LaGrange College Department of Education Graduate Bulletin, LaGrange, Georgia, Catalogue 2011-2012

Collection:
LaGrange College collections in the Internet Archive
Title:
LaGrange College Department of Education Graduate Bulletin, LaGrange, Georgia, Catalogue 2011-2012
Creator:
LaGrange College
Contributor to Resource:
LaGrange College
Date of Original:
2011
Subject:
LaGrange College (LaGrange, Ga.)
LaGrange Female College (LaGrange, Ga.)
LaGrange Female Institute (LaGrange, Ga.)
LaGrange Female Academy (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange College (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange Female College (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange Female Institute (LaGrange, Ga.)
La Grange Female Academy (LaGrange, Ga.)
Women's Colleges--Georgia
Women--Education (Higher)--Georgia
Education--History--Georgia
Location:
United States, Georgia, Troup County, LaGrange, 33.03929, -85.03133
Type:
Text
Format:
application/pdf
Description:
College officially known as LaGrange Female Academy 1831-1847, LaGrange Female Institute 1847-1851, LaGrange Female College 1851-1934, LaGrange College 1934-. College name appears as La Grange in some college publications. Since 2011 the Undergraduate Catalogs (Bulletins) have been produced in electronic form only. The Catalogs (Bulletins) contain details about the faculty, curriculum, student body, physical plant and more from 1848. Catalogs (Bulletins) published as separate itemuments include: Graduate Catalog (Bulletin) from 1992, Evening College Bulletin from 2000, LaGrange College at Albany (Georgia) from 2000-2010, Interim Term from 2001-2010.
Local Identifier:
laGrangecolleged2011lagr
Metadata URL:
https://archive.org/details/lagrangecolleged2011lagr
Language:
eng
Original Collection:
LaGrange College Americana
LaGrange College
Holding Institution:
LaGrange College (LaGrange, Ga.)
Rights:
Rights Statement information

VOLUME XVII JUNE 2011 NUMBER 2

LAGRANGE COLLEGE

Department of Education

GRADUATE BULLETIN

LAGRANGE, GEORGIA

CATALOGUE ISSUE 2011-2012

VOLUME XVII JUNE 2011 NUMBER 2

LAGRANGE COLLEGE

Department of Education

GRADUATE BULLETIN

LAGRANGE, GEORGIA

CATALOGUE ISSUE 2011-2012

College Communications Directory

LaGrange College

601 Broad Street

LaGrange, Georgia 30240-2999

(706) 880-8000 www.lagrange.edu

A complete directory of faculty and staff telephone numbers, fax numbers,
and e-mail addresses is available on the College web site.

General Information 706-880-8000

Office of the President 706-880-8230

Office of the Provost 706-880-8236

Admission Office 706-880-8253

Bookstore 706-880-8068

Business Office/Student Accounts 706-880-8278

Office of the Chaplain 706-880-8297

Department of Education 706-880-8203

Financial Aid Office 706-880-8229

Registrar' s Office 706-880-8997

LaGrange College admits qualified students of any race, color, national and
ethnic origin to all rights, privileges, programs and activities generally
accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate
on the basis of sex, race, color, national or ethnic origin in administration of its
educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and
athletic and other school-administered programs.

LaGrange College Graduate Bulletin, Volume XVII, Number 2

President: Dr. Dan K. McAlexander Editor: Dr. Sharon M. Livingston

LaGrange College Department of Education Graduate Bulletin, the official
publication of LaGrange College for current and future students, is published
annually. Correspondence should be directed to Dr. Sharon Livingston,
LaGrange College, 601 Broad Street, LaGrange, GA 30240-2999. E-mail
correspondence to slivingston@lagrange.edu or fax to (706) 880-83 19.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Academic Calendar, Graduate Education 6

