the periods when the rooms
have been reserved for teaching purposes. Additional computers arc placed
in public access areas for student, faculty and staff use. It is the
responsibility of every user to use lab and public access facilities in a
responsible manner. Accidental damage or damage caused by other parties
should be reported as soon as possible so that corrective action can be
taken. Use ol' laboratory or public access facilities to view material that
may be considered offensive to others which includes, but is not limited to,
racially hateful and sexually explicit material, is considered a form of
harassment. The viewing of harassing material is inconsistent with the
mission oi' LaGrange College. Viewing such harassing material in a lab or
public access area may result in disciplinary action.

Personal Web Pages

Any authorized user or group at the College may have a personal home
page on a LaGrange College World Wide Web server, provided that the
graphical images, multimedia information, text, or the intent of the home
page do not refute the mission of LaGrange College. Users must sign a
Registered Information Provider Agreement before web pages are placed
on the server. Groups must designate an individual as their Registered
Information Provider, who is responsible for the content of their web
pages. Registered Information Provider Agreements must be renewed
annually. Failure to renew will result in removal of content from the web
server. No individual user is authorized to create and seise a web site on
the World Wide Web utilizing College computer resources. Applications
for personal web pages should be made to the I )irector o\ Information
Technology.

71

Student Computer Configurations

Access to the LaGrange College Campus Network is available in dormitory
rooms for students who bring to campus personal computers meeting the
minimum specifications defined by Information Technology. These
specifications are revised annually and will be made available to all new
students. The Campus Network will allow students to access the World
Wide Web (WWW) and email. By accessing the College network,
students agree to abide by this usage policy. Students must not change
network configurations specified by Information Technology. The
Information Technology staff will only support software installed by
Information Technology personnel, and do not provide support for
personally owned computer equipment other than verifying that the
network link is functional.

Students are responsible for all network traffic originating from their
network access. Students should employ appropriate and up-to-date
antivirus software.

Campus Network

The College provides network access in classrooms, laboratories, the
library, offices, public access locations and student dormitory rooms.
While the College is committed to free speech and open access to
information and communication, these must be tempered by the need to
respect others' rights to speech, access and communication. Each user is
expected to balance their needs with the needs and expectations of the
College community as a whole. The College reserves the rights to limit
bandwidth to users and access to non-academic, resource intensive
applications if they threaten to interfere with academic uses of the campus
network.

Users on the network must not attempt to conceal, mask or misrepresent
their identity or the identity of computers when using the network. Users
shall not employ software or hardware that interferes with the operation or
security of the network. Users shall not interfere with the administration of
the campus network nor shall they attempt to breach any network or
resource security system. In administering the network, network activities
of users may be monitored as to type and quantity.

Users are responsible for all network activities originating from resources
provided to them by the College.

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*

Wireless Network

Wireless networking provides many benefits to the College, but with these
benefits comes unique security threats. In order to make a reasonable
effort to prevent access to network resources from unauthorized users via
the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN), the following policy and
associated best practices exist.

An unsecured Wireless Access Point (WAP) has the potential to open a
backdoor into an otherwise secure network. All WAIN located in academic
and administrative buildings must be managed by IT. Faculty and staff are
prohibited from installing a WAP without explicit permission from the
Director o( Information Technology. Requests for expansion of the
wireless network should be made to the Network Manager via the IT
Helpdesk. In order to allow flexibility for students to utilize wireless
networking in the residence halls, secured personal WAPs are allowed. IT
must be notified of intent to install a WAP via the IT Helpdesk. WAPs
must be physically located in the vicinity of the owner's conventional
wired jack and they must be secured in at least one of two ways. At least
40-bit Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) must be enabled on the WAP and
client. Ideally the WAPs internal MAC address table should be set to only
allow access from authorized clients. IT reserves the right to scan lor and
disable any unauthorized or unsecured WAPs.

WAP Best Practices:

Activate WEP on the WAP and client

Change the default administrator password to a more secure password

Don't use the default Service Set Identifier (SSID)

Don't broadcast the SSID if possible

Use the lowest power radio output possible to minimize propagation
* outside the building

Disable the WAP in non-usage periods

73

Remote Access

LaGrange College provides very limited direct telephone dialup access to
the Campus Network for college business. This service was created for
technical and administrative access to the network not available through a
regular Internet connection, and is not intended to provide general Internet
access to members of the LaGrange College community. In order to be
granted dialup access to the Campus Network, a user must submit a request
to the IITR via their department chair/supervisor. The request should
indicate the period of time for which this access is to be granted and
indicate how this access is consistent with the technical and/or
administrative purpose of the dialup resource. For regular dialup needs,
service through a commercial Internet Service Provider is recommended.

Data Security

Within institutional priorities and financial capabilities, LaGrange College-
provides reasonable security against unauthorized intrusion and damage to
data, files and messages stored on its computer systems. The College
maintains facilities for archiving and retrieving data stored in user
accounts. If a user needs to recover data after an accidental loss,
Information Technology staff should be contacted and every reasonable
attempt will be made to recover the lost or corrupted data. Neither the
College nor any Information Technology staff can be held accountable for
unauthorized access by other users, nor can they guarantee data protection
in the event of media failure, fire, criminal acts or natural disaster. Backing
up critical files regularly is recommended.

Information Resource Use by Guests and Alumni

Use of physical facilities for information technology by guests (individuals
not currently enrolled as students or currently employed as faculty or staff
members of LaGrange College) and alumni is allowed only within Frank
and Laura Lewis Library and under the supervision of library staff.
Additionally, such access is allowed only when existing resources are not
being fully utilized by LaGrange College students, faculty, or staff. The use
of technological resources may be extended to alumni and friends of
LaGrange College without the imposition of a "user fee." A "per printed
page" user fee established by Lewis Library will be assessed for use of
College printing resources.

74

*
*

*

V
V

User Awareness

Because Information technologies change at so rapid a rate, updates to the
Responsible Use Policy may be made between printings of College
publications. It is the responsibility of the user to keep informed of the
changes in this policy, which will be available on a LaGrange College web
site (http://panther.lagrange.edu).

LaGrange College Cell Phone and Pager Policy

The carrying and use of eell phones, pagers and other electronic
communications devices are allowed on the LaGrange College campus.
Users of these devices, however, must be attentive to needs and
sensibilities of other members o\' the College community. Furthermore, the
use of these devices must not disrupt the functions of the College.

Devices must be off or ringers silenced in classes, laboratories, the library,
study spaces and other academic settings and during events such as plays,
concerts, speakers and College ceremonies. The term 'laboratories'
explicitly includes computer laboratory spaces. Answering or operating
the device during classes, laboratories, meetings or events is onl\
appropriate in case of emergency. If the device must be answered, the user
must move to a location where the class, laboratory, Library patrons, etc.
will not be disrupted before making use of the device.

75

Academic Policies

Honor Code

As a member of the student body ofLaGrange College, I confirm my
commitment to the ideals of civility, diversity, service, and excellence.
Recognizing the significance of personal integrity in establishing these
ideals within our community, I pledge that I will not lie, cheat, steal, or
tolerate these unethical behaviors in others.

The Honor Code is the responsibility of every student, faculty member, and
staff member at LaGrange College. All members of the College community
are needed to support the enforcement of the Code which prohibits lying,
cheating, or stealing when those actions involve academic processes.

Student Responsibilities

To be honest and truthful in all academic matters, abiding by the letter
and spirit of the Honor Code;

To consult with the appropriate persons to clarify issues regarding
plagiarism, the correct attribution of sources, the acceptable limits of
proofreading or editing by others, and the allowable materials for
examinations, reports, or any academic work;

To sign a pledge that no unauthorized aid has been given or received on
any academic work;

To report any incident to the president of the Honor Council that is
believed to be a violation of the Honor Code;

To cooperate when called upon by the Council to testify in a hearing.

Student Rights

To be presumed innocent;

To a fair, impartial, and timely hearing;

To face and question any witnesses at a hearing;

To testify and present material on one's own behalf;

To a separate hearing upon request;

To subsequent appeal;

To be accompanied by a silent observer in a hearing. The Council
president must be made aware of this person's name and relationship to
the student twenty-four hours before the hearing. The observer's role is
one of support, and this person will not be allowed to speak.

76

Examples of Offenses

Academic cheating - including but not limited to the unauthorized use

of hooks or notes, copying, or collaboration on examinations or any
graded courscwork;

Plagiarism - the misuse of another person's words or ideas, presenting
them as one's own, regardless i)\' intent;

Lying or presenting false information related to any academic matter;

Forgery or misuse of official College documents;

Theft of college property related to academic work;

Aiding another in any o( the above;

Failure to report a violation of the I lonor Code;

Failure to appear before the Honor Council as requested;

Failure to maintain confidentiality regarding a case;

Any dishonest conduct related to Cultural Enrichment requirements,
including but not limited to, taking credit for attendance when one has
not attended, either in whole or in part, any event; aiding another in
attempting to take credit for attending an event one has not attended.

Sanctions

One of the following sanctions is imposed when it is determined that there
has been a violation of the Honor Code. a\11 students will also complete a
program of remediation outlined below.

The final grade in the course lowered one letter grade;

A zero on the related assignment;

An F in the course;

Suspension from the College for one term, excluding summer, and an
F in the course in a grade-related offense;

Dismissal from the College, and an F in the course in a grade-related
offense;

In a case related to Cultural Enrichment credit, the addition o\ five
credits required for graduation. This does not disqualify the possible
sanction of suspension or expulsion.

Remediation

All students found to have N lolated the Honor Code must complete a
Remediation Program before being allowed to enroll m classes tor the
following semester. In course-related violations, they would also receive a
sanction from the Honor Council. In certain non-course-related cases, the
remediation program itself may be the sanction set b\ the Honor Council.

77

1 . A contract will be signed by the student which requires a Remediation

Program to be completed within a month of the date of the initiation of
the contract. If the sanction is imposed late in a semester, the president
of the Honor Council will determine a reasonable time for its
completion at the beginning of the next semester. If the student does not
complete the program as agreed, he or she will not be able to register for
the following semester, not including summer, effectively accepting a
suspension for a semester. It will be the student's responsibility to make
and keep all appointments named in the contract and complete the
program within the specified period.

2. The student must make and keep appointments to meet with the

following groups or members of the college community in person: the
Academic Council or a member of members of the Council designated
by the Provost; a member of the Honor Council designated by the
president of the Honor Council; in a grade-related offense, the member,
or members of the faculty involved; the President of the College. In
each of these discussions the student should be prepared to explain his
or her violation, discuss its impact both personally and on the college
community, and hear what others' thoughts and concerns may be about
the violation. A minimum of thirty minutes is suggested for each
meeting.

3. The student must conclude by writing a five- to ten-page typed paper

reflecting on the experience of the violation and what he or she may
have learned in the process of the meetings. These papers, rendered
anonymous, will be made available for the Honor Council to use at its
discretion in its efforts to educate the student body regarding academic
integrity. When the paper has been submitted and read by the Honor
Council, the final step in satisfying the Remediation Program will be a
meeting with the Honor Council. This is an opportunity for members of
the Council to ask questions of the student about the process and
outcome.

A complete description of honor code policies, rules, and regulations can
be found in the Student Handbook, which is published in the Panther
Planner each year. Copies of the Handbook are available in the Student
Life Office.

78

Orientation

All first-year students are introduced to LaGrange College through an
^ orientation program called first Week Experience that takes place the week

fc before classes begin. The program is composed of a student life component

along with an academic component. The student life aspect is designed to
^ acquaint first-year students with various phases of the life of the College

m including traditions, procedures, and regulations. Students benefit from a

proper introduction to the opportunities and responsibilities of college life.

The academic component of the program requires first-year students to
^ attend academic symposia where faculty present their research interests.
^ academic opportunities, and standards for excellence. In addition to the

symposia, the first-year student is also required to attend Cornerstone
^ classes to discuss the symposia and the assigned summer reading as well as
^ a two-hour Honor Code Presentation and Signing Ceremony.

^ Following the First Week Experience, students will enroll in First- Year

Cornerstone (CORE 1 101 ). and First-Year Orientation (CORE 1 102). the
^ first two required classes of the Core Curriculum. CORE 1 101, as an
^ academic course, has as its main goal to introduce entering lust semester

students to what LaGrange College values in an interdisciplinary Libera]

arts education. CORF 1 102 is an extended orientation course that seeks to
m improve students' academic success and ease the transition into college
life.

Registration and Advising

^ All students should register on the dates specified. All registration

procedures tor all terms are under the direction o\ the Provost. Students

^ have not completed registration until they have cleared the Registrar.
Office of Student File, and the Business Office. Students enrolled tor
twelve or more hours must obtain a campus post office box.
* Communications to the student will be through campus email or campus
mail.

Each student is assigned to a faculty advisor who assists the student in
planning an academic program. However, the ultimate responsibility for
meeting all requirements rests with the individual student.

Students who enter LaGrange College and have earned less than 30
semester hours will be assigned a Cornerstone advisor as their primar\
advisor and an area oi interest ad> isor as their sccondar\ ad\ isor. The area
of interest is determined from the student's application for admission. The
Cornerstone advisor will act as the student's first contact person. The area
of interest Ad\ isor w ill act as a consultant in matters pertaining to major
requirements.

79

Since students may declare their major at any time, the Cornerstone advisor
will still remain as the primary advisor and the major advisor will continue
in the secondary advisor role for the entire first academic term and during
the final registration period for the second term. After the drop/add period
of the first spring academic term and before pre-registration for the next
summer and fall semesters, the Cornerstone advisor will become the
secondary advisor. The area of interest/major advisor will assume the
primary advisor role and become the first contact person for the student for
advising and class scheduling. The Cornerstone advisor is released from
all advising responsibilities for the student and becomes the secondary
contact person when needed.

Students with no area of interest or major will remain assigned to their
Cornerstone advisor as their primary advisor temporarily. At the end of the
drop/add period for fall semester registration and before pre-registration for
the following spring semester, undeclared students will be re-assigned to
one of their fall semester instructors as their primary advisor and the
Cornerstone advisor will become the secondary advisor at that time.

A major may be formally declared any time by contacting the Registrar's
Office. The student must declare his/her major in writing to the
Department by the time the student has earned 51 semester hours of
credit. A student's major program requirements are those described in the
College Bulletin at the time of declaration of the major.

International Students

Students who are on a student visa in the United States are subject to
special regulations mandated by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration
Services (USCIS) of the United States Government. As the institution that
issues documents certifying student status, LaGrange College is subject to
USCIS regulations as a matter of law. USCIS regulations change from
time to time, so students are encouraged to contact the Provost or the
Registrar when questions about USCIS regulations arise. Under current
guidelines, persons with student visas must be enrolled for a full academic
load (at least 12 semester hours) at all times. Federal regulations
concerning "status" for all international students on an F-l visa state that
any student who falls below 12 semester hours at any time will be
considered out-of-status and must be reinstated by the U.S. Citizenship
and Immigration Services (USCIS).

80

English proficiency is fundamental to a successful academic course at
I ^Grange College. Therefore, in addition to the minimum T( )l .1 I . score
required for admission, the Provost may require that a student attend a

special, intensive English language course if it is apparent that a Student's
English continues to jeopardize a successful academic career. It such a
requirement is placed on a student, failure to attend the Imglish language
course can result m withdrawal of the student visa.

International students must enroll in an English course each semester
they are in school until they satisfactorily complete their English
studies.

Credit for work earned at a junior college

Not more than b() semester hours of credit earned at a junior college are
counted toward the degree. No credit is granted toward the degree for
course work taken at a junior college after a student has attained junior
standing except that up to 9 hours of transient credit from a junior college
may he granted for courses that are below the LaGrange College 3000-
level (the r>() credit-hour limit still applies). A transfer student is not given
credit toward graduation for any grade of "13" earned elsewhere. Transient
work with a grade o( "C-" or better is acceptable. Academic averages are
computed on work done only at LaGrange College.

Class An endance Regulations

A student is expected to attend all classes, including labs, tor all courses for
which he/she is registered. The student is solely responsible for accounting
to the instructor tor any absence. An instructor may recommend that the
Registrar drop from class, with a grade of "W" or "WF", any student whose
absences are interfering with satisfactory performance in the course.

Withdrawal

To withdraw from an individual course, a student must confer in the office
of the Registrar. Failure to withdraw officially through this office ma)
result in the assignment of a "WF." A student who wishes to withdraw
completely from the college must confer with the Director of Counseling.

si

Medical Withdrawal

Medical withdrawal is defined as complete withdrawal without academic
penalty for reasons of health. Except in circumstances of emergency, a
licensed health care provider or a qualified counselor must provide a
written recommendation for medical withdrawal to the Provost. This
written recommendation must be on file prior to approval for withdrawal.
Anytime medical withdrawal is initiated, the student's instructors, the
Office of Financial Aid, and the Business Office will be notified by the
Registrar. The re-entry of the student following medical withdrawal for
medical reasons requires a clearance from the attending physician, licensed
health care provider, or a qualified counselor with an evaluation of the
student's potential to resume study successfully at LaGrange College. The
Provost will review this evaluation and make the decision concerning the
student's re-entry.

Course Repetition

At times, a student may wish to repeat a course in which a grade has
already been earned. This is likely to be because a student:

Earned a grade of "F' in a course;

Earned a grade of "D" in a course, which is often considered
unsatisfactory;

Earned a grade of "C-" or better in a course.

Students who have failed a course at LaGrange College are not allowed to
take the course elsewhere. Thus, all courses in which a grade of "F' is
earned at LaGrange College must be repeated at LaGrange College.

Students who have earned a grade of "D" in a course, which may be
considered unsatisfactory as defined by a student's major requirement,
must have the approval of the department chair in the student's major in
order to take the course elsewhere.

A student is prohibited from repeating a course in which he has made a
"C-" or better (while enrolled at LaGrange College or any institution)
without the approval of the Provost, and the Academic Council. Should a
student wish to repeat a course in which a grade of "C-" or above was
awarded, the student may petition to repeat the course.

A student may not remove from the transcript any grade earned at
LaGrange College or elsewhere, even if the course is repeated.

82

Acceleration

Students desiring to accelerate their college program may complete

* requirements in less than four academic years. This may be accomplished
I by attending summer school and/or taking an academic overload.

Permission to take an overload in any semester is granted only to those

* students who have earned at least a cumulative average of "B" (3.0), except
fc that a student may take an overload during one semester of his or her senior

year without respect to grade-point average.

^ Credit by Examination and Exemption

^ Students entering I.aCirange College may earn a waiver ot certain

requirements or college credit as a result of their participation m the

* College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Program, the College-Level
^ Examination Program (CLEP), or the International Baccalaureate (IB)

Program. Advanced Placement credit is accepted lor those students who

* present evidence from their high schools that Advanced Placement courses
^ have been completed and appropriate scores earned on the advanced

placement test. To determine the AP test scores that qualify lor college

* credit and/or exemption, students should contact the Registrar. A CLPP
^ exam grade o\' "C" or better is needed to receive credit; only b CLEP

credit hours will be accepted for courses below the 3000-level. IB credit is
awarded lor scores of 5, 6, or 7 on the Higher Level examinations, with the
. exception of English as a Second Language. No credit is awarded solely

lor earning an IB Diploma, lor IB Standard Level exams, or lor scores
below 5 on any Higher Level examination.

^ Applicants should submit requests lor Advance Placement or Internationa]
Baccalaureate credit during the summer prior to enrollment. Official IB
transcript should be included with the student's final high school transcript.

v Consultation with the academic departments or placement exams ma\ be
required in some areas before final credit is awarded. If a waiver of
requirements is granted, the score on the examination used will be recorded

* on the student's record in lieu of a letter grade.

v

*

+

<4 Current students wishing to gam credit through CLEP lor an elective must
receive prior approval from their academic advisor and the Assistant Dean

lor Academic Affairs; lor a major course, prior approval is required from
* the department chair, academic ad\ isor and the .Assistant I Van tor

Academic Allans. A ("IIP exam grade ol "C" or better is needed to
receive credit; onl) 6 CI IP credit hours w ill be accepted tor courses below
v the 3000-level. CLEP credit is not accepted lor tailed courses, tor ('OKI
classes, or tor ENGL 1 101 and ENGL 1 in:. CI EP credits ^ not count
towards residency requirements and are not included in the cumulative
GPA.
83

Transient Work

1 . Students who have failed a course at LaGrange College may not
take the course elsewhere.

2. Students who have earned a grade of "D" in a course, which may be
considered unsatisfactory as defined by a student's major
requirement, must have the approval of the department chair in the
student's major in order to take the course elsewhere.

3. Students may not take ENGL 1101 and 1 102 as transient students
elsewhere.

4. Students may not take any CORE designated courses as transient
students elsewhere.

Additional Policies concerning transient work

Grades earned for transient work are not included in the cumulative grade
average. As stated in other sections of this Bulletin, a student will not be
given permission to repeat any course at another institution in which a
failing grade has been earned at LaGrange College.

Transient credit for courses within a student's major will only be accepted
from a four-year baccalaureate degree conferring, regionally accredited
institution that offers a major in the specific discipline of the course being
requested for credit. Even if another such institution offers a major in the
specific discipline in which the course is being requested for credit, the
department chair in that discipline retains the right to deny the request.

Extension, correspondence, and on-line courses

Any regularly enrolled LaGrange College student who desires to take
course work for transient credit by extension, correspondence, or through
on-line vendors must obtain prior approval in writing from his or her
academic adviser and from the Provost. Such extension or correspondence
credit (grades of "C-" or better) may not exceed six hours and no credits
earned in this manner may be applied toward the fulfillment of courses
with the subject code CORE or ENGL 1 101 or 1 102. Courses taken by
extension or correspondence must be completed with all grades recorded
before the end of the student's final term in order to graduate in that term.

LaGrange College may award credit for courses earned on-line if they
are from a regionally accredited institution.

84

Credit Through United States Armed Forces
* Institute and Service Schools

^ Courses taken through The United Suites Armed Forces Institute and other
^ recognized military educational programs are accepted in accordance

with the policy governing transfer work when presented on official
^ transcripts from accredited institutions. Nine semester hours of elective
^ credit will be allowed for military service credit, including USAF1

correspondence courses and military service school courses ;is
^ recommended by the American Council on Education. Academic credit tor
9 one activity course in physical education, up to a maximum of lour, will be

awarded for each two months served in the Armed Forces.

^ International Studies

^ Increasing international understanding is valued at LaGrange College. In
promoting that understanding, LaGrange College seeks to enroll an

^ internationally diverse student body. The College serves as a host or home

^ base institution lor short-term international visitors and has executed
cooperative agreements with Seigakuin University in Tokyo, Japan;
Nippon Bunri in Oita City, Japan, Institute) Laurens in Monterrey, Mexico,

^ and Oxford-Brookes University in Oxford, England

p

85

Grades and Credits

The definitions of grades given at LaGrange College are as follows:

A+ 4.0

A superior 4.0

A- 3.75

B+ 3.25

B above average 3.0
B- 2.75

C+ 2.25

C average 2.0

C- 1.75

D+ 1.25

D below average 1 .0

F failing 0.0

I incomplete. This grade is assigned in case a student is doing

satisfactory work but for some reason beyond the student's control
has been unable to complete the work during that term.

P pass

NC no credit or non-credit

W withdrawn. During the first three weeks a student may withdraw
from a class with an "automatic" "W." After this trial period the
student may withdraw, but the grade assigned, "W" or "WF,"
will be at the discretion of the professor.

WF withdrawn failing. The grade of "WF" is included in computing
the grade-point average.

AW audit withdrawn

AU audit complete

NR grade not reported by instructor at the time the report issued.

A student may register for a course on a non-credit basis, for which he or
she pays full tuition. To have a grade of "NC" recorded, he or she must
fulfill all course requirements.

All requests for audit courses must be approved in writing by the instructor
and Provost. Only lecture courses may be audited. No new first-year
student may audit any course during the first semester of residence at
LaGrange College.

86

'

Aii "I" is a temporary grade, assigned b> an instructor within the last three

weeks of the term to students who are doing satisfactory work and who

cannot complete the course due to circumstances beyond their control.
Should conditions prohibiting completion of a course arise w ithin the firs!

eight weeks, students should withdraw.

An 'T' is to he removed by the date indicated on the Academic Calendar.
Failure to remove an "I" by the date set initiates the following action: The

Registrar will write a letter to the student using the address on tile. The
letter indicates that the student has two weeks to respond. Otherwise the "I"
grade will he converted to an "P."

Grades are assigned and recorded for each course at the end of each term.
Grades are available to students on the web. Transcripts are withheld for
any student who is under financial obligation to the College.

Student Grade Appeals

The initial determination of a student's grade is entirely the prerogative of
the instructor. However, a student who wishes to contest a course grade or
other academic decision may initiate an appeal by the procedures outlined
below. Grade appeals must he initiated no later than mid-term of the
academic term following that in which the grade was assigned. The date of
the academic term is defined in the College calendar in the front of this
Bulletin.

The following procedures govern all student requests for grade changes:

The student should first attempt to resolve the matter by discussing the

question with the course instructor.

If the student and the instructor are unable to reach a resolution, the
student must then submit a written appeal to the Provost, The appeal
must state the manner in which the course syllabus was violated.

The Provost shall then seek an informal conference between the
* student and the instructor to settle the grievance to the satisfaction of

the two parties involved. If no resolution l-au he found, the Provost

will deh\er the Student's appeal, together with any other pertinent
v documents pro\ ided by the student and/or the instructor, to the Ke\ iew

Panel o\ the Academic Policies Committee tor its determination.

The Review Panel shall then convene to conduct a preliminary review
oi the appeal, alter which the Chair of the Ke\ iew Panel w ill set times
v convenient to the student and the instructor lor hearing both sides ol

the dispute.

It is the responsibility of the Review Panel to make every reasonable
effort to complete its deliberations prior to the end of the term in which
an appeal was initiated.

Upon completion of its hearings, the Review Panel will report its
findings to the Provost. The Provost will, in turn, inform the principal
parties involved of whether the student's request for a change of grade
or other decision was denied or approved.

Academic Standing and Probation

Students are placed on academic probation when the quality of work is
such that progress toward graduation is in jeopardy. The purpose of
probation is to warn. It is not a penalty. Students on probation will be
notified, and the regulations governing probation will be called to their
attention.

To stay in good academic standing, a student must maintain the following
LaGrange College cumulative grade point average (GPA): with less than
30 earned hours, a minimum 1.75 LaGrange College GPA; with 30-59
earned hours, a minimum 1.9 LaGrange College GPA; and with 60 earned
hours or more, a minimum 2.0 LaGrange College GPA. When placed on
academic probation, a student will have two semesters to remove
probationary status. Failure to do so could result in suspension at the
discretion of the Provost, who will evaluate the student's academic
progress.

In addition, failure to make at least a 1.0 GPA in any term or failure to earn
at least three credit hours in any term could result in probation or
suspension at the discretion of the Provost. Students may be suspended for
other academic reasons, such as Honor Code violations.

In the case of part-time students, the extent of application of these
regulations will be at the discretion of the Provost. Normally, all
applications of the regulations will be based upon a full academic load.

A letter from the Provost is sent to the student providing information on
standing. "Probation One" means that the student's next term will be the
first term on probation, etc. "Dean's Decision" means that the student's
academic records have been given to the Provost for action.

88

Academic Forgiveness

Academic forgiveness is a process which allows a student to have Ins oi-
lier prior academic record adjusted if:

1. lour or more calendar years have elapsed since the period of last
enrollment at LaGrange College;

2. the student applying lor forgiveness has completed a minimum of
12 semester hours since readmission to LaGrange College and has

earned a GPA o( 2.0 with no course grade lower than "C-" since the
time of readmission.

The student may petition lor forgiveness through the Academic Council
and. if approved, the College will:

1. apply toward the student's common core, general education
curriculum, and elective requirements but not necessarily toward the
student's academic major or minor, all those courses in which the
student earned a grade of "C-" or better;

2. set the student's cumulative grade point average to ().();

3. require the student to successfully complete a minimum of 30
semester hours alter bankruptcy declaration in order to graduate:

4. and allow all graduation requirements (see LaGrange College
Bulletin) to remain the same and apply equally, except that students
who have petitioned lor and received academic forgiveness will not
be eligible to receive honors at graduation.

LaGrange College will maintain the student's complete record, including
those courses excluded from the GPA by the granting of forgiveness.
No course work will be expunged from the student's academic record.
The student's official transcript will clearly indicate that the student has
been granted academic forgiveness. Ordinarily, no transfer or transient
credits will be accepted after academic forgiveness. A student ma) be
granted academic forgiveness only once during his or her academic
career at LaGrange College.

Requirements for Bachelor Degrees:
A Summary

LaGrange College's Undergraduate Day Program offers the Bachelor of
Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science degree, the Bachelor of Music degree,
and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. To obtain a second
bachelor's degree, at least 30 additional semester hours must be earned
beyond the first degree, in a minimum of two semesters. Baccalaureate
degrees require a minimum of 120 semester hours of credit including
required course work in the core curriculum, interim terms, and the major.

To be eligible for the degree, a student must meet all requirements for the
degree (core curriculum, major program, all necessary assessments, 120
semester hours and 2.0* cumulative grade point average in all course work
taken at LaGrange College), and make application for the degree before the
beginning of his or her final term. A student who does not earn a degree in
ten full semesters or the equivalent may be denied further registration.

In order to graduate in four academic years a student, at a minimum, should
enroll for at least 30 semester hours each academic year. A student who
takes at least 12 semester hours credit is classified as full-time. The
maximum full load is 16 semester hours; anything beyond is considered an
overload. No student whose average is below 3.0 is permitted to enroll for
more than 16 hours in any one term without the written permission of the
Provost.

The quality-point average is computed by multiplying the grade point by
the course value, summing, and then dividing the total quality points
earned by the total GPA hours. If a student has received credit for a course
and repeats that course, he or she receives no additional credit toward the
degree. In computing the student's average, GPA hours and quality points
are counted on all attempts.

Unless otherwise specified in this Bulletin, grades of "C-" may be counted
toward a major or minor, but the major or minor GPA must remain at or
above 2.0 (or the departmental minimum) in order for a student to graduate
with said major or minor. No grade below a "C-" in any course above
1000-level may be applied toward a major or minor.

*2.5 for Business Management and Accountancy

90

Residency Requirements

There are two ways m which a student must meet residency requirements
for graduation:

I. The student must be in residence the last 39 credit hours;

P> 2.31 credit hours o[ the last n() credit hours must be earned at

LaGrange College.

With prior approval of the academic adviser and the Provost, up to nine

hours of the last 60 credit hours may be earned as a transient student at
P another accredited institution. Transient credit is awarded only for courses
m in which the grade or "C-" or better is earned.

* Classification of Students

^ A student is classified as a first-year student if he or she has earned fewer
m than 30 hours of credit. A student is classified as a sophomore if he or she

has earned 30-59 hours of credit. To be classified as a junior, a student
^ must have completed 60 earned hours of credit. A student is classified as a

p, senior upon having earned 90 hours of credit. A student should be alert to

the fact that a minimum oi 1 20 hours is required for graduation and that
^ some majors may require more than 120 hours. Attaining these minimum
^ progression requirements may not be sufficient to insure graduation within the
^ two semesters of the senior year.

Academic Honors

+. Upon graduation, students who have been in residence at LaGrange

-* College for at least their last 60 hours (90 quarter hours for Evening
College students) and

1. have attained a quality point average of 3.50 to 3.74 ma\ be granted
the bachelor degree cum laude or

2. have attained a quality point average o[ 3.75 to 3.89 ma\ he granted
the bachelor degree magna cum laude or

3. have attained a quality point average of 3.90 to 4.0 m,i\ he granted the
bachelor decree sununa cum laude.

91

At the end of each academic semester, students who have maintained a
3.60 cumulative grade point average on a minimum of 12 GPA hours of
work will be placed on the Dean's List.

Upon graduation, students who have been in residence at LaGrange
College (as transfer students in the day program, in the Evening College, or
in the Albany program) for at least 42 semester hours (70 quarter hours)
and have attained a grade point average of 3.50 or higher may be granted
the bachelor degree with distinction.

Cultural Enrichment Requirement

Because the intellectual and cultural opportunities during one's college
years are exceptionally rich, and because exposure to a variety of cultural
experiences and participation in a lively collegial atmosphere during one's,
intellectually formative years are vital to the concept of a liberal education,
LaGrange College is dedicated to assisting in this enrichment by requiring
all students to accumulate a prescribed number of Cultural Enrichment
(CE) credits over the course of their careers. Of the CE credits required for
graduation, student must include at least four designated sustainability
events. Each semester a list of approved Cultural Enrichment programs,
lectures, presentations, events, performances, recitals, etc., will be
published in a brochure and on the college web page. Many of these events
will occur during the Contact Hour on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and some
will double as required programs in the CORE classes.

Because students at LaGrange College earn academic credit through their
attendance at Cultural Enrichment events, the Honor Council takes
seriously Honor Code violations relating to attendance at CE events. If you
must leave an event early, do not have your ID scanned. If your ID has
been scanned and you must leave unexpectedly, send a note to Dr. Sharon
Livingston, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, and she will remove the
credit for you. Our Cultural Enrichment programs offer unique
opportunities for education, edification, and enjoyment. Take advantage of
as many of these programs as you can, but, most importantly, do not take
credit for something you did not do.

Students will meet their CE graduation requirement according to the
following schedule. Attendance at athletic events will count towards the
total CE credits required for graduation based on the prorated scale listed.

92

Earned Hours CE Sustain- Maximum

Upon Entry to Credits abilitj \thletie(T.

Classification , a(;ran ^/ Needed to CEcredits (.edits

College Graduate Needed to Allowed

Graduate

New/Transfer
First-year

Transfer First-
year

1 runs tor
Sophomore

Transfer
Sophomore

Transfer Junior 60- 75 Sem. Hrs

0- 14 Sem Hrs.
15- 29 Sem Hrs.
30- 45 Sem Hrs.
46- 59 Sem. His.

40

4

6

35

4

5

30

3

4

25

3

4

20

2

3

15

2

2

10

1

1

Transfer Junior j&. 89 Sem His.

Transfer Senior >90SemHrs.

Graduation Rkquirkmknts

A student who enters LaGrange College under a given Bulletin generally
will he graduated under the core curriculum, hours requirement, and grade
point average requirements of that Bulletin. Major requirements are those
m force at the time a student formally declares a major. If a student
suspends his or her study and re-enters more than lour years later, he or she
will graduate under the requirements of the Bulletin in effect at the tune of
re-entry.

Students in their last year of college work must have an audit of their
course credits and planned courses examined upon pre-registration tor their
final semester m residence. This is called a "graduation petition." The
major adviser and the Registrar assist the student m completing this

petition. No student ma> participate in Commencement exercises 11 he or

she has not completed a graduation petition. Also, no student ma)
participate in Commencement unless all graduation requirements have
been certified as completed b) the Registrar and the Provost

Students at LaGrange College will participate in the evaluation of the
extent to which institutional education goals are being achieved. This
evaluation will be in both the core curriculum and the major. College-wide
assessment days for seniors are administered in October for December
graduates and March for May graduates. Dates and times can be found on
the Academic Calendar. For major assessments, consult the specific
majors for details.

Transcripts

Students are entitled to transcripts of their record free of charge. No
transcripts will be issued for any student under financial obligation to the
College. Transcript requests must be made in writing to the Registrar well
in advance of the time the transcript is needed. Transcripts will be issued
promptly; however, at the beginning and end of terms some delay may be
unavoidable. Unofficial transcripts may be obtained from the online
student module of the web.

Student Appeal of Academic Policy

Students may petition for exception to published academic policy. The
Academic Council reviews the petition.

Student Records and FERPA Regulations

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C.
1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student
education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under
an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.
FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's
education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she
reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level.
Students to whom the rights have transferred are "eligible students."

Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the
student's education records maintained by the school. Schools are not
required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great
distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the
records. Schools may charge a fee for copies.

94

Parents or eligible students have the righl to request thai a school
correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading, [f the

school decides IlOt to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then

has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still

decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right
to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the

contested information.

Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or

eligible student in order to release any information from a student's
education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those
records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following
conditions (34 CFR 99.31):

School officials with legitimate educational interest;

Other schools to which a student is transferring;

Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;

Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;

Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf o( the
school;

Accrediting organizations;

To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;

Appropriate officials in cases o[' health and safety emergencies; and

State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant
to specific State law .

Schools may disclose, without consent, "director)" Information such as a
student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors
and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents
and eligible students about director)' information and allow parents and
eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not
disclose director) information about them. Schools must not it \ parents
and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual
means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student
handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion ^\ each school.

For additional information about FERPA, v isit the follow Ing website:
http://w w w .ed.gov/rMhcy/geri/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.htm]

Academic Programs

Introduction

Faculty members and the staff of LaGrange College implement curricular
and co-curricular programs that contribute to the fulfillment of the mission
of the College and the quest for civility, diversity, service, and excellence.
Undergirding all the academic programs at LaGrange College is a
fundamental commitment to the liberal arts. The underlying philosophy of
liberal learning is found in all parts of the curriculum of the College but is
most obvious in the structure of the Core Curriculum, which serves as
foundation of the academic experience at the College. Baccalaureate
majors share the Core Curriculum, which represents just less than forty
percent of a student's formal study at the College. Specific courses within
the Core Curriculum are designed to integrate knowledge from diverse
disciplines.

Within a caring and ethical community, the total LaGrange College
program is designed to challenge and support students as they deal with
fundamental contemplations of self, world, and God. This program is
centered around the liberal arts curriculum, which provides engagement in
a breadth of scholarly disciplines and a foundation for a lifetime of
learning. Because of this orientation, students are given opportunities to
interpret and evaluate the influence of historical, cultural, artistic,
mathematical, scientific, and religious developments. They are exposed to
the modes of creative expression and participate in activities that foster
intellectual curiosity. Through a series of experiences allowing
examination of issues involving ethical reasoning, global awareness,
diversity, sustainability, civic knowledge and service, and personal
wellness, students have an opportunity to reflect upon and consider their
place in the world and their personal and social responsibilities.

96

The curriculum of LaGrange College is designed to improve students 1

creative, critical, and communicative abilities, as evidenced h> the
following outcomes:

Students will demonstrate creativity b> approaching complex problems
with innovation and from diverse perspectives.

Students will demonstrate critical thinking by acquiring, interpreting,
synthesizing, and evaluating information to reason out conclusions
appropriately.

Students will demonstrate proficiency in communication skills that are

applicable to any field of study.

Cork Program in the Liberal Arts

As a Methodist-related institution, LaGrange College otters an educational
experience which emphasizes the inter-relatedness of knowledge and the
importance of understanding and evaluating human experience. The Core
Program in the Liberal Arts (also known as the Common Core Program)
uses an interdisciplinary approach to develop the students' creative, critical
and communicative abilities. The specific objectives of the Core Program
are also noted elsewhere in this Bulletin (see "Core Program Integrative
Curriculum").

The Core Program is designed to be integrated with other courses during
the first three years of the student's experience at LaGrange College. The
forty-six semester hours included in the Core Program are dispersed in
three areas: foundation studies, integrative studies, and exploratory studies.
The thirteen hours of integrative studies, which bring an interdisciplinary
locus to the humanities, the social sciences, and problem solving, are
central to the entire Core Program. The interdisciplinar) courses First-
Year Cornerstone and First- Year Orientation provide the introduction and
foundation for the Core Program. No transient credit will be allowed tor
any Rhetoric and Composition course (ENGL 1101 or 1 102) or for the
Integrative Studies courses (Problem Solving, Computer Applications,
Humanities: Ancient through Medieval Age. Humanities: Renaissance to
Present. The American Experience).

97

Course Taken

Min. Credit Year

Foundation Studies 27 Hours

First- Year Cornerstone (CORE 1 101) *

First- Year Orientation (CORE 1 102) *

Rhetoric and Composition
(ENGL 1101, 1102)

Mathematics

(MATH 1 101, 2105, 2221, or 2222)
(Entry level by placement)

World Languages and Culture

(2 sequential courses in languages:

FREN, GERM, SPAN, JAPN, LANG)

Laboratory Science I and II 8

(BIOL 1 101-1 102, 1 107-1 108, 2148-2149;

CHEM 1101-1102;

PHYS 1 101-1 102; PHYS 2121-2122)

(BIOL 2148 & 2149 are mandatory for BSN students)

Integrative Studies 13 Hours

Problem Solving (CORE 1 120) 3

Computer Applications (CORE 1 140) 1

Two Humanities courses - a choice of two of these:
Humanities I (CORE 200 1 ) 3

Humanities II (CORE 2002) 3

3

First-year

1

First-year

6

First-year

First-year

as best scheduled

as best scheduled

as best scheduled

Sophomore
Sophomore

Humanities Exploration 3 as best scheduled

(Choose from list, if not used for another Core requirement such as
Fine Arts or American Experience) ANTH 1000, ARTD 1 109,
ARTD 1110, ARTD 1111, ENGL 2204, ENGL 2205, ENGL
2206, ENGL 2207, HIST 1 1 1 , HIST 1 1 02, HIST 1 1 1 1 , HIST
1112, LAST 1 104, LAST 2000, MUSI 1112, MUSI 2301, MUSI
2302, PHIL 1410, PHIL 2440, POLS 1 102, POLS 2210, POLS
2220, PSYC 1101, SOCI 1000, THE A 1 101, THEA 1 102, or
WMST 1101

The American Experience (CORE 3001 ) 3

Sophomore or
Junior

98

Exploratory Studios 6 Hours

Fine Arts 3 as best scheduled

(any beginning level classes in the Fine Arts Division that satisfy this
requirement are marked with an asterisk ( ) in the Art, Music, and /Inane
sections of this Bulletin)

Religion 3 as best scheduled

(RLGN 1 101, 1 102. 1 103, 1 104, or 1 105)

TOTAL (OKI: PROGRAM 46 hours **

* Transfer students with 30 or more hours may be exempted from the CORE
1 101/1 102 requirement.

Each .student is required to pass 3 Interim Term courses (one three semester
hour course per term) as port oj the graduation requirements. First-year
Students are required to enroll in an Interim Term cour.se. Students may elect
to complete 4 interim terms, and are encouraged to do .so. Consult
"Requirements for Bachelor Degrees: A Summary" in this Bulletin for details.

Placement

Appropriate placement in certain courses is essential. During the first tew
days on campus all students participate in placement evaluation
inventories. These inventories are necessary for 1 1 1 planning for majors

and careers. (2) providing comparison levels tor subsequent assessment of
the Core Program curriculum, and (3) determining current skill levels for
placement purposes. Placement in mathematics and English is based on
skills assessment or standardized lest scores. Students who are not
predicted to be successful in Mathematics 1101 are required to enroll in
Mathematics 0100. This is a pre-Core Program mathematics course, and
credit in this course does not count toward the fulfillment ol the 4n hours
of core requirements, but does count toward hours required tor graduation.
English placement is based on scores obtained on the Scholastic Aptitude
Test (SAT i. Based on scores obtained, students are placed in an
appropriate section (standard or honors) of English 1 101 (see description ol
English program).

Students entering I. aCrangc College with two (2) years ol high school level
foreign language are placed in an intermediate level course ol that
language; or it the Students choose, the\ ma\ Start the Stud) ol another
language at the beginning level. Any student tor whom English is not the

native language may have the language requirement waived b> submitting
a written request to the Registrar from the student's advisor, the Director ol

International Student Sen ices, or the Chair of the Humanities I)i\ ision.
Those students who are allowed to waive the language requirement must
still complete the minimum 1 20 hours for graduation.

oo

Assessment of the Core Program

During the first semester and again, prior to graduation, students take the
College's assessment exam designed to determine the extent to which
students have achieved the objectives of the curriculum of the Core
Program. Participation in this testing program is a requirement for
graduation with a baccalaureate degree.

Core Program, Time Restrictions

There is no time limit on the credit or validity of coursework in the Core
Program. It should be noted, however, that students who have not been
enrolled at LaGrange College for four years, or who transferred from
LaGrange College and subsequently return, enter the college under the
Bulletin in force at the time of re-entry.

Credit by Examination and Exemption

Students entering LaGrange College may earn a waiver of certain
requirements or college credit as a result of their participation in the
College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Program, the College-Level
Examination Program (CLEP), or the International Baccalaureate (IB)
Program. Advanced Placement credit is accepted for those students who
present evidence from their high schools that Advanced Placement courses
have been completed and appropriate scores earned on the advanced
placement test. To determine the AP test scores that qualify for college
credit and/or exemption, students should contact the Registrar. A CLEP
exam grade of "C" or better is needed to receive credit; only 6 CLEP
credit hours will be accepted for courses below the 3000-level. IB credit is
awarded for scores of 5, 6, or 7 on the Higher Level examinations, with the
exception of English as a Second Language. No credit is awarded solely
for earning an IB Diploma, for IB Standard Level exams, or for scores
below 5 on any Higher Level examination.

Applicants should submit requests for Advance Placement or International
Baccalaureate credit during the summer prior to enrollment. Official IB
transcript should be included with the student's final high school transcript.
Consultation with the academic departments or placement exams may be
required in some areas before final credit is awarded. If a waiver of
requirements is granted, the score on the examination used will be recorded
on the student's record in lieu of a letter grade.

100

Tin; Interim Program

The Interim is the class term held during the month of January for
approximately lour weeks. Courses offered in the Interim are designed to
encourage students to explore course content outside their majors. All
First-year students must successfully complete three of the lour Interim
terms offered during a typical Four-year course of study, lor students w ho
transfer to LaGrange College, reductions are made in this requirement
based on the academic standing of the student at entry.

All first-year students are required to register for an Interim class during
their first-year at LaGrange College. First-year students not pre-registered

for the Interim semester following their first tall semester must submit an
Academic Petition to the Vice President lor Academic Affairs and Dean.
Failure to complete an academic petition by Pall midterm or to register for
an Interim term class will result in a hold on pre-registration lor the
following Summer/Pall semester) s).

Due to the exploratory nature of the Interim term, departments are
encouraged to retrain from offering courses required in the major or
courses that are restricted to certain small groups of students. With this
intent, students can he exposed to opportunities of Study, thought, and
expression that are not available during the other semesters of the academic
year. To preserve the uniqueness of the Interim program, Interim term
courses are not offered during other semesters, core curriculum courses are
not offered during the Interim, and students may not repeat an Interim
course.

To he eligible for any Interim course, all academic, procedural, financial,
and other prerequisites must he met. Students who have been enrolled full-
time during the preceding fall semester ma> take an Interim course at no
additional charge for tuition, room, or board. lndi\ idual courses ma)
assess tees particular to the acth ities planned. The cosis listed in the
Interim course descriptions in the annual prospectus are the anticipated per-
participant charges for that particular class. Students are responsible tor

purchasing their own textbooks; most are available in the College
bookstore.

The primary Interim prospectus is distributed in earl) tall semester, with
pre-registration in late September for the upcoming January. Students are
encouraged to discuss any questions about courses with the indicated
instructors during the week prior to pre-registration. A separate
preliminary travel prospectus is distributed during the prior spring

semester, with an earl\ travel pie-registration period offered in late April.
II space is available in the courses, k may he possible to prc-rcgister for
travel courses during the fall pre-registration period also.

101

All Interim courses require a minimum of 120 clock hours per term of
student involvement. At the first class meeting in early January, the
instructor will provide guidelines for successful completion of the course
as well as a schedule of class meetings, assignments, and other necessary
information. Grading of Interim courses is based on the A-F scale or
Pass/No Credit. Instructors may allow students to choose between these
grading options.

During the Interim Term, LaGrange College offers several opportunities
for off-campus study which require travel, some of which include travel to
other states or travel beyond the United States. Being allowed to travel as
part of the curriculum of LaGrange College is a privilege; approval to
travel is not automatic but may be granted through the Office of the Interim
based on a completed application, including instructor permission and
references. Such travel inevitably involves risk - accident, injury, illness,
civil unrest, and other unforeseen circumstances. These risks are ones that
neither those who sponsor travel nor those who travel can control. In
recognition of these risks, a premium on a travel medical insurance policy
is included with the fees assessed for travel courses. Participation in such
an off-campus study program is purely voluntary on the student's part. As
a condition for participation, LaGrange College requires that student
travelers and their parents read and execute liability releases and other
documents which acknowledge, accept, and assume all risks. LaGrange
College expects that students and their parents will use their own due
diligence in informing themselves of current global conditions and in
determining whether they wish to engage in travel to given sites.

Teaching fellows program

The Teaching Fellows Program is a program that allows faculty members
to offer highly-qualified students opportunities to learn by sharing in the
instructional responsibilities for particular courses. Students enrolled in the
courses will have the added benefit of additional academic support.

The Teaching Fellow is given a sphere of responsibility so that learning
and teaching can be experienced as two aspects of the program. The
student's role differs from that of teaching assistants utilized by many
colleges and universities. Here the faculty sponsor is as involved as ever in
all aspects of the course. Involvement of a student in teaching/learning
participation in a particular course happens only if the faculty sponsor feels
that definite benefit to both the student and the course will result.

The Teaching Fellows Program is voluntary with each faculty member
determining which of his or her courses, if any, are appropriate for such

102

individual studies in teaching/learning. The type ol responsibilities and
extent of involvement of the student w ill vary depending on the course and
faculty sponsor. It may not be counted as a substitute for any of the
undergraduate teacher education requirements.

Students may be approached by faculty members to serve as a I eaching
Fellow or may initiate the process with approval from a sponsoring faculty
member along with other required signatures. This experience should be

reserved for those select leu students who have demonstrated appropriate
characteristics and academic excellence.

Students must he in iiood academic standing with a GPA of 3.5 or higher
and have attained at least junior status to serve as Teaching Fellows.
Additionally, students must have successfully completed the course for
which they will he serving as a Teaching Fellow. Students ma> earn 2
semester hours of credit lor this experience. The experience may be
repeated once; a new proposal must he submitted and approved tor each
experience. Evaluation will he awarded on a pass/fail hasis only. The
Teaching 1-cllow course designation is TCHA 4010.