About LaGrange College 1 1

General Information 1 1

Mission 1 1

Accreditation 12

Financial Information 13

Payment of Charges 13

Expenses 13

Refund Policy 14

Credit Balances 16

Federal Tax Credits 16

Miscellaneous 16

Financial Aid 17

Philosophy 17

General Information 17

Financial Aid Application Procedures 18

Verification 18

Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements 19

Candidate Financial Aid Rights and Responsibilities 19

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy 20

Qualitative Standard 21

Quantitative Standard 21

Satisfactory Academic Progress Evaluation Process 23

Appeal Procedures 24

Re-Establishing Financial Aid Eligibility 24

Financial Aid Sources 25

LaGrange College Financial Assistance Programs 26

Disbursement of Financial Aid 26

Disbursement of Excess Financial Aid 27

Candidate Financial Aid and Federal Tax Implications 27

Suspected Fraud 27

3

Academic Policies 28

Orientation and Advisement 28

Class Attendance Regulations 28

Children of Students 28

Academic Calendars 29

Probation 29

Dismissal 29

Policy for Remediation of Inappropriate Dispositions

and/or Inadequate Performance 30

Honor Code 31

Academic Appeals 33

Grade Appeals 33

Other Non-Academic Appeals 34

Grades and Credits : 35

Graduate Education Programs 36

Introduction to Programs 36

Learning Outcomes 37

Guidance and Counseling 37

Transfer Credit 38

Transient Credit 38

Credit by Examination 38

Extension, Correspondence, and On-line Coursework 38

Grades 38

Probationary Status 39

Course Repetition 39

Time Limitations 39

Applying for Graduation 39

Master of Arts in Teaching Program 40

Mission of the Department of Education 40

Admission Requirements 40

Conditional Admission 41

Field Experience 41

Certification 42

Graduation Requirements 43

Post Graduation 43

Program Course Plan, M.A.T. Secondary 44

Program Course Plan, M.A.T. Middle Grades 45

Program Course Plan, M.A.T. Concentration in Reading

for Middle Grades 46

Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction 48

Mission of the Department of Education 48

Admission Requirements 48

Conditional Admission 49

Graduation Requirements 49

14 Month Program Course Plan 49

23 Month Program Course Plan 50

Education Specialist Program 51

Mission of the Department of Education 51

Admission Requirements 51

Conditional Admission 51

Graduation Requirements 51

Program Course Plans 52

Course Descriptions 54

Graduate Faculty 62

Department of Education 62

Content Faculty and Advisors 63

2011 - 2012

Graduate Education
ACADEMIC CALENDAR

June 2011

6

7

TBA

July 1

Summer I Term 2011

Summer I Classes Begin

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual
classes dropped after this date.

Content Diagnostic Examinations

Summer I Classes End

July 2011

11

12

TBA

29

Summer II Term 2011

Summer II Classes Begin

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual
classes dropped after this date.

Certification of Teacher Candidates

Summer II Classes End

Fall Semester (63 Class Days)
August / September 2011

29-30

31

5
7

7

Registration for New and Returning Day Students not
prepaid. Advisors available.

All Classes Begin

Labor Day College Closed

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual
classes dropped after this date.

All incomplete grades should be changed to permanent
grades.

October 2011

13-14

17

Fall Break No Classes
Mid-Term

November 2011

1-5

6

21
22
24-25
28
28

Student completing degree requirements by end of Fall,
Jan, or Spring terms should file petitions for graduation
with the Registrar. Advisors available.

Daylight Savings Time Ends
Last Day to Withdrawal with an Automatic "W"
Last Day of Classes before Thanksgiving Break
Thanksgiving Break College Closed
Classes Resume after Thanksgiving Break
Celebrate the Servant Week Begins

December 2011

5 Last Day of Fall Term Classes

6-10 Final Exams

10 Begin Term Break at 5:00 p.m.

1 6 Grades Due

22-3 1 Holiday for Administration and Staff College Closed

Interim Term (17 Class Days)
January 2012

1 New Year's Holiday College Closed

3 First Day of Classes

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual
classes dropped after this date.

All incomplete grades should be changed to permanent
grades.

12 Mid-Term

13 Last Day to Withdrawal with an Automatic "W"
16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day College Closed
26 Last Day of Classes

3 1 Interim Term Grades Due

Spring Semester (63 Class Days)

February 2012

2 Classes Begin

March 2012

April 2012

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual
classes dropped after this date.

All incomplete grades should be changed to permanent
grades.

1 1 Daylight Savings Time Begins

14 Mid-Term

Make-up for snow, if necessary, for Day and Evening
classes

Student completing degree requirements in Summer or
26-30 Fall should file petitions for graduation with the

Registrar. Advisors available.