5 The Library

r The print and electronic collections in the LaGrange College Librar)
fc support the curriculum and general information needs of students and

faculty. Included are more than 200,000 printed and electronic hooks, an

* excellent reference collection, a large DVD and CD collection, and

^ numerous full-text databases for all academic disciplines. Notable digital
collections include JSTOR, Project Muse, the Archive ol Americana, the

* Burney 17 and 18 Century British Newspapers, the London Times

^ Digital Archives. Psyc Articles, MathSciNet. ATLAS Religion Database.
CINAHL. ReferenceUSA, Access World News, plus man) more in
addition to the various databases available through ( 1AI II T( ).

Each year the librar) staff receives high marks on the annual Librar) surve)
by administrators, faculty, and students. The) regularl) provide both one-
on-one and course-specific librar) instruction. The librar) stafl is service

oriented and read\ to assist students and faculty.

L03

Endowed Lectureship

The Jennie Lee Epps Memorial Lectureship was revived in 1997 by a
gift from Dr. Grace Hadaway Boswell '49 and her husband, Dr. R. Dean
Boswell. Ms. Kate Howard Cross, professor of Latin, donated the originat-
ing gift for the Epps Lecture in memory of her friend and colleague, who
was professor of English for 28 years.

The Waights G. Henry, Jr., Endowed Lectureship was established by a
gift from the Neighbors Fund, Inc. in memory of Dr. Henry, president and
chancellor of LaGrange College for a period of 42 years. Income from the
endowment is used to fund the Waights G. Henry, Jr., lecture held during
Celebrate the Servant.

The Arthur H. Thompson Lectureship brings to the campus a noted
scholar to address the faculty and student body on the interrelationship of
religion and other fields of knowledge at the Opening Convocation. The
endowment was established by Ms. Mary Will Thompson, class of 1898, in
memory of her husband, who served as chair of the Board of Trustees of
the College. He expressed his philosophy in the statement: "The greatest
thing in life is the simple faith of an honest man."

Awards and Recognitions

The Nancy Alford Award is awarded each year to the sorority accumulat-
ing the greatest number of points in the areas of scholarship, leadership,
sportsmanship, and community service.

The Irene E. Arnett Drama Award is presented annually to the member
of the senior class who shows that greatest potential for contribution to the
field of theatre, devotion to the tasks in the theatre, and dedication to the
principles of good theatre - "to amuse the heart and lift the spirit to a better
understanding of man and his struggle in this world and towards his God."

The Needham Avery Art Award is a purchase award granted annually in
visual arts, provided by Dr. and Mrs. R.M. Avery in memory of their son.

104

The Josephine A. Case Scholarship is awarded to a junior for excellence

in art and promise of achievement m thai field. This award carries a stipend
and is associated with the Josephine A. Case Collection of American In-
dian Art which Ms. Case and her husband, the late Dr. I. eland I). Case of
Tucson, donated to LaGrange College. Both hold honorar) doctorates
from LaGrange College.

The Frances Marion Chalker Medlock Prize for Poetry is awarded to a

student or students exhibiting a profound love and appreciation of poetry in

memory of alumna Frances Marion Chalker Medlock l 53. The recipient! si
is/are selected b\ the Chair of the Department of English using criteria de-
veloped by the English faculty.

The Austin P. Cook Award is presented annually by the Student Govern-
ment Association to the organization that made the most positive impact on
campus life during the year.

The Mamie Lark Henry Scholarship Cup is presented each semester to a
sorority with the highest grade-point average the previous semester.

The Waights (i. Henry, Jr., Leadership Award is given annual!) h\ the

Student Government Association to a student who has actively demon-
strated effective leadership skills. Selection of the recipient is made b) a
committee composed of students, faculty, and administrators.

The John R. Mines, Jr. Undergraduate Research Award is presented

annually to a LaGrange College faculty member who makes an outstanding

contribution to undergraduate research and to an outstanding undergraduate
research project in each division.

The Karen Sue Kafrouni Award is presented annually by the History

Department to a member of Phi Alpha Theta and a graduating senior w ith
the highest academic achievement

The John Love Scholarship Cup is presented each semester to the frater-
nity with the highest grade point average the previous semester.

The Weston L. Murray Award is presented to the senior class member ol

the Georgia Delta Chapter of \ y \ Gamma Mu who has the highest record ol
achievement and contribution in the field of Social Science.

The Meri Meriwether Norris Award was established in l c ^s in tnemor)

of this 1980 alumna by her husband. Dr. Tomnn Norris. This award is
presented annually to a graduating nursing student who demonstrates ex-
traordinary compassion.

105

The Outstanding Achievement in Psychology Award is presented annu-
ally by the Psychology Department to the senior psychology major who,
through academic excellence and service, has made an outstanding contri-
bution to the field of psychology.

The Walter Malcolm Shackelford Award is presented annually to a
graduating senior who has majored in education and has demonstrated out-
standing academic performance, leadership, and service to the College.

The Annie Moore Smith Award is a purchase award given annually in
visual arts, provided by Ms. Rebecca Moore Butler, class of 1924, in mem-
ory of her sister, Annie Moore Smith, class of 1915.

The W. Lee Wilson, Jr., Art Award is presented annually by the Art De-
partment to a graduating senior who has excelled in the art of photography.
Mr. William L. Wilson established the award in 1998 in memory of his
son.

The Jean Young Award in Photography is granted annually, was estab-
lished in memory of Jean Young who was the first curator of the Lamar
Dodd Art Center. The award is a book on contemporary photography and is
presented to the student who has demonstrated an exceptional commitment
to photographic art.

Departmental Awards are presented annually at Honors Day in the
spring.

For a complete listing ofLaGrange College's Scholarships, please refer
to the Financial Aid website:
http://www.lagrange.edu/admission/finaid/scholarships.htm

106

The Major Programs

A major is defined as a primary program of study in w Inch the student
completes a designated number and sequence of courses within a specific
discipline, department or subject area. A major may or may not offer
concentrations for focused course work within the major.

A student may choose to pursue one of lour baccalaureate degrees: the
Bachelor o\ Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Music, or the
Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Majors can be declared at any tune.

Bachelor of Arts

Art and Design Mathematics

Biochemistry Music

Biology Political Science

Chemistry Psychology

Computer Science Religion

Education (Early Childhood) Sociology

English Spanish

History Theatre Arts

Bachelor of* Science
Accountancy
Biolog)

Business Management
Chemistry
Computer Science
Mathematics

Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Nursing

Bachelor of Music

Creative Music Technologies

Performance I voice, piano, organ, guitar, percussion i

Church Music

LaGrange College also offers graduate programs, in these programs,

students may complete the Master of Alts m Teaching, the Master of

Education in Curriculum and Instruction, or the Specialist in Education in
Curriculum and Instruction. Please refer to the Graduate Bulletin tor more
information about these programs.

LaGrange College at Alban) students ma) pursue the Master ol Arts m
Organizational Leadership. More information about this program is
available in the Bulletin tor LaGrange College at Albanv.

107

Interdisciplinary Major

The Interdisciplinary Major at LaGrange College allows highly motivated
students to pursue a self-designed, individualized program leading to a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Studies.

To be eligible to pursue the interdisciplinary major, a student must exhibit
a high-level of maturity and self-direction. A grade point average of 3.3 or
permission of the Provost is required at the time of submission of the
proposal. The major may be declared upon completion of 30 semester
hours, but no later than 69 semester hours.

Policies and Procedures:

1 . The proposed major must stem from at least two separate
disciplines, but no more than three, and be supportable by the
existing resources of the college.

2. The student must select an advisor in each discipline with one
agreeing to serve as the principal advisor.

3. The student must research and select classes totaling at least 36
semester hours that relate to the proposed major and justify the
inclusion of each course. At least 30 semester hours must be from
courses at the 3000 level or above.

4. The proposal must include a clear sense of where the
interdisciplinary major would lead the student (graduate school or
career possibilities). The proposal should also state why the
Interdisciplinary Studies Major better suits the student's needs than
existing majors/minors offered at LaGrange College.

5. The final major curriculum will be determined by the student in
consultation with all advisors. All general education requirements
must be met for graduation. The major must culminate in a
capstone paper or project approved by all advisors and supervised
by the principal advisor. The student must register for INDV 4499
during his or her senior year.

6. The student must complete the Interdisciplinary Studies Proposal
Form, which may be acquired from the Registrar's office. The
proposed major must be approved by all advisors, the Academic
Policies Committee and the Provost. It must also be filed with the
Registrar's office. Any changes to the approved curriculum must
have the approval of all advisors, the Academic Policies Committee
and the Provost. An amendment form with these approvals must be
submitted to the Registrar's office.

108

Major Requirements, Time Restrictions

Course work requirements in major programs necessaril) change in
response to evoh ing curriculum concerns and changing student needs.
Students' major requirements arc governed by the Bulletin in force al the

tunc of the declaration of the major. The declaration ol major is mmatcd

with the chair of the respective department.

At the discretion of the department chair, students maj be required to
demonstrate proficiency and/or currency in the subject matter if the major

course work is older than five (5) academic years. Normalk credit hours

earned m the major may not he applied to the completion of the major it

the hours earned are older than eight years, dated from the student's initial
matriculation.

Students who have been out of school longer than two years must again
declare their majors.

Independent Study in the Major

In certain majors, independent study courses are offered. These courses are
limited to upper-class major and minor students who have completed at
least two-thirds of their particular major or minor program, and w ho w ish
to pursue a special problem or course of reading beyond that taken up in
an) formal course and lying within the capabilities of the library and
laboratories. In order to be eligible lor independent study, the student must
have at least a 3.0 average in major courses. Total credit which can be
earned through independent study normally will not be more than si\
semester hours. Written permission to enroll in such a course must be
obtained from the instructor, the chair of the department concerned, and the
Provost A descriptive syllabus including the method of evaluation must
be submitted with the petition.

Assessment in the Major

The faculty members who are responsible lor instruction in the major

programs have identified specific objectives for a major in that discipline.

There is an assessment, devised b\ the facult) in the discipline that
determines the extent to which the objectives have been met b\ the student.
That assessment is a requirement tor students who graduated m June 1990,
or who will graduate thereafter. The assessment Styles are varied. Students
should caiefull) explore w nh their a^\\ iser in their intended major the
nature o! the assessment. \ satisfactory assessment in the major is a

requirement for the degree. The chair ol the department ottering the major
must certify satisfactory completion of the assessment component

109

Students who fail to complete satisfactorily the assessment in the major and
exhaust reassessment opportunities at the departmental level may appeal
the decision of the department as described in the Academic Procedures
and Regulations section.

Advice and Counseling in the Major

All students are assigned an academic adviser. Prior to the declaration of a
major a student is advised by a member of the faculty in a discipline related
to the student's area of interest. Subsequent to declaring a major, the
student and the department chair work together in planning a program. The
ultimate responsibility for selecting the proper courses in order to complete
the desired degree is the responsibility of the student.

Minors

Academic minors may be earned in most departments. A minor must
include at least 12 semester hours, 6 of which must be in 3000-level or
above courses. Some departments do not designate the courses required
for the minor, but the courses selected must be approved by the chair of
that department.

Pre-professional
Programs of Study

LaGrange College has a curriculum and environment that is well suited to
preparation for further study in fields such as medicine and engineering.
These programs include, but are not necessarily limited to, preparation for
the following areas.

Pre-Health Professions

For the pre-health professions (Dentistry, Medicine, Physician Assistant,
Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, and Veterinary Medicine), the advising team
is chaired by Dr. Nickie Cauthen and is composed of Dr. Cauthen, Dr.
Sarah Beth Mallory, and Dr. Melinda Pomeroy-Black. Students who plan
to major in biology and are interested in one of these professions should
consult with Dr. Cauthen for assignment to one of the team members.
Students in other majors who are interested in these professions should
consult their primary advisers for access to the advising team.

110

Dentistry

Students should consult frequent!) w ith their ad\ ising team member in
addition to their primary ad\ isors for then- majors. The pre-dental student
should select a major as early as possible and work toward the B.S. degree.

The pre-dental student should be familiar with the specific requirements

set by the dental schools to which he or she plans to apply. There is some

variation in the requirements of the various schools, but the minimum
requirements set by most schools of dentistry are:

English 6 semester hours

Biology with Lab 8 semester hours

Physics with Lab 4-8 semester hours

[norganic (General) Chemistry with Lab 8 semester hours

Organic Chemistry with Lab 8 semester hours

Biochemistry 4 semester hours

All applicants must complete the Dental Admission Test not later than the
October M testing preceding the year of desired entry Dental schools also
expect at least 50 hours of experience m the dental field, prclcrabK with a
single dentist. The student should keep records of dates, duration and type
of experience when involved in shadowing, volunteer, or paid work.

^ Medicine (M.D.)

p Students should consult early and frequently w ith their ad> ising team

member in addition to their primary advisers lor their majors. The pre-
medicine student should select a major as soon as possible and seek the
B.S. degree. Medical schools rarely accept candidates with less than the
baccalaureate degree.

The student should be familiar w ith the requirements of the several UK
schools to w Inch he or she plans to apply. Requirements \ ar\ someu hat in
the various medical schools, but the minimum requirements of most
medical schools are:

Biolog) with Lab 8 semester hours

Genera] Chemistry with lab 8 semester hours
Organic Chemistr) with Lab 8 semester hours

Physics 8 semester hours

Every applicant must take the Medical College Admission Test, preferably
in the spring or early summer preceding the submission of his or her
application to medical school, but no later than the early fall of that year.
Students should take General Chemistry (CHEM 1 101-1 102) as a First- or
Second-year student to be on-track for the MCAT exam, normally taken in
the spring or early summer of the Junior year. BIOL 1 107-1 108 with labs
is also suggested for first- or second-year students. Either general
chemistry or general biology should be taken in the first-year to stay on
track for timely graduation and application to medical school. Medical
schools also expect experience in the field of medicine. Students should
keep records of dates, duration and types of experience when participating
in shadowing or volunteer or paid work in a hospital, doctor's office, or
other medical facility.

Physician assistant (P.A.)

Students should consult early and frequently with their advising team
member in addition to their primary advisers for their majors. The pre-PA
student should select a major as soon as possible and seek the B.S. degree.
Most PA programs require completion of a baccalaureate degree.

The student should be familiar with the requirements of the several PA
programs to which he or she plans to apply. Requirements vary
significantly in the various PA programs, but the common requirements of
most PA programs are:

Biology with Lab 8 semester hours

General Chemistry with Lab 8 semester hours

Organic Chemistry with Lab 4 semester hours

Human Anatomy and Physiology 8 semester hours

Microbiology 4 semester hours

Every applicant must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE),
preferably 4-6 months preceding the submission of his or her application to
PA programs. Students should take General Chemistry (CHEM 1101-
1 102) and general biology (BIOL 1 107 and 1 108 with lab) as a First- or
Second-year students. Either general chemistry or general biology should
be taken in the first-year to stay on track for timely graduation. PA
programs also expect extensive direct patient care experience. Students
should begin acquiring this experience early and keep records of dates,
duration and types of experience for their applications.

112

Pharmacy

Students should consult early and frequentl) with their ad\ ising team

member in addition to then- primary ad\ isers for their majors, wink- the
admission requirements vary, the following is standard course work as a
minimum: CHEM 1 101-1 102, 2201-2202, BIOL 1 107-1 108, MATH 2221
and 1 1 14, PHYS 1 101, ICON 2201-2202, ENGL 1 101-1 I02,and6

semester hours each of 1 lumanilies and Social/Bcha\ loral Science. I'( )l S
1101 and HIST 1111 or 1112 may be required as well as electives to reach
60 semester hours. Acceptance to a pharmacy program depends on a
composite score of GPA, PCAT (Pharmacy College Admissions Test >. and
an interview, with the additional expectation thai the applicant will have
alread\ gained practical experience m a pharmacy.

Physical Therapy

A tew schools which offer training in physical therapy award a Bachelor's

degree alter successful completion of classroom and clinical work.
Students are admitted to such programs alter completion of o() semester
hours of work including approximately 12 hours in Humanities. 12 hours m
math and science. 12 hours in social science plus 24 hours in a major field
such as biology. Specific courses to prepare lor admission to individual
schools should be selected in consultation with the adviser.

\lan> schools have moved to the Doctor o\ Physical Therap) (DPI

degree. These schools require a bachelor's degree as well as completion of
the pre-physical therapy core. Typical prerequisite courses include
chemistry, physics, and biology sequences, statistics, psychology, and

sociology. Most schools look lor experience working with or obsen ing a
certified physical therapist. Students should keep records of dates and
duration of such experience.

Vi/ikrinary Medicine

Students should consult early and frequentl) w ith their ,u\\ ising team
member in addition to their pnmar\ ad\ isers lor their majors. I he pre-
veterinary student should select a major as earl\ as possible and work
toward the B.S. degree.

The pre-veterinar) student should be familiar with the specific

requirements of the school to which he/she plans to apply, as the\ \ar\
widel) between schools. The minimum requirements set bs most
veterinary medicine schools are as follows:

A ( iPA oi at least 2.8-3.2, depending on the schools to which the
student applies. .All courses should be completed with a grade ol I
better.

113

Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test.
This test should be taken no later than the September or December of
the year preceding the year of desired entry, depending on the schools
to which the student applies. The results should be received by a
school by anywhere from October 1 to January 15, depending on the
schools to which the student applies. It should be noted that some
schools also require GRE Subject Tests, such as the Biology and
Analytical Writing Subject Tests.

The following courses should be completed prior to entry into
veterinary school.

English 6 semester hours

Biology with Lab 8 semester hours

Advanced Biological Science* 8 semester hours

Physics 8 semester hours

Biochemistry 3 semester hours

Inorganic (General) Chemistry with Lab 8 semester hours

Organic Chemistry with Lab 8 semester hours

Math 6 semester hours

The upper-level course requirements typically include Cellular Biology,
Genetics, Microbiology, and Anatomy/Physiology; again, these vary
widely between schools.

Dual Degree Engineering Program

LaGrange College has an engineering preparation program designed to
provide a broad liberal arts background while preparing the student for a
professional engineering program. Dual Degree Engineering Programs
have been established with Georgia Institute of Technology and Auburn
University. Students accepted in the Dual Degree program will attend
LaGrange College for approximately three years (90 semester hours if
entering under this Bulletin) while they complete the Core Curriculum and
the engineering preparatory courses listed at the end of this section. After
satisfactorily completing these studies at LaGrange College, the student
will then attend the engineering institution and complete a major in
engineering, a process that generally takes two to three additional years.
After completion of the degree requirements for both institutions, the
student will receive an engineering degree in the selected engineering
discipline from the engineering institution and a Bachelor of Arts degree
from LaGrange College.

114

All students considering the Dual Degree Engineering Program should
contact the program adviser, Dr. Terr) Austin, prior to registration.

Students must complete all components of the Core c in hl iilum. including
the College's exit assessment exam before transferring to the engineering
institution.

Dual Degree Engineering students must satisfactorily complete all of the
following courses before attending the engineering institution:

Calculus I, Hand III
Differentia] Equations
Linear Algebra (GA Tech.)

Genera] Chemistr)

Genera] Physics I and II

Please note that calculus based physics <( reneral Physics PHYS 2121-
2122) is required. Students must begin the stud) ol calculus us carl) as
possible in order to he prepared tor the physics sequence.

Prk-skminary

The Church Leadership Concentration is designed to prepare students for
future careers m church service. Many of our graduates take positions in
Christian Education or Youth Ministry directl) after graduation. Others

enroll in seminaries as a preparation tor ordained ministry.

I aGrange College is one of onl) nine colleges in the nation that is
authorized b) the United Methodist Church to offer certification programs
in Youth Ministry and Christian Education. United Methodist students wh<
complete our Church Leadership program fulfill all of the educational
requirements needed tor professional certification in these fields.

Pre-Professional Advising

Journalism/Communigai ions

Many students believe that in order to prepare tor a career in journalism,
the) must earn an undergraduate degree in either journalism or
communications. Tins simpl) is not true. Most publications and graduate
professional programs do not require applicants to hold a bachelor's de

in those disciplines. What these employers and programs do insist upon is

115

that their applicants hold a liberal arts degree that promotes their abilities to
think, read, and write critically. Students at LaGrange College can prepare
themselves for a career in journalism or communications (or for graduate
studies in those fields) by:

majoring in a humanities/social science discipline such as English,
political science, or history AND

completing an English minor with a writing concentration, OR

designing an interdisciplinary major that blends courses from
disciplines pertinent to journalism and communications (see
"Interdisciplinary Major").

These students should also become actively involved in one or more of the
following student publications:

The Hilltop News (campus newspaper)

The Scroll (fine arts magazine)

Citations (scholarly journal of undergraduate research)

The Quadrangle (yearbook)

Law

The pre-law advising committee is chaired by Dr. Tracy Lightcap and is
composed of Dr. Lightcap, Professor Karie Davis-Nozemack, Dr. Kevin
Shirley, and Dr. Brenda Thomas. Students considering law school should
consult with one of these faculty members beginning in their first-year and
should meet regularly with other students interested in pre-law.

Students entering law school come from varied undergraduate programs. It
is not possible to say which major serves as the best preparatory
background for law school. Almost every law school bulletin, however,
suggests that entering students must have a strong background in history,
political science, and English as well as some preparation in economics,
business, sociology, psychology, and mathematics.

116

Summary List of Majors and Minors
Offered at LaGrange College

Accountancy

An and Design

Biology

Biochemistry

Business Management

Chemistr)

Church Leadership

Coaching

Computer Science

Education

English

French

I listor)

Inte rd i sc i p 1 inary S tudies

Internationa] Economics

Japanese Studies

Lathi American Studies

Lite rat n re

Mathematics

Music (B.A.)

Music (B.M.)

Nursing

( )ikus Program

Philosophy

Physical Education

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Major

Minor

\

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

\

X

X

X

X

X

X

\

X

\

X

117

Public History

Religion

Sociology

Spanish

Theatre Arts

Women's Studies

Writing

lajor

Minor

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Evening College degrees:

Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Business

Bachelor of Arts in Human Development

Students should not assume the privilege of automatic transfer from the
Day program to the Evening program. Students interested in changing
their enrollment classification from Day to Evening must complete an
Academic Petition indicating the reason for requesting the program
transfer. Before presenting to the Provost for consideration, the Petition
must be signed by the current academic advisor and the major advisor
of the Evening program into which the student desires to transfer. Note
that transfer between programs may only be requested one time during
a student's undergraduate career.

LaGrange College at Albany degrees:

Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership
Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership

Graduate degrees:

Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction
Master of Arts in Teaching
Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership
Specialist in Education in Curriculum and Instruction

118

Departments

Accountancy 142

Dr. Lydia Rosencrants

An and Design 124

Professor Marcia Brown

Biology 133

Dr. Sarah Beth Mallory

Business 142

Dr. Jon Birkeli

Chemistry 159

Dr. William McCoy

Computer Science 170

Dr. Fay Riddle

Core Curriculum 1 7<S

Dr. Sarah Beth Mallory

Education 180

Dr. Margie )'(iic.s

English \')2

Dr. Anthony Wilson

Health and Physical Education 204

Mr. Phil Williamson

History 21 1

Dr. Joe ( 'afaro

Japanese 220

Drs. DavidAhearn and Amanda Plumlee

Latin American Studies and Modern Languages 22 ;

Dr. Amanda Plumlee

Mathematics

Dr. Greg Met lanahan

Music

Dr. I om Anderson

119

Nursing 259

Dr. Celia Hay

Oikos Program 272

Dr. David Ahearn

Physics 275

Dr. Terry Austin

Political Science 277

Dr. Tracy Light cap

Pre-Professional Programs 1 10

Dr. Nickie Cauthen

Psychology 285

Dr. Chuck Kraemer

Religion and Philosophy 290

Dr. John Cook

Sociology and Anthropology 298

Dr. Frank O 'Connor

Theatre Arts 305

Professor Kim Barber Knoll

Women's Studies 312

Dr. Amanda Plumlee

120

Academic Divisions,
Departments, and Courses

Fine and Performing Arts Kim Barber Knoll. Chair

Professors'. Anderson, Barber Knoll, Brown, Joiner,

l.au rence, Taunton
Associate Professors'. Johnson, Reneke, Tomsheck, Turner
Assistant Professors: Ogle, Poteat

Tins Division, offering B.A. and B.M. decrees, includes the Departments
of An and I )esign, Music, and Theatre -Arts.

Core E > rograni and Interim Term Sarah Beth Mallory, Director

Humanities and Social Sciences Kevin Shirley, (hair

Professors: Ahearn. Cafaro, Cook. Dulin-Mallory, Garrison,

Lightcap, Luo, Plumlee, Scott. Slay, Thomas,

Williams
Associate Professors: O'Connor. Shirley, Tures. Wilson

Assistant Professors: Appleby, Brevik, Lingenfelter, Thurman

This Division, offering the B.A. degree, includes the Departments of
English Language and Literature. History, Latin American Studies and
Modern Languages, Political Science. Religion and Philosophy, and
Sociology and Anthropology.

Professional Programs Maranah Sauter, Chair

Professors: Birkeli, Nowakowski, Sauter

Associate Professors: Bearden, Blair, Hay, I). Livingston,

Rosencrants, Williamson, Yates

Assistant Professors: Alexander. Barber, Cason, Crowe. I )a\ is-

No/emack. (ieetcr. Kovack, McMullen. ( Mom.
Truitt

This I )i\ ision includes the follow ing I )epartments:

Department of Accountancy offering B, S. degrees;

Department of Business offering B. A. and B. S. degrees;

I )epartment of Education offering B. v. M. \ I . M 1 d., Ids. degi

Department ol Health and Physical Education;

Department ol Nursing offering B.S.N, degrees.

121

Science and Mathematics Greg McClanahan, Chair

Professors: Evans, Kraemer, Mallory, McClanahan, McCoy,

Paschal, Riddle, Shelhorse, C. Yin, W. Yin

Associate Professors: Cauthen, Haas, Hall, Hwang, Mallory

Assistant Professors: Austin, J. Ernstberger, S. Ernstberger,

Pomeroy-Black

Visiting Assistant Professor: Parker

Visiting Instructor: Colvin

The Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division, offering B.A. and B.S.
degrees, includes the Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Physics,
Computer Science, Mathematics, and Psychology.

Course Numbering System and Abbreviations

The projected schedule of course numbering will be followed insofar as
possible, but is subject to change. The number in parentheses following the
course title indicates the number of semester hours credit for the course.

Courses numbered 1 100 through 1 199 are intended primarily for first-year
students and sophomores.

Courses numbered 2200 to 2299 are intended primarily for sophomores.

Courses numbered 3300 through 3399 and above are intended primarily for
juniors and seniors.

Courses numbered 4400 through 4499 are intended primarily for seniors.

122

Abbreviations

Accountancy A( !( I

Anthropology AN I H

An and Design AR 1 1)

Biolog) BIOL

Chemistr) CHEM

Computer Science ( SCI

Core (OKI.

Economics ECON

Education EDUC

English ENGL

Finance FNCE

French FREN

German GERM

Health and Physical Education HIM. I)

Physical Education PEDU

History HIM

Japanese Studies JAPN

Languages LANG

I. aim American Studies I VST

Library Science I.1I1K

Management \1( i\l I

Marketing MRKT

Mathematics \1 VI H

Music MI SI

Nursing Ml fRS

Oikos Program OIKS

Philosophy IMIII

Physics PHYS

Political Science POl S

Psychology rs^ C

Religion Rl GN

Sociology s( )( I

Spanish SPAN

Theatre Arts mi \

Women's Studies w Ms I

123

ART AND DESIGN

Mission

The Department of Art and Design at LaGrange College is committed to
education in the visual arts within the stimulating environment of the
College's art museum, galleries and studios. We believe the visual arts are
necessary to the growth and well being of a purposeful society. We teach
that excellence in life includes an appreciation of the arts and an ability to
make aesthetic judgments by providing a technical education in a nurturing
environment.

We are a dedicated faculty of practicing artists and art historians who
foster learning in a liberal arts tradition that challenges our students to
bring form to their evolving creative, written and oral abilities.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of a degree in Art and Design, the student should:

Demonstrate growth in creativity, self-expression, and technical skills
through the realization of a body of work (studio concentration students);

Demonstrate an understanding of art history;

Demonstrate the ability to communicate about the visual arts, both orally
and in writing.

Assessment of learning objectives

Sophomore Review All studio department faculty evaluate sophomore
portfolios according to a standard rubric. Evaluation includes an
assessment of students' writing and oral skills based on statements and
critiques (studio concentration students).

Senior Exit Review All studio department faculty evaluate senior
exhibitions according to a rubric containing course objectives. Evaluation
includes an assessment of students' writing and oral skills based on
statements and critiques (studio concentration students).

Participation in the Art History Forum or other public presentation of
research (art history and museum studies concentration students).

124

Concentrations

The Department of An and Design offers major concentrations in
painting/drawing, graphic design, ceramics/sculpture, photography, art
history, and in art history/museum studies. The courses required of the
concentration are specific and scheduling should be determined in
consultation with an art faculty advisor. A student ma) choose a studio
concentration in more than one area.

Minor

A minor in Art and I )esign, Art I listory/Museum Studies consists ol 18

semester hours: at least one course in art history, at least one course at the
1000 level, and 4 other courses selected in consultation with the minor

ad\ isor.

Awards

The Art and Design Department presents several awards annually during
Honor's Day Convocation. Some are cash awards, and others are purchase
awards that allow the college to acquire works ol art b) the award
recipients. The faculty of the Art and Design Department present these
awards to students tor superior performance and a proven commitment to
their craft.

Requirements for a Studio Concentration Major
in Art and Design:

9 hrs. Art Historj ARTD 1 109, 1 1 10. 1 1 1 1 or an Art Histor) elective

9 hrs. Foundation Core ARID 1151. 1152. 1153

These courses should he taken during the first-year/sophomore
year as the) are prerequisites lor all studio courses.

12 hrs. Introductory Studio ( !ourses: ( me course from each of the

follow ing studio disciplines:

Painting or I )raw ing

Graphic Design or Printmaking

Photograph)

Ceramics or Sculpture

( > hrs. Major Concentration Three additional courses in one ol the

above disciplines.

3 hrs. Studio ( Oiuint ration

42 I otal hours required

125

Requirements for a Concentration
in Art History:

6 hrs. Art History Survey I and II - ARTD 1 1 09, 1 1 1

21 hrs. Art History courses - ARTD 1 1 1 1, 3101, 3102, 3103, 3105,
3106, 3107, 3108 The Art of Greece and Rome, Art of the
Renaissance, Art of the Baroque, Art of the Nineteenth Century in
Europe and America, Modern and Contemporary Art, Art of the
Non-Western World, Museum Studies I, Museum Studies II.

6 hrs. Studio Courses

3 hrs. Internship or Independent Study in Art History

3 hrs. Senior Seminar - ARTD 3380 A course in which senior art

history and museum studies students work on research and writing
skills. They also prepare a resume and focus on applying to
graduate school.

39 Total hours required

Requirements for a Concentration
in Art History/Museum Studies:

6 hrs. Art History Survey I and II - ARTD 1 109, 1 1 10

18 hrs. Art History electives - ARTD 1111, 3103, 3105, 3106,
3107,3108

The Art of Greece and Rome, Art of the Renaissance, Art of the
Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries in Europe and America, Art
of the Nineteenth Century in Europe and America, Modern and
Contemporary Art, Art of the Non-Western World.

3 hrs. Studio Coursework - Three courses in elective studio

6 hrs. Museum Studies I and II - ARTD 3101, 3102

3 hrs. Internship

3 hrs. Senior Seminar - ARTD 3380 A course in which senior art

history and museum studies students work on research and writing
skills. They also prepare a resume and focus on applying to
graduate school.

39 Total hours required

126

Course Descriptions (ARID)

; > ARTD 1109 Art lliston Sur\n 1.(3) Fall

This course surveys the histor) of Western art and architecture from the

Paleolithic period through the Gothic era.

: AK ID 1 1 10 Art History Sm\rv II. (3) Spring

Tins course surveys the history of Western art and architecture from the
earl) Renaissance to the beginning of the 20 century.

i :AR 1 1) 1111 Modern and Contemporary Art History. (3)
This course surveys the development of Western art from the beginning ol
the 20 through the early 21 century.

ARTD 1151 Basic Drawing. (3) Fall

A course in the fundamentals of perceptual drawing, including line, value,

composition and perspective.

\IMI) 1152 2-1) Design. (3) Spring
A stud> of the basic design elements and principles. Emphasis on creative
problem solving and development of unified designs. A study of color
theor) and relationships is included.

\KTI) 1153 3-D Design. (3) Fall

Tins course explores the fundamentals of three-dimensional form using
various materials such as wood, clay, plaster, paper, etc. Craftsmanship,
creative thought, and transformation o( ideas into form while becoming

familiar w nil proper use of tools and equipment is also emphasized.

ARTD 2201 Graphic Design Fundamentals. (3) Fall
An introduction to the fundamentals ol graphic design, emphasizing
typography and layout Basic Macintosh computer skills covered,
including working \\ uh fonts, system basics, printers and sen ice bureaus,
and understanding file formats.

ARTD 2211 Life Drawing. (3) Spring

A course in the stud) of human anatom) and the expressive potential ol the
human form. Drawing from the model, both nude and clothed, and from
the skeleton using a variet) ol drawing media.

Prerequisite: ARTD 1151 (Basic Drawing) or permission ol

instructor

ARTD 2222 Graphic Design Logos and Concepts. (3) Spring
A course exploring the development of graphic ideas through projects in
advertising, layout, corporate identity, magazine and poster design.
Students are exposed to basic concepts of logo design.

Prerequisite: ARTD 2201 or consent of instructor

*ARTD 2223 Basic Photography. (3) Fall
An introductory course in photography in which both silver (film and
paper) and digital (pixel and pigment) based materials are used. The
course begins with the mechanics of the camera, exposure of film and
digital file, darkroom procedures of film and printing processes from the
negative as well as pigment printing and manipulation from digital files.
Students are required to have a digital camera with manual control of
focus, f-stops and shutter speeds. Cameras for film processing will be
provided. Film, photographic and pigment print paper and presentation
materials are the responsibility of the student.

ARTD 2224 Documentary Photography. (3) Spring
A course in documentary photography in which the student is assigned
projects to illustrate narrative issues relevant to contemporary social
concerns utilizing both silver and digital based materials. An introduction
to the history of documentary photography and the study of the stylistic
techniques of contemporary photojournalism is included.

*ARTD 2227 Ceramics-Methods and Materials. (3) Fall
This course is an introduction to ceramic methods and techniques. It
explores both wheelthrowing and hand building used in forming vessels
and sculpture. This includes using the potter's wheel, slabs, coils, textures
to create form. Glazing, decoration and firing methods are explored.

*ARTD 2229 Ceramics-Wheelthrowing. (3) Spring
This course is an introduction to basic wheelthrowing techniques,
beginning with centering and opening then progressing to pulling basic
cylindrical forms, teapots and bottles. Glazing, decoration and firing
methods are also included.

ARTD 2271 Beginning Painting. (3) Fall
An introduction to painting with acrylics or oils. Projects explore the
fundamentals of composition and modeling with color and light, as well as
abstraction and mixed media.

Prerequisite: ARTD 1151 (Basic Drawing)

128

MM I) 2272 Sculpture L (3) Spring

The projects in this class address both traditional and contemporary issues

in sculpture such as figure modeling, carving, and narrative imagery.

\K II) 2273 Printmaking I. (3) Fall

\ course in the basics oi intaglio and relief printmaking techniques,
exposure to selected [Mint and hook arts media, and the development of

ARID 3101 Museum Studies I. (3) Fall

In addition to textbook study . students actively engage in the actn ities ol

the I .amar I )o^\d .Art ( 'enter: cataloguing tiie collection, organizing and
hanging exhibitions, and overseeing the gallery's daily acti\ ities. Students

\isit area museums not only to \ leu their collections and special
exhibitions, but also to learn from museum personnel about the functioning
of a museum.

AKTI) 3102 Museum Studies II. (3) Spring

This course traces the history of museums, discusses contemporary practice
in museums, and examines current issues in Museology. It explores the
museum's mission and its role in society through case studies and
exhibitions m a variety of museums: art, living history, history, children's,
and ethnographic.

VRTD3103 The Art of Greece and Rome. (3) Spring
This course focuseson die art of Greece and Rome, emphasizing the

historical and cultural context of the works studied.

\K ID 3105 Art of the Renaissance. (3) Fall

This course focuses on the painting, sculpture, and architecture ot the
Renaissance, considering works in their historical and cultural context.

\k 1 1)3106 \rt of the Baroque. (3) Spring

This course examines works ol painting, sculpture, and architecture created

m Western Europe and in the United States during the seventeenth and
eighteenth centuries and explores the cultural and historical circumstances

of their creation.

\K I'D 3107 Kit of the Nineteenth Century In Europe and America.

(3) ball

I Ins course tonuses on the painting, sculpture, photography, and graphics

ol the nineteenth century in Europe and America.

129

*ARTD 3108 Art of the Non-Western World. (3) Spring

This course treats the art of non-western cultures: South and Southeast

Asia, China, Japan, Korea, Pre-Columbian America, Africa, and Oceania.

ARTD 3222 Digital Imaging. (3) Spring

A course dealing with the art of computer technology, with emphasis on
photographic image manipulation. Emphasis is placed on developing
creative personal imagery. Access to a digital camera irequired.

ARTD 3301 Advanced Graphic Design. (3) Fall
This course explores advanced design principles in such areas as web
design, applied surface design, and advanced topics in typography and
layout. The course is designed to assist students in developing a portfolio
of their work.

Prerequisites: ARTD 2201, ARTD 2222, preferably ARTD 3222

ARTD 3311 Advanced Life Drawing. (3) Spring

Advanced work with the figure in projects exploring composition and

subjective expression.

Prerequisite: ARTD 221 1

ARTD 3323 Advanced Photography I. (3) Fall
Advanced work in image manipulation in which creative photographic
techniques are employed using both silver and digital/pigment based
materials. Emphasis placed on expressive and technical elements that go
into the making of a personal vision. Students may work digitally or with
film using a variety of formats.

Prerequisite: ARTD 2223

ARTD 3324 Advanced Photography II. (3) Spring
Independent work in photographic concepts dealing with the student's
interest in documentary, commercial, or expressive photography using
either silver or digital media. A portfolio of twenty to thirty prints with a
cohesive theme is required at the end of the semester.
Prerequisite: ARTD 2224

130

VRTD3327 Ceramk Concepts. (3) Fall

This course emphasizes ceramic design using hand building and/or

wheelthrowing techniques. Projects are flexible in their construction

method in order to accommodate different ability levels and interests.

Projects with commercial potential such as lamp bases, teapots, covered

jars and tile, etc. are explored. ( Hazing, decoration and Firing methods are

emphasized.

Prerequisite: ARID 2227 or ARID 2229 or consent ol instructor

\R ID 3329 Ceramic Design. (3) Spring

This course is designed to allow the student to explore design, construction

and firing methods covered in previous ceramic classes.

Prerequisites: AK II ) 2227 or ARM ) 2229 or consent ol
instructor

ARTI) 3341 Internship. (3-9) Fall, Interim. Spring
A supervised experience m an off-campus professional environment such
as a photography studio, a surface or graphic design studio, or a museum or
galler) administrative oil ice.

ARID 3351 -3352 Studio Concentration. (3-6) I all and Spring

This is an advanced intensive course in which art students bring into focus
their studio interest and produce a body of work in one or two disciplines
leading towards their exit exhibition. The course ma\ include discussion
a\k\ readings in contemporary art theor) and criticism, field trips to
conferences, museums and galleries, and the creation of a personal artist's
statement and \ itae. Students are expected to produce a portfolio of then-
work that can be used to appl) for a job application and tor graduate Study.
This course requires that the student receive permission from the studio
professor/professors in which the) plan to concentrate. This course ma> he
repeated tor credit and a student ma_\ receive a maximum of 12 credit
hours.

Prerequisite: Consent oi instructor instructors

\R ID 3371 Intermediate Painting. (3) I all

Intermediate work in either acrylics or oils. Projects w ill allow for the

development of personal imagery, experimental approaches to the media.

and other advanced concepts.

Prerequisite: ARID 22^1

131

ARTD 3372 Sculpture Methods II. (3) Spring
This course is designed to allow the student to independently explore ideas,
methods and techniques covered in previous sculpture classes.
Prerequisite: ARTD 2272

ARTD 3373 Printmaking II. (3) Fall

A continuation of Art 2273 including advanced exploration of color prints
and other selected print and book arts media.
Prerequisite: ARTD 2273

ARTD 3375 Advanced Painting. (3) Spring

A further exploration of either oils or acrylics. Students develop a series of
paintings that explore specific imagery, materials, or techniques.
Prerequisite: ARTD 2271

ARTD 3380 Special Topics. (3) On demand
A special topics course designed to provide students with exposure to
topics in either studio work or art history/museum studies not covered in
the regular course offerings.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor

ARTD 4495 Independent Studies. (3) On demand
Prerequisite: consent of instructor

* Denotes courses in Art and Design that may satisfy Fine Arts
requirements in Core Curriculum

$ Denotes courses in Art and Design that may substitute for a CORE
Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

132

BIOLOGY
Introduction

The Biology curriculum pm\ ides a broad base ol know ledge ol biology
while improving the creative, critical, and communicative abilities ol
students. Biology, the study of life, is intriguing to students on a
fundamental level because il is essentially the stud) of themselves, their
bodies, and the living world around them. The biology faculty works with
their majors to help them develop an understanding and working
know ledge o\ the life phenomenon at subcellular through organismal
levels, w ithm the major, a student may elect to emphasize human biolog) .
Field-oriented biology, or biochemical and microscopic aspects ol life
science.

Mission

The Biology Department provides students with the opportunity to explore,
understand, and explain the unity, diversity, and complexity ol life.

Goals

The Biology Department strives to

lao\ ide opportunities for all students to understand the nature ol
science, to improve then' scientific literacy, and to develop a greater
knowledge of and appreciation for living systems.

Pro> ide a broad-based biology curriculum for students w ho pursue
degrees in biology, providing them with the background needed for
post-graduate study and the guidance to inform their choices.

Pro> ide a supportive and nurturing en\ ironment for faculty in w hich
they can develop teaching expertise as well as engage in discipline-
specific research and scholarship.

Pro> ide collaboration opportunities for student-faculty research,
including the necessary equipment, space, and funding.

Provide opportunities for students to develop then' abilities in critical
and creative thinking and effective communication.

133

Learning Objectives for the Major

The Biology Department offers a curriculum which will provide the basis
for all students majoring in biology to be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge in major fields of biology.

Demonstrate effective communication skills using both written and
oral formats.

Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking and the ability to
creatively address issues in the biological sciences.

Demonstrate competency in reading primary literature in the biological
sciences.

Demonstrate mastery of basic laboratory and/or field skills and
techniques.

Apply the scientific method to answer questions in the biological
sciences.

Effectively collect and analyze data and to creatively solve problems in
the biological sciences.

Work collectively and collaboratively on group projects in the
biological sciences.

Demonstrate an appreciation of the role of science in society.

Methods of Accomplishing Objectives

The student is presumed to have accomplished the specific collection of
objectives by satisfactorily completing the courses which constitute his/her
major. In addition to the Core Curriculum, all biology majors are required
to successfully complete Principles of Biology I and II (BIOL 1 107 and
1 108) and Principles of Biology I and II Laboratory (BIOL 1 107 L and
BIOL 1 108 L); General Chemistry I and II (CHEM 1 101 and 1 102); one
course in Mathematics in addition to the Core math requirement, chosen
from MATH 1 1 14 (Statistics), MATH 2105 (Precalculus), or MATH 2221
(Calculus I); one course in the cellular-level biology category; one course
in the organismal-level biology category, and the Senior Seminar (BIOL
4470). Students may count no more than one accepted upper-level course
taken as a transient student at another institution as one of the biology
major courses.

134

The department offers two degree tracks beyond these basic courses: the
Bachelor of Arts in Biology I B.A. I and the Bachelor ol Science in
Biolog) (B.S.). Additionally, the department offers a Minor in Biology.
The requirements for each of these are as follow s:

Bachelor of Arts in Biolog}

( lore Curriculum

BIOL 1 107. 1 1()7 L, 1 108, and 1 108 L

(HIM 1 101 and 1 102

Choice of MATH I 1 14. MAUI 2105, or MATH 2221

( !hoice of one cellular-level biolog) course I BI( )I $32 1 .

3322, 3360, 3370, 3372. 3373. 3374. 3376)

Choice ol one organismal-level biolog) course (BIOL
$334, 3335, 333(1 3331. 3353, 3384)

BIOL4470 Senior Seminar

6 additional upper level biolog) courses (Biochemistr) I.
CI EM 442 1 . may be chosen as one of these courses. BIOL
214s or 2149 may be counted as one of these courses.)

This represents 44 semester hours of COUTSework m addition to the Core
requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Biolog)

Core Curriculum

BIOL 1 107. 1 107 L. 1 108, and 1 108 L

CHEM 1 101 and 1 102

Choice of MATH 1 1 14. MATH 2105, or MATH 2221

Choice of one cellular-level biolog) course (BIOl 3321,
3322. 3360, 3370. 3372. 3373, 3374, 3376)

Choice of one organismal-level biolog) course I BI( M
3334. 3333. 3336, 3351, 335 \ $384)

( Organic Chemistr) I (CHEM 2201 1 and ( Organic Chemistr)
II (CHEM 2202) '

Introductory Physics I (PHYS 1 101 I and Introductor)
Physics II (PHYS l 102)

BIOL4470 Senior Seminar

5 additional upper level biolog) courses i Biochemisti") I.
( I II M 442 1 . ma) be chosen as one ol these course

BI( )l 2 148 or 2 14- ma) be counted as one ol these

courses, i
This represents 56 semester hours ofcoUTSework in addition to the I
requirements.

Minor in Biology

BIOL 1 107, 1 107 L, 1 108, and 1 108 L or BIOL 2148 and
2149

Choice of one cellular-level biology course (BIOL 3321,
3322, 3360, 3370, 3372, 3373, 3374, 3376)

Choice of one organismal-level biology course (BIOL 3334,
3335,3336,3351,3353,3384)

2 additional upper level biology courses

Declaration of Major

Before declaring a major in biology, a student must successfully complete
an introductory biology major sequence of BIOL 1 107, BIOL 1 107L,
BIOL 1 108 and BIOL 1 108L with a C or better in all courses.

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Students graduating with degrees in biology will complete the
departmental comprehensive exit exam. Through this exam and the
departmental exit interview, students will demonstrate their completion of
the objectives of the major. The Biology Department uses these
departmental assessments and the success of its graduates in the job
market and in advanced study as a gauge of the applicability of its goals
and the success of its students in attaining these goals.

Career Options

Graduates of the College who have majored in biology typically pursue
careers in teaching, pharmacy, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine,
or physical therapy. In addition, many graduates find employment in
industry - some in laboratories, some in management, and others in
research and development. Most careers require further formal study in
graduate or professional schools.

Combined B.A. and M.A.T Program of Study

Undergraduate students who meet the admission requirements for the
Master of Arts in Teaching [M.A.T] (passing GACE Basic Skills or a
combined SAT score of more than 1000) and those who have a GPA of
3.0 or higher in their undergraduate studies are eligible to participate in a
combined B.A. and M.A.T. program of study after the completion of 90
semester hours. Once accepted, candidates may take entering cohort
graduate courses the Summer Semester following their junior year of
study. Upon gaining senior status, candidates may take one three credit
graduate course during the Fall, Interim, and Spring Semesters only if
enrolled with twelve undergraduate credits.

136

Course disc rum ions (BIOL)

BIOL 1101 General Biolog) I. (3) Fall
This is the beginning Biolog) course for non majors. General Biolog)
deals w iih the phenomenon of life as manifested in .ill t) pes oi li> ing
organisms. The origin oi life, chemistry oi life, cellular and tissue
organization, metabolism, cell division, genetics, gene action, and
functioning of the organ \\ stems are among topics covered in ( leneral
Biolog) .

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: BIOL l 101 I

BIOL 1101 L General Biolog) I Laboratory. (1) Fall

This laboratory course is designed to complement and to pros ide

experiential learning for General Biolog) 1.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: BIOL 1101

BIOL 1 102 General Biolog) II. (3) Spring

This course is a continuation of General Biolog) I.

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 101
Corequisite: BIOL 1102L

BIOL 1 102 I. General Biolog) II Laboratory. (1) Spring

This laboratory course is designed to complement and provide experiential
learning for General Biology II and Is a continuation of General Biolog) I
Laboratory .

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 101

( orequisite: BIOL 1 102

BIOL 1107 Principles of Biolog) L (3) Fall
An introductor) biolog) course for science majors that includes biological
chemistry, cell structure and function, energ) transfer, cell cycle, mitosis,
and meiosis.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: BIOL 1 1071

BIOL 1107 1. Principles of Biolog) I Laboratory. (1) Fall

I aborator) expei ience for science majors to accompan) topics from BK )I

1 107. This course focuses on the scientific method, data acquisition,

manipulation and analysis, and presentation of results.
Prerequisite: None
( orequisite: BIOL 1 107

BIOL 1 1 08 Principles of Biology II. (3) Spring
A continuation of introductory biology for science majors. Topics include
Mendelian and molecular genetics, gene expression, evolution,
biodiversity, physiology, and ecology.

Prerequisite: BIOL 1107

Corequisite: BIOL 1108L

BIOL 1108 L Principles of Biology II Laboratory. (1) Spring
Laboratory experience for science majors to accompany topics from BIOL
1 108. This course focuses on the scientific method, data acquisition,
manipulation and analysis, and presentation of results.

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 107

Corequisite: BIOL 1108

BIOL 2148 Human Anatomy and Physiology I. (4) Fall

A study of the structure and function of the human body. Designed for pre-.

nursing majors.

Prerequisite: None

BIOL 2149 Human Anatomy and Physiology II. (4) Spring
A continuation of Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2148

BIOL 3320 Medical Microbiology. (4) Spring
A study of human disease caused by pathogenic microbes and helminthes.
Designed for pre-nursing majors. Laboratory activities focus on bacteria as
model organisms.

Prerequisites: BIOL 2148 and 2149 (may be concurrent) or

permission of instructor

BIOL 3321 Microbiology. (4) Odd years
A study of the morphology, physiology, classification, ecology, and
economics of microbial forms, especially bacteria and fungi.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107, 1 107 L, 1 108 and 1 108 L

BIOL 3322 Immunology. (4) Spring (even years)

A study of the fundamentals of immunology, with an emphasis on tissues

of the immune system, control and cellular interactions of the healthy

immune system. Topics of study will include dynamics of B cell and T cell

interactions with pathogens. The mechanisms of the hallmarks of the

immune system, including memory, diversity and specificity, are also

discussed.

Prerequisites: BIOL 3360 or BIOL 3372 or BIOL 3374 or

permission of instructor

138

BIOL 3334 General Ecology. (4) Spring
An introduction to the basic principles and concepts oi ecolog) u nh
emphasis on environmental sampling, analysis and characterization.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107, 1 107 I . 1 108, and I ins l

BIOL 3335 General Zoology. (4) Fall (even years)

A ph) logenetic approach to the Animal kingdom follow Ing cladistic

principles. Emphasis is placed upon representative animal groups and the

position of Animalia w ithin the domains ol life. Studies of local faunae arc

highlighted.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107. 1 107 I.. 1 108, and 1 108 I

BIOL 3336 General Botany. (4) Fall u>dd years)
\ phylogenetic survey of the kingdom Plantae. Cladistic principles arc
followed while discovering the position of plants among the other forms of
life. Certain plant-like protists arc also covered in the course.

Characteristics, contributions and life cycles of major groups arc
emphasized. Lab work is strongly oriented toward the local florae.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107. 1 107 1.. 1 108, and 1 108 L

BIOL 3351 Vertebrate Embryology. (4) Spring

A study of the embryological development of representative vertebrates,

with laboratory emphasis upon the chick and pig.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107. 1107 I.. 1 108, a\k\ 1 1 OS Lor

BIOL2148and 2149

BIOL 3353 Fundamentals of Evolutionary Theory. (4) Spring

A balanced surve) of the present-da) concepts of the processes and
products of evolution with emphases on 1 1 contrasting models and their
consequences. 2 i mass extinctions, 3 i evolution of man. 4 | methods ol
science and pseudoscience, and 5) philosophical considerations.

Prerequisites: BIOL I 107. 1 107 I.. 1 108, and 1 108 1

BIOL 2148 and 2149

BIOL 3360 Histology. (4) I all (odd years)

A stud) of the microscopic features oi vertebrate cells, tissues, and organs.
l ectures correlate cell structure u nh tissue or organ system function.
Laboratory experiences include the microscopic identification of major

tissues and organs at the cellular level.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107, 1 107 I . 1 108, mw\ 1 108 I

BIOL 3370 Toxicology. (4) Fall (even years)

An introduction to the principles of toxicology and the cellular,

physiological, and ecological effects of toxicants, with an emphasis on the

environmental and physiological effects of toxicants on different

populations.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107, 1 107 L, 1 108, and 1 108 L

BIOL 3372 Molecular Biology. (4) Spring (odd years)
A molecular study of genes, their expression, the control of their expression,
and the gene products that result. The lab uses molecular techniques to study
questions involving genes and their gene products.

Prerequisites: CHEM 1 102, CHEM 1 102 L, and BIOL 3321 or
BIOL 3322 or BIOL 3370 or BIOL 3373 or BIOL 3374
or permission of instructor

BIOL 3373 Genetics. (4) Fall

This course includes topics in both classical and molecular genetics.
Topics of study may include but are not limited to Mendelian and non-
Mendelian transmission of genes, sex-linked traits, chromosomal genetics
and genomes, DNA structure, replication, mutation and repair, gene
expression and its regulation, recombinant DNA technology, cancer, and
population genetics. The laboratory will evaluate wild type and mutant
model organisms using classical and molecular genetic approaches.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107, 1 107 L, 1 108, and 1 108 L

BIOL 3374 Cell Biology. (4) Spring (odd years)
An advanced study of the structure and functions of the eukaryotic cell.
Emphasis will be on the role of cellular membranes and proteins as they
relate to cellular activities such as intracellular communication, secretion,
and recognition.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107, 1 107 L, 1 108, and 1 108 L

BIOL 3376 Virology. (4) Fall (even years)
This introduction to virology will focus on animal viruses that are
important for basic science and human and animal diseases. The topics in
this course may include viral taxonomy, structure, entry/exit, replication,
quantitation, genetics, pathogenesis, and virus-host interaction. The
laboratory will study nonpathogenic model viral systems.

Prerequisites: BIOL 3321 or BIOL 3322 or BIOL 3370 or BIOL
3372 or BIOL 3373 or BIOL 3374 or permission of
instructor

140

BIOL 3384 Neurobiology. (4) I .ill (even years)
An integrated stud) of the human nervous system correlating
neuroanatomy and neurophysiolog) with fundamentals ol clinical
neurolog) .

Prerequisites: BIOL 1 107. 1 107 L, 1 ION. and 1 108 I or

BIOL 2148 and 2I4 1 )

BIOL 4470 Senior Seminar. (1)

Senior seminar is a thematic capstone course th.it is a broad, integrative

experience m biology. The course promotes independent thinking,
develops analytical skills, and pro\ ides practice in group discussion and in
u ritten and oral presentation.

Prerequisites: Senior standing, biolog) major

BIOL 4495 Independent Stud} I 1-4) On demand

Although not required as part of the biology major, this course provides an
opportunity for students, on an individual basis, to pursue in-depth stud) of
a particular biolog) topic. Up to 4 hours of BIOL 4495 ma) be counted

toward the major.

Prerequisites: Consent ol the instructor, the department chair, and
the Provost

BIOL4496 Internship (1-3) On demand

An Opportunit) for students to gain added experience and insight in
approved off-campus Settings. The internship cannot he counted as one ol
the courses required lor the major or minor m biology.

Prerequisites: Consent of the supervising instructor, department

chair, and the Career Center

141

BUSINESS and ACCOUNTANCY

Introduction

The Business and Accountancy Departments of LaGrange College are
committed to academic excellence through degree programs designed to
prepare students for a wide variety of careers in business. The liberal arts
education that students receive at LaGrange College provides the
foundation for critical thinking, communication, and the leadership skills
needed for a successful professional career. The departments seek to
enhance the College's liberal arts curriculum by offering coursework and
internship opportunities that give students a fundamental understanding of
business and provide them with the knowledge and skills needed for
effective decision making in a dynamic, global, and technologically
oriented environment.

Mission Statement

We are dedicated to the development of our students' abilities to think
critically and creatively and to the enhancement of their
communication skills.

We seek to integrate and extend liberal arts-based values through
discussion, discovery, and reflection based on contemporary business
content.

We seek to provide a safe, caring and ethical place for all our students
to grow and mature.

Learning Objectives of Programs

Upon completion of a degree from the Business or Accountancy
Departments, a student should be able to:

Demonstrate general knowledge and comprehension of business
concepts and the ability to integrate this knowledge.

Synthesize and make connections among different ideas, as well as
demonstrate the ability to think creatively and critically, and to
formulate logical arguments.

Show an intrinsic desire to learn and a curiosity about the world and
about business by actively participating in class, group work, and
individual research.

Formulate and defend ethical judgments and develop an understanding
of individual moral responsibility, particularly in a group or corporate
setting.

142

Communicate in a professional manner, both orally and in writing,
using technology appropriately .

Work in teams and demonstrate an understanding ol interpersonal
relations, and the leadership and followership processes.

Accept and embrace risk and uncertainty in the business em ironmenl

Assessment of Learning Outcomes

l earning outcomes arc assessed using the following methods:

Departmental Assessment Program

Senior Exil I liter \ iews

Alumni Surveys

Internship Supen isor l.\ aluations

Competitive Scholarships Received

Professional Exam Pass Kates

1 leadership Roles 1 [eld

SIR II Course Evaluations

Community Service Participation

,\d\ isorj Council Feedback

Programs

The following programs are available:

Bachelor of Science I B.S. I m Accountancy

Bachelor of Science I B.S. | in Business Management

Minor in Accountancy

Minor in Business Management

Minor in International Economics

Bachelor ol .Arts i B.A. i m Business Administration [See sepc i
LaG range Evening ( 'allege Bulletin*

The Bachelor's degree programs are accredited nationally by the
Association ol Collegiate Business Schools and Programs \( BSP

Albany programs in ( Organizational I eadership are nol included in this

accreditation.

143

Accountancy and Business Majors

Business majors (B.S. in Accountancy and B.S. in Business Management)
should note that the applicable requirements for the major, including
required courses, are those in effect when they declare their major, not
those in effect at the time of their matriculation.

In addition to the course requirements, students pursuing a Bachelor's
degree offered by the Business Department must participate in a
comprehensive Departmental Assessment Program (DAP), as well as an
exit interview with department faculty or Advisory Council members.

Program Requirements for the B.S. in
Accountancy

The B.S. in Accountancy gives students the accounting foundation needed
for effective decision making in an organization. Today's accountants
must be able to communicate, synthesize and innovate. They not only
provide the information upon which the business world depends, but also
make crucial decisions and act as trusted advisors. The Accountancy major
builds upon the liberal arts skill base to give students the business and
accounting knowledge they need. Students planning to work in the
accounting function will receive the necessary skills and knowledge to
pursue the CMA and CFM professional designations and be prepared for
the fifth year of study for the CPA examination.

To declare a major in Accountancy the student must meet the following criteria:

Have an overall GPA of 2.75/4.00 or better.

Complete MGMT 2200, ACCT 22 11 , and ECON 2200 with a grade of
'C or better.

Normally, a student desiring to major in Accountancy will complete
ACCT 221 1 with a grade of 'B' or better.

Students who have a GPA at or above 2.5 but less than 2.75 may petition
the department faculty to be admitted on a probationary basis to the major.
Petitioners will be evaluated utilizing a departmental screening process.

To remain a major in Accountancy in good standing, the student must meet
the following criteria:

Complete all other major requirements with a grade of 'C or better.

Maintain an overall and major GPA of at least 2.50/4.00.

144

\ii\ accountancy major w hose overall GPA or major GPA falls below a
2.50/4.00 will be placed on probation and has one semester in which to
remove the probationary status. Exceptions to the above criteria ma) be
made at the discretion oi the departmental faculty.

Students pursuing a Bachelor ol Science degree in Accountancy musi

complete then course work as follows:

Matriculation in the Major

Core Requirements 46 hours

Common Business Core 33 hours

Accountancy Core 27 hours

Interim o- hours

General Elective 05 hours

Total 120 hours

The required courses in the Accountancy major die:

ACCT 2211 ACCT 3301 ACCT 3302

ACCT331 1 ACCT 4401 ACCT 4410

ACCT4415 ACCT 4420 ACCT4430

ACCT 4440 ACCT 4454 ECON 2200

1 NCI J353 M \1H 1114 MGMT2200

MGMT3312 MGMT3351 MC.M1 3370

MGMT3372 MKKT 3380

Students planning to pursue licensure as a Certified Public Accountant
(CPA) are required bj Georgia law to complete 150 semester credit
hours. The Accountancy Program Director will assist students in
determining how the) should acquire the Final 30 semester hours
needed. Students are eligible to sit for the uniform CPA examination
upon graduation with the B.S. in Accountancy degree.

145

Program Requirements for the B.S. in Business
Management

The B.S. in Business Management degree program is designed to help
students develop ideals that are ethically sound and socially desirable,
cultivate an awareness of the social, political, and economic developments
to which businesses must adapt, develop sound judgment and effective
communication skills, and develop individual interests and talents.
Coursework provides both the theoretical and practical foundation needed
for those entering businesses, as well as government and not-for-profit
organizations.

There are two concentrations in the Business Management major: Market
Research and International Economics.

To declare a major in Business Management the student must meet the
following criteria:

Have a GPA of 2.75/4.00 or better.

Complete MGMT 2200, ACCT 2211, and ECON 2200 with a grade of
'C or better.

Normally, a student desiring to major in International Economics will
complete ECON 2200 with a grade of 'B' or better.

Students who have a GPA at or above 2.5 but less than 2.75 may petition
the departmental faculty to be admitted on a probationary basis to the
major. Petitioners will be evaluated utilizing a departmental screening
process.

To remain a major in Business in good standing, the student must meet the
following criteria:

Complete all other major requirements with a grade of 'C or better.

Maintain an overall and major GPA of at least 2.50/4.00.

Any Business major whose overall or major GPA falls below a 2.50/4.00
will be placed on probation and has one semester in which to remove the
probationary status. Exceptions to the above criteria may be made at the
discretion of the departmental faculty.

146

Students pursuing a Bachelor ol Science degree in Business Management
uuisi complete 48 semester credil hours ol majoi coursework I above the
general education requirements ol 46 hours). Students will complete the
total required 1 20 hours as follows:

Matriculation In the Major

c !ore Requirements 46 hours

Common Business c lore 36 hours

c loncentration Core o i j hours

Concentration Directed Electives 12 hours

Interim 09 hours

General Elective OS hours

Total 120 hours

The required courses in the Common Business Core include the follow ing:

Acer 221 1 ACCT 331 1 ECON 2200

I NCE 3353 MATH 1 1 14 MGMT 2200

MGMT 3312 MGMT 3351 MGMT 3370

MGMT 3372 MGMT 3393 MRKT J380

Students choosing no! to major in Accountancy \* ill have two options: a
five-course, in-depth stud) in either "market research " or "international
economics. " The student would begin the concentration \* ith one course in
the second semester ol the junior year and complete the sequence al the end
ol the senior year. Both concentrations, w hile in different sub-disciplines,
will share common learning goals such as integration, < reative application,
ethics, and skills development in research and communication [writing and
oral deliver) |.

Students must meet with their advisor before October 15 ol their junior
year in order to enroll in then- chosen concentration.

147

Market Research Concentration

Students choosing the Market Research concentration must complete:

Capstone I: Business Intelligence (MGMT 4420)

Decision making/problem solving process

Database structure

Data warehousing/On-line Analytical Processing (OLAP)

Data Mining

Converting data into information

Communication

Market Research Methods and Design

Capstone II: Special Topics in Marketing (MRKT4484)

Problem Identification

Decision making/Problem solving process

Creativity in problem solving

Solution Implementation

Communication

Capstone III: Management Simulation (MGMT 4440)

Decision support Systems

Financial/quantitative

Data-based
Forecasting

Risk Benefit Analysis
Group dynamics
Policy implications
Communication

International Economics Concentration

Students choosing the International Economics concentration must complete:

Capstone I: International Economic Environment (ECON 4410)

Macro economics U.S. and globally

Trading patterns and economic geography

Capital markets and currency exchange

Economic and political risk

Appropriate electives:

PHIL 1410 Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 24 1 Moral Philosophy

POLS 2210 Comparative Politics

POLS 2220 International Politics

POLS 3321 International Political Economy

LAST 3210 Latin American Politics

Any intermediate/advanced foreign language course
148

Capstone II; Managing Across international Borden (ECON4420)

i volution oi the global enterprise

I he international manager

Appropriate electives:

l AST 1 104 Intro, to Latin American Culture
PSYC ! 121 Social Psycholog)

HUSV 3308 Cultural and Social Anthropolog)

Kl GN l220Histor) ol Christian Political Thought
RLGN 3340Sociology of Religion

M( i.M I 4K)l Entrepreneurship

An) intermediate/advanced foreign language course

Capstone III: Special Topics in International Economics (ECOM 444(1 >

The class w ill explore international topics in depth through independent
research, group discussion and debate, oral presentations and written
reports. Chosen topics are likely to varj from year to year.

Accountancy, Business and International

Economics Minors

Program Requirements for the Minor in
Accountancy

The department offers a Minor in Accountancy. With the accountancy
minor, students \\ ill develop a deeper understanding ol financial reporting
and the use of financial information.

A minor in Accountant} consists of the follow ing 1 2 bonis ol coursework
above AC 'CI' 2211:

ACC1 3301

ACCT3302

ACCT3311

an) 4000 ACCT class or FNCE ; ;s ;

To declare a minor in Accountanc\ the student must meet the follov
criteria:

Have a GPA ol 2.75/4.00or better.

Complete courses m the minor W ilh a grade ol '( '" ^i' better.

Students must take at least tour ol the minor courses at 1 G

Colli

149

Program Requirements for the Minor in Business
Management

A Minor in Business Management is available to any LaGrange College
student, regardless of major. Courses cover the basic functional areas of
business. The minor is designed to help students develop the ability to
recognize and solve business and organizational problems and understand
the role of business in the community, nation, and the world. Such
exposure should enhance the student's employment opportunities.

A Minor in Business Management consists of the following 15 hours of
coursework:

ACCT2211
ECON 2200
MGMT 2200
MGMT 3370
MRKT 3380

To declare a minor in Business, the student must meet the following
criteria:

Have a GPA of 2.75/4.00 or better.

Complete courses in the minor with a grade of 'C or better.

Students must take at least four of the minor courses at LaGrange
College.

Program Requirements for the Minor in
International Economics

A Minor in International Economics is available to any LaGrange
College student, regardless of major. The required courses range from an
introductory course in economics covering basic micro and macro concepts
to a three-course series providing the student with an understanding of the
economic environment in which international business operates, the added
complexity of managing across international borders, and the opportunity
to pursue independent research culminating in a Senior Paper. The course
work requires extensive reading and writing.

150

\ Minor in International Economics consists oi the follow ing I s hours ol
coursework:

MGMT 2200

icon 2200

I CON 4410

ICON 4420
. icon 4440

1 'o declare a minor in Internationa] Economics, the student must meet the
follow ing criteria:

1. Have aGPA of 2.75/4.00 or better.

2. c lomplete courses m the minor w ith a grade ol '( " or better.

3. Onl\ ECON 22()() may be transferred into the minor; all other
courses in the minor must he completed at LaGrange College.

Course Descriptions

Note that most courses have prerequisites and, generally, 2200-level
courses are introductory. Prerequisites are shown alter the course
description.

All major and minor courses must he completed H ill) a grade of ( " or

belter.

To lake any course Other than MGMT 2200. A( ( T 221 1 or l( ON

2200, students must have aGPA of at least 2.5/4.0.

Accountancy (ACCT)

\( ( 1 221 1 Principles of Financial Accounting. (3)

Fall and Spring
This is a foundation level accounting course which introduces the
terminology, principles, and practices ol financial accounting
corporations. The course's major focus is the accounting cycle and
preparation ol financial statements.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 101, MAUI 1 1 o 1

151

ACCT 3301 Intermediate Financial Accounting I. (3) Spring
This course focuses on the decision-making implications of information
provided to external stakeholders including investors, creditors, customers,
and regulators, and regulation theory and practice as applied to
accountancy. Topics include regulation of accountancy procedures for
external reporting, current problems in reporting financial position, income
determination, and an integration of current professional pronouncements.
Prerequisite: ACCT 221 1

ACCT 3302 Intermediate Financial Accounting II. (3) Fall
Continuation of Intermediate Financial Accounting I.
Prerequisite: ACCT 3301

ACCT 3311 Principles of Managerial Accounting. (3) Fall
A study of the uses of accounting for planning and control, including
analysis and interpretation of data, and use of cost information for business
policy implementation. Active learning projects are emphasized.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2211

ACCT 4401 Auditing and Accounting Ethics and Liability.

(3) Spring
This course focuses on the legal and ethical environment in which the
accounting professional practices and in which financial statements are
prepared and presented. Students consider the conflict between profit
motive and accurate and complete financial reporting. Traditional auditing
practices are studied to determine the efficiency and the effectiveness of
such methods.

Prerequisite: ACCT 3301

ACCT 4410 Federal Income Taxation. (3) Spring
This course introduces students to U.S. Federal income tax concepts and
principles and the application of such concepts to business operating,
investing, and financing activities. Ethical and legal issues confronting tax
practitioners are discussed throughout the course. Students engage in tax
research utilizing professional databases and gain expertise in technical writing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 221 1

ACCT 4415 Cost Accounting. (3) Fall

This is a introductory level cost accounting course which introduces the
terminology, principles, and practices o\' cost accounting. Topics include
planning and control techniques, construction of static and flexible budgets,
and product costing mechanisms.
Prerequisite: ACCT 33 1 1

152

ACCT 4420 Advanced Federal Income Taxation* (3) I .ill
This course continues the study ol Federal Income Taxation from \( ( I
44 10 and addresses more advanced federal taxation issues. I opics covered
include the taxation of entities and their owners, including the taxation
implications ol Formations, distributions, reorganizations, liquidations and
other business transactions. Return preparation, planning, research, and
compliance issues are also integrated throughout the course.
Prerequisite: ACCT 4410

\( ( 1 4430 Advanced Accounting. (3) Spring

This is an intensive course that integrates the disciplines ol accounting,

finance, and taxation with respeel to selected complex business

transactions. Topics nclude: business combinations, goodv* ill, inventor)

costing, property exchanges and advanced stockholders' equity

transactions.

Prerequisite: ACCT 3302

\( ( 1 4440 Accounting Lnformation Systems. (3) Spring
This course is an introduction to the systems, procedures, and processes
management employs to control operating acti\ ities and information
reporting systems.

Prerequisite: ACCT 221 1

\( ( 1 4454 Financial Statement Analysis. (3) Spring

This course focuses on the structure and analysis Ol financial statements
prepared in accordance with US GAAP, providing students with a

framework for using financial statement data to perform financial analysis.
Prerequisite: \( 'CI 3301

\( ( 1 44()() Internship in Accounting. 1 1-6) ( )n demand

This course represents a unique opportunity for a qualified student to
expand his/her understanding ol the practical applications ol accounting
concepts by entering into a specific "help rendered learning
accomplishment* 1 contract u ith a cooperating area enterprise. The com
will specifically identify the student's obligations and duties, the nature and

extent of the host enterprise's commitment to assist the student in further

extending his/her knowledge ol enterprise operations, and the basis on
which the student's learning accomplishments uiii be measun N ore
than 1 2 credit hours may iv applied toward the student's graduation req uir e m en ts .
Prerequisitt s: Accountancy major with demonstrated superior

capabilities and prior approval Ol the contract b\ the

department faculty

ACCT 4480 Special Topics in Accounting. (3) On demand
A series of special topic courses provide students with exposure to issues
and concepts not covered in their regular course work. Most topics
include work with "real-world" organizations.

Prerequisites: ACCT 22 1 1 and consent of instructor

Economics (ECON)

ECON 2200 Principles of Economics. (3) Fall and Spring
An introduction to the science of economics and its analytical tools. This
course is devoted to providing the student with a thorough understanding of
the basic principles of a) microeconomics: the study of the economic
behavior of individual households and firms and the determination of
factor prices, and b) macroeconomics: the study of the determination of the
aggregate levels of income, output, employment and prices and the
examination of fiscal and monetary policy.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1101, MATH 1101

ECON 4410 International Economic Environment. (3) Spring
A comprehensive study of the economic forces affecting global commerce,
including economic geography, trading patterns, capital flows FDI and
portfolio investments and economic and political risk factors. The course
is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the macro-
economic environment in which international businesses operate.
Prerequisite: Management major with Junior standing

ECON 4420 Managing Across International Borders. (3) Fall
A study of the socioeconomic complexity in which international managers
live and work. The course seeks to help students of international
management grasp some of the essentials of doing business in a global
economy the opportunities and threats inherent in a cross-cultural
environment and their impact on both the individual manager, the
transaction, and the business organization.
Prerequisite: ECON 4410

ECON 4440 Special Topics in International Economics. (3) Spring
This class explores 3-4 international topics in depth through independent
research, group discussion and debate, oral presentations and written
reports. Chosen topics are likely to vary from year to year.
Prerequisites: ECON 4420

154

Finance (FNCE)

FNCE 3353 Corporate Finance. (3) Spring
This course focuses on various methods used bj corporate managers to
evaluate alternative investment opportunities, including discounted
payback, internal rate ol return, discounted cash flow and economic value
added analysis. Additionally, the course Focuses on the methods used to
finance corporate investments in assets, including capital structure, cost ol

capital, and the impact ol leverage.
Prt requisite: ACCT 221 1

FNCE 3354 Business Performance Analysis. (3) On demand
\ comprehensive survej ol the basic tools and models used in
contemporary Financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: ACCT 221 1

Management (MGMT)

MGMT 1101 Contemporary Business Issues. (3) Spring

Students experience an introduction to current business topics using active
learning and ethical reasoning skills. Students are exposed to a variety ol
situations and cases that will encourage thinking like a business person.

MGMT 2200 Foundations in Business. (3) Fall and Spring

This course serves as an integrative introduction to the functional areas ol

business. Projects based on current business dilemmas emphasize the need
tor constant research and innovation required to address problems students
will encounter in the business world. Potential decisions are evaluated in
the context of reducing risk and maximizing returns to a variety ot
stakeholders. ( "reati\e and critical thinking, problem soh ing, and ethical
decision making are stressed.

Suggested Prerequisih v ENGL 1 101, MATH 1 101

M( .MI 3312 Business ( lommunication. (3) Fall and Spring

This course pro\ ides an opportunity tor students to practice all forms of

business communication including: written documents and reports, oral
presentations, phone, e-mail, meetings, etc. Particular consideration is
given to audience analysis, appropriate medium, cultural and gender issues,

feedback, and biases affecting communication.

Prerequisites. MGM1 2200, ECON 2200, VCC1 21\ 1

MGMT 3351 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business. (3) Fall
This course addresses the legal and ethical implications of business
decisions. Topics may include business formation, employment
discrimination, contracts, workplace safety, business torts, and antitrust
issues. Cost-benefit analysis is used as a tool to evaluate business
decisions in light of existing legal rules and social responsibility. Ethical
decision making is stressed in every part of the course. Students develop
the mindset necessary to make decisions in an ethical manner.
Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 221 1

MGMT 3370 Management and Organizational Behavior. (3)

Fall and Spring
A study of the science and art of management with special emphasis on
motivating and leading individuals in an organization.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 221 1

MGMT 3372 Operations Management. (3) Spring
A study of the application of the science of management in the operations
management environment. Primary emphasis placed on the theories,
principles, and tools that improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the
operations manager.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 221 1

MGMT 3385 Management Information Systems. (3) On demand
This course is designed for future managers who need to understand and
critically evaluate the role and potential contribution of information
technology for their organizations, and understand and effectively apply
various computerized support systems to make better decisions.
Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 221 1

MGMT 3393 Cultural Aspects of International Business. (3) Spring
This course explores Hofstede's Dimensions of Culture and examines
cultural identities as expressed through business practice, with the
objective to understand the impact of cultural intelligence in the global
arena. Students analyze real world case studies to develop strategies for
effective global management.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 221 1

156

\K ,\i i 44in Entrepreneurship. (3) ( >n demand

A stud) ot the application dI the science ft management to the
development and management ol the small business enterprise.
Opportunities, characteristics, and problems with the small business are
evaluated Students develop a business plan For a small business and, when
possible, students work on special projects with small businesses in the

Community. I he class requires active participation b\ students m and out
of the classroom.

Prerequisites: FNC1 *353,MGNfl *370,MRIC1 (380

M(.M 1 4420 IhisiiHss Intelligence. (3) Spring

1 Ins course is designed tor future managers who need to understand hov,
organizational data can be converted to actionable information through the
use ot data warehouse, data mining, and data visualization technologies.
The course focuses on developing and utilizing actionable information lor
the purpose of Marketing Research and Market Plan Development
Prerequisite: MKKI 3380

MGMT 4430 Applied Business Analysis, (3) On demand

A comprehensive look at the application ol various business analysis

techniques in all functional areas of a business, a simulated en\ ironment

pro\ ides students an opportunity to create various decision support and

forecasting systems and use the resulting output to manage a large
enterprise. Risk-benefit and stakeholder analysis are used to analyze polic)
implications of proposed decisions.

Prerequisite: Senior Standing or consent of instructor

MGMT 4440 Management Simulation. (3) Spring

This is the capstone course tor majors in business. It incorporates the use
ot a computer-based simulation in an effort to integrate all ot the functional
areas ot business into one comprehensive course. Students work in groups

as managers ot a simulated companj and make the necessar) marketii
finance, economic, accounting, and management decisions to am their
compan) effectivel) . The student's grades are a function of individual and
ip performance.

Prerequisites: Senior standing, MGMT 4420, MRK I M84 or

consent ot instructor.

MGMT 4460 Internship in Business. (1-6) On demand
This course represents a unique opportunity for a qualified student to
expand his/her understanding of the practical applications of enterprise
operations by entering into a specific "help rendered learning
accomplishment" contract with a cooperating area enterprise. The contract
will specifically identify the student's obligations and duties, the nature and
extent of the host enterprise's commitment to assist the student in further
extending his/her knowledge of enterprise operations, and the basis on
which the student's learning accomplishments will be measured. No more
than 6 credit hours may be applied toward the student's graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Business major with demonstrated superior
capabilities and prior approval of the internship contract by
department faculty.

MGMT 4483 Special Topics in Management. (3) On demand

A series of special topic courses providing students with exposure to issues'

and concepts not covered in their regular course work.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Marketing (MRKT)

MRKT 3380 Principles of Marketing. (3) Fall
This course is an introduction to the principles of marketing management
and the role of marketing in a contemporary society, in business
enterprises, and in a non-profit organization. Considers the planning,
operation and evaluation of marketing and promotional efforts necessary to
the effective marketing of consumer and industrial offerings.

Prerequisites: MGMT 2200, ECON 2200, ACCT 221 1

MRKT 4484 Special Topics in Marketing. (3) Fall
A series of special topic courses providing students with exposure to issues
and concepts not covered in their regular course work. Students develop
and present a full marketing plan for a local business or institution.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3380 and MGMT 4420

158

CHEMISTRY

Introduction

Chemistr) is often referred to as the central science, because chemical
concepts are used throughout the other sciences. Therefore, in addition to
being a major in its ow n right, the stud) ol chemistry is a part ol man)
curricula. The Chemistr) Department focuses its introductory chemistr)
course as aw element in a liberal education, a sen ice to other departments,
and the beginning of a comprehensive stud) ol chemistr) . I he department
offers B.A. and B.S. majors as well as a minor which can lead to a variet)
ol future occupations. Students w ith a maim- in chemistr) have gone on to
traditional pursuits such as graduate school in chemistr) or biochemistry,

pharmacy, medical school and lav* school (patent law and corporate law i.

as well as becoming laboratory technicians and salespersons for chemistr)
and related industries.

The B.A. degree oilers a broad background in chemistr) while allowing
ample tune for extensive coursework in other fields. The B.A. is

appropriate tor those interested in one ol the medical or law -related
professions, teaching, or tor students desiring the broadest possible
education with an emphasis in natural science. The B.N. program is
designed tor those going on to graduate school in a chemicall) related Field
(chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, chemical physics,
en\ ironmental science, or forensics) or those seeking employment as
chemists after graduation. The B.S. degree is generalK more tlighl) valued
at professional schools. While the B.S. degree is more demanding ol a

student's time, there is sufficient time for electives outside the sciences.

Learning Objectives

The specific objectives tor the respective degrees are as follows:

The Bachelor of Science Degree

Students who earn the B.S. degree with a major in chemistr) will be

appropriate!) competent in the following areas:

Vtomic and molecular structure ami chemical bonding

I he language ot chemistry: verbal written, numerical and graphical

presentation ot chemical concepts

I Equilibria and stoichiometr)

Bei iodic relationships

I hermochemisti\

Chemistr) laborator) skills, including data organization and analysis

Recognition, structure, and reactivity of the major organic functional
groups

Synthesis and characterization of organic compounds by physical and
instrumental methods

Volumetric and gravimetric analytical theory and practice

Analytical instrumentation theory and practice

Thermodynamics

Chemical dynamics

Quantum mechanics and spectroscopy

Either advanced inorganic chemistry, advanced organic chemistry, or
biochemistry

Knowledge of the research process in chemistry

Students earn these competencies by pursuing the following Bachelor of
Science curriculum in chemistry:

General Chemistry 1 101, 1 102
Organic Chemistry 2201, 2202

8 semester hours
8 semester hours

Analytical Chemistry 225 1 4 semester hours

8 semester hours

Physical Chemistry 3301, 3302
Junior Seminar, Chemistry 337 1 2 semester hours

Senior Seminar, Chemistry 447 1 2 semester hours

Instrumental Analysis 445 1 4 semester hours

Chemistry Elective (3000 or 4000 level)

4 semester hours

Additionally, a research experience is required. This should be taken
between the junior and senior years or during the first semester of the
senior year. This may be done on campus, in industry, or in a research
university summer program. Students may elect to earn 4900 credit for this
required activity.

Supporting required courses include the following:

Mathematics 222 1 , 2222 8 semester hours

Physics 2 1 2 1 , 2 1 22 8 semester hours

160

Ilk' scheduling ol the B.S. curriculum is important .is the Physical
Chemistr) sequence (3301-3302) alternates years with Analytical
Chemistr) (2251 1 and Instrumental Analysis (445 1), To be prepared to
take the physical chemistr) sequence, students should take calculus during
ilk- first year and physics during the sophomore year, It is highl)
recommended thai students take general chemistr) during their firsl
year. The following would be typical sequences ol courses for the B.S.
chemistr) degree:

Fall Spring

Firsl year CHEM I 101 ( Ill.M I 102

MAI II 2221 MATH 2222

Second Year (HIM 2201 CHEM 2202

I'HYS 2121 PHYS 2122

Junior and Senior Year Sequence depends on \^ Inch y ear Ph) sical
Chemistr) and Analytical Chemistr) are being offered.

Third Yeai CHEM 3301 CHEM 3302

CHEM 3371

Fourth Year CULM 2251 (Ill.M 4451

CHEM 4471

Chemistr) Elective or Chemistr) Elective

OK:

Third Year (HIM 2251 (HIM 4451

CHI M 1371

Fourth Yea. (HIM 3301 (HIM (302

(III M 4471

Chemistry Elective or Chemistry Elective

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Students w ho cam the B.S. degree w ill have demonstrated their attainment
of the specific objectives In appropriate scores on the current American
Chemical Society (ACS) Examinations on the following three topics:
General, Organic, and Physical. The students will additional!) attain

appropriate score from one ol the following examinations: Analytical,
Instrumental. Inorganic, or Biochemist! - ) . I he passu w ill be at or

above the 40 percentile Ol the national norms In: these e\ tl au

appropriate level, as determined b) the Chemistr) Department, based on

161

the accumulated data of the performance of LaGrange College students on
these exams. The results which are in the best interest of the students will
be used. These exams will be given at the end of the appropriate courses
and will be offered to students up to three additional times prior to the time
of the student's scheduled graduation. The student must attempt a retest at
least once a semester until successful completion of the exam. In the event
that a student needs to repeat an exam for the second, third, or final time,
evidence of preparation must be presented. Reexamination cannot be
scheduled earlier than two weeks following a previous examination.

The Bachelor of Arts-Chemistry

Students who earn the B.A. degree with a major in chemistry will be
appropriately competent in the following areas:

Atomic and molecular structure and chemical bonding;

The language of chemistry: verbal, written, numerical, and graphical

presentation of chemical concepts;

Equilibria and stoichiometry;

Periodic relationships;

Thermochemistry;

Chemistry laboratory skills, including data organization and analysis;

Recognition, structure ,and reactivity of the major organic functional

groups;

Thermodynamics

Chemical dynamics

Quantum mechanics and spectroscopy

Synthesis and characterization of organic compounds by physical and

instrumental methods;
Either advanced inorganic chemistry, advanced organic chemistry, or

biochemistry.

Students earn these competencies by pursuing the following courses
required for the Bachelor of Arts curriculum in chemistry:

General Chemistry 1 101, 1 102 8 semester hours

Organic Chemistry 220 1 , 2202 8 semester hours

Analytical Chemistry 225 1 4 semester hours

Physical Chemistry 3301 , 3302 8 semester hours

Junior Seminar, Chemistry 337 1 2 semester hours

Senior Seminar, Chemistry 447 1 2 semester hours

Chemistry Electives 4 semester hours

162

Required supporting courses include the following:

Physics 1 101, 1 102, or2121, 2122 8 semester hours
Math 1121 or 2221 J or 4 semester hours

Ilk' scheduling oi the courses for the B.A. inchemistr) can be somewhal
flexible. The following are possible sequences to fulfill the requirements

for the major.

l all Spring

First-yeai CHEM 1 101 CHEM 1 102

MAUI 2221

Second Year (HIM 2201 (HIM 2202

IMIVS l loi or2121 PHYS 1 102 or 2122

Junior and Senior Year Sequence depends on u Inch year Physical
Chemisti) and Analytical Chemistr) are being offered.

Third Year CHEM 3301 CHEM 3302

CHEM 1371
Fourth Year CHEM 2251 Chemisti) Elective

CHEM 4471
OR:
Thud Year CHEM 2251 Chemistr) Elective

CHEM 3371
Fourth Year CHEM 3301 CHEM J302

CHEM 4471

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Students who earn the B.A. degree u ill have demonstrated then attain menl

ol the specific objectives b) appropriate scores on the current American
Chemical Societ) VCS) Exams for (1) General Chemistr) ai gank

Chemistry. The passing score w ill be at or above the 4o' percentile of the

national norms tor these exams or at an appropriate level, as determined b)

the Chemistr) Department, based on the accumulated data ol the

performance Ol I .i( irange ( College students on these exams. I he iesulls

which aie in the best interest ol the students will he used. I hese exams

will he given at the end ol the appropriate courses and will he offered to

idents up to three additional times prior to the time of the student's
icduled graduation. I he student must attempt a retesl at least CHK G

stu

sch

semester until successful completion of the exam. In the event that a
student needs to repeat an exam for the second, third, or final time,
evidence of preparation must be presented. Reexamination cannot be
scheduled earlier than two weeks following a previous examination.

The Bachelor of Arts-Biochemistry

Students who earn the B.A. with a major in biochemistry will be
appropriately competent in the following areas:

Atomic and molecular structure and chemical bonding

The language of chemistry: verbal, written, numerical, and graphical
presentation of chemical concepts

Equilibria and stoichiometry

Periodic relationships

Thermochemistry

Physical measurements of chemical systems

Chemistry laboratory skills, including data organization and analysis

Recognition, staicture, and reactivity of the major organic
functional groups

Experimental synthesis and characterization of organic compounds by
physical and instrumental methods

In-depth study of biological molecules and metabolism

Techniques of biotechnology.

Students earn these competencies by pursuing the following courses
required for the Bachelor of Arts-Biochemistry:

General Chemistry 1 101, 1 102 8 semester hours

Organic Chemistry 220 1 , 2202 8 semester hours

Biophysical Chemistry 3311 4 semester hours

Junior Seminar, Chemistry 337 1 2 semester hour

Biochemistry, Chemistry 442 1 , 4422 8 semester hours

Senior Seminar, Chemistry 447 1 2 semester hours

Math 1 1 14 or 1 1 2 1 3 semester hours

Physics 1 1 1 , 1 1 02 8 semester hours

Suggested but not required Biology 8 semester hours

164

Assessment of Learning Objecth \ s

Students who earn the B.A. with a major in biochemistry will have
demonstrated the attainmenl ol the specific objectives bj appropriate
scores on the current American Chemical Societ) (ACS)] Rams for (1)
( ieneral ( !hemistr) , (2) ( Organic ( !hemistr) and/or I ; I Biochemistr) . I he
passing score vt ill be ai or above the 40 percentile oi the national norms
foi these exams or al an appropriate level, as determined b) the ( 'hemisu*)
l tepartment, based on the accumulated data of the performance ol
I a( irange C 'ollege students on these exams. The results w Inch are in the
besl interest ol the students w ill be used. These exams w ill be given at the
end of the appropriate courses and will be offered to students up to three
additional nines prior to the nine of the student's scheduled graduation.
The student must attempt a retest at least once a semester until successful
completion of the exam. In the event that a student needs to repeat an
exam for the second, thud, or final time, e\ idence ol preparation must be
presented. Reexamination cannot be scheduled earlier than two weeks
follow ing a pre> ious examination.

The scheduling for the B.A. degree in biochemistr) is flexible. I be

following is a proposed schedule to meet the requirements tor the
degree. This degree provides a flexible yet strong program tor the pre-
health professional requirements.

First-year
Second Year

I nl

(HIM 1 101

Spring

MATH 1121 or

MATH 1114

(HIM 1 in:

hud Year

lourtli Year

(HIM 2201
TUTS 1 101

(HI M 4421
(HIM 331 1

(HI M 2202
PHYS 1 102
CHI M
CHI M 4422

CHI M 4471

A suggested schedule to meet the Pre-Health Professional Requirements
and earn a B.A. degree in biochemistry is the following:

Fall Spring

First-year CHEM1101 CHEM1102

BIOL 1101 BIOL 1102

Second Year CHEM 220 1 CHEM 2202

PHYS 1101 PHYS 1102

MATH MATH

Third Year CHEM 3301 Molecular Biology

CHEM 3371
MCAT, PCAT,
DAT, etc.
Fourth Year CHEM 4421 CHEM 4422

CHEM 4471

The Molecular Biology and Biochemistry course could be switched during
the third and fourth year depending on the interest of the student.

Declaration of Major

Before declaring a major in chemistry, a student must successfully (C or
better) complete the introductory sequence (CHEM 1101, 1 102). A student
may declare a major after one term of chemistry with permission of the
chair of the department.

Minor

A minor in chemistry shall consist of CHEM 1 101, 1 102, 2201, 2202 and two
additional chemistry courses from the following: CHEM 2251, 3301, 3302,
33 1 1 , 442 1 , 4422, 443 1 , 445 1 . Students must demonstrate proficiency in
general chemistry by passing the ACS General Chemistry Examination as
stated above.

Chemistry Awards

The CRC Freshman Chemistry Award is awarded annually on Honors Day
to the student with the most outstanding achievement in the CHEM 1101,
1 102 General Chemistry sequence.

The A.M. Hicks Award for outstanding achievement in organic chemistry
is awarded annually on Honors Day to the student taking organic chemistry
who has attained the most outstanding record. The award is made in honor
of Dr. A. M. Hicks who was a long time faculty member and chair of the
department.

166

Course Descrifi ions (CHEM)

Chemistr) is a laboratory science and the department views the laboratory
experience as an essential component ol those courses with an associated
laboratory. Consequently, students must achieve a passing grade in both
the lecture and laboratory portions of the i ourse to obtain a passing grade
in the course.

CHEM 1101 Genend Chemistr) L (3 In lee* 3 hr& tab per week) (4)

tall
\ stud) ol the Foundations ol chemistr) Including stoichiometry, atomic
structure and periodicity, molecular structure and bonding models,
and thermochemistry .

Prerequisite: MATH 1101 (ma) be taken as co-requisite) or

placement in 2 105 or higher.

(HIM 1102 General Chemistr] EL (3 hi& lee* 3 Ira lab per week) (4)

Spring
\ continuation of CHEM 1 101; a stud) ol the gas, Liquid, and solid phases,
chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, acid/base equilibria,
oxidation-reduction reactions and electrochemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM lloi.MAlll 1101 or placement in 2 105

or higher.

CHEM 2201 Organic Chemistr) L(3hrs.le&,3hrs.labperweek) (4) Fed!

A stud) ol the fundamentals ol organic chemistr) with respect to the
bonding, structure, nomenclature and reactivity ol various classes ol
organic compounds including aromatic compounds.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1 102

CHEM 2202 Organic Chemistr) EL(3hrs.fcc^3hr&Ubperweek) (4)

Spring
A continuation ol ("HIM 2201 including spectroscopy, synthesis,
carbon) Is, and biomolecules.

Prerequisiu CM M 2201

CHEM 2251 \iml\tieal( 'liunistn. i.Mhn. kv.. 3 hi\ l:ih per week I

I all (even years)
A stud) ol the theor) and practice ol volumetric and gravimetric
quantitative analysis, chemical equilibrium, and acid/base chemist]
Pn requisite: CHI M 1 102

C HEM 330 1 Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics.

(3 hrs. lec^ 3 hrs. lab per week) (4) Fall (odd years)
A study of the basic principles of physical chemistry including the
properties of gases, kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics,
thermochemistry, changes of state, phase rules, electrochemistry, and
chemical dynamics

Prerequisites: CHEM 2202 or permission of instructor,

MATH 2221, PHYS 1 102 or PHYS 1 122

CHEM 3302 Physical Chemistry: Chemical Dynamics and Quantum
Mechanics. (3 hrs. lec^ 3 hrs. lab per week) (4)

Spring (even years)
The study of basic principles of physical chemistry focusing on gas
kinetics, chemical dynamics, quantum mechanics, and atomic and
molecular spectroscopy.

Prerequisites: MATH 2222, PHYS 1 102 or PHYS 1 122

CHEM 331 1 Biophysical Chemistry. (3 hrs. lee. per week) (3) Fall
An overview of thermodynamics, dynamics and quantum chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 2202 or permission of instructor,

MATH 1 1 14 or MATH 2105 or placement in MATH 2221.

Physics 1101 is a prerequisite (preferred) or may be taken as a

corequisite.

CHEM 3371 Junior Seminar (2 hrs. class per week) (2) Spring
A course that acquaints the student with the chemical literature as well as
presentation and discussion of scientific data and information. In addition,
students explore career opportunities, prepare a portfolio, and develop
career plans. Note: Course is graded on a pass/no credit basis.
Prerequisite: Junior standing

CHEM 4421 Biochemistry I. (3 hrs. lee, 3 hrs. lab per week) (4)

Fall
An introductory course in the principles of biochemistry, with emphasis on
the structure and function of biomolecules, membrane structure and
function and an introduction to metabolism and bioenergetics.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2202 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 4422 Biochemistry II . (3 hrs. lee, 3 hrs. lab per week) (4) Spring
A continuation of CHEM 4421 with emphasis on cellular metabolism,
fundamentals of molecular genetics, and current topics in biochemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 4421

168

CHEM 4431 Inorganic (3 hrs. lee per week) (3) On demand
An in-depth examination ol atomic and molecular structure. Symmetry
concepts are introduced and used.

/'/< requisite: (HIM ; ; <M or consent ol die instructor.

CHEM 4441 Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3 Ins. lee. per

week) (3> ( )n demand
I his course is concerned with the synthesis ol organic compounds.
Because synthesis requires a master) i>t organic reactions, mechanisms and
stereochemistry, il is the ultimate consolidation oi the student's expertise in
organic chemistry.

Prerequisite: (HIM 2202

CHEM 4451 Instrumental taarysis.(31ii&lec^3hr&labperweek) i4>

Spring (odd years)
A stud) of instrumentation and advanced analytical techniques.

CHEM 4471 Senior Seminar. (2 hrs. class per week) (2) Spring
A capstone course which is thematic. Emphasis is on integration ol the
student's experience in chemistr) and the presentation of chemical
literature in seminar and written form
/'/( requisite: Senior standing

CHEM 4800 Special Topics. (1-4 hours) On demand

A special topics course thai ma) be designed to provide the student with

exposure to topics and concepts no! covered in the regular course offerings.

CHEM 4900 Independent Study.

This course can var) and ma) be used to satisfy the research requirement
for the B.S. major and piw ide research experience for B.A. majors.

169

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Introduction

The Computer Science Department at LaGrange College has several goals.
With the goal of computer literacy for our general student population,
courses are offered to acquaint students with microcomputer applications
and networks. For students who want further study in computer science, the
following options are available:

A minor in computer science (18 semester hours)

B.A. degree in computer science (39 semester hours)

B.A. degree in computer science with a concentration in business (48
semester hours)

B.A. degree in computer science with a concentration in graphic design (45
semester hours)

B.S. degree in computer science (50 semester hours)

Learning Objectives

Graduates from the B.A. and B.S. degree programs at LaGrange College
should be able to do each of the following:

Write programs in a reasonable amount of time that work
correctly, are well documented, and are readable.

Determine whether or not they have written a reasonably efficient
and well-organized program.

Know which general types of problems are amenable to computer
solution and the various tools necessary for solving such problems.

Assess the implications of work performed either as an individual
or as a member of a team.

Understand basic computer architectures.

Pursue in-depth training in one or more application areas or further
education in computer science.

In addition, students in the B.S. degree program should be able to do
research, be able to convey technical ideas in a clear writing style, and have
the mathematical background necessary for scientific problem-solving.
Students in the B.A. degree program with a concentration in business
should have the knowledge of the functional areas of business necessary

170

foi working in dial environment Students in the B.A. degree program
with a concentration in graphic design should have the knowledge oi
graphic design necessary for creating functional and well designed
websites.

All ol the 1000-level or above courses in computer science, mathematics,
and business thai are required For the B.A. 01 B.S. degree or the minor
must be completed w 1th a grade ol c ! or better.

The computer science curriculum al I a( Irange c College is based on the
recommendations ol the A.( \\1. | Association for ( Computing Machinei
In addition, our students have the opportunity to take courses thai will
make them more attractive in the job market. These courses include
programming languages (such as Python, COBOL, Visual Bask, and
Java), PC support and troubleshooting (including an A+ course), database
administration (Oracle), network administration, and web programming
(including XML, XIITMI . HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Adobe web
applications I.

Assessment of learning objectives

The accomplishmeni of these objectives will be demonstrated by the
follow ing:

1. Satisfactory performance on a programming test. This test will he
based on the concepts learned in CSC1 1990 and 2990 and must be

taken at the end of the semester in which the student completes
CSC1 2990. The test will be littered once at the end ol ever)
semester in which CSC1 2990 is uttered. The test must he
satisfactorily completed by the end ol the semester in which the
student reaches senior status, but under no circumstances W ill a
student he allowed to take the test more than tour times prior to mk\
including that semester. If the test has not been completed
satisfactorily b> that time, the student will not he allowed to
continue in either the B.A. or the B.S. degree programs in computer
science.

2. Satisfactory performance by the student in deliveru entation
at a regularly scheduled Computer Science Department semm.tr.

I his presentation will be developed with the approval ol and

possible input from the computer science faculty. It the student d

171

not arrive at the scheduled time for the seminar or does not perform
satisfactorily in the seminar, the department reserves the right to
impose additional requirements to substitute for the seminar. A
student who fails to fulfill these requirements will not be allowed to
graduate.

3. Satisfactory completion of an assessment portfolio to be kept by
each computer science major. The purpose of this portfolio will be
to aid in assessing the professional development of each student and
the growth of the student's programming skills as the student
progresses through the computer science curriculum. Each portfolio
will include the programming test described in item (1) above, a
program selected by the instructor from CSCI 3250, three additional
examples of the student's work, a copy of the student's resume,
material from the departmental seminar presentation made by the
student and described in item (2), a copy of the student's web page,
and a personal information sheet (including forwarding address and
phone number, e-mail address, and plans after graduation). The three
examples of the student's work mentioned above must be approved
for inclusion by faculty consensus. Maintaining the portfolio is the
responsibility of the student. Additional information about the
portfolio is available from the department.

4. Attendance at Computer Science Department seminars. Each student
will be required to attend at least 50% of these seminars each
semester. A student who fails to attend 50% of the seminars will be
required to submit a short written report for each seminar under the
50% missed. Details concerning such written reports are available
from the department. Failure to attend 50% of the seminars and
submit such reports will result in the student not being certified as a
computer science graduate.

Career Opportunities

Students who complete the computer science major have a wide range of
employment opportunities. These include positions in programming, PC
support and troubleshooting, database administration, network
administration, and web programming. Graduates of the computer science
degree program at LaGrange College have secured positions as I.T.
department managers, I.T. security specialists, systems analysts, database
administrators, webmasters, web designers, PC support specialists, as well
as other positions. Companies employing these graduates include Milliken
and Co., Interface, Duracell, Hitachi, Walt Disney World (I.T. security),
Chick-Fil-A (I.T. department), WestPoint Stevens, Total Systems Services,
BellSouth, Texas Instruments, General Motors, and others.

172

lii addition, a number oi graduates bave gone on to graduate school in areas
such as computer science, computer engineering, electrical engineering,
and management information systems.

Course Requirements

Requirements tor all students pursuing ii minor, B.A., or U.S. in
( Computer Science (9 semester hours)

CSC1 1990

CSC1 2990

csci 2500

Requirements for the minor In Computer Science (9 additional hours):
CSCI 3000or 3250

rwo additional CSCI courses at the 3000-level or aho\e
(excluding internship credit)

Requirements Tor the I*. A. Degree (30 additional hours)
csci 3000
csci 3050
csci 3250

CSCI 3700

Five additional CSCI courses at the 3000-level or above

(excluding internship credit)
MATH 1 121

Requirements lor the B. A. \>ith a concentration in Business
(3 ( > additional hours)

csci 3ooo

Six additional CSCI courses at the 3000-level or above

(excluding internship credit)

MAUI 1121

The five courses required lor a minor in business management:

\( ( I 2211, ICON 2200, MRKT 3380, MGMT 2200, and

MGMT 3370

Requirements tor the H.A. N>ith a concentration in Graphic Design

(36 additional hours)
( m i 1500
CSCI 3550

I ive additional CSCI courses at the 3000-level or above

(excluding internship credit)

The six courses required tor a minor in Art and Design:

AKTI) 1 152, 2201,2222, (222, 3301. plus an art history class as

the line arts course in the Core Program.

173

Requirements for the B.S. Degree (41 additional hours)

CSCI 3000

CSCI 3050

CSCI 3250

CSCI 3990

CSCI 4100

CSCI 4250

CSCI 4900

Four additional CSCI courses at the 3000-level or above

MATH 2221

MATH 2222

In addition, PHYS 1 101/1 102 or 2121/2122 are required as the

laboratory science courses in the Core Program.

Course Descriptions (CSCI)

CSCI 1990 Introduction to Algorithmic Design. (3) Fall, Spring
Problem solving and algorithmic design using the language Java or Python.
Structured programming concepts, debugging and documentation.

CSCI 2050 PC Maintenance and Troubleshooting. (3)

On demand
A study of basic computer hardware, how to install hardware components,
and how to diagnose hardware problems. In addition, the course includes a
study of the basics of Windows and DOS necessary for maintaining
computer hardware. The course is designed to begin to prepare students
for A+ certification, as well as for the benefit of those who just wish to
upgrade and diagnose hardware and operating system problems on their
own computers.

Prerequisite: CSCI 1990 or consent of instructor

CSCI 2500 Visual Basic. (3) Fall (odd years)

The study of Visual Basic, an event-driven (as opposed to procedural)

language.

Prerequisite: CSCI 1990 or consent of instructor

CSCI 2990 Algorithmic Design. (3) Spring

A continuation of CSCI 1990. Further development of techniques in Java
for program design, program style, debugging and testing, especially for
larger programs. Introduction to algorithmic analysis. Introduction to the
basic aspects of string processing, recursion, internal search/sort methods,
and simple data structures. Programming using graphical user interfaces.
Prerequisite: CSCI 1990

174

( SCI 3000 Introduction to Computer Systems. (3) Fall (odd years)
Compute! structure and machine language, assembly language
programming. Addressing techniques, macros, file I/O, program
segmentation and linkage, assembler construction, and interpretive routines.

( SCI 3050 Introduction to Computer Organization. (3)

Spring (even years I
Basic logic design, coding, Dumber representation and arithmetic,
computer architecture, and computer software.
Prerequisite: CSC1 1990

CSCI3150 Introduction to File Processing. (3) On demand
Concept ol I/O management (fields, keys, records, and buffering). File
organization, file operations, and data structures. Tunc and storage space
requirements. Datasecurit) and integrity.

Prerequisite: CSC1 3000 or 3250 or consent of instructor

( SCI 3250 Data Structures. (3) Fall (even years)

Review ol basic data structures such as stacks, queues, Lists, and trees.

( iraphs and their applications. Internal and external searching and sorting.
Memory management

Prerequisite: (SCI 2990 or consent of instructor

CSC1 3310 Organisation nf Progr amming I.nngimgPg (3)

( )n demand
An introduction to the structure of programming Languages. Language
definition structure, data types and structures, control structures and data
flow. Run-time consideration, interpretative Languages, lexical analysis
and parsing.

Prerequisite: CSC1 3000 or consent of instructor

CSC1 3400 Computer Networks L (3) Fall (odd years)

An introduction to networks with particular emphasis on the TCP/IP
protocols used on the Internet.

/'/< n quisite: CSC] L990 or consent ot instructor

( s( i 345U Computer Networks II. (3) Spring (even years)
\ continuation ot CSC1 3400.

/'/( requisite: CSC1 3400

CSCI 3500 Web Programming. (3) Fall (odd years)
The study and practice of the planning, construction, and programming of
web pages using HTML, CSS, SSI, and CGI. Graphics, sound, video, and
animation will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: CSCI 1990 or consent of instructor

CSCI 3550 Server-Side Scripting and Database Management. (3)

PHP, a server-side scripting language that can be embedded in a web page
to allow for dynamic content, MySQL, a relational database management
system, and how to interface them.

Prerequisite: CSCI 3500 or consent of instructor

CSCI 3700 Discrete Mathematical Structures in Computer

Science. (3) Spring s(even years)
An introduction to the mathematical tools for use in computer science.
These include sets, relations, and elementary counting techniques. Algebra
and algorithms, graphs, monoids and machines, lattices and Boolean
algebras, groups and combinatorics, logic and languages.

Prerequisites: MATH 1121, 2221, or consent of instructor

CSCI 4050 Database Management Systems Design. (3)

Spring (odd years)
Introduction to database concepts using SQL and Oracle. Data models,
normalization, data description languages, query facilities. File
organization, index organization, file security, and data integrity and
reliability.

Prerequisite: CSCI 1990

CSCI 4100 Numerical Methods. (3) On demand

Introduction to numerical analysis with computer solution. Taylor series,

finite difference calculus, interpolation, roots of equations, solutions of

linear systems of equations, matrix inversion, least-squares, numerical

integration.

Prerequisites: MATH 1121, 2221, or consent of instructor

CSCI 4300 Computer Graphics. (3) On demand
An overview of graphical concepts and applications on the computer.
These include programming graphics, graphical manipulation software,
animation, web graphics, and graphics in multimedia presentations.
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 or consent of instructor

176

CSCI4500 Operating Systems. (3) On demand
\ course in systems software thai is largely concerned with operating
systems. Such topics as process management, device management, and
memor) management are discussed, as are relevant issues associated with
security and protection, networking, and distributed operating systems.
Prerequisite: ( S( 'I 3000 or consent of instructor.

( SCI 4510 -4520 -4530 Special Topics. (3) On demand
This series oi courses provides the student with material not covered in the
courses above. Topics such as telecommunications, microcomputer
interfacing, artificial intelligence, automata theory, survey of modern
languages, fourth-generation languages, operating systems, and object-
oriented design will be covered.

Prerequisite: Determined by topic

CSCI4900 Formal Languages. (3) On demand
An introduction to the basic theoretical models ofcomputability. Finite
automata. Turing machines, computability, decidability, and Gddel's
incompleteness theorem.

Prerequisite: CSC1 3250, 3310, or 3700 or consent of instructor

CSCI4950 Independent Study. (3) On demand

177

CORE PROGRAM
INTEGRATIVE CURRICULUM

Learning Objectives

The core curriculum of LaGrange College is designed to improve students'
creative, critical, and communicative abilities, as evidenced by the
following outcomes:

Students will demonstrate creativity by approaching complex problems
with innovation and from diverse perspectives.

Students will demonstrate critical thinking by acquiring, interpreting,
synthesizing, and evaluating information to reason out conclusions
appropriately.

Students will demonstrate proficiency in communication skills that are
applicable to any field of study.

Course Descriptions (CORE)

CORE 1101* First- Year Cornerstone. (3)

The academic Cornerstone program has as its main goal to introduce
entering first-semester students to what LaGrange College values in an
interdisciplinary liberal arts education. The course balances the
instructor's selected academic theme with a common set of assignments
and academic skill sets. Together, these components strive to enhance the
creative, critical, and communicative abilities of students while engaging
ethical living through servant leadership and sustainability.

CORE 1102* First-year Orientation. (1)

This extended orientation course will improve students' academic success
and ease the transition into college life. First-year students develop study
skills, time management, understand the services offered by the college
such as career development and selection of major, academic support, and
understand the traditions and policies of LaGrange College.

* Transfer students with 30 or more hours may be exempted from the
CORE 1 101/1 102 requirement.

178

CORE 1120 Problem Solving. (3)

indi\ idual and small-group problem solving geared toward real-life
situations and nontraditional problems. The course focuses on a number oi
problem soh ing strategies, such as: drau a diagram, eliminate possibilities,
make a systematic list, look for a pattern, guess and check, solve an easier
related problem and sub-problems, use tnanipulatives, work backward, act
n out, unit analysis, use algebra and finite differences, and others.
Divergent thinking and technical communication skills of writing and oral
presentation arc emphasized.

Prerequisite: MATH 1 101 or higher

CORE 1 140 Computer Applications. ( 1 )

Mathematical techniques and computer methods with spreadsheets are used
in the development ol quantitative reasoning skills. These techniques are

examined in the contexts of business and economics and of sustainability
through managing one's personal finances.
Prerequisite: MATH 1 101 or higher

CORE 2001 Humanities: Ancient through Medieval Age. (3)
This course focuses on our cultural heritage w ith an emphasis on the

impact ol the Judeo-Christian tradition as it relates to all knowledge. The
course balances the instructor's selected academic theme with a common
set of assignments and academic skill sets. The period from the emergence
ol human history to 1660 is covered in this course. Students confront
primal") and secondary source materials to gain an historical consciousness.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1 102

(OKI: :oo: Humanities II. (3)

This course focuses on our cultural heritage with an emphasis on the
impact of the Judeo-C'hristian tradition as it relates to all know ledge. The
course balances the instructor's selected academic theme with it common
set ot assignments and academic skill sets. The period from 1660 to the

present is covered in this course. Students confront primary and secondary

source materials to gam an historical consciousness.
Prerequisiu . ENGL 1 102

(OKI 3001 The American Experience. (3)

I his course focuses on the Social structure, economics, politics, and culture
of the United States. It examines many of the common assumptions about
American society, especiall) meritocracy, freedom, and "justice tor

all." In addition, the course considers issues ot sustainabilit) and how they

have shaped America's past and present and will continue to shape its

future.

Prerequisites: COR1 2001 oi CORE 2002.

179

EDUCATION

Introduction

The Department of Education offers several initial teacher preparation
programs: a Bachelor of Arts program at the Early Childhood (PK - 5th)
level and a Master of Arts in Teaching program for both the Secondary and
Middle Grades levels. The Master of Education in Curriculum and
Instruction and Specialist in Education programs are designed for those
who already have a teaching certificate. See the Education Department's
Graduate Bulletin for advanced programs.

The education curriculum at LaGrange College serves three basic purposes:

to provide for the development of professional knowledge, skills,
and dispositions that are essential for the teaching profession;

to provide planned and carefully guided sequences of field
experiences (this requires that all students meet with their advisors
before making any work plans);

to provide initial preparation programs in Early Childhood education
at the undergraduate level, and a Master of Arts in Teaching initial
preparation program for middle and high school grades, all of which
are fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools and the Georgia Professional Standards Commission;

Admission to Undergraduate Teacher Education

During the sophomore year, students intending to complete a Bachelor of
Arts program in Early Childhood Education make formal application to the
teacher education program. Normally this occurs after the student has
completed three semesters of full-time coursework.

The following are required for entrance into an undergraduate program:

GACE Basic Skills Examination requirement or exemption with a
SAT Score of at least 1000 (Verbal and Math) or ACT score of at
least 43 (English and Math)

EDUC 1 199 - Foundations of Education (grade of "C" or better)

GPAof 2.5 or better

Submission of application to program

Background check to ensure that no criminal record or discharge
from the armed services would prevent teacher certification

180

After inten ieu ing vt ith the ( lhair ol the Education I tepartment, candidates
ma) be admitted conditional}) it the results of the ( IACE Basic Skills
examination are pending, or il one of the other criteria falls marginall)
shod ol the minimum requirements. II admitted conditionally due to a GPA
thai lalK marginall) slum ol the requirement, candidates have one semester
to meet the (ip.\ requirement before being dropped from the education
program Candidates who have been conditionally admitted because they

have not satisfied the ( IA( T. requirement must slum proof that they have
taken the test w ithin the last lour weeks or are scheduled to take it by the
end ol the semester. Those who tail to show proof will not he registered

for the follow ing semester. It a junior has not satisfied the ( IA( T. Basic
Skills Assessment requirement b) the spring semester of the junior year,

the candidate will he dropped from the program and can only be reinstated
once the Education Department has received official passing scores.

1 1 uiii.K Certification

The education department otters a variety of programs that are approved

b) the Georgia Professional Standards Commission and lead to

certification in Georgia. To be eligible for recommendation by LaGrange
College for a professional teaching certificate, candidates must meet the

follow ing criteria:

Graduate from LaGrange College in an approved initial preparation
program

Maintain a 2.5 grade point average on all work attempted, and a 2.5
institutional grade point average

I am DO less than a "C-** grade on all professional and field courses

presented for graduation

Successful!) complete the Georgia certification examinations

appropriate tor the tieldisi m which certification is sought

Core Program Requirements

All candidates planning to complete approved programs of Teacher

1 ducation must complete the ('( )KI . program requirements.

181

Learning Objectives

Approved Program in Early Childhood Education

Candidates completing the Early Childhood Education Major will:

develop a thorough understanding of the social, intellectual, physical,
and emotional development of the child;

identify the nature of learning and behaviors involving the child;

construct a curriculum appropriate to the needs of the child;

utilize existing knowledge about parents and cultures in dealing
effectively with children;

gain a thorough knowledge of the fundamental concepts of
appropriate disciplines and how to relate them to the child;

identify and implement differentiated teaching strategies in lessons
designed for elementary students;

understand diagnostic tools and approaches for assessing students at
all levels and how to remediate learning problems in the various
disciplines;

develop their maximum potential through the provision of a
succession of planned and guided experiences.

Assessment of Learning Objectives

The Georgia Professional Standards Commission requires that the
Education Department use technology to show that all candidates have met
specific standards for teaching certification. To cover the cost of the
software used for individual candidate performance, portfolio development,
and data collection, a $100 subscription fee is assessed in the fall junior
course EDUC 3342 Child Development and Practicum.

Program of Study

Early Childhood majors begin their program of study during the spring
semester of their sophomore year. The course EDUC 1 199 Foundations of
Education is a prerequisite for unconditional admittance and must be taken
before or during the spring semester of the candidate's sophomore year.
Because Early Childhood Education is a cohort program, it is imperative
that interested students declare their intent to become early childhood
certification candidates by following the above admission to teacher
education procedures before spring registration in the fall of their
sophomore year.

182

Pn n i/u/v/^' EDUC 1 199 Foundation in Education

MATH Mtil

/u// Junior

1 DI (

I DI (

1 Di C4360

1 DI C4449

MATH 3102

1 Dl C4460

Spring Junior

1 Dl 1

1 Dl (

Special Needs/Exceptional Children

Fundamentals ol Mathematics I foi
I eachers

Child Development

I heories ol Reading Instruction

Curriculum and Accountability
( lassroom 1 echnolog)

Fundamentals ol Mathematics II lor
reachers

Diversity in Elementary Classroom 3

Math Methods

Fundamentals of Reading Instruction 3

l Dl (

1 Dl C4457

Language Aits Methods

Social Studies Methods

Fall Senior I Dl I

I Dl (

I Dl (
1 Dl (

Science Methods

Diagnosis/Remediation of Problems
in Reading

Integrating Specialt) Areas

Senior Seminar

Student leaehme

12

183

Admission to student teaching

Applications for student teaching are due midterm, the semester prior to
student teaching. Candidates will spend one semester in full-time teaching
activities under the supervision of a classroom teacher. Before a candidate
can begin student teaching, all core and program coursework must be
completed with at least a cumulative 2.5 GPA and a "C-" or above in
courses related to the program. Students should not hold outside
employment during the semester of student teaching without the
permission of the director of field experience.

When a candidate applies for admission to student teaching the following
artifacts are collected: GPA, Opening School Experience Journals and
Logs, Lesson Plan Rubrics, Professional Development Plans (if used),
Teacher Candidate Evaluations, and Disposition Evaluations from all field
experiences.

Detailed requirements and information related to field experience can be
found in the LaGrange College Field Experiences Handbook.

Certification Requirements

To be eligible for certification recommendation, teacher candidates must
have successfully completed all program requirements. Candidates must
successfully complete fieldwork assignments and receive satisfactory
ratings on all Teacher Performance Observation Instruments (TPOI) and
Dispositions Evaluations or show evidence of successfully completing a
Professional Development Plan. Program completion artifacts collected at
the time of graduation include transcripts, GPA, Lesson Plan Rubrics, and
Documentation of Student Learning, Opening School Experience
documentation, Senior Teacher Work Sample, Professional Logs, Teacher
Candidate Evaluations, Disposition Evaluations, and PDPs (if needed). In
addition to the above, candidates must have a passing score on the
appropriate GACE Content Examination(s).

Post Graduation

After completing an initial program, graduates are asked to respond to a
survey based on Georgia Professional Standards Commission Standards
and the Georgia Framework Domains. The survey is designed to elicit
responses regarding candidates' perceptions of their preparation at
LaGrange College. Employers of LaGrange College graduates are also
contacted and asked to complete a brief survey for each LC graduate whom
they supervise. The survey based on the Georgia Framework Domains asks
employers to rate candidates on job performance.

184

Policy for Remediation of Inappropriate
Dispositions and/or Inadequate Performance

Dispositions

Because appropriate dispositions enhance teaching and learning, the
Department ol Education believes that candidates should project positive
and productive attitudes toward students, colleagues and professors.
\, i eptable dispositions refer to positive attitudes, respect for the diverse

characteristics Ol others and taking grievances to the appropriate person in
a professional manner. In the pursuit of know ledge of learning, childhood

and society, appropriate dispositions reflect the teachers' abiding respect
for the Intellectual challenges set before them by their professors. Teachers

are committed intellectuals who value rigorous inquiry, critique and

informed skepticism as ways to expand their ethical, cultural and
intellectual universes. To engage in professional exchanges, committed
teachers must demonstrate constructive dispositions at all times. If a
classroom professor observes or becomes aware of inappropriate
dispositions, s/he will issue a written warning to the student. Upon the
second lime, the student will he required to attend a hearing of the
Education Department Faculty tor possible disciplinary action. At the
discretion of the faculty, disciplinary action may result in a reduction in
grade or in severe situations, expulsion from the program. Appropriate
dispositions are also expected and assessed during field and clinical
experiences.

Performance

Candidates who exhibit poor content knowledge, content pedagogical

knowledge, professional skills and/or tail to demonstrate a positive effect
on student learning based on specific criteria stated in the Field Experience

Handbook I I 11 ma\ be required to complete a remedial Professional
Development Plan (PDP). Dismissal from the program is possible if the
candidate tails to meet the minimum scores on the PDP. Specific

procedures, instruments and scoring criteria used to assess dispositions and

performance are described in the II H

Grants and scholarships

Qualified eari) childhood and BA MA I education candidates are eligible
lor HOPE Promise and TEACH grants. See General Grants and

Scholarship m the Financial Aid portion of this bulletin lor details.

Combined B.A. and M.A.T Program of Study

Undergraduate students who meet the admission requirements for the
M.A.T (passing GACE Basic Skills or a combined SAT score of more than
1000) and those who have a GPA of 3.0 or higher in their undergraduate
studies have the opportunity to participate in a combined B.A. and M.A.T.
program of study after the completion of 90 semester hours. Once
accepted, candidates may take entering cohort graduate courses the
Summer Semester following their junior year of study. Upon gaining
senior status, candidates may take one three-credit graduate course during
the Fall, Interim, and Spring Semesters only if enrolled with twelve
undergraduate credits.

B.A. and M.A.T. Program of Study

First Summer EDUC 6040 Foundations of Curriculum and

Semester I Instruction (after 90 credit hours)

EDUC 5000

Summer Field Experience

3

First Summer
Semester II

EDUC 6020

Educational Technology

3

First Fall Semester

EDUC 5060

Students with Special Needs

3

Interim

EDUC 5040

Affirming Diversity in the
Classroom

3

First Spring Semester

EDUC 5020

OR

EDUC 5090

Teaching Methods in the Middle and

Secondary Grades

OR

Foundations of Reading Theories

3

Second Summer
Semester I

EDUC 6030

Problems of Reading

3

Second Summer
Semester II

EDUC 6010
OR
EDUC 5070

Assessment and Accountability

OR

Assessing and Improving Literacy

3

Second Fall Semester EDUC 5700

Internship I

(formal observations)

Second Spring
Semester

EDUC 5700

Internship II
(formal observations)

186

Course Descriptions (EDUC)

lDl ( n*>> Foundation In Education. (3) Fall and Spring

An introduction to teaching and learning. This course addresses teacher

beha\ ior, teacher rules, teacher ethics and experiences, historical

perspectives, philosophical foundations, approaches to curriculum
development, the politics oi education, school governance, school funding
and legal issues, school environments, and living and learning in a diverse
society . I his course is a prerequisite tor admission to education program

and includes an initial school visitation experience.

M \ in 3101 Fundamentals of Mathematics I for Teachers. (3)

Spring
A stud) ot topics in mathematics designed lor future elemental) and

middle school teachers who are not pursuing a concentration m

mathematics. Topics include problem solving, number systems and die
relationships between these systems, understanding multiplication and
division, including wh) standard computational algorithms work,
properties ot arithmetic, and applications of elementary mathematics. The

NCTM and ( leorgia Performance Standards are used to frame the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or higher

MAUI 3102 Fundamentals of Mathematics II for Teachers. (3)
Fall

A stud) ot topics m mathematics designed lor future elemental) and
middle school teachers who are not pursuing a concentration in
mathematics. Topics include numbers and operations, algebra, geometry,
data anal\ sis. statistics, probability, and measurement. Technology is used
when appropriate. The NCTM and Georgia Performance Standards are

used to frame the course.

/'/< requisiu . MATH 1 101 or higher

I l)l ( 3317 Science Methods. (3) Fall

I his course addresses science content, process skills, attitudes, and real-
world applications that are developmental!) appropriate for science and

instruction. Effective teaching strategies that incorporate integrated and
interdisciplinary approaches, technology, literature, multicultural
education, and the Georgia Performance Standards are combined with
theories ol learning. Field experience required.

EDUC3319 Math Methods. (3) Spring

The math methods course focuses on a constructivist approach to teaching
and learning with emphasis on problem-solving, NCTM standards, and
Georgia Performance Standards. The course stresses mental mathematical
exercises and activities with manipulatives that promote mathematical
confidence in children. There is an extensive field experience that involves
a semester relationship with exemplary math teachers. Coursework
involves implementation of the tenets that underlie the conceptual
framework of the Education Department.

EDUC3342 Child Development Practicum. (3) Fall
A study of the principles of growth and development from conception
through twelve years of age. Specific attention will be given to the
influences of family on physical maturation, cognitive development, social
skills, and personality development. Major contributions from the leading
authorities in the field are emphasized during the study of each area of
development. A nursery and preschool field experience is required.

EDUC 3354 Theories of Reading Instruction. (3) Fall
Different theories of reading instruction are the focus for this course.
Special emphasis is on children's literature and its role in successful
reading programs. Other topics include: reading process, principles of
reading instruction, and emergent literacy. IRA standards and Georgia
Performance Standards provide a basis for lesson plans and field
experiences in local schools.

EDUC 3355 Fundamentals of Reading Instruction. (3) Spring
A study of word recognition strategies with emphasis on phonics.
Teaching techniques for vocabulary and comprehension, reading in content
areas, and interrelatedness of reading and writing are also addressed.
Standards from IRA and Georgia Performance Standards are used in
combination with various approaches to effective instruction in planning
effective lessons for experiences in local schools.

EDUC 3356 Integrating Specialty Areas into Classroom

Instruction (3) Fall
This course teaches the early childhood certification candidate how to
integrate the arts, health and physical education into instruction. Through
collaboration with college faculty, elementary classroom teachers and
specialty area teachers, candidates will understand, and use the content,
functions, and achievements of dance, music, theater, and the several visual

188

.His as primary media for communication, inquiry, and insight among
elemental) students; use the major concepts in the subject matter of health
education to create opportunities for student development and practice ol
skills that contribute to good health; and know, understand, and use human
movement and physical activity as central elements to foster active,
health) life styles and enhanced quality oi life for elementary students.

ll)l ( 4356 Diagnosis and Remediation of Problems In Reading.

(3) Fall
I he focus o( this course is the identification and correction of reading
problems in elemental) school students. Special attention is given to
testing and teaching materials for corrective work including reading
inventories, tonn.il ai\^\ informal assessment, and computer programs. A
variety ol assessment techniques, IKA standards, Georgia Performance

Standards, and technology are incorporated throughout the course.

EDI C 4360 Curriculum and Accountability In Elementary
Grades. (3) Fall

Tins course addresses the practical aspects ol curriculum development
along with the role ol preparation and its contribution to successful
classroom management A variety of assessment techniques, use of the
Georgia Performance Standards, differentiated instruction, and classroom
management are among other key areas that are studied. EDUC 4360
Curriculum and Accountability in the Elementary Grades is taken in

conjunction W tth II H fC 4480 Senior Seminar.

EDI ( 444 ( > Classroom Technologj for Elementary Grades. (3)
Fall

A course ottered to carls childhood and middle grades education majors
during the tall and spring semesters. This course meets the expected

performances found in the Georgia Technology Standards tor Educators. It

is designed to teach <a | ( llobal Communication Skills (b) Application
Skills and (c) Integrative Strategies. All students are responsible for

designing a professional web site and electronic portfolio that contains

evidence ol their expertise in classroom technology. The evidence must

he aliened W ith the ( leorgia I echnolog) Standards.

189

EDUC4456 Language Arts Methods. (3) Spring
This course provides a thematic approach to methods for teaching language
arts in the elementary grades. Major topics include oral and written
language, reading and writing workshop, spelling, and grammar. Georgia
Performance Standards, NCTE and IRA standards are used in developing
instructional resources and units. Field experience is required.

EDUC 4457 Social Studies Methods. (3) Spring
The interdisciplinary nature of social studies are the focus for the study of
curriculum, methods, technology, and professional sources. Emphasis is on
planning for and developing resources for instruction, including the
development of a unit with emphasis on the NCSS standards and Georgia
Performance Standards for a chosen grade level. This course includes a
field experience component.

EDUC 4459 Special Needs and Exceptional Children. (3) Spring
A study of identification and diagnostic techniques for teachers related to
areas of exceptionality among students and of alternative styles of teaching
to meet special needs. The introduction to the Student Support Team
(SST) process, the writing of eligibility reports and Individual Education
Plans (IEP) are explored. The psychological and behavioral characteristics
of exceptional children are studied. The importance of transition and other
forms found within the exceptional children's categories is identified.
Weekly field experience in the exceptional children's areas will be
provided.

EDUC 4460 Diversity in the Elementary Classroom. (3) Interim
This course addresses a variety of issues in diversity including
psychological, physiological, and social conditions of different students.
Various issues of equality and equal opportunity are also examined as well
as strategies for working with children at risk. This course includes a field
experience in diverse school settings outside of Troup County.

EDUC 4480 Senior Seminar. (3) Fall

This course is designed to explore current issues in early childhood
education. Teacher candidates choose topics, examine research, and
present information in a workshop format. Another focus of the course is
classroom management, lesson presentations and peer critiques. In
addition, teacher candidates have the opportunity to discuss field
experiences in connection with the conceptual framework and national and
state standards.

190

EDI C4490E I artj Childhood Student Teaching. (12)

Fall and Spring
l his course pro> ides .1 full da) teaching experience tor a minimum of
thirteen weeks. Pre service teachers are assigned to diverse public schools
and graduall) assume responsibilit) for working with groups and
ituli\ iduals. I hc\ participate in classroom teaching and observation,
planning and evaluation conferences, and other school-related experiences
with guidance provided b) the cooperating teacher and college supervisor,
graduall) assuming total responsibilit) for the class.

191

ENGLISH

Introduction

The Department of English Language and Literature offers a wide range of
courses to meet a variety of needs and demands:

introductory and advanced courses in composition and literary studies;

British and American literature survey and period courses;

genre studies including non-English works in translation;

language and theory courses;

single-author courses;

creative writing and nonfiction writing courses.

Learning Objectives of Composition courses

The primary goal of courses in composition and literature is to help
students become competent readers and writers by providing them with
challenging texts and ample opportunities to practice their skills of critical
thinking and expression. Toward this end, the English faculty has set the
following four objectives. All students completing the core curriculum will
demonstrate:

proficiency in expository writing with Standard American English
grammar, punctuation, and usage;

proficiency in critical reading;

the ability to assimilate, organize, and develop ideas logically and
effectively;

an understanding of the rudiments of research-based writing, including
accurate and ethical citation and MLA documentation.

Learning Objectives of English Major Courses

All students completing the baccalaureate program in English will be
prepared to pursue careers in which a broad knowledge of literature and a
proficiency in critical reading, critical thinking, and expository writing are
important. They also will be prepared to pursue graduate studies in English
and in other professional areas, such as law, medicine, or journalism. In
addition, students who wish to prepare for a career in teaching may do so
by completing a major in English. For each of these endeavors, English
majors will demonstrate:

192

.i capacity foi interpreting literature, reading critically, and expressing
literary ideas, both in oral discussion and in written work;

an ability to bring informed critical and analytical judgment to bear

(Mi the stud) ol literarj issues, both in oral discussion and in written

uoik;

.i master) ol the techniques ol Literal) research and the use ol Ml \
style;

a knowledge ol Standard American English grammar, punctuation,
and syntax;

.1 knowledge ol Standard American English usage.

Asm ssmim ol Learning Objectives

1 English majors arc required to complete a capstone course, English 4495,
in the final semester of their senior year. In this course, students must
demonstrate then completion ol the major's objectives through

composing a senior thesis essa) and gh ing a senior thesis presentation.

Students preparing for graduate stud) in English or law are encouraged to
take theGREorthe LSAT.

Requirements for a Major in English

Hehue declaring English as a major, students must complete the CORE

Composition classes 1 |.\( il. 1 101 t V 1 102) w ith no grade lower than a C.

English majors are required to take 40 semester hours m English language

and literature above the 1000 level, lor satisfactor) completion of the
major, Students must complete each major course with a grade ofC or

better.
English Major

uitroductor) Course 1 1 required)

l nc.I 2200 I 1-hour course)

Surve) Courses i 3 required I

l NG1 2204, 2205, 2206, 2207

I anguage/Theor) Courses (1 required)

l \( i] ! KX), 3302, 44oo

w riting Courses 1 1 requin

l \(,l | K)3, ; ; <>c I ; os. 1310, 1315

193

Genre Courses (2 required)

ENGL 3315, 3335, 3345, 3355, 4440, 4450, 4460

British Literature Courses (2 required)

ENGL 3320, 3330, 3340, 3350, 3360

American Literature Courses (2 required)
ENGL 3375, 3380, 3385, 3390

Single- Author Courses (1 required)
ENGL 4410, 4420, 4430

Capstone Course (1 required)
ENGL 4495

Total: 40 semester hours

Requirements for a Minor in English

The English Department offers two minors: English Minor with Literature
Concentration and English Minor with Writing Concentration. The
requirements of each minor are as follows:

English Minor: Literature Concentration

Survey Courses (2 required)

ENGL 2204, 2205, 2206, 2207

Language Courses (1 required)
ENGL 3300, 3302

Genre Courses (1 required)

ENGL 3315, 3335, 3345, 3355, 4440, 4450, 4460

British Literature Courses (1 required)

ENGL 3320, 3330, 3340, 3350, 3360

American Literature Courses (1 required)
ENGL 3375, 3380, 3385, 3390

Total: 18 semester hours

194

English Minor: Writing Concentration

Survej ( bourses 1 1 required I

l NG1 2204, 2205, 2206, 2207

I anj I leor) ( bourses 1 2 required)

I NG1 2210. 2212. 2215

Creative Writing Courses 1 1 required)
l NCI 3306, 3308

Nonfiction Writing/Genre Courses (2 required)
l \(,i J303, *310, 1315

I otal: is semester hours

A\\ AKDS

The English Department gives the follow ing awards to outstanding English
majors during the annual Honors Daj program:

the Walter D. Jones Award for Excellence in Composition and
Scholarship

the MuriaJ B. Williams Award for Excellence In Literal*) Studies

the Francis Marion Chalker Medlock Prize for Poetry

The Jones Vward is given to the student whose paper written for a major
course is judged as outstanding h> an impartial panel of reviewers. The
Williams Award is given to the student who is deemed b> the English
faculty to demonstrate the highest standards of scholarship and who
contributes the most to the advancement of literal") studies among English
majors at LaGrange College. The Medlock Prize is awarded to the student
who has demonstrated a love of and appreciation for poetry and who shows
great promise as ,m aspiring poet.

In addition, each spring at Honors Da\. the Department of English

;nizes the most outstanding essay< s > composed for a Rhetoric and
Composition course ENG1 1 loi or 1 102) during the current academic
year. The winning essay(s) are published in the next year's edition of the
LaGrangi i olltgt Handbook of Rhetoric and Composition.

195

Sigma Tau Delta

Sigma Tau Delta, the International English Honor Society, confers
distinction upon students of the English language and literature in
undergraduate, graduate, and professional studies. Sigma Tau Delta fosters
all aspects of the discipline of English, including literature, language, and
writing; promotes exemplary character and good fellowship among its
members; and upholds high standards of academic excellence.
Qualifications for induction into the local chapter, Alpha Beta Chi, include
the recommendation of the English faculty, an overall GPA of 3.0, and a
GPA of 3.5 in English major courses.

Writing Center

The Department of English Language and Literature maintains a Writing
Center, which serves the college community by providing advice and
support for student writers. The Writing Center is part of the Moshell
Learning Center, located on the ground (2 nd ) floor of the Frank and Laura
Lewis Library. Both facilities are directed by Dr. Laine Scott, who trains
students to serve as peer writing consultants. These tutors are available
Sunday through Thursday evenings, from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Students who are ineligible for work-study funding may enroll in ENGL
4492 (On-Campus Internship) and thus earn one to three semester hours
of academic credit for their service as writing tutors. Note that these hours
do not count toward the major or minor in English. This course may be
repeated for credit.

The Scroll and LC Writing Contest

Since 1922, The Scroll has been LaGrange College's journal of creative
arts. Published each spring, the magazine features the best of fiction,
drama, poetry, essays, and artwork by the students and faculty of the
College.

The LC Writing Contest is an annual event sponsored by the English
Department, the Writing Center, and The Scroll. It is open to all LC
students. First and second prizes are awarded to best entries in
fiction/drama, poetry, and essay. Winners are announced at Honors Day
and included in the annual Scroll.

196

Advanced Placement

Most I a< irange College students will take Rhetoric and Composition I and
n ENG1 1101 and 1 102 1 during their first year. Some students will
receive credil foi one ol these courses based on the Advanced Placemen! Test.

Students who earn a score o( A or 5 on the \\* Test In English
Language and Composition will receive three hours of credit for
Rhetoric and Composition I [English 1 101 1.

Students who cam a score ol 4 or 5 on the AI* Test In English

/ //( rature and ( Composition w ill receive three hours ol credil for
Rhetoric and Composition II [English 1 102].

Students who earn a SCODS ol 4 or 5 OH both tests must choose which

course the) prefer to exempt. Onl) one exemption [sallowed.

Onl) the AP Tests m English Language or English Literature are
accepted for credil in the LaGrange College English program.

Honors ENGLISH

The honors sections ol ENG1 1101 and 1 102 are open to students whose
standardized test scores and other placement criteria indicate the) would
benefit from more challenging readings and writing assignments.
Enrollment in each honors section is limited to 15 students, and
participation is based upon placement criteria or recommendation from the
English facult) of LaGrange College. LC transcripts will reflect
participation in an honors-level course.

I\ 1 ERNATIONAL STUDEN is

International students must enroll in a 1000-level English course during
each semester that the) spend at LaGrange College until the) have
satisfactoril) completed both courses in the Rhetoric and Composition
sequence (ENG1 1101 and 1102).

Transient Credi i

transient credit w ill be accepted for courses in first-year Rhetoric and
Composition (ENG1 1 KM or 1 i 1

Combined B.A. and M.A.T Program of Study

Undergraduate students who meet the admission requirements for the
Master of Arts in Teaching [M.A.T] (passing GACE Basic Skills or a
combined SAT score of more than 1000) and those who have a GPA of 3.0
or higher in their undergraduate studies are eligible to participate in a
combined B.A. and M.A.T. program of study after the completion of 90
semester hours. Once accepted, candidates may take entering cohort
graduate courses the Summer Semester following their junior year of
study. Upon gaining senior status, candidates may take one three credit
graduate course during the Fall, Interim, and Spring Semesters only if
enrolled with twelve undergraduate credits.

Course Descriptions (ENGL)

ENGL 1101 Rhetoric and Composition I. (3) Fall and Spring
Introduction to expository writing, emphasizing the essay form, the writing
process, and rhetorical modes of thesis development. Some students may
be invited to join an honors section of ENGL 1101. Prerequisite to all
higher-numbered English courses.

ENGL 1102 Rhetoric and Composition II. (3) Fall and Spring
Introduction to critical thinking and writing about literature, emphasizing
reading strategies, analytic writing, research techniques, and modes of
documentation. Some students may be invited to join an honors section of
ENGL 1 102. Prerequisite to all higher-numbered English courses.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101.

ENGL 2200 Introduction to Literary Studies. (1) Fall
Introduces students to the academic discipline of English. Focuses on
critical issues (past and present) involved in literary studies. This course is
a prerequisite for English majors for any 3000- or 4000-level course.
Required of all English majors.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 101 & 1 102

t ENGL 2204 British Literature I. (3) Fall (even years)

A survey of British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the

eighteenth century. Short critical essays required, at least one with

documentation.

198

ENGL 2205 British Literature ll. (3) Spring (odd years)
\ surve) ol British literature from the Romantic through the Modern/
Postmodern period Shod critical essays required, al least one with
documentation.

I \(,i 2206 American Literature I. (3) Fall (odd years)
\ survey ol American I iterature from the Colonial period through
American Romanticism Shod critical essays required, al least one with
documentation.

i M.l 2207 American Literature ll. (3)
\ surve) ol American literature from Realism and Naturalism through the
Modern Postmodern period. Shod critical essays required, at least one
w iih documentation.

I NGL 2210 Introduction to Peer Tutoring. (3) In rotation
Tins course prepares undergraduates to work as peer tutors in a writing
center. Students practice tutoring as the) lean about reading and
responding to the writing of others. Students from all majors, as well as
undeclared majors, arc encouraged to enroll.

/'/( n quisites*. ENG1 1 101 & 1 102 an J permission of the

instructor.

ENGL 2212 Rhetorical Theory. (3) Spun- 201 1
Tins course introduces undergraduates to the theor) thai informs the
modern practice ol teaching composition. Fundamentals of persuasion and
human communication are presented as well.
Prerequisites'. ENGL 1 101 cV 1 102

I NGL 2215 w riting tboufl Film. (3) Fall 2010

I Ins course focuses on the critical \ ieu ing of film w ith critical w riting in

several modes.

/'/< requisites'. I M.l 1 101 & I 102

Prerequisite to 3000-level or 4000-level courses: ENGL 1101, 1102, and
for l ngtish majors, I VGL 2200

I N( ,i 3300 HistniN of the English Language. (3) Fall 2010
Introduction to principles ol linguistics; a surve) ol the origins and
development ol English, and a stikh ol its structure.

|00

ENGL 3302 Advanced Grammar. (3) Spring 201 1

A survey of the basic logic and grammatical structure of English, from

morpheme to word, phrase and clause, to sentence.

ENGL 3303 Advanced Composition. (3) Fall 20 1
This course is open to all students, regardless of major, who are interested
in strengthening their written expression beyond the level of "functional."
The focus is on producing nonfiction prose that is exemplary for its clarity
and finesse.

ENGL 3306 Creative Writing Workshop (poetry). (3) Spring 201 1
An advanced course in imaginative writing. Professional models studied,
but student writing emphasized.

ENGL 3308 Creative Writing Workshop (fiction). (3)

An advanced course in imaginative writing. Professional models studied,
but student writing emphasized.

ENGL 3310 Art of Argumentation. (3) Spring 201 1
This course presents the fundamentals of effective persuasion, including
the three appeals (logical, emotional, ethical), logical fallacies, inductive
and deductive reasoning, and evaluation of evidence. Students from all
majors, as well as undeclared majors, are encouraged to enroll.

ENGL 3315 Readings in Literary Journalism. (3)

This course consists of a survey of literary journalism, a form of creative
nonfiction that blends elements of fictional narrative and factual reporting.

ENGL 3320 Medieval Literature. (3) Fall 20 1

A survey, mostly in Middle English, of English literature to about 1500.

ENGL 3330 Renaissance Literature. (3) In rotation
Renaissance English literature to about 1675, excluding Shakespeare.

ENGL 3335 Development of Drama. (3) In rotation

An examination of the development of drama, excluding Shakespeare,

from its beginnings up through the 18 th century.

200

i \(,i 3340 Restoration and Neoclassical Literature.0)

wmsi 3340 Restoration and Eighteenth-Centur} English

Literature. (3)
Selected Restoration, Neoclassical, and Pie-Romantic English Literature,
excluding the novel.

I NGL334S

or l he Rise of the Novel. (3)

wmsi 3345

A stud) ol die i ise ol the novel \* ith an emphasis on selected works oi
the late seventeenth century and eighteenth century, including novels in
translation.

ENGL 3350 English Romanticism. (3)

A stud) ol selected major nineteenth-centur) British prose and poetry,

u uh emphasis on lyric verse.

I NGL 3355 rhe Nmeteenth-Centur} NoveL (3) Fall 2010
A stud) ol selected nineteenth centur) novels, including novels in
translation.

1 NGL 3360 \ Ictorian Literature. (3) Spring 201 !

A stud) ol selected major Victorian prose and poetry, with emphasis on

Tennyson, Browning, and the Pre-Raphaelites.

ENGL 3375 American RomantkisnL (3) Fall 2010

Major American Romantic writers through Whitman and Dickinson.

I \(,l 3380 American Realism and Naturalism. (3)

American writers ol the Realistic and Naturalistic movements in
the United states.

I \(,1 3385 Southern literature. (3)

A Stud) ol major Southern unlets from about 1815 to the present.

I NGL 3390 Modern and Contemporar) American Literature.

(3)

A stud\ ol major Amenean writers from l l NM) to the present

I NGL 4400 Contemporary Uterarj rheory. (3) In rotation
rve) ol theoretical interpretive traditions of the 20th and 21st
centuries.

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ENGL 4410 Chaucer. (3)

A survey of Chaucer's work. Consideration will also be given to
Chaucerian influence and criticism.

ENGL 4420 Shakespeare. (3)

The development of Shakespeare's art, as reflected in selected individual
plays or groups of plays.

ENGL 4430 Milton. (3) Fall 20 1
Selected poetry and prose of Milton.

ENGL 4440 Modern / Contemporary Fiction. (3) Spring 201 1
A study of selected contemporary fiction writers and their novels or short
stories, including works in translation.

ENGL 4450 Modern / Contemporary Poetry. (3) In rotation

A study of selected contemporary poets and their poems, including works

in translation.

ENGL 4460 Modern / Contemporary Drama. (3) In rotation

A study of contemporary playwrights and their plays, including works in

translation.

ENGL 4492 On-Campus Internship. (1-3) On demand

This course allows students who are ineligible for the college's work-study

program to serve as tutors in the Writing and Tutoring Center. This

internship cannot be counted as one of the courses required for the major

or minor in English, but it may be repeated for credit. Pass/Fall grading

only.

ENGL 4495 Senior Thesis and Presentation. (3) Spring
English majors write and present orally an original research project based on
a significant topic in language or literature. Required of all English majors.
Prerequisite: Senior standing

ENGL 4496 Internship. (1-3) On demand
An opportunity for students to gain added experience and insight in
approved off-campus settings. The internship cannot be counted as one of
the courses required for the major or minor in English.

Prerequisites: Consent of the supervising instructor, department

chair, and the Career Development Center

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I \(,i. 4-m Independent Study/Research. (3) On demand

I I his is an opportunity For students u> conduct an indh idual, in-depth
exploration ol an area in literature, writing, or theory.

Prerequisites: Consent ot the instructor, the department chair, and
the Provost

Denotea com sis In En glish that m;i> substitute for ;i ( OKI
Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

HEALTH and PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Introduction

The curriculum in the Department of Health and Physical Education is
composed of two programs. The physical education activities program
offers a selection of physical skill classes designed to promote health,
physical skill development and lifetime fitness. The minor programs offer
courses that are designed for students who may be involved in some facet
of physical education or coaching as a career path. Coaching at all levels,
health/fitness promotion and sports management are all potential
employment areas.

Learning Objectives

The activities program strives to provide classes for student to gain skill in
activities for lifetime fitness. The two minor programs provide knowledge
and skill in teaching and coaching areas that will be beneficial in career
choices and/or leisure pursuits.

Assessment of learning objectives

satisfactorily complete all course work requirements

maintain a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA

current certification in Community First Aid/CPR.

Required hours for the physical education minor
and for the coaching minor

There are two minor programs, one in physical education and one in
coaching. The department will guide the student in selecting courses that
best meet the student's aims and plans. Fifteen (15) semester hours are
required for each minor.

Physical Education minors must take HPED 225 1 - Introduction to
Physical Education

Coaching minors must take HPED 3310 Coaching Theory and Methods.

The remaining 12 semester hours for either minor may be selected from
the following courses:

HPED 1 154 First Aid: Responding to Emergencies
HPED 2202 Sports Statistics
HPED 225 1 Introduction to Physical Education
HPED 3302 Organization and Administration of Physical
Education and Recreation

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him D 1 105 spoils Psychoid

him D3310 ( baching rheor) and Methods

him D 1312 Principles of Strength, Conditioning and Nutrition for

Athletes

HIM D33I3 l eadership in Physical Education and Athletics

him D33 Prevention and Care oi Athletic Injuries/Illness

him D ;;v '<> Seminar and lab Practice in Physical Education

him n 1400 Internship in Physical Education

Coi km Descriptions (HPED)

hn 1) U53 Camp Leadership and Program. (3) On demand
A stud) ol camping in an organized setting and of the leadership skills
necessar) for the implementation of the camp program

HIM l) 1154 I irst Aid: Responding to Emergencies. (3)

Fall and Spring
This course focuses on the identification of emergenc) situations and
selection ol correct response. Certification in American Red Cross
standard first aid and adult, child and infant rescue breathing and
cardiopulmonary resuscitation is earned upon successful completion ol the
course.

HPED 1155 Lifeguard Training. (3) Spring

Competencies m swimming and life guarding techniques, swimming speed

and endurance are developed in this course. American \<l\\ Cross Lifeguard

training and cardiopulmonary resuscitation tor the professional rescuer

certifications are the result ol successful completion ol this course.

Pn -< quisites". Current Standard First Aid Certification; Passing of

the folloVi ing practical exams on the firs! ^\a\ of class; 500 yd.

continuous swim (crawl, breast stroke and sidestroke); treading
water for two minutes with legs onl) and retrieving a brick from

the deep end ol the pool.

HPED 1156 Water Safety Instructor. (3) Spring.

\ course which toe uses on the development of competencies in su imming

Stroke and instructional techniques. Students who SUCCeSSfull) complete

this i .in certification in RcA Cross wsi. enabling them to teach all

levels ( >t the I earn id Swim Program, Bask and I i m ergency Water Safer) courses

HPED 2202 Sports Statistics. (3)On demand

hniqu es ol ret ts statistics and rnamtaining scorebooks are

the locus ol this class.

HPED 2251 Introduction to Physical Education. (3) On demand
A survey course of the career choices available in physical education.
Opportunities to talk with and observe professionals in various sub-
specializations.

HPED 3302 Organization and Administration of Recreational
and Physical Education Programs. (3) On demand
A study of the organization and administration of instructional, intramural,
and interscholastic activity programs. Special emphasis is placed on the
selection, purchase, and care of safe equipment and facilities as well as on
the legal requirements for providing and maintaining safe programs and facilities.

HPED 3305 Sports Psychology. (3) Spring
A study of human behavior in the context of the sporting experience and
how performance is affected by the interactions of the coach, athletes and
the environment. Emphasis is on motivation, personality, attributions,
disengagement from sport, aggression, leadership, and communication patterns.

HPED 3306 Techniques of Sports Officiating. (3) Spring
This course focuses on techniques of officiating athletic events.
Knowledge of the rules of selected sports and extensive practical
officiating in selected sports form the basis of this course.

HPED 3310 Coaching Theory and Methods. (3) On demand
Analysis of teaching skills and techniques of the different interscholastic
sports in high schools.

HPED 3312 Principles of Strength Conditioning and Nutrition

for Athletes. (3) Fall
This course focuses on the examination of proper techniques, concepts, and
applications of exercise science. Nutritional principles as these relate to
athletic performance also are included.

HPED 3313 Leadership in Physical Education and Athletics.

(3) Spring
A study of the leadership skills necessary to implement and conduct
physical activity programs and functions.

HPED 3320 Methods in Health and Physical Education in

the Elementary School. (3) Fall
A study of the objectives, materials, activities, and curricula appropriate for
elementary school physical education and health. Supervised observation
and practical experiences in the elementary schools are provided.

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him I) 3331 Personal Health Issues. (3) On demand
l his course allows students to explore basic health issues and principles in
depth, topics include fitness, diet and weight control, nutrition, human
sexuality, stress management, death education, aging, and drug and
alcohol education.

UN I) 3332 Pre v e n tion and Care of Athletic Injuries/Illnesses. (3)

Spring
This course focuses on common mimics and illnesses occurring in
athletics. I opus include, but are not limited to, hen exhaustion, heat
stroke, abdominal injuries, injury management, emergency triage,
anatomical instability, blood borne pathogens, and mechanics <>i injury.

HPED 3333 Yogi far Wellness. (3) I all

\ stud) ol the effects that yoga has on all aspects of the human body,
including physical, mental, and spiritual. Topics will include breathing
techniques, asanas, fasting, meditation, and different disciplines of yoga.

HPED 3334 Advanced N oga with Martial Arts Training. (3)

Fall and Spring
This advanced course will build on the foundation that the yoga for
wellness course established. Advanced Yoga with Martial Arts Training
will emphasize mental focus, bod) organization, alignment, technique, and
core development I his a<\\ a\kw\ yoga course w, ith martial arts training is
designed to bring the student eye to eye with their greatest obstacles, which
are perceived physical and mental limitations. This course is one pathwa)
to cultivating the mind/bod) clarity and power that leads to developing the will.

HPED 3340 Karate: Techniques and Phllosoph) (3) On demand

A stud) ot the interrelation between training and philosoph) in
karate. Students learn karate techniques and examine the philosophy of
modem karate. Participants observe how, the philosoph) influences the
essences ot training and how the training affects the spun of
philosophy. Physical activit) is required.

HPED 3352 Physlolog) of Exercise. (3) On demand

ercise on the major systems ot the human body, including
cardiorespiratory, neuromuscular, glandular, and digestive are the focus of

this course I rTtt tS ot beat, altitude, and ergOgenic aids on the human bod)
during exercise also are included.
Pn requisitt r. UK >l 2148- BIOI 2149

HPED 3390 Seminar and Lab Practice in Physical Education. (3)

Fall and Spring
This course provides supervised leadership experiences in various physical
education or athletic settings. Seminar discussions focus on common
issues and concerns.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and completion of 6 hours of

HPED courses

HPED 4400 Internship in Physical Education and Coaching. (3)

Interim

Directed observation and participation in physical education, coaching,

and/or supervisory situations.

Prerequisites'. All students eligible with recommendation from the
department chair in health and physical education

Physical Education Activities (PEDU)

The physical education activity program is designed to provide
opportunities for learning or enhancing those skills necessary to participate
in leisure time activities throughout the life cycle. Special emphasis also is
given to activities which improve one's physical fitness and condition. All
courses carry one semester hour of credit and count toward the hours
needed for graduation.

PEDU 1102 Beginning Archery. (1) Fall and Spring

Basic competencies in archery techniques and safety with experiences in

target shooting.

PEDU 1103 Badminton. (1) Spring

Introduction to the skills, strategies, and rules of badminton.

PEDU 1104 Basketball. (1) On demand

Basic competencies in the techniques, strategies, and rules of basketball.

PEDU 1105 Jogging. (1) Fall and Spring

Participation in progressive running programs designed to increase

cardiovascular endurance.

PEDU 1108 Physical Conditioning. (1) Fall and Spring

Basic assessment, maintenance, and improvement of over-all physical

fitness.

PEDU 1109 Beginning Golf. (1) Fall and Spring

Introduction to the basic skills, strategies, and rules of golf. Field trips to

city golf courses.

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N Di 1 1 1 1 Softball. (1) Fall

Basic competencies and know ledge oi rules and strategies oi softball.

PEDI 1112 Beginning Tennis. (1) Fall and Spring
[ntroduction to the basic skills, strategies, and rules oi tennis.

PEDI 1 1 14 Volleyball. (1) Fall and Spring

Basic competencies in the techniques, strategies, and rules oi volleyball.

PI di 1 1 16 Personal Fitness. (1) Spring

[ntroduction to diet and weight control techniques as well as assessment

and maintenance oi personal fitness.

iini 1 120 Karate. (l)On demand

Basic competencies and skills in karate techniques.

N Di 1 121 Bicycling. (1) On demand

Introduction u> the basic equipment, safety . and techniques of cycling

including training and racing strategies. Weekend field trips.

PEDI 1122 Weightlifting/Plyonietrics. (1) Fall and Spring
[ntroduction to exercises thai are geared toward increasing speed, power,
and jumping ability. A basic overview of the physiological factors
involved in the exercises.

PEDI 112^ Be ginning Sw imming. (1) Spring

Introduction to the aquatic en\ ironmenl w ith emphasis on competence in
primar) swimming mk\ safety skills and stroke readiness.

PEDI 1124 Intermediate/Advanced Swimming, (1) On demand
Development and refinemenl ol key swimming strokes, [ntroduction to
turns, surface dives, and springboard diving.

Pn n quisiu IM I )l 112 1 oi equivalent skills

PI Dl 1130 SCI BA. ill Fall and Spring

Competencies in safe diving techniques and practices as well as sate use of
SO BA diving equipment P \Dl open Water Diver Certification available
upon completion oi course and optional trip for checkout dives.

Prei PEDI 11 24 or equivalent intermediate

swimming skills

PEDU 1156 Canoeing. (1) Fall and Spring

Fundamental canoeing skills emphasized. Field trips to lake facilities and
overnight camping experience are provided to give extensive opportunities
for recreational canoeing.

PEDU 1158 Backpacking. (1) Spring

Introduction to basic equipment, safety, and techniques of trail camping.

Extensive field trips to state and national trails are provided.

PEDU 1161 Rhythmic Aerobics. (1) Fall and Spring

A conditioning course in which exercise is done to musical accompaniment

for the purpose of developing cardiovascular efficiency, strength and

flexibility.

PEDU 1162 Hiking, Orienteering, and Camping. (1) Fall and Spring
Introduction to basic techniques of tent camping, map, and compass work. '
Field trips to nearby campgrounds and forest lands.

PEDU 1164 Water Aerobics. (1) Fall and Spring
Development of cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, body
composition, and muscle endurance/tone through vigorous water exercise.
The resistance of the water makes this course an excellent choice for the
beginner as well as the well-conditioned athlete, and for the swimmer as
well as the non-swimmer.

PEDU 1 166 Scottish Country Dance. (1) Fall and Spring
Introduction to, and dancing folk dances of Scotland. Learn figures and
steps of reels, jigs, and strathspey. Opportunity to attend workshops
sponsored by the Atlanta Branch of The Royal Scottish Country Dance
Society.

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HISTORY

In i ROD! CI ion

i be facult) ol the I tepaitmem ol Histor) believes thai all persons,
whatevei then selected role in life, require an understanding ol their pasl in
ordei to prepare foi their future, I he facult} firm!) believes thai the liberal
.iits preparation, which encompasses courses from the discipline <>i history,
provides the studenl with the mosl appropriate educational background for
life b\ integrating knowledge from the broadesl range ol disciplines. The
objective ol the Department ol l listor) is to pro> ide students al LaGrange
College with knowledge ol the historical forces which have shaped
ci\ ilization .is we know n.

Li mining Objectives

I o achieve the mission sel forth above, all courses seek to help each
studenl ultimately demonstrate:

\ grounding in and familiarit) with a basic historical narrative;

\n abilit) to master and analyze primar) sources;

\n awareness ol historiograph) and the ability to critically assess thai
historiograph) ;

Vcapacit) to synthesize material from a variet) of sources;

( )ial. written, and electronic communication skills.

Asm ssmin i OF LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Success m achieving the objectives established for the major will be
demonstrated as follows:

successful completion ol each major course u ith a grade of c '- or

he tier;

successful completion ol the Research Methods m Histor) course;

successful completion ol the senior histor) seminar and defense of the
senior thesis before the students and facult) ol the department;

successful completion ol a major field examination during then senior

seal.

Those wishing to major in histor) are encouraged to declare then major
during the beginning ol the spring semester of then sophomore year.

The facult) ol the department believes thai students who select to complete
a major course ol studs in histor) should have the foundation know ledge
and understanding ol the discipline, developed b) classroom instruction
and individual studs, necessar) to provide them with the opportunit) to:

211

pursue graduate study within the discipline;

pursue a professional degree in a selected field of study;

pursue employment as a teacher in pre-collegiate education;

seek employment in a field such as government, entry level historic
documentation and preservation, social or historic entry level research,
or a field where their liberal arts preparation can be beneficially
utilized.

Graduates of the Department of History may be found pursuing careers in
business, law, education, politics and government, broadcasting,
journalism, the ministry and other fields of endeavor. In all of these
endeavors, our graduates have found that their education has provided a
foundation for their careers and for their growth in life.

The Department of History offers the following major in history:

A. Prerequisite Courses:

HIST 1 101 and 1 102 World Civilization
HIST 1 1 1 1 and 1 1 12 United States History

These are prerequisite courses for the major.

Prerequisite courses can be met by AP, CLEP tests, or by transfer credit.

B. Two courses from:

HIST 33 1 7 Colonial America

HIST 3319 Nineteenth-Century America

HIST 44 1 6 Twentieth-Century America

Two courses from:

HIST 3301 Greco-Roman World

HIST 3302 Middle Ages

HIST 3320 Renaissance and Reformation

Two courses from:

HIST 3372 Europe 1660-1870

HIST 3374 Europe 1 870- Present

Required courses:

HIST 2000 Research Methods in History

HIST 4490 Senior History Seminar

C. An additional nine semester hours of 3000 and 4000 level history
courses are required. The total major course requirements are 33
semester hours credit beyond 1000 level courses. Those majors
seeking a concentration in Public History have slightly different
requirements. Please see the section on Public History Minor/
Public History Concentration.

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We strongly encourage the history major to pursue the widesl possible
liberal arts preparation by the careful selection ol courses from the core
program structure.

i ppei level courses in history, those numbered 3000 or above (with the
exception of HIS1 4490), are available to .ill students who have
sfully completed prerequisites.

Minor

The minor in history consists ol I V\ I I VI . hours oi history courses
successful!) completed with no lower than a grade ol C-. At least six o[
those hours must be at or above the 3000 level.

Public History Minor/Public History
Concentration

In i RODUC1 ION

I he history department offers a Public 1 listory concentration for history
majors as well as a Public I listory minor open to all students. These
options are designed to oiler interdisciplinary training to those interested in
pursuing a career in public history. Both the concentration and the minor
provide a strong basis m public history, focusing on research, critical issues
in the held, and practical hands-on experience through the internship.
These core histor) courses are supplemented with interdisciplinary
electives designed to augment the student's proficiency in administration
and communication in the public setting.

Learning Object i\ is

( Iraduates w ith a minor or concentration in Public History should
demonstrate:

Competency in the basic components, knowledge, techniques, and
practical application ol public history;

I he ability to apply historical research techniques, analysis, and
presentation in a public setting;

\ inderstanding ol the contemporary issues facing public historians

and the abilit) to critical!) respond to those issues;

Practical, hands-on experience working within the held;

Competency in the administrative methodology utilized at public
history sites;

Ability to communicate information and implement historical
presentations for a non-academic audience.

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Success in achieving the objectives established for the concentration/minor
will be demonstrated as follows:

successful completion of each of the five courses with a grade of C- or
better;

successful completion of the Research Methods in History course;

successful completion of the Public History course;

successful completion of the Internship in Public History and the
required presentation to the college community.

Graduates with a minor or concentration in Public History will have the
foundation for pursuing a variety of careers, including those in archives,
museums, historic sites, editing, corporate history, non-profit
organizations, oral history, historical preservation, cultural resource
management, and local, state, or national government agencies.

Requirements

The requirements for the concentration are in addition to the requirements
for the History major (though some overlap). The requirements for both
the concentration and the minor are as follows:

Required Courses: (9 hours)

History 2000: Research Methods in History

History 3000: Public History

History 4485: Internship in Public History

Elective Courses: (6 hours) Choose one course from each area.

(One course: Administrative and Methods)

ANTH 1000 Introduction to Anthropology

ARTD 3101, 3102 Museum Studies I or II

POLS 3312 Public Administration and Public Policy

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i( toe course: i tommunication and Implementation)

VRTD 2201, 222 \ 2224, Graphic Design I. Basic Photography,
Documentar) Photograph)

I \(,i 1303, (310, 1315 Advanced Composition, Art of Argumentation,
Readings in I iterar) Journalism

I III \ :i 10 Introduction to I tesign

P Histor) minor, the total hours required is 15 as outlined above.
I or a Histor) major ith a Public Histor) concentration, the totaJ hours
required is 48: \2 hours ol prerequisites (see Section A under Histor)
Major), 24 hours in accordance with Section B, and instead ol "an
additional nine semester hours ol 3000 or 4000 level histor) courses*' Listed
in Section C, Histor) majors with a Public Histor) concentration need
twelve additional credits i Ills I (000,1 lis I 4485, one Administrative and
Methods elective and one Communication and Implementation elective. I

Combined b.a. and m.a.t Program of Study

Undergraduate students who meet the admission requirements for the
Mastei ol Arts m Teaching [M.A.T] (passing GACE Basic Skills or a
combined S \ I score ol more than loooi and those who have a GPA of 3.0
or higher in then undergraduate studies are eligible to participate in a
combined B.A. and M.A.T. program of study alter the completion of 90

semester hours. Once accepted, candidates ma\ take entering cohort

luate courses the Summer Semester following their junior year of study.
n gaining senior status, candidates ma) take one three-credit graduate
rse during the Fall, Interim, and Spring Semesters onl) if enrolled with

twelve undergraduate credits.

CO! RSE DESCRIP1 ions (HIST)

ills I 1101 World Civilization I. (3) Fall and Spring
Surve) course on the development ol world ci\ ilization up to 1660.

nisi 1102 World Civilization II. (3) Fall and Spring

ourse on the development ol world civilization from 1660 to the
ent

His I nil Hhtory of the United States to 1865. (3) Fall
Empfc Revolutionary, early national, and Civil War

peril

$ HIST 1112 History of the United States, 1865 to the Present.

(3) Spring
Emphasis on Reconstruction, liberal nationalism, New Deal, and postwar
periods.

HIST 2000 Research Methods in History. (3) Interim

This course is required of all sophomore history majors. It acquaints the

student with the basic components of historical methodology and research.

HIST 3000 Public History. (3) On demand
This course provides an overview of public history, exploring the many
arenas in which one can apply the practical use of historical research,
analysis, writing, and presentation in non-teaching fields. Students learn
what constitutes public history, understand the techniques and practices
associated with it, and develop a critical assessment of the public history
field and the contemporary issues facing public historians. The course also
aims to improve students' abilities to apply historical skills and knowledge,
especially in their presentation of information to general audiences outside
of academia.

HIST 3301 Greco-Roman World. (3) Fall

A study of Greco-Roman civilization from its birth in ancient Greece

through the collapse of the western Roman empire in the fifth century A.D.

HIST 3302 The Middle Ages, 350-1350. (3) Spring

This course offers a comprehensive study of the development of medieval

civilization from the late fifth century to the late fourteenth century.

HIST 3305 Islamic World to 1500. (3) On demand
This course will examine the development of Islam, its growth and
diversification from its birth in seventh century c.e. Arabia through the
Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453.

HIST 3306 History of the South. (3) On demand

Emphasis on the antebellum, Civil War, Reconstruction, and New South periods.

HIST 3310 Constitutional History of the United States to 1900.

(3) Fall
An analysis of fundamental constitutional development from 1776 to present.
Prerequisites: HIST 1 1 1 1 and HIST 1112

216

ins I 331 I Constitutional fflstorj of the! nited States 1901 to

the Present (3) Spring
\n analysis ol fundamental oonstitutiona] developmenl &om 1901 to the present

ills I 3315 Georgia History . (3) Summer (on demand)
A stud) ol ( ieorgia Histor) from the pie-colonial period to the present w 1th
emphasis on the historical, social, economic and political development ol
ilk' Stale.

His i ui7 Colonial American. (3) On demand

This course examines the colonial histor) ol British North America during

the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

His I }}\ l > Nineteenth-Century America, (3) On demand

This course examines the histors ol the I fnited States over the eourse of the

1800s, tracing its developments from a fledgling nation, through internal
divisions, to its use as an industrial world power. Themes may include

. gender, Jeffersonian republicanism, popular democracy, territory and
war, the frontier, expansion and imperialism, and industrialization.

His i 3320 I In Renaissance and the Reformation, 1350-1600,

(3) Fall
I his course otters a detailed stud) of the ei\ ih/aiion of Renaissance and
Reformation Europe. Primary focus is on the artistic and religious
achievements ol the period 1350 to 1600.

His I 3330 l he Medieval Church and Papacy. (3) Spring

This course examines the institutional and cultural history oi the medieval
church, with special emphasis on the role oi the papacy, and its impact on

medieval ei\ ili/ation.

His I 3331 Colonial Latin American History. (3) Fall

An examination >t the history ol Latin America from the pre-Conquest era

through the independence movements ol the earl) nineteenth century.

I lis i 3332 ( Comparative ( Colonization and Slaver] . (3) Spring

I Ins course offers a comparative examination of colonial contact in the
Americas, including the interaction ot Europeans, natives, and Africans
within the French, Spanish, and British empires ol the New World.

ills i 334] Russia to 1856. (3) Fall

\ comprehensive surve) ot the Russian historical developmenl from the

appe K ivan State in the l > centUI) through the Crimean War.

HIST 3342 Russia 1856 to the Present. (3) Spring

An examination of the Imperial Russian state.

HIST 3350 Renaissance and Renascences. (3) Spring

An examination of the great cultural revivals from the age of Charlemagne

to the age of Michelangelo.

HIST 3361 History of England to 1689. (3) Fall

A political, economic, social, and cdtLiralhistoryofEnglandfiom55B.C.tD 1689.

HIST 3362 History of England from 1689 to Present. (3) Spring
A political, economic, social and cultural history of England from 1689 to present

HIST 3372 Europe 1660-1870. (3) Fall

A comprehensive survey of European history from the reign of Louis XTV through

the rise of the modem German state in 1 870.

HIST 3374 Europe 1870 to the Present. (3) Spring

A comprehensive survey of European history from the Bismarckian Era to

the present.

HIST 3378 European Diplomatic History:1890 to the Present.

(3) On demand
A detailed examination of European international relations from 1 890, the
end of the Bismarkian system to the present.

HIST 4416 Twentieth-Century America. (3) On demand

An intensive study of the United States during the twentieth century.

HIST 4485 Internship in Public History. (1-6) On demand
This course allows students practical experience in the field of public
history. Internships consist of a minimum of 120 hours (per 3 credits) of
work in areas such as: archival management, historical editing and
publication, exhibit design, historical tourism, collections processing, etc.
May be repeated for a maximum of six credits, but only three credit hours
may apply to the major requirements.

HIST 4490 Senior History Seminar. (3) Spring

A study of historiography and research methods and materials.

Prerequisites: Senior History Major or permission of the
professor and the Chair of the Department. This course may only
be attempted twice.

218

nisi av> { > Special topics. (3) On demand

\ course offered al the junior/senior level focusing on a specialized topic

in the field ol history.

Denote* courses In Hlstorj thai ma} substitute tor a ( !ORE
Humanities course in the ( tore Curriculum.

219

MINOR in JAPANESE STUDIES

Introduction

LaGrange College shares a cooperative international exchange
agreement with Seigakuin University of Tokyo. Students who wish to
complete a minor in Japanese Studies must complete successfully at
least two semesters of Japanese language study at LaGrange College and
at least 6 hours of study at Seigakuin University. In most cases students
spend one semester at Seigakuin University. The Japanese Studies
Program Director advises students who wish to study at Seigakuin
University.

Learning Objectives

The exchange agreement between LaGrange College and Seigakuin
University states that its intent "is to promote international friendship
and world peace by encouraging students and faculty from each
institution to develop friendships within and learn more about the
culture of the other country." In addition, the agreement allows each
student to have an extensive international experience and learn Japanese
in a total immersion environment.

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Program goals are assessed by meeting the following criteria:

Successful completion of at least two semesters of Japanese study at
LaGrange College with an overall average of B or above.

Admission to the Seigakuin exchange program after review by the
Program Director and the selection committee.

Completion of at least 6 hours of study at Seigakuin University with
grades of C- or above in each class.

Program Overview

1 . Courses Offered at LaGrange College.

JAPN 1 101: Beginning Japanese I
JAPN 1 102: Beginning Japanese II
JAPN 2103: Intermediate Japanese I
JAPN 2105: Intermediate Japanese II

220

Students musi successfull) complete al least 1 101 and 1 102 with a grade ol
H 01 bettei before the) can stud) abroad, it is recommended thai students
complete al least the third semester ol Japanese with a grade ol B or better.

.uses .it Seigakuin l fniversit)

Seigakuin University has exchange relationships with several
international universities and offers a slate ol courses each semester
thai serves their needs. I bese courses are ol three types:

c burses taught in English and about Japanese histor) and culture

c burses taught in simplified Japanese i i.e.. using a limited number ol
Kanji >

( tourses taught in Japanese for regular Japanese Seigakuin students.
but that alio* international students to turn in papers and exams
written in English

Courses covei abroad range ol topics, including the Japanese language,
history, culture, and economy. In consultation with the Japan Studies minor
advisor, students select a slate ol courses from the Seigakuin schedule
during the pre-registration period al I aGrange College. The student

iters fol several sections ol this course:

i \i'\ HXX): special Topics m Japanese Studies: [Subtitle Varies
According to Course topic] I variable credit)

In consultation with the I aGrange College Registrar and the Provost, the

n Studies advisor will establish correct hours earned a\k\ will develop

course subtitles that best describe the contents of each course. Course

credits will be transferred to I aGrange College if the student receives a
course grade ol C- or higher.

Si ii(i io\ oi Si i Di n is

Participation ol I (' students m the exchange program is necessaril) limited
and competitive. Each year the Japanese Studies Director, in consultation

with a selection committee ol facult) and staff, selects those students who
are best prepared to pursue studies in Japan and who will best represent the

colic i election include:

I inese language skills, based on semesters m Japanese completed

and grades earned.

irticulate clear goals for participating in the program;

221

the maturity to handle the stress of living in a foreign country;

character that represents the mission and values of LaGrange
College.

Studying abroad requires a great deal of paperwork and planning. Students
who wish to study at Seigakuin University should consult with the
Japanese Studies program advisor as soon as they begin to consider
studying abroad. Students must contact the program advisor no later than
the beginning of the semester before they wish to study abroad. For
example, students who wish to study in Japan in the fall term must initiate
contact with the program advisor no later than the beginning of the prior
spring term. Students who wish to study in Japan in the spring term must
initiate contact no later than the beginning of the prior fall term.

While the Program Director will advise students through the application
process, the preparation ultimately is the student's own responsibility.

Course Descriptions (JAPN)

JAPN 1101 Beginning Japanese I. (3)

A course for beginners with intensive practice in listening and speaking,
essentials of grammar, and writing of Japanese Kana and simple Kanji.

JAPN 1 1 02 Beginning Japanese II. (3)

A continuation of JAPN 1 101.

Prerequisite:! km 1101

JAPN 2103 Intermediate Japanese I. (3)

Study of advanced grammar, reading of texts, and more complex Kanji.
Prerequisites: JAPN 1 101 and 1 102

JAPN 2105 Intermediate Japanese II. (3)

A continuation of JAPN 2103.

Prerequisites: JAPN 1 101, 1 102, 2103

JAPN 3000 Special Topics in Japanese Studies, (variable credit)

Courses cover a broad range of topics, including Japanese language,
history, culture, and economy. While a student at Seigakuin University,
students enroll at LaGrange College for several sections of this course.
Students work with the Japanese Minor Program Director to select
appropriate credits and subtitles for the courses.

Prerequisites: JAPN 1101 and 1 102 with a grade of B or above
and admission to the Seigakuin exchange program.

222

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES and
MODERN LANGUAGES

In i ROD! CTION

I .inn American Studies is an interdisciplinary program thai introduces the
student to the cultural diversity and richness ol Latin America and its
people. A minof in I atin American Studies enhances one's career
opportunities and effectiveness in such Fields as business, government,
health care, journalism, law, and social work.

Learning Object ivr.s

\\ bile the minor in I atin American Studies current!) requires 6 hours of
Spanish language study, students arc encouraged to take more Spanish
courses in ordei to develop bask conversational fluency. In addition, study
abroad is strongl) encouraged because it provides the student with total

cultural immersion. At present, the College oilers a minor in I -atin
American studies.

I he minor in I atin American Studies consists of the follow ing 1 8 hours n\

course work:

Spanish courses 6 Mrs.

I VST 1 104 Introduction to 1 atin American Culture 3 his.

I \si 2000 Introduction to Latin American Studies 3hrs.

I \si \\ 10 Special Topics or Spanish 3110 3hrs.

tive in cither I AS I' or Spanish 3 Ill's.

- K)00 level or above)

Assissmi m oi Learning Objectives

n ess in achie> ing the objectives ol all majors and minors m this
irtmenl will be demonstrated in the following ways:

I lompletion ol each major/minor course with a grade ol C or better;

( lompletion ol exil survey.

Cot km Descripi ions (LAST)

I \ s ' IHM Introduction to Latin American Culture. (3)

id) ot the art. literature, history, and anthropology ol I atin America
i VNG 2000 ma\ be taken for I am i K I

LAST 1199 Latin American Travel Seminar. (1-9)

A travel-study seminar that provides valuable educational experience
through close contact with the contemporary life and civilization of a
selected Latin American country. Basic academic preparation in the
history and customs of the target culture is undertaken before departure.
Prerequisites: SPAN 1101, SPAN 1 102, and SPAN 2103 or
permission of instructor and chair of Latin American Studies

% LAST 2000 Introduction to Latin American Studies. (3)

An interdisciplinary approach to the people, culture, development, and
identity of Latin America. Attention will be given to such topics as art,
class, economics, gender, history, literature, music, politics, race, and religion.

LAST 3001 Survey of Latin American Literature I. (3)

A general survey of contemporary Latin American literature.

LAST 3002 Survey of Latin American Literature II. (3)

Focuses on the works of a current major Latin American writer or writers.

LAST 3110 Special Topics. (3)

A study of selected topics from a specific discipline. Since the focus of this
course changes frequently, this course may be repeated for credit. (HIST
3331: Colonial Latin America, SPAN 3110, or WMST 3110: Latin
American Women Writers may be taken for LAST 3110 credit)

LAST 3210

or States and Politics in Latin America. (3)

POLS 3352

A comparative study of political systems in Latin America. Topics
considered include: basic comparative political theory, modern history of
Latin American societies, politics of selected Latin American states, and
the interaction of economic and political factors in Latin America.

LAST 3930 Intercultural Communications. (3)

A study of the cultural risks confronting the business manager in an
international environment. This course will survey the differences in
values and codes of behavior among a number of cultures with the primary
focus being on Latin America. This course will give the student the
opportunity to learn how to read and respond to the organizational culture
of regulators, business associates, and customers across cultural borders.

% Denotes courses in Latin American Studies that may substitute for
a CORE Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

224

Spanish

l Ik- ability to speak Spanish is becoming an asset it not a necessity In the
market place. I bis need is alread) occurring in such diverse Fields as
business, education, health care, law, and social work. In order to hotter
prepare students to meet this gnw ing need in their future Fields, we offer a
majof and minor in Spanish. While not required, stud) abroad is strongl)
encouraged Foi both majors and minors to improve language fluency and
cultural awareness

\ majoi in Spanish consists ol a total i>t 36 hours. I hirty ol these hours
are in Spanish courses above 1 1<>2. Required courses are as follows:

SP w 2103 Intermediate Spanish I 3 hrs.

SPAN 2105 Intermediate Spanish II 3 hrs.

SP w 2 106 Introduction to I lispanic I iterature 3 hrs.

SPAN S mish Conversation and Composition 1 3 hrs.

SPAN ;|)< >; Spanish Conversation and Composition II 3 hrs.

SP w ; "'<i" Hispanic Culture and Civilization 3 hrs.

SPAN 40001 atin American Literature 3 hrs.

SPAN 1001 Peninsular Spanish Literature 3hrs.

rwo electives in Spanish courses at the 3000 level or above. The
remaining six hours of the major consist of two Latin American Studies
elective

A minor in Spanish consists ol 18 hours, all in Spanish courses aho\e
isfa 1 102. Required courses are as follows:

SP W 1 103 Intermediate Spanish I 3 h rs .

SPAN 2105 Intermediate Spanish ll 3 hrs.

SP \N 2 106 Introduction to Hispanic Literature 3 hrs.

SP \\ ; < m m > Spanish Conversation and Composition 3 hrs.

SPAN KX)1 Spanish Conversation and Composition D 3 hrs.
Plus:

wish elective at the 3000 level or above 3 hrs.

Course Descriptions (SPAN)

SPAN 1101 Elementary Spanish I. (3)

A course for beginners with intensive practice in pronunciation, essentials
of grammar, and reading of simple prose.

SPAN 1102 Elementary Spanish II. (3)

A continuation of Spanish 1101.

Prerequisite: Spanish 1101

SPAN 2103 Intermediate Spanish I. (3)

A review of grammar and syntax with practice in reading selected texts.
Prerequisite: Spanish 1 102 or permission of instructor

SPAN 2105 Intermediate Spanish II. (3)

A continuation of Spanish 2103.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2103 or permission of instructor

SPAN 2106 Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (3)

An introductory course designed to introduce the intermediate level
language student to reading and analyzing short literary works in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 2103 or permission of the instructor

SPAN 2199 Latin American Seminar. (1-9)

A travel-study seminar which provides valuable educational experience
through close contact with the contemporary life and civilization of a
selected Spanish-speaking country. Basic academic preparation in the
history and customs of the culture is undertaken before departure.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1 101, SPAN 1 102, and SPAN 2103 or
permission of instructor and chair of Latin American Studies

SPAN 3000 Spanish Conversation and Composition I. (3)

A course stressing practice in speaking and writing Spanish. Not open to
students fluent in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2105 or permission of instructor

SPAN 3001 Spanish Conversation and Composition II. (3)

A continuation of Spanish 3000. Not open to students fluent in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3000 or permission of instructor

SPAN 3002 Hispanic Culture and Civilization. (3)

This course provides an overview of Spain's and Latin America's cultures
and civilizations.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2106 or permission of instructor

226

SPAN 31 n> Special ropics. (3)

I Ik* further development ol Spanish language skills b) focusing on a
variet) ol professions 01 fields ol study. Since the focus ol this course
changes Frequently, tins course ma) be repeated For credit

Pn requisite: SPAN 2103 or permission of instructoi

srw 4linn latin \nuriean I iU ratine. (3)

\n advanced course designed to introduce the studenl to I .aim America's
major literal) movements and waiters.

Prei SPAN 2106 or permission ol instructor

sr \n 4001 Peninsular Spanish Literature. (3)

An advanced course designed to introduce the students to Spam's major
literal) movements and writers.

Prerequisiti : SP \N - 106 or permission of instructor

SPAN 4002 latin American Women Writers. (3)

This course introduces the student to major contemporai) I aim American and

I atma women writers. Writers and works lobe studied change periodically.

Prerequisin SP W 4000 or SPAN 4001 or permission of
instructoi

Modi k\ LANGUAG1 S

I be program in Modern I anguage is administered by the department of
I atin American Studies. Courses are taught m Spanish. French, German,
and other modern languages (under the LANG label). As for Japanese,

please reter to the Japanese minor.

Minor in FRENCH

students wishing to develop then general understanding ol French and
the Francophone world, and/or to concentrate in a particular area o\ French

language study I he French minor eonsists ol IS credits < 12 additional
;s beyond the intermediate level).

Ki'(|iiirc(l emirsis 15 credits

FR1 N 2103 Intermediate French I \ credits

FR1 N 2105 Intermediate French II 3 credits

I Kl \ ; <hmi French Conversation 3 credits

FREN ;iH i Advanced Grammar and Composition 3 credits
I ki N ch Civilization or

I hi N 3003 f reach Literature (ever) other ye 3 credits

The remaining 3 hours can come from any 3000-level French course listed
below:

FREN 3004 Francophone Culture and Literature (On demand)
FREN3110 Special Topics:
Topics will change, so students may take for repeat credit.

FREN 3110 Business French (On demand)

FREN 3110 Translation and Reading in French (On demand)

FREN 3110 French Philosophers (On demand)

Total credits: 18 credits

French (FREN)

FREN 1101 Beginning French I. (3)

A course for beginners with intensive practice in pronunciation, essentials
of grammar, and reading of simple prose.

FREN 1102 Beginning French II. (3)

A continuation of French 1 101.

Prerequisite: FREN 1101 or permission of instructor

FREN 2103 Intermediate French I. (3)

A continuation of French 1 102 with additional readings.

Prerequisite: FREN 1 102 or permission of instructor

FREN 2105 Intermediate French II. (3)

A systematic and thorough review of French grammar with emphasis on
the production of speech. Not open to students fluent in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 2103 or permission of instructor

FREN 2199 Francophone Travel Seminar. (1-9)

A travel-study seminar composed of preliminary academic preparation
followed by contact with the culture through travel in the selected French-
speaking country.

Prerequisite: FREN 1101, FREN 1 102, and FREN 2103 or
permission of instructor and chair of Latin American Studies

FREN 3000 French Conversation. (3)

The goal of this course is to help students improve their

( 1 ) vocabulary

(2) aural comprehension: listening skills

(3) oral production: speaking skills

Prerequisite: FREN 2105 or permission of instructor

228

i ki \ 3001 \(i\ :iih i el Grammar and ( ompositioiL (3)

I he objective ol this course is to allow the participants to improve their

composition skills in French. I be course has three major components:

.in.u review and refinement; reading and analysis ol various kinds ol
texts, both literar) and journalistic; a variet) ol composition assignments
invoh ing such techniques .is desci iption, analysis, persuasion, and
managing complicated chronologies. I be participants can expect to
improve then command ol \ rench grammar, to increase their vocabulary .
and to develop appropriate strategies for writing good compositions.
Prerequisiti I Rl N 2 105 or permission ol instructor

! ki \ 3002 French CMbzalkm. (3)

entrating on political and soei.il history, rather than "high culture,' 1
this course is designed to introduce the moments and personages who have
defined France and what it is to be French across the centuries. Some high
points include Roman Gaul, the Carolingian Renaissance, St. Louis and the
high Gothic Period, Jeanne d' Arc and the Hundred Years' War.
dssance and Reform, I ouis XIV and Versailles, the Revolution,
'leon. Resolution and Restoration in the 1 9th centur) . France at w ar in
the 20th century.

/''< - FREN 2105 or permission of the instructor

I RI \ 3003 introduction to French Literature, (3)

An introduction to representative writers from the Middle Ages to the

ilution. Attention is paid to the changing social and cultural contexts
in which the literature was produced; emphasis is on enduring humanistic
valiM

/'/< n quisiu I Rl \ 2 lo. - ^ or permission of instructor

I RJ N3004 i rancophone Literature and Culture. (3)

I his elass seeks to improve the reading, writing, speaking, and Listening
skills ol students studying French, particularly with the goal ol preparing
students who wish to stud) upper-division French. Hie tour skills
areintegrated into the bod) ol the course and developed simultaneously.

I Rl \ ; <hi: or FREN 3003

I RJ N 31 10 Special lupus. (3) On demand

ill change so students ma) edit.

i'' i Rl N ::< ; "i permission ol instructor

Translation and Reading in French

Translation and Reading skills. This course concentrates exclusively on the
cultivation of reading and translation abilities in the French language.
Classes are in English and all work is from French to English.

Business French

The trend of internationalizing business and services forces companies to
cope with cultural differences inside a company and when sending
executives and their families abroad. In a foreign country there are more
than language barriers to overcome. Methods which work at home can lead
to failure abroad. Likewise, the most competent manager can damage an
operation if not properly prepared for his or her stay in the host country.
This course is designed to help you cross cultural boundaries, whether you
are planning on living abroad as a student, an intern, or an employee. It is
not meant to be a technical business course, but rather a course that will
help you understand what culture shock is and how you can prepare
yourself for it.

French Philosophers

An introduction to French philosophers and the different philosophical
currents that have shaped French thought and the world at large.

German (GERM)

GERM 1101 Beginning German I. (3)

A course for beginners with intensive practice in pronunciation, essentials
of grammar, and reading of simple prose.

GERM 1102 Beginning German II. (3)

A continuation of German 1 101.

Prerequisite: GERM 1 101 or permission of instructor

GERM 2103 Intermediate German I. (3)

Continuation of the development of proficiency in listening and speaking,
while expanding the reading and writing skills using materials of a literary
or cultural nature; grammar review included.

Prerequisite: GERM 1 102 or permission of instructor

GERM 2104 Intermediate German II. (3)

A continuation of German 2103.

Prerequisite: GERM 2103 or permission of instructor

230

Other Langi iges and Culture (iang)*

i iNG 1101 R unning Language L (3)

\ course fbi beginners with intensive practice in oral communications,

pronunciation, essentials ol grammar, and where possible, reading oi simple

i \\(,iii>: R fginning LangMflg* n. (3)
tinuation ol I \\( i l I'M .
Pn ft quisite: I W i 1101 or equivalent

I \\(, ii ( >> Language l 'ravel Seminar. (1-9)

\ travel-stud) seminar which provides further preparation in the language

and culture through travel in a countr) which speaks the language.

\. aderoic work is determined bj the course instructor.

Pn requisites: I AN(i 1 101, LANG 1 102, and LANG 2103 or
consent ol instructor and chair ol I atin American Studies

l \\(, 2000 Culture and Civilization of a Selected Country. (3)

irve) ol the civilization and culture ol one ol the major societies ol the
world. I he course examines the culture's social and political development,
its customs and traditions, and its contributions to the global community in

terms ol art, music, and literature. 1 1 \\( i 2000 ma) be taken for I AS I
1 104

I ING2103 Intermediate Language I. (3)
itinuation ol I \N( l 1 102.

Prerequisite: I \N( i 1 102 or equivalent

I \\(, 2105 Intermediate Language II. (3)

An intensive re\ ien ol the language grammar w ith emphasis on the

iction ol speech. Not open to students fluent in the language.

Note: These onuses are available so thai a language other than French,
German, or Spanish ma) be available from time-to-time.

MATHEMATICS

Introduction

The mathematics curriculum at LaGrange College provides a solid
undergraduate mathematics foundation. Along with the broad-based
general education curriculum, the Mathematics Department seeks to
prepare mathematics majors for careers in industry or teaching, or for
graduate study in mathematics.

Departmental Mission Statement

The Mathematics Department supports the College's commitment to the
liberal arts education of its students by using mathematics as a means to
improve students' critical thinking, communicative, and creative abilities.

Major Requirements

To be accepted as a major in the Mathematics Department, a student must
have completed Mathematics 2221, have an overall GPA of 2.25 or better,
and a GPA of 2.5 or better in all mathematics courses numbered 2221 or
higher. Students can pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in
mathematics or a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in mathematics.
Students who pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree have more options in
selecting their courses. This is the liberal studies degree in mathematics.
A more in-depth degree is earned by students in the Bachelor of Science
program.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree

This degree requires a minimum of 40 semester hours in mathematics
courses, as follows:

MATH 222 1 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (4)

MATH 2222 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (4)

MATH 2223 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III (4)

MATH 2224 Differential Equations (3)

MATH 3316 Probability Theory (3)

MATH 3335 Linear Algebra (3)

MATH 3380 Discrete Mathematics (3)*

OR MATH 3382 Combinatorial Design Theory (3)*

MATH 4333 Modern Algebra I (3)**

OR MATH 4343 Analysis I (3)**

MATH 4350 Senior Capstone (3)

* One of these courses must be taken. The other may he used to satisfy
one of the additional courses in the next listing.

232

I }fu , ' tht ^ i - w ft i must be taken. I in- other may be used u
i additional course* in the nexx listing.

PI i S3 dditional courses selected from:

MATH 2241

Programming in MAT! \B

for the Sciences

MATH 2261

Calculus Applications

MATH -

Partial Differential Equations and

Boundar) Value Problems

MATH ;; >^

Number Theorj

MATH ;; ><>

( lollege ( ieometr)

\1 \IH -

Mathematical Statistics

MATH 3

Histor) ol Mathematics

-

M \in 1342

i Complex Variables

(3)

\1 \IH

I )iscrete Mathematics

\1 Mil

Combinatorial Design Theor)

\1 MU-

Modern Algebra I

NI Mil 4-4

Modern Algebra II

MATH 4

Analysis I

(3)

MATH 4344

Analysis 11

MATH 4410

Numerical Analysis

0RCSC1 4KH)

Numerical Analysis

1

\1 Mil

Independent Stud)

\l Mil

Independent Stud)

MATH

Special Topics in Mathematics

gr ammin g course in Computer Science is required, as approved b) advisor.
I he Bachelor <>t Science Degree

squires B minimum of 4o semester hours m mathematics
courses, as foU<

MATH 2221 Analytic Geometr) and Calculus 1

MATH : Analytic Geometr) and Calculus D

MATH . Vnalytk Geometr) and Calculus in (4)

MATH: Differentia] Equations
MATH ibabilit) Tha

MATH 3 I um ebra

MATH 334 i iriables

MATH I Discrete Mathematics
OR MATH ibinatorial Design Theor)

M MM M idem Ugebra I
M mm s|

MATH 4 apstone

*One of these courses must be taken. The other may be used to satisfy one
of the additional courses in the next listing.

PLUS 3 additional courses selected from:

MATH 2241

Programming in MATLAB

for the Sciences

(3)

MATH 2261

Calculus Applications

(3)

MATH 3225

Partial Differential Equations and

Boundary Value Problems

(3)

MATH 3305

Number Theory

(3)

MATH 3306

College Geometry

(3)

MATH 3317

Mathematical Statistics

(3)

MATH 3340

History of Mathematics

(3)

MATH 4334

Modern Algebra IT

(3)

MATH 4344

Analysis II

(3)

MATH 4410

Numerical Analysis

(3)

OR CSCI 4100

Numerical Analysis

(3)

MATH 4495

Independent Study

(3)

MATH 4496

Independent Study

(3)

MATH 4499

Special Topics in Mathematics

(3)

A programming course in Computer Science is required, as approved by
advisor. Physics 2121 and 2122 are recommended.

Learning Objectives

Students in Core classes will demonstrate the abilities to think critically
and creatively and to communicate mathematics effectively using
appropriate terminology and notation.

All majors will be assessed on their abilities to demonstrate the following
competencies:

Algebra and Number Theory

Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the natural, integer,
rational, real, and complex number systems and the ability to perform
the basic operations (+, - , x, and -r) on numbers in these systems.

Compare and contrast properties (e.g., closure, commutative,
associative, distributive) of number systems under various operations.

Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of counting numbers
(e.g., prime, composite, prime factorization, even, odd, factors,
multiples).

Solve ratio, proportion, percent, and average (including arithmetic
mean and weighted average) problems.

234

Wort with algebraic expressions, formulas, and equations; add,
subtract, and multiply polynomials; divide polynomials; add, subtract,
multiply, and dh idc algebraic fractions; perforni standard algebraic
operations involving complex numbers, radicals, and exponents,
including fractional and negative exponents.

Solve and graph systems ii equations and inequalities, including those
invoh ing absolute value.

Interpret algebraic principles geometrically.

Geometrj

Solve problems using relationships ol parts ol geometric figures (e.g.,
medians oi triangles, inscribed angles in circles) and among geometric
figun ongruence, similarity i in two and three dimensions.

ribe relationships among sets ol special quadrilaterals, such as the
square, rectangle, parallelogram, rhombus, and trapezoid.

Solve problems using the properties ol triangles, quadrilaterals,
polygons, circles, and parallel and perpendicular lines.

Solve problems using the properties ol circles, including those
involving inscribed angles, central angles, chords, radii, tangents,
secants, arcs, and sectors.

t fnderstand and appl) the Pythagorean theorem and its converse.

Compute and reason aboul perimeter, area/surface area, or volume ol
two or three dimensional figures or ol regions or solids thai are

combinations Ol these Injures.

Solve problems invoh ing reflections, rotations, and translations ol

geometric hemes in the plane

I rigonouM tr>

Define and use the six basic trigonometric relations using degree or

radian measure ol angles; know then graphs and be able to idenlit\
their periods, amplitudes, phase displacements Or shitts. and

asymptoti

Appl) the law ol sines and the law ol cosines

mulas for the trigonometric functions ol . i/2, 2\. \. \ + \.

and \ \. prove trigonometric identities.

Solve trigonometric equations and inequalities.

Convert between rectangular and polar coordinate systems.

Functions and Special Equations

Demonstrate understanding of and ability to work with functions in
various representations (e.g., graphs, tables, symbolic expressions,
and verbal narratives) and to convert flexibly among them.

Find an appropriate family of functions to model particular
phenomena (e.g., population growth, cooling, simple harmonic
motion).

Determine properties of a function such as domain, range, intercepts,
symmetries, intervals of increase or decrease, discontinuities, and
asymptotes.

Use the properties of trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic,
polynomial, and rational functions to solve problems.

Determine the composition of two functions; find the inverse of a one
-to-one function in simple cases and know why only one-to-one
functions have inverses.

Interpret representations of functions of two variables, such as three
dimensional graphs, level curves, and tables.

Recognize and use algebraic representations of lines, planes, conic
sections, and spheres.

Solve problems in two and three dimensions (e.g., distance between
two points, the coordinates of the midpoint of a line segment).

Calculus

Demonstrate understanding of what it means for a function to have a
limit at a point; calculate limits of functions or determine that the
limit does not exist; solve problems using the properties of limits.

Understand the derivative of a function as a limit, as the slope of a
curve, and as a rate of change (e.g., velocity, acceleration, growth,
decay).

Show that a particular function is continuous; understand the
relationship between continuity and differentiability.

Numerically approximate derivatives and integrals.

Use standard differentiation and integration techniques.

Analyze the behavior of a function (e.g., find relative maxima and
minima, concavity); solve problems involving related rates; solve
applied minima/maxima problems.

236

lonstrate understanding ol and ability to use the Mean Value
l heorcm and the FundamentaJ Theorem ol c lalculus.

I lemonstrate an intuitive understanding ol integration as a limiting sum
thai can be used to compute area, volume, distance, or other
accumulation processes.

I determine the limns ol sequences and simple infinite series.

Data \nal\sis ;ii)(l Statistics

nize data into a suitable form (e.g., construct a histogram and use
it in the' calculation ol probabilities I.

Know and find the appropriate uses ol common measures ol central
tendency (e.g., population mean, sample mean, median, mode) and
dispersion (e.g., range, population standard deviation, sample standard
deviation, population variance, sample variance).

Analyze data from specific situations to determine what type ol
function (e.g., linear, quadratic, exponential i would most likel) model
that particular phenomenon; use the regression feature of the calculator
to determine curve ol best tit; interpret the regression coefficients,
correlation, and residuals in context

Understand and apply normal distributions and their characteristics

mean, standard de\ lation i.

Understand how sample statistics reflect the values ol population
parameters and use sampling distributions as the basis for informal
inference.

Understand the differences among various kinds ol studies and which
s ol inferences ^a\\ legitimately be drawn from each.

know the characteristics ol well-designed studies, including the role of
randomization in surveys and experiments.

Pi 'ohahilit)

md the concepts ol sample space and probability distribution

and construct sample spaces and distributions in simple cases.

lerstand the concepts ol conditional probability and independent
events; understand how to compute the probability ol a compound

event.

pute and interpret the expected value ol random variables in

simple cai faircoins, expected winnings, expected profit).

Use simulations to construct empirical probability distributions and to
make informal inferences about the theoretical probability distribution.

Discrete Mathematics

Solve basic problems that involve counting techniques, including the
multiplication principle, permutations, and combinations; use counting
techniques to understand various situations (e.g., number of ways to
order a set of objects, to choose a subcommittee from a committee, to
visit n cities).

Find values of functions defined recursively and understand how
recursion can be used to model various phenomena; translate between
recursive and closed-form expressions for a function.

Determine whether a binary relation on a set is reflexive, symmetric, or
transitive; determine whether a relation is an equivalence relation.

Use finite and infinite arithmetic and geometric sequences and series to
model simple phenomena (e.g., compound interest, annuity, growth,
decay).

Understand the relationship between discrete and continuous
representations and how they can be used to model various
phenomena.

Use difference equations, vertex-edge graphs, trees, and networks to
model and solve problems.

Matrix Algebra

Understand vectors and matrices as systems that have some of the
same properties as the real number system (e.g., identity, inverse, and
commutativity under addition and multiplication).

Perform scalar multiplication on a matrix; multiply, add, and subtract
vectors and matrices; find inverses of matrices.

Use matrix techniques to solve systems of linear equations.

Use determinants to reason about inverses of matrices and solutions to
systems of equations.

238

Measurements

Make decisions aboul units and scales thai are appropriate for problem
situations involving measurement; use unit analysis.

Analyze precision, accuracy, and approximate error in measurement
situations.

Mt' n informal concepts ol successive approximation, upper and lower
bounds, and limit in measurement situations.

Ass i ssMi M 01 Ll MINING OBJECT IVES

Students in Core Mathematics courses musi demonstrate satisfactory
improvement on post-course exams i from pre-course exam scores >.

In order to cam either a Bachelor ol Arts or Bachelor ol Science degree in
Mathematics, students must:

Six cessfull) complete each maim- course with a grade ol "'('-" or

heller, earn a ( il' A for .ill MATH courses ol at least 2.0. and

Successfully complete a standardized examination covering the
learning objectives at the conclusion ol MA 1 1 1 4350 during the

senior year.

A survey is sent to recent graduates ol the program during the fall term of

each year. I he results ol these surveys are considered and ma) result in

changes to improve the program.

Minor

linor in mathematics consists of the follow ing courses: MA I 1 1 222 1 .
plus ti\e additional courses selected from MATH 2222. 2223, 2224. 2261,
(316,331 :. 1380, 1382, 4333, 4334, 4343, 4344,

. 4496, and 4499. At least two ol the six courses must be
at the (000 oi 4(hk) level.

Combined B.A. and M.A.T Program of Study

Undergraduate students who meet the admission requirements for the
Master of Arts in Teaching [M.A.T] (passing GACE Basic Skills or a
combined SAT score of more than 1000) and those who have a GPA of 3.0
or higher in their undergraduate studies are eligible to participate in a
combined B.A. and M.A.T. program of study after the completion of 90
semester hours. Once accepted, candidates may take entering cohort
graduate courses the Summer Semester following their junior year of study.
Upon gaining senior status, candidates may take one three credit graduate
course during the Fall, Interim, and Spring Semesters only if enrolled with
twelve undergraduate credits.

Course Descriptions (MATH)

MATH 0100 Basic Mathematics. (3) Fall and Spring

An introduction to algebra. Topics include instruction in real numbers,

graphs, algebraic expressions, equations, and polynomials.

MATH 1101 College Algebra. (3) Fall and Spring
A study of sets, real numbers, operations, order, inequalities, polynomial
factoring, functions, graphs, exponents, first- and second-degree equations,
and systems of equations.

Prerequisite: MATH 0100 or satisfactory score on

Mathematics placement test

MATH 1114 Introduction to Statistics. (3) Fall and Spring
An introduction to probability and statistics. Topics include descriptive
statistics, probability, normal probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis
testing, and linear regression.

Prerequisite: MATH 1 101, 2105, or 2221

MATH 1121 A Survey of Calculus. (3) Fall (even years)
An intuitive introduction, using technology, to the concepts and
applications of calculus. Topics include functions and graphing, tangents
to a curve, differentiation and integration, maxima, minima, and area under
a curve.

Prerequisite: MATH 1 101 or 2105 or satisfactory score on

mathematics placement test.

Note: Not open to students who have credit for MATH 2221

240

MATH 2105 Precakulus. (4) Fall and Spring
\ stud) ol calculus oriented algebra and trigonometry. Topics include
simplifying algebrak expressions, solving equations, exponential and
irithmic functions, applications ol functions, graphs, and the
ometric functions.
Prerequisih MATH I lui or satisfactory score on mathematics
placement test

MATH 2221 Inalytk Geometry and ( lakuliu L (4) l .ill and Spring
An introduction to differentiation and integral calculus. I opics include
limits, differentiation and applications, integration, and the calculus oi
exponential and logarithmic functions.

Pren quisite: MATH 2105 or 1121 (and permission ol instructor)
oi satisfactory score on mathematics placement test.

MATH 2222. Analytic Geometrj and Calculus II. (4) Fall and Spring
\ continuation ol Math 222 1 . Topics include the applications of
integration, the calculus ol inverse trigonometric functions, techniques ol
integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, sequence and series,
and the parametric equations, and the polar coordinates.
Prerequisite: MATH 2221

MATH 2223 Analytic Geometry and Calculus UL (4) Fall
A continuation ol Math 2222. I opics include vectors and vector-valued
functions ol several variables, multiple integration, and vector analysis.
Prerequisite. MATH 2222

MATH 2224 Differential Equations. (3) Spring
An introduction to differential equations. Topics include the stud) ol first-
and second-order differentia] equations, first-order systems, linear systems,
Laplace transforms, and numerical methods.

Prei or Co-requisite: MATH 2223, 2241 or permission

structor

MATH 2241 Programming InMATL \n for the Sciences. (3)
Interim {( )n demand i
irse in M \ 1 1 \H thai ranges from basic programming to the
implementation <>t higher-level mathematics and data presentation
techniques.

/ n reqw \U MATH 2222

MATH 3101 Fundamentals of Mathematics I for Teachers. (3)

Spring
A study of topics in mathematics designed for future elementary and
middle school teachers who are not pursuing the concentration in
mathematics. Topics include problem solving, number systems and the
relationships between these systems, understanding multiplication and
division, including why standard computational algorithms work,
properties of arithmetic, and applications of elementary mathematics.
Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or higher
Note: Open only to Early Childhood Education Majors

MATH 3102 Fundamentals of Mathematics II for Teachers. (3)

Fall
A study of topics in mathematics designed for future elementary and
middle school teachers who are not getting a concentration in mathematics.
Topics include numbers and operations, algebra, geometry, data analysis,
statistics, probability, and measurement. Technology is used when
appropriate.

Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or higher

Note: Open only to Early Childhood Education Majors

MATH 3225 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations and

Boundary Value Problems. (3) On demand
Topics include Fourier Series, the Wave Equation, the Heat Equation,
Laplace's Equation, Dirichlet Problems, Sturm-Liouville Theory, the
Fourier Transform, and Finite Difference Numerical Methods.
Prerequisite: MATH 2224

MATH 3306 College Geometry. (3) Interim (on demand)
A study of the concepts of plane Euclidean geometry, with an introduction
to coordinate geometry and non-Euclidean geometries.
Prerequisite: MATH 2221

MATH 3316 Probability Theory. (3) Spring

An Introduction to probability theory. Topics include random variables,

method of enumeration, conditional probability, Baye's theorem, discrete

distributions (binomial distribution, and Poisson distribution), continuous

distributions (uniform distribution, exponential distribution, gamma

distribution, chi-square distribution, and normal distributions), Multivariate

distributions.

Prerequisite: MATH 2222

242

MATH 3317 Mathematical Statistics. (3) On demand
An introduction to the mathematical theory of statistics. Topics include
estimation and maximum likelihood estimates, sampling distributions,
confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing.
Prerequisite: MATH 3316

MATH 3335 Linear Algebra. (3) Spring
An introduction to linear algebra and matrix theory. Topics include
Vectors, Systems of Linear Equations, Matrices, Eigenvalues,
Eigenvectors, and Orthogonality.

Prerequisite: MATH 1121, 2221, 2241 or permission of instructor

MATH 3340 History of Mathematics. (3) Interim (on demand)
An historical development of mathematical concepts.

Prerequisite: MATH 2221 or permission of instructor

MATH 3342 Complex Variables. (3) Spring (even years)

An introduction to complex variables. Topics include complex numbers,

Analytic functions, elementary functions, complex integration, series

representations for analytic functions, residue theory, and conformal

mapping.

Prerequisite: MATH 2223

MATH 3380 Discrete Mathematics. (3) Fall (even years)
An introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics include set theory,
combinatorics, recurrence relations, linear programming, and graph theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 2221

MATH 3382 Combinatorial Design Theory. (3) Fall (odd years)
A study of techniques used for constructing combinatorial designs. Basic
designs include triple systems, Latin squares, and affine and projective
planes.

Prerequisite: MATH 2221

MATH 4333 Modern Algebra I. (3) Fall (odd years)
An introduction to modern abstract algebra.
Prerequisite: MATH 2222

MATH 4334 Modern Algebra II. (3) On demand
A continuation of Modern Algebra I.
Prerequisite: MATH 4333

243

MATH 4343 Analysis I. (3) Fall (even years)
An introduction to Analysis.

Prerequisite: MATH 2223

MATH 4344 Analysis II. (3) On demand
A continuation of Analysis I.

Prerequisite: MATH 4343

MATH 4350 Senior Capstone. (3) Fall

A study of problem-solving techniques selected from the spectrum of
mathematics course work required to complete a mathematics major at
LaGrange College. Topics come from a variety of areas, including algebra,
trigonometry, geometry, calculus, discrete mathematics, probability and
statistics, and mathematical reasoning and modeling.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of instructor

MATH 4410 Numerical Methods. (3) On demand
An introduction to numerical analysis with computer solutions. Topics
include Taylor series, finite difference, calculus, roots of equations,
solutions of linear systems of equations, and least-squares.
Prerequisite: MATH 2222 and CSCI 1990

MATH 4495 Independent Study in Mathematics I. (Variable)

On demand

This course allows students to pursue a special problem or topic beyond

those encountered in any formal course.

Prerequisites: Minimum prerequisites are outlined in the
LaGrange College Bulletin. Additional prerequisites will be
determined by the instructor, based on the material to be studied.

MATH 4496 Independent Study in Mathematics EL (Variable)

On demand

This course allows students to pursue a second special problem or topic

beyond those encountered in any formal course.

Prerequisites: Minimum prerequisites are outlined in the
LaGrange College Bulletin. Additional prerequisites will be
determined by the instructor, based on the material to be saidied.

MATH 4499 Special Topics in Mathematics. (Variable)

On demand
A course offered at the junior/senior level focusing on a specialized topic
from the field of mathematics. A prerequisite may be required

244

MUSIC

Introduction

The Department of Music is committed to the development of musicians
who are both creative and critical thinkers, and who are able to
communicate in culturally relevant ways. We seek to integrate and extend
liberal arts-based values through musical scholarship, presentation, and
creative collaboration. Within a challenging and nurturing environment, we
seek to prepare competitive musicians whose personal development and
artistry demonstrate intelligence, ethical values, and a lifelong pursuit of
excellence.

Our program size allows us to focus attention on each student as an
individual, helping each one grow into a well-rounded, intelligent, and
confident musician. We offer the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of
Music, as well as a minor in Music. The B.A. in Music provides a broad
study of music while allowing ample time for extensive coursework in a
related minor. The B.M., a professional music degree, demands more
courses within the music department and is offered in three areas of study:
Composition and Music Technologies, Performance (Voice, Piano, Organ,
Guitar, Percussion), and Church Music.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of a degree from the Department of Music, a student
should be able to:

Demonstrate basic musicianship and the ability to integrate
musical knowledge.

Demonstrate the ability to synthesize musical ideas and technique
in creative musical expression.

Demonstrate effective presentation of scholarship, artistry, and/or
musical creativity.

Demonstrate appreciation of music that results in an ongoing
commitment to artistic endeavors.

Facilities and Resources

The Department of Music is located on the Callaway Campus and is
housed in the Callaway Educational Building. Our facilities include the
Callaway Auditorium (a 740-seat concert hall), Callaway Recital Hall,
instructional and rehearsal space, student practice rooms, theory lab,
keyboard lab, composition lab, edit/mix suite, video editing suite, and two
recording studios. Most laboratories are 24/7 facilities and enjoy a great
deal of student use and creative productivity.

245

General Information for Music Majors

Acceptance into the Department of Music is granted by a music faculty
committee to those students who have submitted an application and
completed an audition/interview. Please inquire about audition dates,
usually held in early spring. Incoming students who have not auditioned or
interviewed before the committee prior to the beginning of the fall
semester should contact the Chair of the Department before enrolling in
music courses. Admission of all new music students to the Department of
Music, first-year students and transfers, is provisional in nature and will be
evaluated at the end of the first-year of study (see Entry Requirements for
Music Majors below).

The Bachelor of Music degree is designed for students who are preparing
for professional careers in music and/or graduate study in music. The
curricula leading to this degree are based on a philosophy that recognizes
the need for rigorous study in all aspects of music. Each program of study
requires a heavy concentration of music courses/experiences, and many
courses are sequential. Therefore, potential music majors are strongly
encouraged to begin taking music courses in their first-year. The Chair of
the Department of Music can provide advisement and a four-year
suggested course guideline.

The music faculty provides incoming students with a Music Majors
Handbook containing departmental policies and further details about
requirements for music majors.

Music Scholarships

Talent-based scholarships are available for incoming first-year students as
well as transfer students. Audition dates for scholarships are held annually
in the fall and spring. Check the Department of Music's website for
audition requirements.

Ensembles

Various ensembles arc available by audition for both music majors and non
-majors. Our ensembles represent the College and Department of Music in
public performances throughout the academic year, both locally and
abroad. Those interested may contact the Department of Music
( music @ lagrange.edu).

246

Music Minor

I\) obtain a minor in Music, students must complete the following courses:
MUSI 1101 and 1 102 Theory 1-2 6 hours

MUSI 1113 and 1114 Ear Training 1-2 4 hours

MUSI 1110 Literature and Language

of Music 2 hours

MUSI 1103 Piano 1 1 hour

MUSI 3301 (or MUSI 3302) Music History 1 (or 2) 3 hours

Music Electives 3 hours

Total: 19 hours

Entry Requirements for Music Majors

[n addition to fulfilling the general requirements for admission to LaGrange
College, students desiring to major in music must complete an audition/
interview before the music faculty prior to enrolling in music courses and
take the Music Theory Placement Exam. The results of this exam are used
to determine the appropriate level of music theory instruction.

Exit Requirements for Music Majors

Students must earn a grade of "C-" or better in all music courses.

All music majors must take the Theory Competency Exam upon
completion of MUSI 2202 and MUSI 2213 and must receive a
minimum score of 80 percent in all sections. A detailed description of
this exam is included in the Music Majors Handbook.

All music majors must take the Piano Proficiency Exam demonstrating
keyboard skill, receiving a "Pass" on each of the exam's criteria.
Further details about this exam are included in the Music Majors
Handbook.

All music majors must present either a capstone presentation or a
public recital featuring their talent (according to the degree
requirements). Recital requirements vary between the different
programs of study. Consult the Music Majors Handbook for specific
guidelines.

All music majors must attend at least 80 percent of departmentally
sponsored concerts and events each semester of study.

247

Bachelor of Arts in Music

This program of study provides the student with a broad, liberal arts based
music education. The major consists of course work in four areas of study:
1) academic, 2) performance, 3) music electives, and 4) capstone
presentation. The academic areas include music theory and music history.
The performance component is comprised of Piano Class (1-3) and applied
lessons and/or ensemble. The music electives consist of MUSI courses and
may not be counted in the academic or performance areas. MUSI 4486
Special Topics may be taken multiple times for credit. The capstone
presentation should be a senior-level investigation of a topic approved by
the music faculty. The successful capstone project should bring together
each facet of the student's music education, and thus should be completed
in the student's final semester. The student is encouraged to choose a
complementary minor area of study, including (but not limited to) English,
History, or Theater. The student must adhere to all entrance/exit
requirements common to all Music Majors.

In addition to the other degree requirements, students complete the
following Music courses:

General Requirements:

CORE (43)
Jan Term (9)
General Electives (21)

Music Requirements:

MUSI 0999 -- Music Seminar (0) taken each semester

MUSI 1 1 10 - Lit. & Lang of Music (2)

MUSI 1 1 1 , 1 1 02, & 220 1 - Music Theory 1-3(9)

MUSI 1113, 1114, & 2213 --Ear Training 1-3(6)

MUSI 1 105 (or 1 106) - Applied Lessons (4)

MUSI 1 107 (or 1 108) -- Ensemble (4)

MUSI 1 103, 1 104, & 2203 - Piano 1-3 (3)

MUSI 2310 - Orchestration (3)

MUSI 3366 - Conducting (3)

MUSI 2301 & 2302 -- Music History 1-2 (6)

MUSI 4486 -- Special Topics in Music OR

Approved Music Electives (6)
MUSI 4488 -- Capstone Presentation (1)

TOTAL = 120

248

Bachelor of Music in Composition and Music
Technologies

This program of study prepares the student for an entry-level position in
the music industry or continued study at the graduate level. Students of
this program typically come from backgrounds that include performance,
song writing, composition, electronic and/or computer music. The course
work prepares students for a wide variety of activities, such as film/video
scoring, multimedia, electro-acoustic concert and studio applications,
music printing, digital audio and video editing, 5.1 audio editing and
mixing, and MIDI applications of every sort.

Internships allow students to tailor their academic work to their specific
career goals and gain valuable experience with industry professionals.
Internships may be repeated for credit.

In addition to the other degree requirements, students complete the
following music courses:

General Requirements:

CORE (43)
Jan Term (9)

Music Requirements:

MUSI 0999 - Music Seminar (0) taken each semester

MUSI 1110 Lit. & Lang of Music (2)

MUSI 1 101, 1 102, & 2201 -- Music Theory 1-3 (9)

MUSI 1113, 1114, & 2213 --Ear Training 1-3(6)

MUSI 1 105 (or 1 106) -- Applied Lessons (5)

MUSI 1 107 (or 1 108) - Ensemble (5)

MUSI 1 103, 1 104, & 2203 -- Piano 1-3 (3)

MUSI 2310 -- Orchestration (3)

MUSI 2390 -- Audio Engineering (3)

MUSI 3369 -- New Media (3)

MUSI 1211 -- Composition Seminar (3) repeat for credit

MUSI 3210 -- Advanced Composition Seminar (3) repeat for crdt.

MUSI 3366 -- Conducting (3)

MUSI 2301 & 2302 -- Music History 1-2 (6)

MUSI 3384 -- Junior Recital (0)

MUSI 4470 - Internship ( 1 )

MUSI 4484 - Senior Recital ( 1 )

MUSI 4486 -- Special Topics in Music OR

Approved Music Electives (6)
Music electives (12)

TOTAL = 126

249

Bachelor of Music in Performance
(Voice, Piano, Organ, Guitar, Percussion)

This program of study is designed for students seeking careers as
professional classical performers and/or studio teachers. Students admitted
to this program of study must possess exceptional talent in their principal
applied area, and instrumental and keyboard majors must demonstrate
previous training. The curriculum couples rigorous scholarship with
numerous performance opportunities, thus adequately preparing students
for graduate study in performance.

In addition to the other degree requirements, students complete the
following music courses:

Vocal Majors Track

General Requirements:

CORE (43)
Jan Term (9)

Music Requirements:

MUSI 0999 -- Music Seminar (0)

MUSI 1 1 10 -- Lit. & Lang of Music (2)

MUSI 1 101, 1 102, & 2201 -- Music Theory 1-3 (9)

MUSI 1 1 13, 1 1 14, 2213 -- Ear Training 1-3 (6)

MUSI 1 105 (or 1 106) - Applied Voice (10)

MUSI 1 107 (or 1 108) - Choral Ensemble (8)

MUSI 1 103, 1 104, & 2203 -- Piano 1-3 (3)

MUSI 2239 & 2240 - Diction for Singers: 1-2 (4)

MUSI 2310 -- Orchestration (3)

MUSI 3366 - Conducting (3)

MUSI 2301 & 2302 - Music History 1-2 (6)

MUSI 4480 Opera Experience (6)

Music or Theater or Language Electives (9)

MUSI 4486 -- Special Topics in Music OR

Approved Music Electives (6)
MUSI 3384 - Junior Recital (0)
MUSI 4484 -- Senior Recital (1)
TOTAL = 128

Piano Majors Track

General Requirements:

CORE (43)
Jan Term (9)

250

Music Requirements:

MUSI 099 -- Music Seminar (0)

MUIS 1110 Lit. & Lang of Music (2)

MUSI 1101, 1102, & 2201 -- Music Theory 1-3 (9)

MUSI 1113, 1114, & 2213 --Ear Training 1-3(6)

MUSI 1 105 (or 1 106) -- Applied Piano (10)

MUSI 1 107 (or 1 108) -- Ensemble (6)

MUSI 1 107 (or 1 108) -- Ensemble: Accompanying (4)

MUSI 2239 - Diction for Singers: Part 1 (2)

MUSI 2310 -- Orchestration (3)

MUSI 2390 -- Audio Engineering (3)

MUSI 3366 -- Conducting (3)

MUSI 2301 & 2302 -- Music History 1-2 (6)

Music or Approved Electives (9)

MUSI 4486 -- Special Topics in Music OR

Approved Music Electives (9)
MUSI 3384 -- Junior Recital (0)
MUSI 4484 -- Senior Recital (1)
TOTAL = 125

Instrumental Majors Track

General Requirements:

CORE (43)
Jan Term (9)

Music Requirements:

MUSI 0999 - Music Seminar (0)

MUSI 1 1 10 - Lit. & Lang of Music (2)

MUSI 1101, 1102, & 2201 -- Music Theory 1-3(9)

MUSI 1113, 1114, 2213 --Ear Training 1-3(6)

MUSI 1 103, 1 104, & 2203 -- Piano 1-3 (3)

MUSI 1 105 (or 1 106) Applied Instrument (10)

MUSI 1 107 (or 1 108) -- Ensemble (8)

MUSI 2310 -- Orchestration (3)

MUSI 2290 -- Audio Engineering (3)

MUSI 3366 - Conducting (3)

MUSI 2301 & 2302 -- Music History 1-2 (6)

Music or Approved Electives (11)

MUSI 4486 -- Special Topics in Music OR

Approved Music Electives(9)
MUSI 3384 - Junior Recital (0)
MUSI 4484 -- Senior Recital (1)
TOTAL = 126

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Bachelor of Music in Church Music

The Bachelor of Music degree in Church Music prepares future leaders
for music ministry in the church. The course of study affirms both the
rich heritage of the sacred musical tradition and contemporary worship
styles practiced in many churches today. This degree is also appropriate
for those students pursuing graduate study in church music at the
seminary/graduate school level.

The required internship hours provide an opportunity for students to
practice their craft in a real-world environment. Students are expected
to provide their own transportation to and from the internship site.
Because the internship experience offers valuable interaction with
professionals and spiritual mentoring, students are encouraged to enroll
for as many internship credit hours as their schedule permits. Internship
may be repeated for credit.

In addition to the other degree requirements, students complete the
following music courses:

General Requirements:

CORE (43)
Jan Term (9)
General Electives (3)

Music Requirements:

MUSI 0999 - Music Seminar (0)

MUSI 1 1 10 -- Lit. & Lang of Music (2)

MUSI 1 101, 1 102, & 2201 -- Music Theory 1-3 (9)

MUSI 1113, 1114, & 2213 -Ear Training 1-3(6)

MUSI 1 105 (or 1 106) -- Applied Lessons (8)

MUSI 1 107 (or 1 108) -- Ensemble (8)

MUSI 1 103, 1 104, & 2203 -- Piano 1-3 (3)

MUSI 2310 -- Orchestration (3)

MUSI 2390 - Audio Engineering (3)

MUSI 3331 -- Christian Hymnody (3)

MUSI 3366 -- Conducting (3)

MUSI 2301 & 2302 -- Music History 1-2 (6)

MUSI 4486 -- Special Topics in Music OR

Approved Music Electives (6)
MUSI 2239 - Diction for Singers: Part 1 (2)
Music Electives (6)
MUSI 4470 -- Internship (3)
MUSI 4488 - Capstone Project ( 1 )
TOTAL = 127

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Course Descriptions (MUSI)

MUSI 0999 Music Seminar. (0)

A weekly seminar/recital hour featuring student performances, master
classes, and presentations by guest artists.

* MUSI 1100 Music Fundamentals. (3) On demand

Provides an introduction to elementary music theory, including scales, key
signatures, staff notation, clefs, rhythm, meter, intervals, and general music
terminology.

* MUSI 1 101 Theory 1. (3) Fall

This course focuses on Diatonic Harmony and is designed to provide the
student with the basics of music theory, including: scales, key signatures,
intervals, triads, beginning voice leading, harmony, figured bass, basic
reductive and hierarchic graphing techniques. Some lab time will be
devoted to internet music resources and notation using FINALE. Other
topics will include basic MAC computer skills especially as they pertain
to music theory and CAI in music theory. Must be taken with MUSI 1113.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1 100 or passing score on Theory Placement

Exam

MUSI 1102 Theory 2. (3) Spring

Continuation of MUSI 1 101. This course focuses on Chromatic Harmony
and Form and is designed to provide the student experience with
intermediate-level music theory topics, including: phrase structure, non-
chord tones, voice leading, harmony, figured bass, modulations, and form
(binary, ternary, variations, etc.). Some lab time is devoted to internet
music resources and notation using FINALE. Other topics include basic
MAC computer skills, especially as they pertain to music theory and CAI
in music theory.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1101

MUSI 1103 Piano 1. (1) Spring

Beginning instruction in piano for music majors with no previous keyboard

training. Development of basic reading skills.

MUSI 1104 Piano 2.(1) Fall

Continuation of Piano 1 with additional emphasis on sight-reading.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1 103 or permission of Instructor.

253

MUSI 1105-1106 Applied Lessons. (1-2) Fall and Spring
Individual instruction in the student's choice of instrument or voice to
develop technical proficiency, repertoire knowledge, and performance
skills. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Audition and authorization by the Chair

Section A - Voice

Section B - Piano

Section C - Organ

Section D - Guitar (Classical and Contemporary)

Section E - Percussion

Section F - Brass

Section G - Composition

Section H - Strings

MUSI 1107-1108 Ensemble. (1) Fall and Spring
Performance organization(s) providing ensemble experience. May be
repeated for credit. Performance ensembles include: LaGrange College
Chamber Singers, Women's Chorus, LaGrange Symphony Chorus, and the
Instrument Ensemble.

Prerequisite: Audition

MUSI 1 109 Beginning Classical Guitar. (1) On demand
Basic techniques of classical guitar taught in a classroom setting, intended
for non-music majors. The course includes fundamentals of reading music
and understanding elementary music theory. In addition, students will
study examples of simple folk music and music for worship. A selection of
the most useful guitar chords, suitable for beginners, and basic
accompaniment patterns will be taught to allow the students to accompany
their singing. Students will need to own an acoustic guitar and plan for
daily practice time.

MUSI 1 1 10 Literature and Language of Music 1. (2) Spring
This course acquaints students with the appropriate language needed for a
precise discussion of music and the literature that corresponds to musical
evolution since notation developed. The course also has a strong listening
component, thereby encouraging more discriminate listening.

* t MUSI 1112 Music Survey. (3) On demand

A broad survey of music aimed at developing aesthetic awareness and

critical analysis of music from diverse styles and genres.

154

MUSI 1113 Ear Training 1. (2) Spring

This course is designed to provide the student with basic sight singing and

listening skills. Some lab time is devoted to internet music resources and

notation using FINALE. Other topics include basic MAC computer skills

especially as they pertain to music theory and CAI in music theory and ear

training.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1 100 or passing score on Theory Placement

Exam

MUSI 1114 Ear Training 2. (2) Fall
Continuation of MUSI 1 1 14.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1113

MUSI 1211 Composition Seminar. (1) Fall and Spring
Introductory compositional study in instrumental and vocal writing.
Assigned and student-initiated composition projects that include woodwind
quintet, percussion ensemble, and art song. All completed compositions
that meet the required criteria for these listed performing groups are
rehearsed and recorded.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1101 and MUSI 1113

MUSI 2201 Theory 3. (3) Fall

Continuation of MUSI 1 102. This course focuses on Form and Twentieth-"
Century Techniques and is designed to provide the student with more
advanced knowledge of music theory, including: modulations, form
(Sonata, Rondo, Concerto, etc.), introduction to pitch-class set theory,
introduction to 12-Tone theory, and more recent musical trends. Some lab
time is devoted to internet music resources and notation using FINALE.
Other topics include basic MAC computer skills, especially as they pertain
to music theory and CAI in music theory.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1102

MUSI 2203 Piano Class 3. (1) Spring

Continuation of MUSI 1 104 with emphasis on transposition and chord
accompaniment. Upon completion of this course, the student should be
prepared for the Piano Proficiency Exam. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1104

255

MUSI 2213 Ear Training 3. (2) Spring
Continuation of MUSI 1114. This course is designed to provide the
student with a more advanced knowledge, sight singing, and listening
skills. Some lab time is devoted to internet music resources and notation
using FINALE. Other topics include basic MAC computer skills,
especially as they pertain to music theory and CAI in music theory and
ear training.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1114

MUSI 2239 Diction for Singers: Part 1. (2) On demand
A study of English and Italian art song literature, and correct rules of
pronunciation. Trains students in the use of the International Phonetic
Alphabet to transcribe English and Italian art songs.

MUSI 2240 Diction for Singers: Part 2. (2) On demand
A study of French and German art song literature, and correct rules of
pronunciation. Use of International Phonetic Alphabet to transcribe
French and German art songs.

Prerequisite: MUSI 2239

t MUSI 2301 Music History 1. (3) Fall

The study of the western classical tradition, from earliest antiquity
through Haydn and Mozart. Course emphasizes historical analysis and
criticism, aural identification, and research.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1 102 or permission of instructor

$ MUSI 2302 Music History 2. (3) Spring
Music of the Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras, beginning with
Beethoven. Course will emphasize historical analysis and criticism,
aural identification, and research.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1 102 or permission of instructor

MUSI 2310 Orchestration. (3) Spring

Techniques of scoring for string, brass, woodwind, percussion

instruments and MIDI instruments.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1 102 and MUSI 1114

MUSI 2390 Audio Engineering. (3) Fall

Classroom instruction in digital and analog audio engineering.
Recording console operation, microphone placement and usage, mixing,
tape based and hard disc recording, mastering, CD burning and
troubleshooting.

256

MUSI 3210 Advanced Composition Seminar. (1) Fall and Spring
Advanced compositional study of large-scale forms and genres. Assigned
and student-initiated composition projects that include brass quintet, string
quartet, art song, mixed-voiced choir, and chamber orchestra. Students may
also compose works that use live or pre-recorded elements and/or
techniques, music for video or short film, or other nontraditional means.
All completed compositions that meet the required criteria for these listed
performing groups are rehearsed and recorded.

MUSI 3331 Christian Hymnody. (3) On demand
A survey of Christian hymnody in the English-speaking world from its
roots in the early Christian Church to present day practices in worship.
The study of selected hymns and hymn writers associated with a number of
different Christian traditions is included.

MUSI 3352 Jazz Theory and Popular Practice. (2) Fall
Theoretical foundations of the Jazz tradition and consideration of related
contemporary style; blues, fusion, rock, gospel, and current popular idioms.
Aural skills emphasized, with keyboard harmony studies oriented to
realizing technical comprehension of the material.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2202

MUSI 3366 Basics of Conducting. (3) Fall

Conducting techniques, score reading, rehearsal techniques for choral and/

or instrumental ensembles.

Prerequisite: MUSI 2202

MUSI 3369 New Media. (3) Fall

Basic studio techniques, music sequencing, music printing, synthesizers,
studio operation.

Prerequisite: MUSI 2390 Audio Engineering

MUSI 3384 Junior Recital. (1) Fall and Spring

A 30-minute public performance of the student's creative work and/or

talent presented during the junior year.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Pre-Recital Hearing

257

MUSI 4413 Business of Music Industry. (3) On demand
The study of basic issues pertaining to the music industry: music
copyrights, music synchronization, musical mechanical licensing, standard
music contracts, royalties, artists' advances and contracts, buyouts.
Introduction to the major licensing organizations, i.e., ASCAP, BMI,
SESAC, and the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the
professional society of musicians.

MUSI 4460 Production Project. (3) Interim
A special projects course with hands-on participation and teamwork
required. Each project is unique; specific content is publicized in the
semester preceding the course offering.

MUSI 4470 Internship. (1) Fall, Interim, Spring
A supervised, practical "real world" experience in a professional off-
campus environment. May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 4480 Opera Experience. (3) Fall, Interim, Spring

The study of selected operas and operatic excerpts that may result in staged

performances.

MUSI 4484 Senior Recital. (1) Fall and Spring

A one-hour public performance of the student's creative work and/or talent

presented during the senior year.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Pre-Recital Hearing

MUSI 4486 Special Topics. (3) On demand
Class instruction for musical topics of a highly specialized nature. The
content of this course changes based upon the expertise of the instructor
and the needs of the students. May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 4488 Capstone Presentation. (1)

The capstone presentation is a senior-level investigation of some music-
faculty approved topic.

* Denotes courses in Music that may satisfy Fine Arts requirement
in Core Curriculum.

$ Denotes courses in Music that may substitute for a CORE
Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

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NURSING

Mission and Purpose

The Department of Nursing, as an integral part of LaGrange College,
provides a program in nursing congruent with the Mission and Goals of the
College. Founded in the broader purpose of the College, the program of
nursing study is developed by nursing faculty and reflects the ideas and
concepts central to the profession of nursing and beliefs regarding nursing.

The faculty has chosen to express these beliefs in the form of assumptions
which are related to various philosophic approaches to nursing education and
nursing practice. Assumptions provide a rich descriptive base upon which to
build curriculum and serve as a basis for criteria which guide the
development, maintenance, and evaluation of the nursing education program.

These assumptions and associated criteria, while interrelated, are presented
within a number of discrete categories. These include education as a
teaching-learning process within the discipline of nursing and the liberal
arts, the profession of nursing, and health as related to persons, groups, and
communities.

These assumptions are:

( 1 ) EDUCATION is renewing, lasting, liberalizing and liberating,
emphasizing understanding, critical thinking, human caring, and
participatory learning.

(2) The PROCESS OF EDUCATION fosters the development of
cognitive abilities which are of lifelong value while the content of
education is revised as new knowledge develops. Therefore the value of
the learning process far exceeds that of content learned.

(3) A foundation in the LIBERAL ARTS, as the basis for professional
education, fosters the development of the individual as a caring,
responsible, and contributing member of society who values the diversity
of others. Liberal arts education creates a repository of knowledge,
experiences, and abilities which forms a basis for continuing learning and
personal and professional development.

(4) LEARNING is the process of coming to know. Through this
process, one gains the knowledge, skill, and creativity necessary to
confront the challenges of contemporary life with a growing appreciation
for the discovery of new learning.

(5) TEACHING is the establishment and maintenance of goal-directed
partnerships wherein opportunities for growth and learning are realized by
both teachers and students.

259

(6) NURSING EDUCATION is preparation for the professional role.
It is characterized by acknowledgment of the human context of both
nursing practice and the educational process. Purposeful learning
partnerships are formed to support achievement of the goals of professional
education. Integrated within these partnerships are the processes of critical
thinking, caring, knowing, and participating. Nursing education seeks to
prepare individuals capable of moral and ethical commitments toward
improving self, others, and society within nursing's professional role.

(7) NURSING is a profession representing an academic and practice
discipline, comprised of purposeful activities serving individuals, groups,
and communities in need of health care. Nursing is based in knowledge
synthesized from the discipline of nursing and from the sciences, arts, and
humanities.

(8) HEALTH is a perceived, personal, and relative state of well being.
It is influenced by human responses to life events, transitions, and
meanings derived from lived experiences. Health is characterized by
variation from birth to death.

(9) SOCIETY is the larger human milieu, created by individuals and
groups and bound by common human needs. COMMUNITY is
characterized by interacting individuals and groups who share common
cultural norms. FAMILIES are self-defined and comprised of closely
interdependent INDIVIDUALS. Each individual is an integrated and
unique being having physical, emotional, social, and spiritual
characteristics.

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) curriculum consists of two
plans of study. The basic program prepares graduates for entry into
professional nursing practice and confers eligibility for initial licensure as a
registered professional nurse (RN). A degree-completion option is designed
for licensed RNs who wish to earn the BSN degree.

The curriculum provides professional nursing education within a heritage
of Christian faith and liberal arts learning. The nursing major, grounded in
an ethic of caring, encourages independent thought, appreciation for the
discovery of excellence, and commitment to supporting the health of
individuals and society. BSN studies establish a sound foundation for
professional nursing practice, graduate study, and continuing progress
toward personal and professional goals. Faculty and students serve as
resources for the College and community in nursing education, sen ice, and
research. Opportunities for collaborative study with students of Other

260

majors and clinical experience with varied health care providers emphasize
the interdisciplinary nature of nursing practice. As professional nurses,
graduates are able to assist individuals, groups, and communities in
meeting health care goals.

The BSN program is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing and is
accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission,
3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326; Sharon Tanner,
Ed.D., RN, Executive Director; 1-800-669-1656 ext. 153;
sjtanner@nlnac.org

Program Goals

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program will be able to:

Practice nursing from a knowledge and research base utilizing skills of
critical thinking, and communication, with the ability to expand
knowledge and skills through lifelong learning.

Engage in nursing practice based in a value system consistent with
professional standards of nursing and the philosophy of the nursing
program, characterized by caring and valuing of self and others.

Participate in transitions of health recognizing the opportunities and
limitations imposed by historical, sociocultural, spiritual, legal, ethical,
political, economic, and environmental contexts.

Assume the role of professional nurse, accountable as provider of care,
manager, collaborator, educator, learner, and resource for individuals,
families, groups, and communities in promoting and restoring health
and well-being.

Admission to the BSN Program

Students may declare the intent to pursue a nursing major at any time.
However, application for admission to the upper-division program is made
during the sophomore year. Nursing studies begin at the junior level with
the exception of Nutrition (NURS 3305) which may be completed prior to
admission to the nursing program. Admission requirements are as follows:

A completed Application for Admission to Nursing. An application form is
available from the College Admissions office and in the office of the
Department of Nursing.

Completion of a sufficient number of credits in Common Core and other
required courses to permit an uninterrupted progression in the nursing
major.

261

All applicants are administered the Assessment Technologies Institute
(ATI) Test of Essential Skills (TEAS) as part of the screening process for
admission. The TEAS is an exam of academic preparedness that covers
Reading, Math, Science and English Language Usage.

A grade of C or higher is required in anatomy, physiology, microbiology,
and English composition courses. A student is allowed one attempt to
repeat one of these courses. A subsequent failure in this course or any
other of these prerequisite courses renders the student ineligible to enter the
nursing program. A limit of five years applies to completion of anatomy,
physiology, and microbiology courses.

A cumulative overall GPA of 2.5 or higher at the time of entry into the
nursing program, including all courses completed or attempted at any
institution.

An interview with a member of the nursing faculty is required. Acceptance
into the LaGrange College Nursing Program is based upon an Admission
Score that ranks applicants based on GPA, TEAS Score, grades in science
courses, English and psychology with preference given to those who have
been at LaGrange College since they were first-year students.

An applicant who has completed any program of study leading to licensed
employment in the health care area (such as registered or practical nursing,
emergency medical technician) must present the license in person.

Unlicensed students enrolled in the nursing program may not be employed
by any health care agency in the capacity of licensed nursing personnel.
They shall not represent themselves in any practice setting as nursing
students unless engaged in planned programmatic learning activities which
are part of the nursing curriculum.

Admission to the BSN Completion Option

The BSN Completion Option is open to Registered Nurses who have
graduated from an Associate Degree or Diploma program in Nursing and
who hold a valid license to practice as a Registered Nurse. Current
Georgia RN licensure is required prior to entering a clinical nursing course.

In addition to RN licensure, the general admission requirements above
apply to RN applicants, with the following exceptions:

RN students who enter the nursing sequence on a full-time basis must
have completed all Common Core requirements and all required non-
nursing courses through the junior level.

No time limit applies to the completion of anatomy, physiology, or
microbiology courses.

262

Thirty (30) previously earned Associate or Diploma nursing semester
credits may be accepted toward the BSN degree, subject to the terms of
the Georgia RN-BSN Articulation Agreement (the complete
Agreement is available in the office of the Department of Nursing).
These 30 semester credit hours represent previously completed nursing
courses in Adult Health, Child Health, Maternal Health, and Mental
Health and are not intended to equal the actual number of previously
earned nursing credits. Normally, no more than 30 hours of Associate
Degree or Diploma nursing course credits may be applied toward
fulfilling any requirements of the BSN degree.

Twenty-four (24) additional nursing course credits must be earned at
the upper division level (3000 and 4000 courses). Up to 9 of these
credits may be earned through challenge examinations on a one-
attempt basis. A minimum of one year of nursing practice experience
within the past three years is required for eligibility for challenge
examinations.

Matriculation Requirements

An accepted student must possess a level of physical and emotional
health sufficient to enable him/her to meet nursing program
requirements and the standards of professional nursing practice.

Prior to beginning the first clinical nursing course, a medical
examination is required which documents the student's level of health
and immunization including current documentation of the Hepatitis
series and TB skin test.

Students are required to provide a current 12 panel urine drug screen
and a criminal background check after acceptance. (Drug Screen
Criteria to include: Marijuana, Cocaine, Amphetamines, Opiates,
Oxycodone, Phencyclidine (PCP), Barbiturates, Benzodiazepine,
Methadone, Propoxyphene, and Methaqualone)

Professional liability insurance (purchased on a group basis through
the College) and basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
certification are required prior to beginning the first nursing course and
must be continued throughout all clinical nursing courses.

263

Curriculum

Nursing courses are offered in a 4-1-4 semester sequence during the junior
and senior years of study. The total BSN curriculum can be completed in
four academic years (8 semesters) and includes 46 credit hours in the
Common Core, 16 credit hours in other required and elective courses, and
61 credit hours in nursing courses. Included in these hours are two elective
and one required interim courses which compose 9 hours of required
interim hours. Selected courses required for the BSN degree may fulfill
certain Common Core Requirements; these and other required non-nursing
courses are:

BIOL 2148 and BIOL 2149

MATH 1101
CORE 1120, 1140

PSYC 1101
PSYC 3302

ENGL 1101, 1102
BIOL 3320
CORE 3001

Human Anatomy and

Physiology*

College Algebra*

Problem Solving/Computer

Applications

Introduction to Psychology*

Human Growth and

Development*

Rhetoric and Composition*

Microbiology *

American Experience

*These courses are prerequisite to entering the nursing courses.
Junior Year

Fall:

Interim:

NURS 3305 Nutrition and Health*

(may be completed in advance)

NURS 3310 Health Promotion I: A Focus on Aging

NURS 33 1 1 Health Assessment Across the Life-Span

NURS 33 1 2 Conceptual Foundations of Nursing

NURS 3400 Health Restoration I: A Psychiatric Mental
Health Focus

NURS 3321 Introduction to Pharmacotherapy and
Pathophysiology

264

Health Restoration III: Adult Health Focus

Research in Nursing*

Health Promotion III: A Community Focus*

Spring:

NURS 3331 Pharmacology in Nursing*

NURS 3330 Health Promotion II: Mother, Child and
Family

NURS 3350 Health Restoration II: Adult Health Focus
Senior Year
Fall:

NURS 4430

NURS 4431

NURS 4440
Spring:

NURS 4432 Senior Capstone in Nursing*

NURS 4433 Health Restoration IV: Advanced Concepts

NURS 4450 Leadership and Role Transition

Nursing courses designated above by an asterisk are required of RN
students enrolled in the BSN-completion option. RN students also
complete two RN only courses:

Junior Level NURS 33 13 Transitions: A Seminar for

Registered Nurses (Fall)

Senior Level NURS 4460 Transitions and Leadership for

Registered Nurses (Spring)

Information regarding the program length and costs is provided to the
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission and is available
from that organization at 61 Broadway, 33 rd Floor, NY 10006,
800-669-1656 Ext. 153.

265

Progression

A grade of C (75%) or higher is required for successful completion of
all nursing courses. Course syllabi and the BSN Student Handbook
detail requirements for achieving a passing grade of C or better. A
grade of D, F, or WF is a failing grade.

A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 must be maintained throughout
the period of enrollment in nursing courses. A nursing major whose
GPA falls below 2.0 will be placed on departmental probation and has
one semester in which to raise the GPA to 2.0 or higher. Failure to
achieve a 2.0 in one semester will result in withdrawal from the
nursing program. A 2.0 GPA is required for entrance into senior level
courses.

Students earning a D or F in any nursing course may repeat the course
one time. The course may be repeated, and if the student passes, he/she
is eligible to continue the nursing program. However, any other failure
in that or any other nursing course will result in dismissal from the
program.

All Common Core and other required non-nursing courses, with the
exception of American Experience, and an interim elective must be
completed prior to beginning the senior-level nursing courses.

Students who fail a course in the first semester of the program must
compete for readmission with the next year's applicant pool.

Any student who fails clinically will not be allowed to continue in the
nursing program.

Students must successfully complete all junior-level clinical courses
before proceeding to senior-level clinical courses.

The faculty of the Department of Nursing reserve the right to dismiss
at any time a student whose health, conduct (academic dishonesty,
professional conduct), general attitude, clinical performance, or
scholastic standing make it inadvisable to retain the student in the
program. Students are expected to display qualities that are desirable
in professional persons.

266

Progression in BSN Completion Option

In addition to the guidelines above, the following policies apply to
progression in the BSN Completion Option:

A valid Georgia RN license must be maintained throughout enrollment
in clinical nursing courses.

Credit for completion of NUR 33 1 1 (Health Assessment) may be earned
by successful completion of a standardized examination and
demonstration of clinical competence. Credit for NUR 3331
(Pharmacology) and NUR 3305 (Nutrition) may be earned through
successful completion of standardized examination. Should a passing
score not be achieved on the first attempt the student is required to
complete the course.

All previously earned ADN or Diploma nursing credits will be placed
in escrow when the RN student enters the nursing program. Upon
satisfactory completion of 6 credit hours of BSN nursing courses, the
escrowed credits will be transferred to the student's permanent
academic record. Should the RN student not be successful in the
initial 6 hours of nursing course's, the previously earned nursing
credits will not be applied toward the BSN degree.

Assessment of Learning Objectives in the Major

In order for students and faculty to monitor learning progress and to provide
for evaluation of the educational program, periodic assessment measures are
used. All assessments are program, course, or College requirements.
Students are provided information as to the scheduling and cost of each
assessment.

Senior Institutional Assessment. Prior to graduation, students are
required to complete a senior institutional assessment that measures
students' creative, critical, and communicative abilities. This assessment
is designed to determine the extent to which students have achieved the
objectives of the College curriculum.

Standardized Exams. ATI achievement exams are administered at
intervals throughout the nursing program. These tests are required
within selected nursing courses.

Assessment in the Major. Standardized testing through Assessment
Technologies Institute (ATI) with course specific tests will be used in
each course as 5% of the course grade. Those students scoring below
the "cut score" for each test will be required to remediate using ATI
study materials. The RN Comprehensive Predictor Exam will be used in

267

the last semester as an exit exam that must be passed in order to
graduate. Students are provided with study materials and a practice
exam before their first Predictor Exam and students have two
opportunities to pass the exam. RN students complete an essay-type
examination.

Course Descriptions (NURS)

Course credit hours and corresponding clock hours are shown in
parentheses. One class clock hour/week equals one credit hour; three
laboratory or practice clock hours/week equal one credit hour.

NURS 3305 Nutrition and Health. (1) Fall

An introduction to nutrition concepts and current dietary trends, focusing
on health promotion. Nutrients are explored with regard to sources, dietary
requirements, and health implications. Student interests are incorporated.
Prerequisite: None

NURS 3310 Health Promotion I: A Focus on Aging. (4) Fall
(3 hrs. class 3 hrs. lab/clinical per week)

A foundation course to introduce and develop concepts, practices and
processes of health promotion in professional nursing, emphasizing the
needs of the elderly. The skills of communication, problem solving, and
critical analysis in nursing are included.

Prerequisite: Admission to BSN program.
Corequisites: NURS 331 1, NURS 3400

NURS 331 1 Health Assessment Across the Life-Span. (4) Fall
(3 hr. class, 3 hrs. lab per week)

A study of the health assessment process applied to persons of all ages,
with emphasis on building knowledge and skill in data acquisition,
organization, and interpretation.

Prerequisite: RN status or Corequisite: NURS 3310, NURS 3400

NURS 3312 Conceptual Foundations of Nursing. (2) Fall
(2 hrs. class per week)

An introduction to professional nursing practice and the varied roles of the
nurse in multiple practice settings. Conceptual bases of the professional
nursing role is explored.

Prerequisite: Admission to BSN program.

Corequisites: NURS 3305, NURS 3310, NURS 331 1

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NURS 3313 Transitions: A Seminar for Registered Nurses. (2) Fall
(2 hrs. class per week)

A study of varied perspectives and conceptual bases of the professional nursing
role. The research process and research significance in nursing practice is
introduced.

Prerequisite: Admission to BSN program, RN status.

NURS 3321 Introduction to Pharmacotherapy and Human

Pathophysiology. (3) Interim (6 hrs. class per day)

An introduction of concepts of pharmacotherapeutics and
pathophysiological processes as they relate to professional nursing.
Emphasis is on the use of pharmacological agents and the skills and
techniques of safe administration of medications as well as calculation of
drug dosages.

Prerequisite: NURS 3311, 3310, 3312, 3400

NURS 3330 Health Promotion II: Mother, Child and Family.

(4 hrs. class, 6hrs. lab/clinical per week) (6) Spring
A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of nursing
care for mother, infant, and family and selected women's health issues.
Emphasis is placed on the nurse's role in promoting the health of mother,
infant and family. Physical, developmental, and psychosocial challenges to
health are examined.

Prerequisites: NURS 3310, NURS 331 1, NURS 3312,

NURS 3400

Corequisites: NURS 3331, NURS 3350

NURS 3331 Pharmacology in Nursing. (4) Spring
(4 hrs. class per week)

A course designed to build on pharmacologic concepts and skills essential
for nursing practice introduced in a previous course. This course provides
opportunities for analysis and synthesis of content and concepts while
continuing to introduce the basic science of drugs, human pathophysiology
as it relates to drug therapy and the nursing implications related to
pharmacotherapy.

Prerequisites: NURS 3310, 331 1, 3400

Corequisites: NURS 3330, 3350

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NURS 3350 Health Restoration II: Adult Health Focus. (5) Spring
(3 hrs. class, 6 hrs. lab/clinical per week)

The foundation course in nursing care of individuals and families who are
experiencing challenges to health, emphasizing understanding and skill in
health restoration.

Prerequisites: NURS 3310, NURS 331 1, NURS 3312,

NURS 3400

Corequisites: NURS 3331, NURS 3330

NURS 3400 Health Restoration I:A Psychiatric Mental Health

Focus. (4) Fall (3 hrs. class, 3 hrs. lab/clinical per week)

Course provides the student with a foundation in psychiatric and mental
health nursing with a focus on therapeutic communication, influences
affecting mental health and illness, and nursing care for mental health
maintenance and restoration.

Prerequisites'. Admission to BSN Program
Corequisites: NURS 3310, NURS 3311, NURS 3312

NURS 4430 Health Restoration III: Adult Health Focus. (7) Fall
(3 hrs. class, 12 hrs. lab/clinical per week)

A study of advanced nursing care relevant to acutely ill patients with
complex health problems. Learning experiences emphasize collaboration
and critical analysis necessary in providing and coordinating care.

Prerequisites: NURS 3331, NURS 3350, NURS 3340,

NURS 3400

Corequisites: NURS 4431 NURS 4440

NURS 4431 Research in Nursing. (3) Fall
(3 hrs. class per week)

A course designed to assist students in developing a sense of inquiry,
including research designs, sampling strategies, data analysis methods, and
the use of research in clinical nursing practice.

Prerequisites: NURS 3312 or NURS 3313

NURS 4432 Senior Capstone in Nursing. (3) Spring
(3 hrs. class per week)

A seminar to assist students in synthesizing learning related to the roles and
practices of professional nurses, exploring the health care system and the
legal-ethical, sociopolitical, cultural, and professional issues influencing
contemporary nursing.

Prerequisites: All Junior-Level Nursing & Senior Fall Courses

Corequisites: NURS 4450, NURS 4460

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NURS 4433 Health Restoration IV: Advanced Concepts.

(5) Spring (4 hrs. class, 3 hrs. lab/clinical per week)

This course is the third of a three-course sequence. This course provides
opportunities for analysis and synthesis of content and concepts contained
in previous nursing courses. The primary focus of this course is clients
with complex health care needs.

Prerequisites: All Junior level courses; NURS 4430

Corequisites: NURS 4432, NURS 4450

NURS 4440 Health Promotion III: A Community Focus. (4) Fall
(3 hrs. class, 3 hrs. lab/clinical per week)

A course directed toward the knowledge and skills necessary to the practice
o\' community health nursing. Emphasis is placed on the promotion and
protection of the health of individuals and groups within the context of
community. A research project is completed focusing on a problem or
issue in community health.

Prerequisites: All Junior-level Nursing courses

Corequisites: NURS 4430, NURS 4431

NURS 4450 Leadership and Role Transition. (6) Spring

(2 hrs. class per week, 180 total hours clinical
practice)

A course to facilitate the transition to professional practice. Leadership
and management roles assumed in clinical practice and increasing
autonomy in patient care are guided through preceptorial experiences.
Prerequisites: All Junior-Level Nursing Courses and
NURS 4405, NURS 4330, NURS 4430, NURS 4431
Corequisites: NURS 4432, NURS 4433

NURS 4460 Transition and Leadership for Registered Nurses.
(2 hrs. class per week, 108 total hours clinical
practice) (4) Spring
A clinical practicum to facilitate RN transition to professional practice.
Principles of leadership are examined as they relate to Nursing Practice for
the RN.

Prerequisite: All nursing courses
Corequisites: NURS 4432, NURS 4433

NURS 4495 Independent Study in Nursing. (Variable) On demand
For students meeting requirements, the opportunity to pursue special
interests beyond those in the formal course of study.

Prerequisite: Completion of 2/3 nursing major, 3.0 GPA,

and permission.

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THE OIKOS PROGRAM
A Minor Program in Sustainability

Introduction

The Oikos Program is an interdisciplinary minor program on the theme of
sustainability. The program is sponsored by the departments of Biology,
Political Science, Religion, and Sociology and Anthropology. Oikos is the
Greek word for "house." It is the root word for both ecology and
economics, and thus points to the dual aspects of ecological and social and
responsibility that are central to the sustainability theme. The uniting theme
across disciplines is how we might contribute to a just, sustainable, and
peaceful future.

Learning Objectives

Using the expertise unique to each academic discipline, students
explore the root causes of injustice, ecological degradation, and social
conflict.

Students explore creative responses to these realities and imagine
possibilities for future social policy.

Students from various disciplines form a coherent learning community
around a common theme.

Oikos students engage in genuine servant leadership: i.e.; understand
the systemic roots of social problems and engage in transformation of
the world in which they live.

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Mastery of the Oikos curriculum is demonstrated by the following:

Completion of each course with a grade of C- or better and a GPA of
2.0 or better in the minor.

Successful completion and defense of a senior research project that
explores an Oikos theme in great depth. (See discussion on OIKS
4000 below.)

Program Overview

The advisor for the program is the Oikos Program Director. The Oikos
minor requires successful completion of the 5 courses described below (16
hours in total) with a grade of C- or better in each course and a GPA of 2.0
or better in the minor.

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Course Descriptions

SOCI 1320 Oikos Seminar on Social Justice (3) Spring

An introduction to issues of diversity and social justice in the United
States. The course provides students with theoretical frameworks for
understanding the dynamics and intersections of oppression and an
opportunity to expand their awareness of various forms of oppression.
Prerequisites: none

RLGN 2320 Religion, Violence, and Social Change (3)

An examination of models of non-violent social change that are grounded
in religious faith commitments. The course will focus on the Christian faith
tradition but works comparatively with figures and movements from
Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam. The course includes practice in
the skills of peace-building that are guided by the principles of restorative
justice.

Prerequisites: none

POLS 2320

or Seminar on Ecological Sustainability and Policy (3)

SOCI 2320

A survey of sustainability as a political, economic and socio-cultural part
of our lives. The course is divided into three major segments. First, it
assays how our lives are conducted and considers the ecological cycles and
processes that make life possible. Second, it examines the ground solutions
to the issue of a sustainable lifestyle and attempts to implement this goal.
Finally, it surveys the arena of ecological politics in order to engage the
issue of how can we achieve this as a society.
Prerequisites: none

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BIOL 3334 General Ecology (4)

or
BIOL 3370 Toxicology (4)

General Ecology is an introduction to the basic principles and concepts of
ecology with emphasis on environmental sampling, analysis, and
characterization. Toxicology is an introduction to the principles of
toxicology and the cellular, physiological, and ecological effects of
toxicants, with an emphasis on the environmental and physiological effects
of toxicants relating to the nervous system, cardiovascular system, and
respiratory systems.

Prerequisites: The prerequisites for BIOL 3334 are BIOL 1101,
1 101 L, and BIOL 1 102, 1 102L. The prerequisites for BIOL 3370
are BIOL 1101, 1101L, and BIOL 1102, 1102Lor BIOL 2148 and
2149.
Note: Toxicology (BIOL 3370) and General Ecology (BIOL 3334) now
require as a prerequisite the General Biology sequence (BIOL
1101,1 101L, 1 102, 1 102L) reserved for Biology majors. Oikos
students who are not Biology majors will require special
permission from instructors to take these courses.

OIKS 4000 Capstone Research Project (3)

A research project and presentation that explore in great depth an issue at
the intersection of peace and nonviolence, social justice, and ecological
sustainability. If the student is completing a major that requires a senior
research project, the student may register for the departmental capstone
course instead of OIKS 4000. The student must work out a common topic
in consultation with the Oikos program director and the faculty member
who teaches the capstone course in the student's major. In those rare cases
in which the student is earning a major that does not require a senior
project, or if the student cannot develop a topic that is acceptable to his or
her major advisor, the student may register for OIKS 4000 instead of a
departmental capstone course. In this case the student must choose a topic
in consultation with the Oikos program director.

Prerequisite: Completion of all other Oikos courses with a grade
of "C-" or better and a GPA of 2.0 or higher in the minor, or
permission of the Oikos Program Director.

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MINOR in PHYSICS

Introduction

Why study physics? Physics is crucial to understanding the world around
us, the world inside us, and the world beyond us. It is the most basic and
fundamental science. Physics encompasses the study of the universe from
the largest galaxies to the smallest subatomic particles. Physics challenges
our imaginations and leads to great discoveries that change our lives. The
computer that you are using and the laser that reads your CDs were
developed as a result of basic physics research. Are you curious about how
the world works?

The physics curriculum at LaGrange College serves two basic purposes:

An introduction to the physical sciences, oriented towards
transforming critical thinking by developing problem solving,
analytical reasoning skills, and data collection and analysis skills
suitable for the core requirements of the College.

Courses that support programs in mathematics, chemistry, biology,
computer science, dual-degree in engineering, education, and
preparation for health professional schools including medicine,
dentistry, veterinary science, pharmacy, and physical therapy.

Physics Courses Required for the Minor
Concentration

A minor in Physics requires at least 16 credit hours, with at least a C
average. The required courses include: General Physics I and II (PHY2121
and 2122), Introduction to Modern Physics (PHYS3201), and Introduction
to Quantum Mechanics (PHYS3302).

Course Descriptions (PHYS)

PHYS 1101 Introductory Physics I.

(3 hrs. lee, 3 hrs. lab per week) (4) Fall
A non-calculus-based introduction to elementary kinematics, dynamics,
energy, momentum, fluids, and thermodynamics. Physics is a science of
measurement, testing, and experimentation - inquiry based laboratories
make physics come to life!

Prerequisite: MATH 2105

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PHYS 11 02 Introductory Physics II.

(3 hrs. lee, 3 hrs. lab per week) (4) Spring
A continuation of Physics 1 101 and an introduction to sound and waves,
electric and magnetic fields, electric circuits, light and optics, and nuclear
physics. Physics is a science of measurement, testing, and experimentation
- inquiry based laboratories make physics come to life!
Prerequisite: PHYS 1101

PHYS 2121 General Physics I.

(3 hrs. lee, 3 hrs. lab per week) (4) Fall
A calculus-based introduction to particle dynamics, energy and momentum
conservation, rotational dynamics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and
kinetic theory of gases. Physics is a science of measurement, testing, and
experimentation - inquiry based laboratories make physics come to life!
Prerequisite: MATH 2222

PHYS 2122 General Physics II.

(3 hrs. lee, 3 hrs. lab per week) (4) Spring
A continuation of Physics 2121 covering wave mechanics, electricity and
magnetism, electric circuits, light and optics. Physics is a science of
measurement, testing, and experimentation - inquiry based laboratories
make physics come to life!

Prerequisites: PHYS 2121

PHYS 3201 Introduction to Modern Physics.

(3hrs. lee, 3 hrs. lab per week) (4) Fall
During the early twentieth-century, two momentous theories were
proposed: the theory of relativity and the quantum theory. This course
introduces these theories and supporting experimental evidence, as well as
many of the theories developed in the twentieth-century. Topics to be
studied include: the Birth of Modern Physics, Special Relativity, Quantum
Theory, Atomic Physics, General Relativity, and Cosmology. An
undergraduate research project explores the quantum nature of matter and
energy.

Prerequisites: PHYS 2122 with a grade of C or higher

Corequisite: MATH 2223

PHYS 3302 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics.

(3 hrs. lee.) (3) Spring (odd years)
A study of basic principles of quantum mechanics including the origins of
quantum mechanics, the Schrodinger Equation (one and three dimensional
time-independent), angular momentum, and solution approximation
methods (variational principle and perturbation theory). CHEM 3302 may
be substituted for this course.

Prerequisites: MATH 2222, PHYS 3201

276

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Introduction

The political science program is designed to provide students with the
knowledge and skills they need to become active, useful citizens in modern
democratic polities. For students who concentrate in political science or
who take only occasional courses, this means that the political science
program develops capacity to understand political organizations and
political processes, to analyze the forces affecting political decisions, and
to form judgments about obligations and rights as a citizen. It also means
that the political science program will provide the skills necessary to begin
a career in business, public service, consulting, or journalism or to continue
education in graduate studies or law school.

Learning Objectives

Students majoring in political science at LaGrange College will acquire
basic knowledge of these areas:

the values, processes, and institutions that affect collective decision-
making and contemporary politics in the United States,

the comparative analysis of the values, processes, and institutions that
affect collective decision-making and contemporary politics in other
countries,

the relations between and among states, especially those affecting
international conflict and international cooperation,

the ethical dimensions of public policy issues, political practices, and
constitutional and legal questions.

Students majoring in political science at LaGrange College will also
acquire the basic skills necessary to comprehend and perform modern
political analysis. These include:

ability to analyze the foundations of and differences between
normative, quantitative, and qualitative inquiry,

knowledge of the basic elements of research design and methods in
quantitative and qualitative studies of politics,

knowledge of basic data management and analysis and of the use of
computers in quantitative and qualitative studies of politics,

ability to convey findings in both written and oral presentations.

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Course of Study

The Department of Political Science offers both a major and minor course
of study in political science.

For a Major in Political Science

Required sequence for the program in Political Science (POLS)

POLS 1101 U.S. Government

OR

POLS 1 102 Introduction to Political Science

POLS 22 1 Comparative Politics

POLS 2220 International Relations

POLS 3300 Research Methods in Political Science

POLS 4430 Senior Seminar in Political Science

Students majoring in political science must also complete an additional 18
semester hours of elective courses chosen from among the three and four
thousand level courses listed for the program in this catalog. At least one
of these courses must be in the field of American politics and public policy
(POLS 3310, 331 1, 3312, 3313, 3314, or 3315) and one in the fields of
international relations (POLS 3320, 3321, 3322, 3323) or comparative
politics (POLS 3350, 3351, 3352, 3353). Political science internships
(POLS 4400) can earn up to a full semester (12 hours) of credit toward
graduation, but usually only three (3) hours will be credited toward
completion of the major. This limit can be waived by the Department under
special circumstances. Completing the full semester program in the Capital
Hill Internship Program can be substituted for the required completion of
POLS 4430 with approval of the Department. Completion of the interim
term Capital Hill Internship Program earns elective credit only.

For a Minor in Political Science

Required sequence for the program in Political Science (POLS)
POLS 1101 U.S. Government

OR
POLS 1 102 Introduction to Political Science

POLS 22 1 Comparative Politics

POLS 2220 International Relations

Students minoring in political science must also complete an additional 6
semester hours of elective courses chosen from among the three and four
thousand level courses listed for the program in this catalog. In the minor
course of study, political science internships cannot substitute for elective
course credit.

278

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Assessment of the objectives of the program in political science is based on
demonstration of mastery of the skills the program requires students to
acquire. This demonstration is linked to an assessment by the faculty of
student performance in completing a research project for POLS 4430:
Senior Seminar in Political Science or in completing a research project
associated with their internship during a full semester term in the Capital
Hill Internship Program. Evaluation of the projects is determined by
instruments ranking students according to their proficiency in each required
skill. In special circumstances, these requirements may be waived or
altered by permission of the faculty of the program.

Special Opportunities

LaGrange College is a charter member of the United Methodist College
Washington Consortium that sponsors the Capital Hill Internship Program
in Washington, D.C., for students of political science and other disciplines.
The program in political science also supervises a variety of internships in
local and state government and in Georgia's legal community. Students
interested in pursing one of these opportunities should consult with the
program faculty. The program also includes service learning opportunities
in several of its courses. Again, students should consult with program
faculty concerning these courses prior to registration.

Combined B.A. and M.A.T Program of Study

Undergraduate students who meet the admission requirements for the
Master of Arts in Teaching [M.A.T) (passing GACE Basic Skills or a
combined SAT score of more than 1000) and those who have a GPA of 3.0
or higher in their undergraduate studies are eligible to participate in a
combined B.A. and M.A.T. program of study after the completion of 90
semester hours. Once accepted, candidates may take entering cohort
graduate courses the Summer Semester following their junior year of study.
Upon gaining senior status, candidates may take one three credit graduate
course during the Fall, Interim, and Spring Semesters only if enrolled with
twelve undergraduate credits.

279

Course Descriptions (POLS)

POLS 1 101 United States Government. (3)

An introduction to political science through an analysis of the political
system of the United States. Topics considered include: basic concepts of
political science, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, basic
governmental institutions, elections and public opinion, political parties
and groups, and domestic and foreign public policy.

t POLS 1 102 Introduction to Political Science. (3)

An introductory course which focuses on the nature of the discipline of
political science and which deals with the way political scientists study
politics through an overview of the major topics of the discipline.

$ POLS 2210 Comparative Politics. (3)

An introduction to comparative analysis of political systems. Topics
considered include: basic concepts of comparative theory, modern political
history in developed and developing areas, the interaction of political and
economic factors in developed and developing areas, politics and state
institutions in selected countries, and comparative aspects of domestic and
foreign public policy.

t POLS 2220 International Politics. (3)

An introduction to the interaction of nation-states in the global system.
Topics considered include: war and power, economic and social
interdependence, and problems specifically associated with developing
nations.

POLS 2320

or Seminar on Ecological Sustainability and Policy (3)

SOCI 2320

A survey of sustainability as a political, economic and socio-cultural part
of our lives. The course is divided into three major segments. First, it
assays how our lives are conducted and considers the ecological cycles and
processes that make life possible. Second, it examines the ground solutions
to the issue of a sustainable lifestyle and attempts to implement this goal.
Finally, it surveys the arena of ecological politics in order to engage the
issue of how can we achieve this as a society.

280

POLS 3300 Research Methods in Political Science. (3)

or
SOCI 3900 Research Methods in Social Science. (3)

A study of basic social science research methods as applied in political
science. Topics considered include: research design and data collection,
measurement and causality, fitting models to data with various methods,
graphic analysis, and the use of statistical software.

POLS 3310 State and Local Government. (3)

A study of state and local government in the United States. Topics
considered include: the political cultures and social environments of
American states and communities, political processes in states and
communities, the structure of state and local political institutions, and
policy issues facing states and communities.

POLS 331 1 Congress and the Presidency. (3)

A study of the institutional interactions of the executive and legislative
branches of the United States government. Topics considered include: the
President and policymaking, Congress and policymaking, institutional
constraints on executive and legislative policymaking; foreign policy, civil
rights policy, economic policy and budgeting, and social welfare policy.

POLS 3312 Public Administration and Public Policy. (3)

An introduction to the study of public administration and public policy.
Topics considered include: theoretical approaches to the study of public
administration, the historical and constitutional basis for public
administration in the United States, the organization and management of
public institutions, the social, political, and legal environments of public
institutions, the role of political processes in public administration, the
analysis and evaluation of public policy, and the ethical basis of public
administration.

POLS 3313 American Judicial Institutions. (3)

A study of judicial institutions in the United States. Topics considered
include: the functions of legal and judicial institutions, the structure and
powers of national and state court systems, the legal profession, judicial
selection, judicial procedure, court administration, and policy formation by
judicial institutions.

28

POLS 3314 American Constitutional Law: Institutions. (3)

An introduction to the study of constitutional law as it applies to
government institutions in the United States. Topics considered include:
basic concepts of constitutional analysis, historical development of present
legal institutions and regimes, judicial policy decisions in different areas of
law, and the social, political, and economic factors affecting those
decisions.

POLS 3315 American Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and
Civil Rights. (3)

An introduction to the constitutional liberties and rights accorded American
citizens. Topics considered include: basic concepts of constitutional
analysis, historical development of present legal interpretations and
regimes, judicial decisions in different areas of law, the social, political,
and economic factors affecting those decisions, and their effect on
governing in the United States.

POLS 3320 Analysis of Foreign Policy. (3)

An introduction to how structures, institutions, outside actors, and political
culture produce American foreign policy. Topics covered include: recent
history of U.S. foreign relations, the roles played by both the President and
the Congress, the roles, functions and structures of U.S. State Department,
the Defense Department, intelligence agencies and the National Security
Council, the policy making process and the measurement of outcomes,
roles played by the public, interest groups, and other actors. Current major
foreign policy issues will be discussed and examined as case studies.

POLS 3321 International Political Economy. (3)

A study of international economics and trade through the analysis of the
factors influencing past and present changes. Topics covered include:
current and past international finance systems and mechanisms of
exchange, the role of the state and other actors, an examination of
comparative advantage, various strategies states employ such as import
substitution or export promotion, the nature and impact of formal and
informal barriers to trade, the GATT and WTO, the problems, failures,
successes and prospects of the international economic system and its
impact on domestic politics.

282

POLS 3322 International Organizations. (3)

A study of the current international system. Topics covered include: the
nature of "systems", the recent history of global affairs and the evolution of
the international system to its present state, selected theoretical analyses of
international systems, the nature, roles and functions of the various actors
in the system, how advances in technology have fundamentally changed
the world, and the evolving roles of both states and supranational
institutions.

POLS 3323 International Conflict. (3)

A study of the conditions that produce war and peace in international
relations. Topics considered include: an examination of recent conflicts in
the international system, theories concerning the potential sources and
determinants of war with an emphasis on the theory of realism and
competing theories, and theories of war settlement and potential sources of
future interstate tension.

POLS 3340

or Themes in Political Philosophy. (3)

PHIL 3420

An introduction to the basic ideas of political philosophy. Topics
considered include: the social and historical context of political theory; the
development of major ideas in political philosophy; critical analysis of
theoretical arguments; and the relation of political theory to contemporary
politics.

POLS 3341 Modern Political Theory. (3)

An overview of liberalism, communism, and fascism, the three primary
political ideologies that have shaped the twentieth century.

POLS 3350 The Politics of Development. (3)

A comparative study of the political systems in developing countries.
Topics considered include: basic comparative political theory, modern
history of developing societies, and an overview of theories explaining
economic and political change in developing countries.

POLS 3351 States and Politics in Developed Areas (3)

A comparative study of the political systems of developed societies. Topics
considered include: basic comparative theory, modern history of developed
societies, political systems of selected states, and the interaction of political
and economic factors in developed societies.

283

POLS 3352

or States and Politics in Latin America. (3)

LAST 3210

A comparative study of political systems in Latin America. Topics
considered include: basic comparative political theory, modern history of
Latin American societies, politics of selected Latin American states, and
the interaction of economic and political factors in Latin America.

POLS 3353 States and Politics in Africa. (3)

A comparative study of political systems in Africa. Topics considered
include: basic comparative political theory, modern history of African
societies, politics of selected African states, and the interaction of
economic and political factors in Africa.

POLS 4400 Political Science Internship, (credit may vary)

A supervised internship opportunity for students to work for approved
public or private organizations.

POLS 4410 Selected Topics in Political Science. (3)

This course examines particular issues related to topics in political science
selected by program faculty.

POLS 4420 Directed Study in Political Science. (3)

A supervised course of independent study available to selected students.
The course provides an opportunity for close cooperation between program
faculty and students on research projects and presentations.

POLS 4430 Senior Seminar in Political Science. (3)

A seminar course on a major subject of national or international concern
based on individual research and assigned readings.

Denotes courses in Political Science that may substitute for a
CORE Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

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PSYCHOLOGY

Introduction

The primary goal of this department is to teaeh effectively the seienee of
psyehology. Students will develop skills relevant to a variety of eareers.
Students intending to pursue graduate study in psyehology or a related area
will be prepared to sueeeed in this endeavor.

Learning Objectives

A student who graduates from LaGrange College with a major in
psychology will:

be familiar with statistical methods and research design and be able to
eritique research efforts;

be familiar with basic content areas of the discipline, viz., developmental,
social, abnormal, personality, learning, and biological psychology;

be familiar with scholarly resources in psychology and the APA style in
which professional literature is presented;

recognize the applicability of psychological principles to everyday life.

Major Requirements

A major in psychology consists of 37 semester hours (12 courses) beyond
the introductory course (PSYC 1 101). (See note 1 below) Twenty-five of
these hours come from the following categories:

Methods (Both Required - See note 2 below.)

PSYC 2298, PSYC 2299
Experimental Content (Select Two)

PSYC 4455, PSYC 4465, PSYC 4470
Social/Personality/Development Content
(Select Three See note 3 below)

PSYC 3321, (PSYC 3302 or PSYC 3358), PSYC 3350, PSYC 4460
Advanced Special Topics (Required - See note 4 below)

PSYC 4480 Senior Capstone

Notes:

1 . PSYC 1101, Introduction to Psychology, is the prerequisite or
corequisite to all 2000 level and above psychology courses. Some
courses also have additional prerequisites.

2. Since this department views psychology as a research-based
discipline, these courses provide the foundation for much of the upper
level coursework. It is strongly recommended that the student
complete PSYC 2298 and PSYC 2299 as soon as possible after
beginning the major.

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3. Students may take either PSYC 3302 or PSYC 3358 but not both to
satisfy this requirement. If a student takes both, one course counts
toward the 12 hours of major electives.

4. PSYC 4480 will be offered once per year during January term and
will involve advanced study of a specialized topic. Topics will vary
from year to year.

Major Electives

An additional 12 hours of major courses will be selected by the student. A
student may select any 3000 or 4000 level psychology course beyond those
counted in the required areas. A maximum of two of these courses, ANTH
2000, SOCI 2500, BIOL 2148, BIOL 3373, BIOL 3374, and BIOL 3384,
may be applied toward the major with the approval of the advisor.

Minor

A minor in psychology consists of PSYC 1101 and five additional courses
with the approval of the chair of the department. Any psychology (PSYC)
course that is listed in the current bulletin counts toward the minor. Two of
the courses listed above as Major Electives taken outside the department
may also be counted toward the minor (i.e., at least four of the courses for
the minor must be taken in the psychology department).

Assessment of Learning Objectives

The accomplishment of the psychology objectives by students majoring in
Psychology will be demonstrated by obtaining an acceptable score on the
Area Concentration Achievement Test (ACAT) in psychology. Normally,
this test will be given during the student's final semester at LaGrange
College.

Career Options

Students who complete the major in psychology have a wide variety of
career options. Psychology is a very broad field that overlaps many
different areas. Some of the jobs taken by recent psychology graduates
include management and supervisory positions in business and industry
and positions in community and state service agencies. A psychology
major also serves as good preparation for advanced study in law, social
science, counseling, and psychology.

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Miscellaneous

No course with a grade below "C-" may be applied toward the major in
psychology. The only exception is PSYC 4000 in which a grade of Pass
must be obtained. Additionally, a student must maintain a "C" average
(2.0) in the major in order to graduate.

Course Descriptions (PSYC)

t PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology. (3) Fall and Spring
A survey of major topics in psychology including research methods, basic
neuroanatomy, learning, perception, personality and abnormal behavior.
Prerequisite to all other psychology courses

PSYC 2298 Behavioral Statistics. (3) Fall

Introduction to the measurement of behavior and quantitative methods of
data analysis emphasizing parametric statistics and their application to the
behavioral sciences. May be taken simultaneously with PSYC 1 101.

PSYC 2299 Research Methods. (4) Spring

A survey of various types of research design, including the strengths and
weaknesses of each. The laboratory includes practice in designing and
conducting experiments, as well as analysis and reporting of results.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2298 and PSYC 1 101

PSYC 3302 Human Growth and Development. (3) Spring
A study of human life beginning with conception. Important
developmental phenomena are considered in the light of major
theories of development.

PSYC 3304 Educational Psychology. (3) Fall

Application of psychological principles and research to the teaching/
learning process. Major topics include behavioral and cognitive
approaches to learning, classroom management, and test construction
and interpretation.

PSYC 3321 Social Psychology. (3) Fall

A course dealing with behavior as affected by social influences. Major
topics include social perception, social communication (verbal and
nonverbal), altruism, attitudes, aggression, and prejudice. Also, applied
areas such as forensic psychology are considered.

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PSYC 3341 Human Sexuality. (3) Spring
This course involves a multidisciplinary examination of human sexual
behavior and intimate relationships. Typical topics considered include
male and female sexual response, gender roles, sexual disorders and
dysfunctions, gender identity, legal and cross-cultural aspects of human
sexuality, sexual orientation, and relationship issues related to sexuality.
May be taken simultaneously with PSYC 1101.

PSYC 3350 Abnormal Psychology. (3) Spring

A survey of the causes, characteristics, current theories, and treatment of

psychological disorders.

PSYC 3351 Introduction to Counseling. (3) Spring

An introduction to counseling approaches, methods, and assessment

techniques. Emphasis is placed on individual counseling.

PSYC 3358 Psychology of Aging. (3)

Human aging is examined from physiological (e.g. sensory and
cardiovascular changes), psychological (e.g., memory and intellectual
changes) and sociological (e.g., adjusting to retirement) perspectives.
Also, death and disorders associated with aging such as Alzheimer's
Disease are explored.

PSYC 3380 Special Topics in Psychology. (3) Fall

A course offered at the sophomore/junior level focusing on a specialized

topic from the field of psychology.

Prerequisites: A prerequisite may be required.

PSYC 4000 Internship in Psychology. (3) On demand
Students majoring in psychology may be eligible to enroll in a psychology
internship in an applied setting. This course requires 120 hours of
supervised experience (observation, work, etc.) in a local agency or office,
selected readings, and a public presentation. The internship must first be
discussed with the student's psychology advisor and then an application
must be submitted in writing to the Department of Psychology no later than
the beginning of advising for the term in which the student expects to
enroll for internship (i.e., The application is submitted in the term
preceding the one in which the internship is done). Students are then
selected on a competitive basis for enrollment. Once approved by the
department, the student must arrange the details of the placement with the
Director of the Career Center. Approval for an internship does not
guarantee that an appropriate placement will be available. Grading is on a
Pass - No Credit basis.

Prerequisite: Major in psychology with junior or senior standing

and permission of department

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PSYC 4400 Individual Research. (3) On demand

Under supervision of a faculty member, the student develops a project on a

topic that is psychological in nature. The emphasis is on analyzing and

synthesizing scientific literature with the goal of producing a literature

review and/or research proposal. A successful proposal may lead to data

collection and analysis. The result of the project is a paper written in APA

style.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2298 and PSYC 2299

PSYC 4455 Cognitive Psychology. (3) Spring

An information processing analysis of topics in perception, thinking,

learning, and memory.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2298 and PSYC 2299 or consent of

professor.

PSYC 4460 Psychology of Personality. (3) Fall

A critical study of major personality theories, principles and instruments of

assessment, and relevant empirical research.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2298 and PSYC 2299 or consent of professor

PSYC 4465 Biological Psychology. (3) Spring
Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology will be explored and will provide a
foundation for examining biological aspects of various behaviors (e.g.,
sensory processes and sleep). Also, the psychopharmacology of selected
drugs and genetic influences on behavior will be considered.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2298 and PSYC 2299 or consent of

professor

PSYC 4470 Behavior Analysis and Its Applications. (3) Spring
A survey of principles, research findings, and applications of classical,
operant, and observational learning.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2298 and PSYC 2299 or consent of

professor

PSYC 4480 Special Topics in Psychology: Senior Capstone.

Interim
A course offered at the junior/senior level focusing on a specialized topic
from the field of psychology.

Prerequisites: There may be a prerequisite.

$ Denotes courses in Psychology that may substitute for a CORE
Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

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RELIGION and PHILOSOPHY

Mission Statement

The Religion and Philosophy Department is dedicated to challenge and
support students to think critically and creatively and to enhance their
communication skills as they deal with fundamental issues of self, world,
and God. We seek to provide a safe, caring, and ethical community where
our students grow and mature as global citizens.

Learning Objectives

The overall learning objectives of the Religion and Philosophy Department
are for students to:

Think critically about religious traditions by introducing a variety of
perspectives on them;

Demonstrate creativity in formulating responses to these traditions;

Explore their own faith commitment in a complex global world;

Develop communication skills in undergraduate research and writing;

Develop a broad knowledge of received religious and philosophical
traditions including these areas: (1) biblical studies, (2) history, (3)
theology, ethics, social scientific study of religion, (4) philosophy, (5)
church leadership.

Assessment of Learning objectives

Success in achieving the objectives of the Religion and Philosophy major
will be measured by the following assessments:

Papers with a common grading rubric

Exit Interviews

Graduate School Acceptance

Senior Thesis/Project

Autobiographical Assignments and Journaling

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The Religion and Philosophy Major

The Religion and Philosophy Major is a traditional liberal arts study of the
field. It is especially suited for those with a general interest in religion and
philosophy or those who wish to prepare for graduate study of religion.

The major consists of 1 1 courses in addition to the exploratory course in
religion that is taken as part of the core (RLGN 1 101-05), yielding a total
of 12 courses. The religion major must include at least 2 courses in each of
these areas: Biblical Studies, Historical Studies, and Ethics and
Theological Studies. The major also requires at least one course in the area
of Philosophy. In addition, all Religion and Philosophy majors will
complete a senior thesis or project. Thus, of the 1 2 courses required for a
religion major, at least 8 courses must conform to the following guidelines:

Biblical Studies (2 courses). Minimum requirement is one course in
Old Testament and one course in New Testament at the 2000-level or
above. Courses: 21 10, 21 1 1, 2120, 2121, 31 10-3160.

Church Leadership and Youth Ministry (1 course). Courses: 3510-
3560.

Historical Studies (1 course). Courses: 1 104 (if not taken for the core),
2210-2230,3210-3220.

Ethics and Theological Studies (2 courses). Courses: 1 105 (if not
taken for the core), 2310, 3310-3350.

Philosophy (1 course). Courses: any of the philosophy courses, which
are listed under Area IV in the course listing below.

Senior Thesis or Project (1 course). Course 4620 is normally taken in
the fall of the senior year. The student should choose a project director
from within the department and work with this director to refine a
topic in the semester prior to which the student enrolls for the course.
Thus, most students should select a topic and project director by the
end of the spring semester of the junior year.

Students are free to choose any other religion or philosophy department
courses for the remaining 4 courses. Internships may be taken for up to 1
full course of credit, with permission of the department chair. At least 6
courses in the major must be numbered at the 2000-level or above.

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The Religion and Philosophy Major with a
Concentration in Church Leadership

The Church Leadership Concentration is designed to prepare students for
future careers in church service. Many of our graduates take positions in
Christian Education or Youth Ministry directly after graduation. Others
enroll in seminaries as a preparation for ordained ministry.

LaGrange College is one of only nine colleges in the nation that is
authorized by the United Methodist Church to offer certification programs
in Youth Ministry and Christian Education. United Methodist students who
complete our Church Leadership program fulfill all of the educational
requirements needed for professional certification in these fields.

The major consists of 1 1 courses in addition to the exploratory course in
Religion that is taken as part of the core (RLGN 1 101-05), yielding a total
of 12 courses. The Church Leadership concentration requires successful
completion of the following courses:

Biblical Studies (1 course). Courses: 1 102 or 1 103 (if not taken for

the core requirement), 2110, 2111,2120,2121,3110-3160.

Historical Studies (1 course). Courses: 1 104 (if not taken for the core),

2210-2230,3210-3220.

Ethics and Theological Studies (1 course). Courses: 1 105 (if not taken

for the core), 2310, 3310-3350.

Philosophy (1 course). Courses: any of the philosophy courses, which

are listed under Area IV in the course listing below.

Church Leadership and Youth Ministry (4 courses). Courses: 3510-

3560.

Internship (1 course). Course: 3550, scheduled in consultation with

the Church Leadership Program Director.

Senior Thesis or Project (1 course). Course 4620 is normally taken in

the fall of the senior year. The student should choose a project director

from within the department and work with this director to refine a

topic in the semester prior to which the student enrolls for the course.

Thus, most students should select a topic and project director by the

end of the spring semester of the junior year.

At least two of the courses in Areas I-III must be at the 2000-level or
above. In addition, students seeking certification in Christian education by
the United Methodist Church must complete United Methodist Studies
(3210). Students who do not seek United Methodist certification may
choose any religion department course for the remaining to fulfill the
remaining course requirements for the major.

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The Religion and Philosophy Major with Honors

Students who maintain a 3.5 grade point average in departmental courses
and who receive "A" grades on their senior theses or projects may graduate
with honors.

The Religion and Philosophy Minor

A minor in religion requires completion of 3 courses in addition to the
exploratory religion core requirement: 4 courses in all. At least 2 courses
must be at the 3000-level or above.

The Church Leadership Minor

A minor in Church Leadership consists of 4 courses in addition to the
exploratory religion core requirement: 5 courses in all. The minor includes
at least two courses taken at the 3000-level or above in Area I, II, III, IV, or
VI. In addition, the minor includes at least 2 courses taken in Area V
(Church Leadership).

The Philosophy Minor

No major program currently is offered in philosophy. A minor consists of
4 courses in Area IV, of which at least 2 courses must be taken at the 2000-
level or above.

The Church Music Program

The church music program is administered through the music department in
cooperation with the Religion and Philosophy department. See the Music
Department section of the catalogue for a program description.

Course Descriptions (RLGN and PHIL)

Core Exploratory Courses:
Explorations of the Christian Faith

RLGN 1 101 Introduction to Christianity. (3) Spring

An introduction to the Christian tradition of faith through a study of its

central symbols, sacred texts, and practices.

RLGN 1 102 Jewish Origins in Context. (3)

A study of the Hebrew bible, commonly called by Christians the Old
Testament, in the context of the ancient near eastern world. The course
asks students to reflect on the impact of the Hebrew bible on Western
civilization and its implications for the contemporary world.

293

RLGN 1 1 03 New Testament Writings in Context. (3)

A study of the New Testament writings in the context of Greco-Roman
civilization. The course asks students to reflect on the impact of Christian
scriptures on Western civilization and consider their implications for the
contemporary world.

RLGN 1 104 Dialogue with World Faith Traditions. (3) Fall

The course places the insights of the Christian faith in dialogue with those

of major living world religions.

RLGN 1105 Christian Ethics and Contemporary Social

Issues. (3) Spring
A study of contemporary ethical issues in the light of the moral traditions
central to the Christian faith. The course examines such issues as marriage
and family, war and peace, racism, abortion, and the environment. Servant
leadership component.

Religion and Philosophy Departmental Courses
Area I: Biblical Studies

RLGN 2120 Introduction to Hellenistic Greek I. (3) Fall

A beginning course designed to teach the fundamentals of Hellenistic or

Koine Greek, which includes the language of the New Testament.

RLGN 2121 Introduction to Hellenistic Greek II. (3) Spring
A continuation of RLGN 2120.

Prerequisite: RLGN 2120

RLGN 3150 The Apostolic Age. (3) Spring

An examination of the origin and expansion of the early Christian Church,

with studies in the Epistles and the Acts of the Apostles.

Prerequisite: RLGN 1 103, or permission of professor

RLGN 3160 The Gospels. (3) Fall

An examination of one of the four canonical gospels with emphasis on the
historical context, history of interpretation, and modern appropriations of
the text.

Prerequisite: RLGN 1 103, or permission of professor

294

Area II: Historical Studies

RLGN 2210 Early Church History. (3)

A survey of the history of the Christian Church from the close of the
Apostolic age to the end of the Middle Ages.

RLGN 2220 Modern Church History. (3) Fall

A history of the Christian Church from the reformation era to the modern

period.

RLGN 2230 Race and Religion in America. (3) Spring
This course examines the role that religion played and continues to play in
American race relations and racial identities. The course emphasizes the history
and the theorists of the civil rights contemporary era.

RLGN 3210 United Methodist Studies. (3) Fall
A survey of the history, theology, and polity of the United Methodist Church.
Prerequisite: A religion core course

Area III:
Theology, Ethics, and the Social Scientific Study of Religion

RLGN 2320 Religion, Violence, and Social Change. (3)

An examination of models of non-violent social change that are grounded
in religious faith commitments. The course focuses on the Christian faith
tradition but works comparatively with figures and movements from
Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam. The course includes practice in
the skills of peace-building that are guided by the principles of restorative
justice.

RLGN 3310 Contemporary Christian Thought. (3) Fall

A survey of the development of Christian thought, with particular attention

to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Prerequisite: A religion core course

RLGN 3320

or The Ethics of Sexuality, Marriage, and Gender. (3)

WMST 3320

A study of the moral issues related to sexuality, gender roles, and family
life. Topics vary per offering, but may include ethical reflection on such
topics as the meaning and purpose of sexuality, gender roles, pre-marital
and extra-marital sexuality, homosexuality, and family structure.
Prerequisite: A religion core course

295

RLGN 3340 Sociology of Religion. (3)

A sociological analysis of the interplay between religion and culture.
Prerequisite: A religion core course

Area IV: Philosophy

$ PHIL 1410 Introduction to Philosophy. (3) Spring

A survey of major philosophical themes and figures that were formative in

Western civilization.

PHIL 2410 Moral Philosophy. (3) Fall

A study of the major philosophical understandings of morality and the

good life.

t PHIL 2440 Elementary Logic. (3)

An introduction to the logic of propositions with attention to the structure
and evaluation of informal arguments. The rhetoric of persuasion and its
use of logic and emotions are discussed.

PHIL 3410 Philosophy of Religion. (3)

An investigation of problems related to philosophical reflection on
religious thought and experience.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in philosophy or

permission of professor

PHIL 3420

or Themes in Political Philosophy. (3)

POLS 3340

An introduction to the basic ideas of political philosophy. Topics
considered include the social and historical context of political theory, the
development of major ideas in political philosophy, critical analysis of
theoretical arguments, and the relation of political theory to contemporary
politics.

PHIL 3430 Bioethics. (3) Spring

A study of the ethical issues raised by the practice of nursing, medicine, and

biomedical research.

PHIL 4410 Selected Topics in Philosophy. (3) Spring

A seminar course on a major subject of concern in philosophy based on

individual research and assigned readings.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in philosophy or

permission of professor

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Area V: Church Leadership Courses

RLGN 3510.Christian Education in the Local Church. (3) Fall

A study of issues confronting those participating in a local church setting.

Required of all students in the Internship.

Prerequisite: A religion core course

RLGN 3520 Christian Worship. (3)

The study and practice of Christian worship in its historical and
contemporary contexts. Topics include the theology of worship,
sacraments, liturgy, and the place of music in worship.
Prerequisite: A religion core course

RLGN 3540 Youth Ministry. (3)

The study and practice of ministry to persons from adolescence through
young adulthood.

Prerequisite: A religion core course

RLGN 3560 Congregational Leadership. (3) Spring
The study of the leadership styles and skills necessary for leadership of a
religious institution. Topics may include congregational dynamics, leading
institutional change, working with volunteers, avoiding burnout, and racial
and gender issues in leadership.

Prerequisite: A religion core course

RLGN 3550 Internship. (1-6) On demand

Supervised participation in the local church setting. May be repeated for

credit up to 6 hours.

Prerequisite: Two courses from Area V

Area VI: Capstone and Other Courses

RLGN 4610 Selected Topics in Religion. (3) Spring

A seminar course on a major subject of concern based on individual

research and assigned readings.

Prerequisite: Permission of professor

RLGN 4620 Senior Thesis or Project. (3) On demand
A directed study normally taken in the fall of the senior year. The student
should choose a project director from within the department and work with
this director to refine a topic in the semester prior to which the student
enrolls for the course. Thus, most students should select a director and
topic by the end of the spring semester of the junior year.

Prerequisite: Application to Religion Department Chair

t Denotes courses in Religion that may substitute for a CORE
Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

297

SOCIOLOGY and ANTHROPOLOGY

Introduction

The mission of the Sociology and Anthropology Department is to equip
students with an entry-level knowledge of sociological concepts,
theories, and research strategies.

Description of Major

Sociology is the study of human social relationships and institutions.
Sociology's subject matter is diverse, ranging from crime to religion,
from the family to the state, from the divisions of race and social class to
the shared beliefs of a common culture, and from social stability to
radical change in whole societies. Unifying the study of these diverse
subjects of study is sociology's purpose of understanding how human
action and consciousness both shape and are shaped by surrounding
cultural and social structures.

Anthropology is the holistic and comparative study of human practice
and behavior. Anthropology, a sister discipline to sociology, has
traditionally focused on the investigation and analysis of human action
through the lens of culture and by means of ethnographic fieldwork. Its
initial subject matter was the study of small-scale, non-industrial groups
primarily outside the developed world. Through a four field (cultural/
social anthropology, physical anthropology, linguistics and archeology)
approach, anthropologists strove to make relevant generalizations about
human behavior and society. In the last forty years, the scope and focus
of anthropology has broadened and, now, anthropologists investigate all
aspects of life in the industrialized world as well. Anthropology
provides a global perspective on life and today, with its global focus,
anthropology offers preparation for effective living in a rapidly
changing world that is complementary to the sociological perspective.

The department offers a major in Sociology.

The department requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 to declare
a major in Sociology.

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Learning Objectives

Students majoring in Sociology will acquire a basic knowledge of the
following areas:

the "sociological imagination," or ability to link individual biography
with history and culture;

the difference between micro- and macro-level groups and processes,
and the interconnections among them;

the importance and necessity of theory in the process of learning;

the strengths and weaknesses of various research methods, and the
appropriateness of each for various research questions;

the social bases and biases of what constitutes knowledge or
conventional wisdom;

the opportunities as well as constraints that are imposed on us by social
structure.

Requirements for the Sociology Major

Sociology majors are required to complete the following courses, totaling
30 semester hours. All courses for the major should be completed with a
grade of "C" or higher. The only exception is as follows:

One grade of "C-" will be allowed to count toward the major so long as it
does not occur with any of the following three courses:

Math Statistics

Research Methods

Development of Sociological Thought

These courses should be satisfied with a grade of "C" or higher. Under no
circumstances will a "D" grade count toward the major.

Foundation (15 hours)

SOCI 1000 Principles of Sociology

SOCI 2000 Social Problems and Policy

SOCI 3000 Social Change

SOCI 4000 Development of Sociological Thought

SOCI 4200 Social Inequality

Research (6 hours)

MATH 1114 Introduction to Statistics

SOCI 3900 Research Methods in Social Science

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Electives/Substantive Component (9 hours)

Students may complete the major by electing 3 other courses from the
following list, two of which must be at the 3000-level or higher:

SOCI 2500
SOCI 3300
SOCI/RLGN 3340
SOCI 3400
SOCI 3500
SOCI 3600
SOCI/ANTH 3800
ANTH 1000
ANTH 2000
LAST 1104
RLGN 2230
WMST1101

Marriages and Families

Sociology of Childhood

Sociology of Religion

Criminology

Gender and Society

Sociology of Education

Special Topics in Sociology/Anthropology

Introduction to Anthropology

Cultural and Social Anthropology

Introduction to Latin American Culture

Race and Religion in America

Introduction to Women's Studies

One appropriate Interim course may count towards the elective
requirement, with approval of the department chair.

Requirements for the Sociology Minor

A minor in sociology consists of five courses, two of which must be at the
3000-level or higher.

All students planning to minor in sociology must take the following:

SOCI 1 000 Principles of Sociology

SOCI 2000 Social Problems and Policy

SOCI 3000 Social Change

Students must choose two courses from the following list:

SOCI 2500
SOCI 3300
SOCI/RLGN 3340
SOCI 3400
SOCI 3500
SOCI 3600

Marriages and Families
Sociology of Childhood
Sociology of Religion
Criminology
Gender and Society
Sociology of Education

SOCI/ANTH 3800 Special Topics in Sociology or Anthropology

300

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Mastery of the curriculum for a major in Sociology is measured by:

Completion of all major requirements with a "C" or higher in every
course (One grade of "C-" may count towards the major, so long as
the grade is not awarded in any of the following courses: Statistics,
Research Methods, and/or Development of Sociological thought.
These courses should be completed with a grade of "C" or higher).

Course Descriptions (SOCI and ANTH)

t SOCI 1000 Principles of Sociology. (3) Fall and Spring
A study of the fundamental concepts and principles of the discipline, with
emphasis on socialization, social institutions, social interaction, social
stratification and inequality, as well as mechanisms of social control.
Familiarization with the distinction between macro- and micro-level
sociological processes.

SOCI 1320 Oikos Seminar on Social Justice. (3) On demand
An introduction to issues of diversity and social justice in the United
States. The course provides students with theoretical frameworks for
understanding the dynamics and intersections of oppression and an
opportunity to expand their awareness of various forms of oppression.

SOCI 2000 Social Problems and Policy. (3) Spring
Using a special topics approach, this course provides the most current
assessment of social problems and the policies created in an attempt to
remedy these social ills.

SOCI 2320

or Seminar on Ecological Sustainability and Policy (3)

POLS 2320 On demand

A survey of sustainability as a political, economic and socio-cultural part
of our lives. The course is divided into three major segments. First, it
assays how our lives are conducted and considers the ecological cycles and
processes that make life possible. Second, it examines the ground solutions
to the issue of a sustainable lifestyle and attempts to implement this goal.
Finally, it surveys the arena of ecological politics in order to engage the
issue of how can we achieve this as a society.

301

SOCI 2500

or Marriages and Families. (3) Fall

WMST 2500

This course offers a multi-disciplinary perspective on contemporary
marriages, families, and other intimate relationships. Students become
familiarized with competing models and theories on family
relationships. In addition, the course explores cross-cultural variation in
family systems as well as diversity and change within the American
population. Topics to be covered include: mate selection, sexuality,
marital structure, marital happiness, divorce, parenting, and alternative
family forms.

SOCI 3000 Social Change. (3) Fall

An analysis of the sources, patterns, and consequences of social and
cultural change. The roles of socio-economic, political, technological
and other factors in processes of change at institutional and societal
levels are investigated.

SOCI 3300 Sociology of Childhood. (3) On demand

A sociological analysis of current issues confronting America's children

and a consideration of sociological perspectives on children and

childhood.

SOCI 3340 Sociology of Religion. (3) On demand
A sociological analysis of the interplay between religion and culture.
Prerequisite: A religion core course

SOCI 3400 Criminology. (3) On demand

A multi-disciplinary examination of criminal behavior and corrections,

with an emphasis on competing theories regarding the origins and

incidence of criminality. The course explores the history of laws and the

criminal justice system, as well as various categories of crime. Special

attention is given to the social forces underlying criminal and deviant

behavior.

302

SOCI 3500

or Gender and Society. (3) On demand

WMST 3500

Students become aware of the gendered society in which we live, the
norms, values, and patterns of communication associated with each gender
and how these affect personal life choices and social status. Specifically,
students become aware of how our basic social institutions, such as the
economy, the family, education, religion, and the political system are
gendered institutions with differing ideals and expectations for women and
men.

SOCI 3600 Sociology of Education. (3) On demand

This course examines, from a sociological perspective, the structure and
process of education in contemporary society, and its effects. The primary
focus on U.S. public education. Topics include the contribution of
sociology to understanding education and teaching; the relationship of
education to other social institutions such as families and religion; the
effects of socio-demographic variables on learning outcomes, etc.

SOCI 3800 Special Topics in Sociology or Anthropology.

or (3) On demand

ANTH 3800

This course involves in-depth exploration into a unique topic in either
Sociology or Anthropology. The course content rotates from year to
year. Students may repeat the course for credit so long as the topic changes
and with departmental approval.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of either SOCI 1000 or

ANTH 1 000 with a grade of "C" or higher.

SOCI 3900 Research Methods in Social Science. (3) Fall

or
POLS 3300 Research Methods in Political Science. (3)

A study of basic social science research methods. Topics considered
include research design and data collection, measurement and causality,
fitting models to data with various methods, graphic analysis, and the use
of statistical software.

SOCI 4000 Development of Sociological Thought. (3) Spring

This course is an introduction to the development and current state of
sociological theory. It focuses on the most influential figures in the
development of sociological theory and their legacy in contemporary sociology.
Prerequisites: SOCI 1000 and a minimum of four other SOCI
courses successfully completed. Senior status preferred.

303

SOCI 4200 Social Inequality. (3) Fall

This course examines social inequality, a topic which is at the core of
sociological analysis and research. The classical perspectives on inequality
is examined, as well as the contemporary extensions of these approaches.
Particular attention is paid to class, race, and gender as separate and as
intersecting axes of inequality.

Prerequisite: SOCI 1000, with a grade of "C" or higher.

SOCI 4500 Sociology/Anthropology Internship. (3-6 hours)

or On demand

ANTH 4500

This course requires 120 hours of supervised experience (per 3 credit
hours) in a local agency or office, selected readings, as well as an oral
presentation given in one of the SOCI/ANTH courses. Applications for
internships must be submitted to the department chair in the term or
semester prior to placement. Students may select a graded or Pass/No
Credit option. Course may be repeated twice (for 3 hours credit) for a
maximum of 6 hours credit. This course does not count towards the major
in Sociology.

Prerequisites: Completion of SOCI 1000 with a grade of "C" or
higher as well as at least two other courses with the SOCI or
ANTH prefix with grades of "C" or higher.

$ ANTH 1000 Introduction to Anthropology. (3) On demand

An introduction to the scientific study of the origin, the behavior, and the
physical, social, and cultural development of humans.

ANTH 2000 Cultural and Social Anthropology. (3)

On demand
A study of modern anthropological theory through directed readings of
classic ethnography with special emphasis upon recent advances and trends
in research.

Denotes courses in Sociology and Anthropology that may
substitute for a CORE Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

304

THEATRE ARTS

Mission Statement

The Department of Theatre Arts at LaGrange College is committed to
providing students with the tools necessary to function as complete artists
and creative, self-realized individuals, combining pre-professional
theatrical training with a strong liberal arts curriculum.

Faculty are dedicated to the development of students' abilities to think
critically and creatively and to the enhancement of their communication
skills. A combination of classroom training and production work provides
a supportive, invigorating environment for the collaborative and creative
process.

Introduction

The Department of Theatre Arts offers a pre-professional training program
emphasizing the practical aspects of theatre and the importance of process.
It is the belief of the faculty that the training process must prepare students
for the real world of theatre. Faculty teaching in the Theatre Arts program
are experienced working professionals. With the belief that theatre is both
an art form and a business, the curriculum provides a strong undergraduate
foundation in theatre performance, design, production and literature.

For the B.A. in Theatre Arts, majors must successfully complete 24
common core hours designed to foster an appreciation for, and an
understanding of each area of theatre. In addition, students must complete
18 additional track courses in their area of interest: performance, technical,
design, or a combination of the three, to complete the theatre arts degree
composed of a total of 42 major hours.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of a degree in Theatre Arts, a student should be able to:

demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the components of the theatrical
process;

demonstrate the ability to critically interpret and communicate the
cultural, social and historical relevance of dramatic works;

demonstrate creativity and self-expression in the realization of
dramatic works;

demonstrate an extensive artistic vocabulary in their specific area of
concentration.

305

Assessment of Learning Objectives

Learning objectives are assessed in the following manner:

examinations, graded performances and auditions and graded projects
in the four major areas within each track;

audition critiques for all departmental productions;

upperclassmen scholarship audition interviews;

exit interviews.

Graduation Requirements for the
Theatre Arts Major

A student pursuing a major in Theatre Arts must meet all of the following
criteria on an ongoing basis:

satisfactory completion of all degree requirements as outlined in the
catalogue;

participation in all departmental productions and activities, including
auditions, production crews, work calls and production strikes as
assigned by faculty;

attendance at all scheduled departmental meetings and activities.

Admission to the Theatre Arts Major

In order to be admitted and to continue as a Theatre Arts major, a student
must meet the following criteria:

overall grade point average of 2.5 or better. Scholarship recipients
must maintain a 3.0 grade point average or better;

writing proficiency - a grade of "C" or better in English 1 101, 1 102;

theatrical proficiency - a grade of "C" or better in all Theatre Arts
courses;

prognosis for success - evaluation during Theatre courses pertinent to:

1) attendance

2) attitude

3) cooperation

4) oral and written skills

5) enthusiasm and dedication to the Theatre Arts program:

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Transfer students wishing to continue as a Theatre Arts major
must provide evidence of all of the above plus the following:

1) past participation in departmental productions;

2) acceptance as a major is subject to approval by a majority oi'
the LaGrange College Theatre Arts faculty.

A student who does not meet all of the above criteria each semester may be
placed on probation. After the probationary period, the student will be re-
evaluated by the Theatre Arts faculty. If it is determined that the student
has failed to meet the above criteria satisfactorily, the student may be
removed as a major.

Requirements for the Theatre Arts Major

A total of 42 semester hours are required for the Theatre Arts Major.
CORE COURSE REQUIREMENTS (24 hours):

THEA 1101

Drama Survey I

3

THE A 1 102

Drama Survey II

3

THEA 1180

Stagecraft

3

THEA 1184

Acting I

3

THEA 21 10

Introduction to Design

3

THEA 2330

Script Analysis

3

Two Theatre Arts Electives 6

Common core hours 24

TRACK COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Performance Track (18 hours)

THEA 2205 Movement for the Actor 3

THEA 2286 Makeup 3

THEA 2210 Voice and Diction 3

THEA 2351 Acting II 3

THEA 445 1 Auditioning 3

One Theatre Arts Elective 3

Total Performance Track Hours 18

Technical Track (18 hours)

ARTD1151 Basic Drawing 3

THEA 2283

Stage Management

Or

THEA 3420

Theatre Management

3

THEA 3360

Scenic Design

3

THEA 3370

Directing

3

Two

Theatre Arts Electives

6

Total Technical Track Hours

18

307

Design Track (18 hours)

ARTD 1151

Basic Drawing

3

ARTD 1153

3-D Design

3

ARTD 2211

Life Drawing

3

THEA 3360

Scenic Design

Or

THEA 3381

Lighting Design

Or

THEA 3385

Costume Design

3

THEA 3370

Directing

3

One

Theatre Art or

Art & Design Elective

3

Total Design Track Hours 18 hrs.

Theatre Arts Major Hours 42

Requirements for the Theatre Arts Minor

A minor in Theatre Arts consists of 18 semester hours: at least one course
in Drama Survey, at least one course at the 1000 level, and 4 other courses
selected in consultation with the minor advisor.

Course Descriptions (THEA)

*$ THEA 1101 Drama Survey I. (3)

A survey of the discovery of theatre beginning in ancient Greece
continuing through the rise of Realism. Students study theatre as a
developed art form through reading, viewing and discussing plays
representing diverse eras of history.

Drama Survey II may be taken independently of Drama Sun'ey I.

*$ THEA 1102 Drama Survey II. (3)

A survey of the discovery of theatre from the rise of Realism through
contemporary drama. Students study theatre as a developed art form
through reading, viewing and discussing plays representing diverse eras of history.
Drama Sun'ey II may be taken independently of Drama Survey I.

* THEA 1180 Stagecraft. (3)

A course designed to provide the student with theoretical and working
knowledge of technical theatre. An emphasis is placed on the fundamental
techniques and processes used in theatre productions. Students work on a
departmental production.

308

*THEA1184 Acting I. (3)

A course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of acting for
the stage. The course includes achievement of a simple objective, self and
sensory awareness, relaxation, concentration and beginning scene and
text analysis.

* THEA 2110 Introduction to Design. (3)

A course designed to introduce students to the fundamental elements of
the design process, with emphasis on script analysis and visual communication.

Prerequisites: Basic Drawing highly recommended for Design and

Technical Track Majors

* THEA 2200 Stunts/Fights for Stage, TV and Film 1. (3)

A performance course covering basic stage movement, acrobatics, faints,
falls, flips, kicks, slapstick comedy, hand-to-hand combat, and stage
weapons when applicable.

* THEA 2201 Stunts/Fights for Stage, TV and Film II. (3)

A continuation of THEA 2200, adding period weaponry such as, but not
limited to quarterstaff, broadsword, rapier, dagger, food fights, etc. for
the stage.

* THEA 2205 Movement for the Actor. (3)

A course designed to develop body awareness by exploring movement
connected to impulse and instinct, focusing on integration of the mind,
body and spirit.

THEA 2210 Voice and Diction. (3)

To introduce students to the process of voice production, methods of
Linklater's freeing the voice with emphasis on relaxation and breathing,
and applicable techniques for working with text.

THEA 2280 Advanced Stagecraft. (3)

In this advanced study of stagecraft, students apply the principles of
stagecraft to rigorous practical assignments intent on developing fine
craftsmanship skills. This project-based course will provide opportunity
for woodworking, metal work and technical design.
Prerequisite: THEA 1180

THEA 2283 Stage Management. (3)

A course designed to provide students with introduction to, and basic
training in, the area of stage management.

* THEA 2286 Makeup for the Stage. (3)

A study in the theories and application of stage makeup. Topics may
include corrective, old age and character makeup, as well as prosthetics.

309

THEA2330 Script Analysis. (3)

A study of major genres of dramatic literature designed to provide the
director, actor, designer, dramaturge and/or technician with basic
guidelines for text analysis. Students develop and utilize skills to
thoroughly analyze text.

THEA2351 Acting II. (3)

A continuation of THEA 1 184 which explores further character
development through advanced scene work and improvisational exercises.
Prerequisite: THEA 1184

THEA 3272 Creative Dramatics. (3) On demand
A course which introduces methods of creating, designing and utilizing
drama to enhance teaching skills and foster the educational
development of students.

Highly recommended for early childhood and secondary

education majors

THEA 3305 Period Styles of Acting. (3)

A course designed to introduce students to period styles of acting and
movement which may include: Greek, Elizabethan, Comedy of Manners,
Farce, Realism and the Theatre of the Absurd.

Prerequisites: THEA 1 184, THEA 2351

THEA 3310 Playwriting/Screenwriting. (3)

A course designed to stimulate critical and creative thinking through the
creation of original material. Students are guided in the completion of
writing a play/screenplay.

Prerequisite: THEA 2330, grade B or better in ENGL 1 101 &

1 102, or consent of instructor

THEA 3345 Musical Theatre. (3)

A practical study of techniques and styles of musical theatre.
Prerequisite: THEA 1 1 84

THEA 3360 Scenic Design. (3)

An advanced study of the Scenic Design process. Students apply the
principles of design to scenery through intense practical assignments.
Emphasis is placed on communication through Drafting, Renderings and Models.
Prerequisite: THEA 21 10

THEA 3370 Directing. (3)

A course designed to introduce students to the director's role in
interpreting, choosing, rehearsing and staging a play. Course includes
direction for performance of a short play.

Prerequisites: THEA 1 184, THEA 2110, THEA 2330

310

THE A 3381 Lighting Design. (3)

An advanced study of the Lighting Design process. Students apply the
principles of design to lighting through intense practical assignments.
Emphasis is placed on communication through Rendering, Magic Sheets,
and Lighting Plots.

Prerequisite: THEA2110

THEA3385 Costume Design. (3)

A course that acquaints the student with the basic skills needed to design
theatrical costumes, which includes patterning and cutting/draping.
Prerequisite: THEA21K)

THEA 3420 Theatre Management/Arts Management. (3)

A course which introduces the fundamentals of Arts management. Course
investigates and navigate through the conflicting issues, strategies and
opportunities in management in the Arts.

THEA 4451 Auditioning. (3)

A course designed for developing audition techniques and examining
guidelines for audition procedures with emphasis on practical auditions,
resume, headshots, selection of audition material and compilation of an
audition portfolio.

Prerequisite: THEA 1 184, THEA 2351

THEA 4470-2 Special Topics. (1-3)

A series of courses designed to provide students with advanced
material/study in either performance or design tracks.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

THEA 4484 Senior Thesis. (3)

A course in which senior Theatre Arts majors bring their training and
emphasis into focus. Senior thesis projects may be track-specific special
projects in acting, design, directing, stage-managing or playwriting.

All proposals must be approved by the Department Chair and
are subject to scheduling and faculty supervisory commitments.

* Denotes courses in Theatre Arts that may satisfy Fine Arts
requirement in the Core Curriculum.

t Denotes courses in Theatre Arts that may substitute for a CORE
Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

31

WOMEN'S STUDIES

Introduction

Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary field of study which complements
a liberal arts education by drawing upon a variety of disciplines to gain a
critical awareness of the female experience. In developing this awareness
and in presenting its diversity, courses explore gender as well as race,
ethnicity, culture, age, and social class as categories of analysis. While
exploring these issues, the courses also promote the development of skills
in critical thinking, speaking, and writing. Courses focus on women's past
and present roles in culture, politics, the family, the arts and sciences,
health care business, and religion.

Learning Objectives

A minor in Women's Studies consists of twelve semester hours: three of
which must be WMST 1101: Introduction to Women's Studies. Of the
remaining nine hours, six must be taken at the 3000 level. This flexibility,
coupled with the interdisciplinary nature of the field, permits students to
design a minor that best reflects their academic and future career interests.
(Only cross-listed courses taken during or after the fall of 2000 may be
applied to the minor in Women's Studies.)

Course Descriptions (WMST)

$ WMST 1101 Introduction to Women's Studies. (3)

This course provides an understanding of the female experience and the
evolution of women's roles within one's own culture and that of others. In
developing this understanding, emphasis is placed on the great diversity of
women's individual lives by considering such factors as race, age, marital,
and class status.

WMST 2500

or Marriages and Families. (3)

SOCI 2500

WMST 3110

or Special Topics: Latin American Women Writers. (3)

LAST 3110

312

WMST 3320

or The Ethics of Sexuality, Marriage, and Gender. (3)

RLGN 3320

WMST 3340

or Restoration and Eighteenth Century English

ENGL 3340 Literature. (3)

WMST 3345

or The Rise of the Novel. (3)

ENGL 3345

WMST 3500

or Gender and Society. (3)

SOCI 3500

Advanced Library Research in the Social
WMST 4400 Sciences and Humanities. (2)

or
PHIL 4410 Philosophical Theory: Gender and Sexuality (3)

WMST 4478 Women in Ministry (3)

WMST 4500 Advanced Library Research in the Sciences. (2)

Also, Interim term courses are offered in Women 's Studies.

t Denotes courses in Women's Studies that may substitute for a
CORE Humanities course in the Core Curriculum.

313

Faculty

David OkiAhearn (1995)

Professor of Religion and Philosophy; Chair of the Oikos Program
B.A., Austin College; M.Div., Southern Methodist University;
Ph.D., Emory University

Rebecca J. Alexander (2010)

Assistant Professor of Education

B.S., Florida State University; M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth

University, Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Toni P. Anderson (1999)

Professor of Music; Chair of the Music Department

B.M., Lamar University; M.M., New England Conservatory of Music;

Ph.D., Georgia State University

Elizabeth Appleby (2006)

Assistant Professor of Latin American Studies and Modern Languages
B.A., Seton Hill College; J.D., M.A., University of Pittsburgh;
Ph.D., Ohio State University

Terry Austin (2006)

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics
B.S., Ph.D., University of Florida

Kim Barber Knoll (1995)

Professor of Theatre Arts; Division Chair of Fine and

Performing Arts; Chair of the Theatre Department

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.F.A., U. of California at Los Angeles

Linda A. Mason Barber (2006)
Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S., University of Florida; M.S.N., University of South Florida

Charlene Baxter (1976)

Assistant Professor; Librarian for Public and Technical Services
A.B., West Georgia College; M.L.S., George Peabody College
for Teachers

CindiBearden(2001)

Associate Professor of Business

B.S., Jacksonville State University; Master of Accountancy, University

of Alabama, Certified Public Accountant

314

Jon Birkeli (1987)

Ely R. Callaway, Sr., Professor in International Business;

Chair of the Business Department

A.B., Lenoir-Rhyne College; Ph.D., University of South Carolina

Sandra Blair (2000)

Associate Professor of Nursing

B.S.N., LaGrange College; M.S.N., Georgia State University

Frank W. Brevik (2006)

Assistant Professor of English

B.S., Troy State University; M.A., University of Manchester;

Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Marcia Langham Brown (1996)
Professor of Art and Design;
Chair of the Art and Design Department
B.F.A., Guilford College; M.F.A., University of Georgia

Joseph J. Cataro (1984)

Professor of History; Chair of the History Department

A.A., Manatee Junior College; B.A., Florida Atlantic University;

M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University

David M. Cason (2008)

Assistant Professor of Education

A. A., Gordon College; B.A., LaGrange College;

M.S.Ed., Troy State University; Ph.D., Georgia State University

Angela N. Cauthen (2006)

Associate Professor of Biology

B.S., Shorter College; Ph.D., University of Georgia

Randy William Colvin (2008)
Instructor of Biology
B.S., Colorado State University; M.S., Oregon State University

John Granger Cook (1994)

Professor of Religion; Chair of the Religion Department;
B.A., Davidson College; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary;
Ph.D., Emory University

David Alan Crowe (2007)

Assistant Professor of Education
B.S.E., M.Ed., Ph.D., Auburn University

315

Lisa Crutchfield (2008)

Assistant Professor of History

B.A., James Madison University; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D.,

College of William and Mary

Mary Lou Dabbs (1999)

Assistant Professor; Electronic Resources Librarian

B.A., Florida Presbyterian College; M.Ln., Emory University

Karie Davis-Nozemack (2007)

Assistant Professor of Business Law and Taxation

B.A., Emory University; M.Tx., Georgia State University;

J.D., Washington and Lee School of Law

Nina Dulin-Mallory (1989)
Professor of English

B.A., Clemson University; M.Ed., LaGrange College;
Ph.D., Auburn University

Jon M. Ernstberger (2008)

Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., M.S., Murray State University;
Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Stacey L. Ernstberger (2010)

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

B.S., Murray State University;

M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Charles H.Evans (1981)
Professor of Psychology
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia

David L. Garrison (2010)

Provost, Professor of English

B.A., Appalachian State University; M.A., Baylor University;

Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Gordon Jeffrey Geeter (1990)

Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education
A.S., Andrew College; B.S., Tennessee Wesleyan College;
M.S.S., United States Sports Academy

Heather A. Haas (2001)

Associate Professor of Psychology

B.S., Rocky Mountain College; M.Phil., University of St. Andrews;

Ph.D., University of Minnesota

316

Melvin H. Hall (2002)

Associate Professor of Chemistry

B.S., Cuttington University College; M.A., University of California at

Berkeley; Ph.D. Auburn University

CeliaG. Hay (1996)

Associate Professor of Nursing; Chair of the Nursing Department

A.D., Piedmont Hospital School of Nursing;

M.S., Georgia State University; Ph.D., Georgia State University

B. Joyce Hillyer-Nowakowski (1995)
Professor of Education
A.S., Southern Union State Junior College;
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Auburn University

John C.Hurd( 1974)
Professor of Biology
B.S., Alabama College; M.S., Ph.D., Auburn University

Seok Hwang (2005)

Associate Professor of Mathematics

B.S., Yeungnam University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Lee E.Johnson (1990)

Fuller E. Callaway Associate Professor of Music
B.A., Auburn University; M. M., Indiana University

Dorothy M. Joiner (2001)

Lovick Corn Professor of Ail History

B.A., St. Mary's Dominican College; M.A. Emory University;

Ph.D., Emory University

Bill Kovack (2006)

Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., Michigan State University;
M.B.A., Michigan State University

Charles P. Kraemer (1978)

Professor of Psychology; Chair of the Psychology Department;

Director of Undergraduate Research

B.A., LaGrange College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia

JohnD. Lawrence (1970)

Fuller E. Callaway Professor of Art and Design

B.F.A., Atlanta College of Art; M.F.A., Tulane University

317

Tracy L. R. Lightcap (1991)
Professor of Political Science;
Chair of the Political Science Department

A.B., University of the South; M.A., University of South Carolina;
Ph.D., Emory University

Alvin B. Lingenfelter (2003)

Assistant Professor of Religion

B.A., Mississippi College; M.Div., Duke Divinity School

Donald R. Livingston (2001)

Associate Professor of Education;

B.S., Drexel University; M.Ed., West Chester University;

Ed.D., Georgia Southern University

Sharon M. Livingston (2006)

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs; M.Ed. Thesis Advisor
B.S., Drexel University; M.S. A., West Chester University;
Ph.D., Georgia State University

Sarah Beth Mallory (1993)

Associate Professor of Biology, Director of the Interim Term and

Core Curriculum; Chair of the Biology Department

B.S., M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Auburn University

Greg A. McClanahan (1988)

Professor of Mathematics; Chair of the Division of Mathematics and

Science; Chair of the Mathematics Department

B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., Clemson University

William J. McCoy, IV (1991)

Professor of Chemistry/Physics; Chair of the Chemistry and Physics

Department

B.S., Yale University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina

Linda H. McMullen ( 1999)

Assistant Professor of Organizational Leadership;

Director of the Evening College

B.S., Geneva College; M.S., Geneva College

Francis A. O'Connor (1997)

Associate Professor of Latin American Studies;

Chair of Sociology and Anthropology Department

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Idaho State University;

Ph.D., University of Iowa

318

Anna Odom (2007)

Assistant Professor of Nursing

A.D.N, LaGrange College; M.S.N., Georgia State University;

C.F.N. P., American Academy of Nurse Practioners

Debbie Ogle (2003)

Assistant Professor of Music

B.S., University Montevallo; M.M., University of Alabama

Richard Hank Parker (2008)

Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics
B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Florida

William G. Paschal (1994)
Professor of Biology
B.S., Saint Joseph's College;
Ph.D., Indiana University School of Medicine

Vicki T. Pheil (2007)

Director of Field Placement, Education Department
B.A., M.Ed., LaGrange College

Loren L. Pinkerman (1998) , ,i .

Assistant Professor; Director of Banks T 'hrnry/-* ^ f P ^ f
B.A., Westmar College; M.A.T., Colorado State University;
M.L.S., Indiana University

Amanda R. Plumlee (1996)

Professor of Latin American Studies and Modern Languages;
Chair of the Latin American Studies and Modern Languages
Department; Chair of Women's Studies
B.S., UTC of Chattanooga; M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Melinda Pomeroy-Black (2005)
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.A., Rhodes College; M.S., Virginia Tech; Ph.D., Virginia Tech

AshleighPoteat(2010)

Assistant Professor of Art and Design
B.A., University of North Carolina;
M.F.A, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Margaret Reneke ( 1999)

Associate Professor of Art and Design

B.F.A., University of Georgia;

M.F.A. , Virginia Commonwealth University

319

Fay A. Riddle (1980)

Professor of Computer Science;

Chair of the Computer Science Department

B.S., H. Sophie Newcomb College of Tulane University;

M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida

Arthur Robinson (1998)

Assistant Professor; Public Services Librarian

B.A., Trinity College; M.L.S., Ph.D., Indiana University-Bloomington

Lydia W. Rosencrants (1999)

Boatwright Associate Professor of Accountancy;

Chair of the Accountancy Department

B. S., University of Richmond; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Maranah A. Sauter(1983)

Professor of Nursing; Division Chair of Professional Programs
A.A., B.S., Georgia Southwestern College; M.S., Georgia State
University; Ph.D., Medical College of Georgia

Laine Allison Scott (1998)
Professor of English

B.A., The College of William & Mary; M.A., Middlebury College;
M.A., Salisbury State University; Ph.D., University of Alabama

Bailey Brooks Shelhorse, Jr. (1968)

Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science
A.B., LaGrange College; M.A., Louisiana State University; M.Ed.,
Washington State University; M.S., University of Evansville;
Ph.D., Georgia State University

Kevin L.Shirley (1998)

Associate Professor of History;

Division Chair of Humanities and Social Sciences

B.A., M.A. (history), M.A. (religion), Ph.D., Florida State University

JackC. Slay, Jr. (1992)

Dean of Student Affairs, Professor of English
B.A., M.A., Mississippi State University;
Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Timothy N. Taunton (1984)
Professor of Art and Design
B.A., University of Arkansas-Little Rock;
M.F.A., Louisiana State University

320

BrendaW. Thomas (1989)
Professor of English

A.B., Samford University; M.A., Auburn University;
Ph.D., Georgia State University

Justin Thurman (2010)

Assistant Professor of English

B.A., University of Nevada, Reno; M.A., University of Nevada, Reno;

Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Charles A. Thompson (2001 )

Associate Dean and Director of LaG range College at Albany
B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.A., Wichita State University;
Ph.D. University of Missouri

Nathan Tomsheck (2004)

Associate Professor of Theatre Arts

B.F.A., Whitworth College; M.F.A., Yale School of Drama

Ginger Truitt (2006)

Assistant Professor of Nursing

B.S.N., LaGrange College; M.S.N., State University of West Georgia

John A. Tures (2001)

Associate Professor of Political Science

B.A., Trinity University; M.S., Marquette University;

Ph.D., Florida State University

Mitchell Turner (2002)

Associate Professor of Music

B.S., Georgia Southern University; M.M., University of Georgia;

Ph.D., University of Georgia

John M.Williams (1989)
Professor of English
B.A., M.A., Auburn University; Ph.D., Georgia State University

Phillip R.Williamson (1969)

Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education;
Chair of the Health and Physical Education Department
B.S., M.S., Troy State University

Anthony Wilson (2004)

Associate Professor of English; Chair of the English Department
B.A., Oglethorpe University; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

32

Margie Yates (2005)

Chair of the Education Department

Associate Professor of Education

B.S., University of Georgia; M. Ed., Columbus State University;

Ph.D., Auburn University

Carol M. Yin (1991-1994, 1996)
Professor of Mathematics
B.S., M.A.M., Ph.D., Auburn University

Kuo-chuan Yin (1994)

Professor of Mathematics

B.S., National Chung Hsing University; M.S., Ph.D., Auburn University

Adjunct Faculty

Ethyl L. Ault

Instructor of Education

B.S., Georgia State University; M.S., Georgia State University;

Ed.S., Georgia State University

Michael Bishop

Writer in Residence

B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., University of Georgia;

Honorary Doctorate, LaGrange College

Patricia Callaway

Instructor of Music

B.A., Emory, M.M., State University of West Georgia;

D.M.A, University of Georgia

Takemi Kapamaya

Instructor of Modern Foreign Language

B.A., Kyoto Sangyo University; M.A., Himeji Dokkyo University

George Mann

Instructor of Applied Classical Piano

B.M., University of Cincinnati;

M.M., Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati

Melina Lorenz Moyer
Instructor of Biology
B.S., Purdue University; M.S., Southern Illinois University

322

Christiane B. Price

Instructor of Modern Foreign Language

M.A., Freie Universitat; Ph.D., Emory University

Tracy Clahan Riggs

Instructor of Theatre Arts

B.F.A., Catholic University; M.F.A., Florida Atlantic University

Phil Snyder

Instructor of Ear Training and Applied Classical Guitar
B.M., M.M., D.M.A., University of Georgia

Thomas P. Steele

Instructor of Religion

B.A., Newberry College; M. Div., Lutheran School of Theology;

D. Min., McCormick Theological Seminary

Pamela Tremblay

Instructor of Cornerstone and Physical Education

A.B.J, University of Georgia; M.Ed., Ed.S., State University of West

Georgia

William Walsh

Instructor of English

A.B., Georgia State University

M.F.A., Vermont College

President Emeritus

Walter Y. Murphy (1980-1996)

A.B., Emory University; M.Div., Emory University;
LL.D., Bethune-Cookman College; D.D., LaGrange College

Retired Faculty Members

Professors Emeritus

Nancy Thomas Alford, B.S., M.S. (1969-2007)

Sybil L. Allen, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. (1976-1994)

Roland B. Cousins, B.S., M.S., D.B.A. (1990-2005)

Sue M. Duttera, Ph.D. (1986-2002)

Luke K. Gill, Jr., B.B.A., M.S.W., J.D. (1971-2002)

S. G. Hornsby, B.S.Ed., M.A., Ph.D. (1966-2005)

Sandra K. Johnson B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D. (1983-2005)

Richard Donald Jolly. B.A., M.S., Ed.D. (1961-1995)

Evelyn B. Jordan, A. A, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. ( 1977-2001 )

Charles Franklin McCook, A.B., S.T.B., S.T.M., Ph.D. (1961-1994)

323

Frederick V. Mills, A.B.,S.T.B., M.Th., M.A., Ph.D. (1967-2007)
Maynard L. Reid, B.S.E., M.S.E., Ed.D (1973-1995)
John L. Shibley, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1950-1986)

Associate Professors Emeritus

Julia B. Burdett, A.A., B.A., M.P.E., M.S.W. (1974-1997)

Patrick M. Hicks, B.S., M.S. (1958-1998)

Jennifer S. Harrison, Baccalaureate, M.Ed., Ph.D. (1995-2005)

Assistant Professors Emeritus

Martha M. Estes, B.A., M.A. (1982-1991)
Marvin D. Johnson, B.A., M.A. (1995-2006)

Board of Trustees

Officers

Chairman William M. Hodges

Vice Chairman Richard W. Story

Second Vice Chairman Dan K. McAlexander

Secretary Nancy K. Stevens

Treasurer Martin E. Pirrman, Jr.

Members

Cindy Autry, Columbus, Georgia Ex Officio

Ann Gaylord Badding, Lockport, New York 2013

A. Quillian Baldwin, Jr., LaGrange, Georgia 2013

Amos T. Beason, LaGrange, Georgia 2012

Sally Bethea, Atlanta, Georgia 2014

Daniel T. Brown, Augusta, Georgia 2014

James F. Bruce, Jr., LaGrange, Georgia 2012

H. Speer Burdette III, LaGrange, Georgia 201 1

Edward C. Callaway, Pine Mountain, Georgia 201 1

Robert L. Carmichael, Jr., LaGrange, Georgia 2013

Janet Gipson Caswell, Atlanta, Georgia 2012

Chris Daniel, SGA President Ex Officio

324

E. Malone Dodson, Alpharetta, Georgia 201 1

Garnett J. Giesler, LaGrange, Georgia 2014

Elizabeth C. Harris, Cartersville, Georgia 201 1

Scott D. Hawkins, Atlanta, Georgia 2014

David Hobbs, LaGrange, Georgia 2014

William M. Hodges, Atlanta, Georgia 2014

Pat H. Holder, LaGrange, Georgia 201 1

John S. Holle, LaGrange, Georgia 2011

John M. Jackson, Jr., LaGrange, Georgia 2013

Robert L. Johnson, West Point, Georgia 2013

Jared T. Jones, LaGrange, Georgia 2012

Harold A. Lawrence Jr., LaGrange, Georgia Ex Officio

Jeannette L. Little, LaGrange, Georgia Ex Officio

Kathy R. McCollum, Augusta, Georgia 2011

Marie T. Moshell, Columbus, Georgia 2014

H. Andrew Owen, Jr., Atlanta, Georgia 2013

Joe Frank Ragland, Jr., LaGrange, Georgia 2012

Edward D. Smith, LaGrange, Georgia 2013

Nancy K. Stevens, LaGrange, Georgia 2012

Richard W. Story, Gainesville, Georgia 201 1

Stanley E. Thomas, Newnan, Georgia 2013

B. Michael Watson (Bishop), Atlanta, Georgia Ex Officio

George F. Wheelock, III, Birmingham, Alabama 2012

Deedee G. Williams, West Point, Georgia 2012

Richard C. Wolfe, LaGrange, Georgia 2012

James M. Wood, III, Chamblee, Georgia 2013

Howard J. Wright, LaGrange, Georgia Ex Officio

Consultants

Quincy D. Brown, Vice President for Spiritual Life and Church Relations

Nina Dulin-Mallory, Faculty Representative

David L. Garrison, Provost

William Andrew Jones, Vice President for Advancement

Dan K. McAlexander, President

Walter Y. Murphy, President Emeritus

Richard Dana Paul, Vice President for Enrollment Management

Martin E. Pirrman, Jr., Vice President for Finance and Operations

Legal Counsel

Daniel W. Lee, LaGrange, Georgia

325

Administrative Officers

President's Cabinet

Dan K. McAlexander (2009) - President

B.A., University of Kansas; M. M., The Julliard School;
D.M.A., University of Cincinnati

Quincy D. Brown (1997) - Vice President for Spiritual Life and Church
Relations

B.S., DeVry Institute of Technology; M.Div., Emory
University; D.Min., Interdenominational Theological Center

David L. Garrison (2010) - Provost

B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Baylor University;
Ph.D., University of Minnesota

William Andrew Jones (2010) - Vice President for Advancement
B.A., Berea College

Richard Dana Paul (2007) - Vice President for Enrollment Management
B.A., Maryville College; M.Ed., Westminster College

Martin E. Pirrman (2009) - Vice President for Finance and Operations
B.A., Midway College

President's Advisory Council

Ray C. Anderson, Atlanta, Georgia
Carolyn M. Bernard Becker, Athens, Georgia
David E. Boyd, Atlanta, Georgia
Hal N. Brady, III, Columbus, Georgia
Samuel G. Candler, Atlanta, Georgia
Robert B. Copeland, LaGrange, Georgia
Lovick P. Corn, Columbus, Georgia
George W. (Buddy) Darden, Marietta, Georgia
William B. Fackler, Jr., LaGrange, Georgia
Charles L. Foster, Jr., LaGrange, Georgia

I
326

Clifford C. Glover, West Point, Georgia

Edmund C. Glover, West Point, Georgia

William G. Griffin, Jr., Rome, Georgia

G. Sanders Griffith III, Columbus, Georgia

Charles D. Hudson, LaGrange, Georgia

E. Wayne Hunter, LaGrange, Georgia

L. Bevel Jones III, Decatur, Georgia

J. Smith Lanier II, West Point, Georgia

C. Stephen Lynn, Nashville, Tennessee

Charles M. Miller, Cornelia, Georgia

Walter Y. Murphy, LaGrange, Georgia

Howard R. Park, LaGrange, Georgia

S. Cliff Rainey, LaGrange, Georgia

Charles W. Smith, LaGrange, Georgia

James L. Waits, Atlanta, Georgia

Almonese Brown Clifton Williams, Atlanta, Georgia

Administrative Staff

Rebecca Anderson (2000) Secretary, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Amber Johnson Baldridge (2007) Admission Counselor

Patricia Barrett (2008) Archives and Circulation Assistant, Library

Ryan Bass (2010) Graduate Assistant for Sports Information

Charlene Baxter (1976) Librarian for Public and Technical Services

David Beard (2005 ) Webmaster

Jackie Belcher (2000) Financial Aid Counselor

James Blackwood (1997) Director of Information Technology,

Chief Security Officer, Informational and
Instructional Technology

Marcus Blandingburg (2006) Assistant Coach, Football

Jennifer Bleimeyer (2006) Data Manager, Assistant Dean's Office

Torri Bridge (2009) Graduate Assistant Volleyball

Dawn Briggs (2000) Administrative Assistant, Lamar Dodd Art

Center

327

Christy Brown (2008)
Elizabeth Brown (2009)

Quincy Brown (1997)

Susan Brown (1999)
Andy Brubaker (2008)
Becky Carter (1999)

Karen Clark (2004)
Jennifer Claybrook (1999)
Dawn Coker (2009)
Austin Cook, 111(1981)
Jase Crenshaw (2009)
Emily Cummins (2007)
Mary Lou Dabbs (1999)
Lee Davis (2008)
Stacey Davis (2005)
Ashley DeFreitas (2010)
Sandra Dennis (1972)
Rob Dicks (2001)
Matthew Donnett (2010)
Veronica Drasher (2010)
Debby Durrence (2009)
Billy Ehlers (2006)
Rachel Evans (2008)
Vickie Evans (2005)
Laura Faulkner (2008)
Brandon Fetner (1999)

Assistant Athletic Trainer

Assistant Director of LaGrange College at
Albany

Vice President for Spiritual Life and
Church Relations

Swimming Coach

Director of Alumni and Parent Relations

Accounts Receivable Specialist, Business
Office

Development Writer

Softball Coach, Volleyball Assistant Coach

Director of Human Resources

Postmaster

Graduate Assistant Men's Soccer

Assistant Coach, Women's Basketball

Electronic Resources Librarian, Library

Recruitment Writer

Serials Assistant, Library

Graduate Assistant Women's Basketball

Human Resources Coordinator

Athletic Trainer

Cross Country and Tennis Coach

Resident Director, Pitts Hall

News and Feature Writer

Pool Supervisor

Evening Assistant, Library

Administrative Assistant, Manget Building

Leadership Secretary

Database Administrator, Information
Technology

328

Fleming Garner (2009)
David Garrison (2010)
G. Jeffrey Geeter ( 1990)
Diana Gold wire (2001)

Susan Hancock (1975)
Tracy Harden (2004)
Dean Hartman (2000)
Warren Haynes (1998)
Holly Hazelwood (2010)
WyleneHerndon(1979)
Jimmy Herring (1974)
Kenneth Hoats (2007)
Jacque Hornsby (2008)
Kevin Howard (1999)
Patti Hoxsie (2000)
Ben Hudson (2010)
Janet Hughes (2004)

John Hughes (2002)
Mark Isenhour (2007)
Stacy Jackson (2000)
William Jones (2010)
Erika Kastner (2008)
Tara Kermiet (2008)
Lori Knopp (1998)
Jennifer Knox (2005)
Tony Kunczewski (2005)
Susan A. Laforet (1994)

Resident Director, Hawkins Hall

Provost

Men's and Women's Soccer Coach

Director of Career Development,
International Student Advisor

Secretary, Alumni and Family Relations

Receptionist, Admission Office

Director of Communications and Marketing

Men's Basketball Coach

Graduate Assistant Swimming

Parking

Registrar

Counselor

Archive and Circulation Assistant, Library

Head Baseball Coach

Controller, Business Office

Graduate Assistant Baseball

Assistant to Vice President of
Advancement

Sports Information Director

Women's Basketball Coach

Assistant Director of Publications

Vice President for Advancement

Assistant Athletic Trainer

Director of Student Life and Service

Secretary, Division of Nursing

Graduate Counselor and Certification Officer

Assistant Coach, Football

Secretary, Division of Natural Sciences
and Mathematics

329

Anita Laney (1974)
Shanon Lipham (2009)
Sharon Livingston (2006)
Nate Masters (2010)
Marc Mattioli (2010)
Cynthia Mayfield (2006)

Dan K. McAlexander (2009)
Kirby McCartney (1983)

James McGehee (2010)
Linda McGill (2000)
Patricia McKay (1998)
Linda McMullen (1999)
Carolyn McNearney (2000)
Tiffany Mixon (1999)

Brandon Mobley (2000)
Todd Mooney (2005)
Lisa Morgan (1991)

Satomi Morgan (2009)
JackMorman, Sr. (1992)
Julie Moses (2008)
Evan Nardone (2010)
Sharon Newton (2000)

Monica Parker (2008)
Dana Paul (2007)

Bookstore Director

Basketball Assistant

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

Graduate Assistant Football

Graduate Assistant Football

Administrative Assistant, Communication
and Marketing

President

Administrative Assistant, Student
Development Office; Resident Director,
Hawkes Hall

Admission Counselor

Switchboard Operator/Receptionist

Administrative Assistant, Registrar's Office

Director, Evening College

Assistant to the Provost

Support Manager, Information
Technology

Systems Analyst, Information Technology

Head Coach, Football

Assistant to Library Director, Circulation
Manager

Graduate Assistant Women's Soccer

Pool Operations Manager

Head Coach, Volleyball

Graduate Assistant Football

Administrative Assistant, Career
Development Center and Counseling

Financial Aid Counselor

Vice President for Enrollment Management

330

Vicki Pheil (2007)
Loren Pinkerman (1998)
Martha Pirkle (1994)

Kathy Pirrman (2000)
Marty Pirrman (1999)
Katie Porter (2008)
Sara Proctor (2010)
Kenya Rainey (2007)
Michele Raphoon (2005)
Melissa Reeves (2010)
Michelle Reeves (1998)
Carla Rhodes (2005)
Lee Richter (1993)
Brenda Riley (1989)
Jim Robbins (2009)
Arthur Robinson (1998)
Tammy Rogers (1992)

Rebecca Roth (2006)
Cynthia Saines (2006)
Ann Sellman (2002)
Ashley Seman (2008)
David Shonts (2005)
Jack Slay (1992)
Charles Smith (2008)
Kacey Smith (2009)
Sylvia Smith (1985)
Beth Spencer (2008)

Director, Field Placement, Education Dept.

Director, William and Evelyn Banks Library

Senior Director of Development and
College Relations

Application Coordinator, Admission

Vice President for Finance and Operations

Career and International Advisor

Graduate Assistant for Service

Administrative Assistant, Evening College

Administrative Assistant, Theatre Dept.

Assistant Manager Bookstore

Assistant Director, Financial Aid

Executive Assistant to the President

Golf Coach

Secretary, Division of Business

Head Coach Women's Soccer

Public Services Librarian, Library

Director of Stewardship and Leadership
Development

Director of Development

Assistant Registrar

Administrative Assistant, Music Dept.

Associate Director for Annual Fund

Assistant Coach, Football

Dean of Student Affairs

Construction Manager

Admission Counselor

Director of Financial Aid

Advancement Services Coordinator

331

Nancy Spradlin (2001)
Ronald Stafford (2005)

Eva Stephen (2005)
Barbara Storie (1992)

Accounting Assistant, Business Office

Network Manager, Information
Technology

Data Manager, Education Department

Secretary, Athletics/ Health, Physical
Education and Recreation

Christina Strassenberg (2003)Evening Supervisor Albany
Michael Thomas (2007) Admission Counselor

Charles Thompson (2001)

Emma Trammell (1992)
Pamela Tremblay (1998)
Glenda Turner (1993)
Josh Watson (2010)
Darlene Weathers (1988)
Jake White (2010)
David Wiggins (2003)
Jennifer Wiggins (2006)
Chastity Williams (2007)

Phillip Williamson (1969)
Sandra Williamson (1999)
Mary Wilson (1994)
KaylaYeargin(2010)

Associate Dean and Director of LaGrange
College at Albany

Information Specialist, Admission Office

Director of Counseling

Resident Director, Candler Hall

Resident Director, Boatwright Hall

Manager, Campus Bookstore

Graduate Assistant Football

Acquisitions Assistant, Library

Library Assistant

Helpdesk Technician, Information
Technology

Athletic Director

Accounts Payable Specialist, Business Office

Resident Director, Henry Hall

Graduate Assistant Softball

332

Index

A

Abbreviations, Course 1 23

Academic

Advising 79

Calendar 4

Counseling 65

Divisions 121

Forgiveness 89

Grades, Credits 86

Honors 91

Policies 76

Programs 96, 107

Satisfactory Progress 37

Standing/Probation 88

Study Abroad 85

Withdrawal 81

Acceleration 83

Accreditation 15

Adjunct Faculty 322

Administrative Officers 326

Administrative Staff 327

Admission and Enrollment 23

Advanced Placement 81

Advising

International Student 66

Major 110

Pre-Professional 1 15

Registration 79

Albany Campus 16

Appeals 67,87,94

Application, Admission 23

Art and Design 124

Assessment

Core 100

Major 109

Associate Degree 16

Athletic Programs 60

Attendance, Class 81

Auditing, Charges 29

Awards and Recognition 104

B

Biology 133

Board of Trustees 324

Building Descriptions 17

Business and Accountancy.. 142

C

Calendar, Academic 4

Campus Buildings 17

Career Development Center .... 64

Chaplain 62

Change of Regulations 3

Charges and Fees 29

Chemistry 159

Class Attendance 81

Classification of Students 91

College Level Examination

Program (CLEP) 83, 100

Community Service Orgs 57

Computer Science 170

Conduct, Social/Honor 50, 76

Core Program 97, 178

Counseling 65

Course Numbering and

Abbreviations 122

Course Repetition 82

Credit Balances 32

Credit By Examination and

Exemption 83

Credit for Junior College 81

Credit through USAFI and

Service Schools 85

Cultural Enrichment 92

D

Dean's List 92

Declaration of Major 107, 109

Degree Requirements 90

Degrees Offered 13, 1 18

Dentistry 1 1 1

333

Departments 1 19

Directory 2

Divisions, Academic 121

E

Education 180

Employment, Student 48

Endowed Lectureships 104

Engineering, Dual Degree ...114
English 192

Evening College 16

Evening College Degrees 1 18

F

Faculty 314

Federal Tax Credits 31

Fees 30

FERPA 94

Financial Aid 36

Academic Progress 37, 40

Appeals 41

Eligibility Requirements 36, 41

Grants and Scholarships 45

Loans 47

Scholarships 43

Sources 43

Student Policies 42

Financial Information 29

Foreign Languages {see Latin
American Studies)

Fraternities 59

Fraud, Suspected 49

French 227

G

German 230

Grade Appeals 87

Grades and Credits 86

Graduate Degrees 1 18

Graduation Requirements 93

H

Harassment Policy 5 1

Health and
Physical Education 204

Health Services 64

History of the College 14

History 211

Holidays (see Academic Calendar)

Home-Schooled Students 25

Honor Code 76

Honor Societies 59

Honors, Academic 91

HOPE Scholarship 46

Housing Requirements 55

I

Independent Study 109

Information Technology 68

Campus Network..., 72

Cell phone and Pager Policy 75

Data Security 74

Email Accounts 70

Facilities 71

Personal Web Pages 71

Remote Access 74

Responsible Use Policy 68

Student Computer

Configurations 72

User Accounts 69

User Awareness 75

Wireless Network 73

Intercollegiate Athletics 60

Interdisciplinary Major 108

International Baccalaureate (IB)

Program 83, 100

International Students .28, 66, 80

International Studies 85

Internships (consult indiv. depts..)

Internship Program 64

Interim Program 101

Intramural Sports 61

J

Japanese Studies 220

Joint Enrollment 26

Journalism 115

Junior College 81

334

L

LaGrange College

Accreditation 15

At Albany 16

Campus 17

Evening College 16

Mission 13

History 14

Latin American Studies and

Modern Languages 223

Law 1 16

Learning Center 63

Library 20, 103

Load, Course 83,90

Loans 47

M

Majors 107, 117

Mathematics 232

Medicine (M.D.) 1 1 1

Minors 110, 117

Mission Statement 13

Moshell Learning Center 63

Music 245

N

Nursing 259

Non-degree student 27

Non-traditional student ( see
Evening College Bulletin)
O

Oikos Program 272

Online Courses 84

Organizations, Student 59

Honorary 59

Religious 59

Service 59

Special Interests 59

Orientation 79

Overload, Course 83,90

P

Payment of Charges 29

Petition, Graduation 93

Pharmacy 1 13

Physical Therapy 113

Physician Assistant (P.A.)... 112
Physics 275

Placement, Course 99

Political Science 277

Pre-Professional Programs. 110
Pre-Seminary 1 15

President's Cabinet 326

Probation, Academic 88

Psychology 285

Publications, Student 59

R

Readmission 28

Recognitions, Awards 104

Records, Student 94

Refund Policies 34

Registration and Advising 79

Religion and Philosophy 290

Religious Life 59, 62

Repayment Policy 35

Requirements

Admission 25

Bachelor Degrees 90

Cultural Enrichment 92

Graduation 93

Residency 55, 91

Residence Halls 17

Residence Life 55

Retired Faculty Members 323

Room and Board 30, 55

S

SAT 23,25

Service Clubs 57

Service Organizations 57

Scholarships 43

Seminary, Pre- 115

Sexual Harassment 5 1

Social Code 50

Sociology and

Anthropology 298

Sororities, Social 59

335

Spanish 225

Staff 327

Status

Full-time 90

Part-time 90

Student

Appeals 67,87,94

Classification 91

Conduct, Social /Honor .. 50, 76

Counseling 65

Development 50

Employment 48

Government 58

Grade Appeals 87

Health 64

Housing 55

Life 50

Organizations 58

Publications 59

Records 94

Repayment Policy 33

Residency Requirements 91

Student Activities 56

Student Life 50

Suspension 50, 77, 88

T

Teacher Education and

Certification 184

Teaching Fellows Program 102

Testing

ACT /SAT 23,25

CLEP 83, 100

Theatre Arts 305

Time Restrictions

Major 109

Core Program 100

Financial Aid 39

Transcripts 94

Transfer

Admission 26

Credit 26,81

Transient

Admission 27

Credit 27,81,84

Tuition and Fees 29

Tutoring Center 63

U

U.S. Armed Forces Institute .... 85

V

Vehicle Registration 56

Veterinary Medicine 113

W

Withdrawal 81,82

Women's Studies 312

Work Opportunities 48

Writing Center 63, 196

336

337

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