2-6 Spring Break No Classes

23 Last day to withdrawal with an automatic "W"

May 2012

3
7

9-15

17

18
18

18

19

28

National Day of Prayer
Last Day of Classes

Final Exams
Grades due for Graduates by Noon

Graduation rehearsal

Baccalaureate at First United Methodist Church

Grades for those not graduating due at 5:00 p.m.

Graduation on Residential Quadrangle
Memorial Day Holiday - College Closed

June 2012

4
5

TBA

29

Summer I Term 2012

Summer I Classes Begin

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual
classes dropped after this date.

Content Diagnostic Examinations

Summer I Classes End

July 2012

9

2
10

TBA

27
Aug 7

Summer II Term 2012

Summer II Classes Begin
Summer I Grades Due

End drop/add at 5:00 p.m. No refund for individual
classes dropped after this date.

Certification of Teacher Candidates

Summer II Classes End

Summer II Grades Due

10

ABOUT LAGRANGE COLLEGE

General Information

The LaGrange College Graduate Bulletin is subordinate to the LaGrange
College Bulletin. All policies not specifically addressed in this Graduate
Bulletin are detailed in the LaGrange College Bulletin. This Graduate
Education Bulletin details policies, procedures, degrees, and courses that
are unique to the graduate education program. Inquiries regarding policies
not covered should be addressed to the Provost.

The College reserves the right to make modifications in the degree
requirements, courses, schedules, calendar, regulations, fees, and other
changes deemed necessary or conducive to the efficient operation of the
College. Such changes become effective as announced by the proper
College authorities.

Mission

LaGrange College challenges the minds and inspires the souls of its
students. Founded in 1831 and committed to its relationship with the
United Methodist Church and its Wesleyan and liberal arts traditions, the
college supports students in their search for truth. An ethical and caring
community valuing civility, diversity, service and excellence, LaGrange
College prepares students to become successful, responsible citizens who
aspire to lives of integrity and moral courage.

Through an interdisciplinary, broad-based general education curriculum,
rigorous study in the major disciplines, innovative learning opportunities
and integrative co-curricular programs, LaGrange College students
encounter experiences that challenge and inspire them to develop
intellectually, socially, and spiritually.

The oldest private college in the state of Georgia, the institution has been
affiliated with the United Methodist Church for more than 150 years.

11

Firmly rooted in the Christian faith and grounded in the Wesleyan and
liberal arts traditions, both of which are devoted to the unfettered pursuit of
truth, the college encourages students to deepen their understanding of their
faith and empowers them to engage in free intellectual
inquiry. Welcoming students from widely diverse backgrounds and a
variety of faith traditions, the college fosters an environment of respect and
humility and is committed to the ideals of religious and academic freedom.

Understanding the necessity of informed thought directed toward
responsible decision making, the academic programs of the college provide
opportunities for students to grow in their ability to communicate
effectively, to encounter the world with critical insight, and to approach
problems and opportunities with creativity. Committed to the success of
students as members of the college community and as alumni, the
institution encourages students to see life and work as deeply related and to
engage themselves in rich opportunities for meaningful service. Aware of
the global nature of 21 st -century learning and living, the college provides
multiple opportunities for students to experience distant cultures and
diverse peoples through study-away options, language study, internships,
and a wide exposure to cultural-enrichment events - all in the context of
academic study and action that foster responsible, sustainable stewardship.

Adopted by Faculty, Administration, and Board of Trustees, 2010.
Accreditation

LaGrange College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the degrees of
Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of
Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of Science in
Nursing, Master of Education, Master of Arts in Teaching, the Education
Specialist degree in Curriculum and Instruction, and the Master of Arts in
Organizational Leadership. Accreditation information is given in order for
interested constituents to ( 1 ) learn about the accreditation status of
LaGrange College, (2) file a third-party comment at the time of the
institution's decennial review, or (3) file a complaint against the institution
for alleged non-compliance with a standard or requirement. Contact the
Commission on Colleges at 1 866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-
4097 or call 404-679-4500 or visit www.sacscoc.ore for questions about

12

the accreditation of LaGrange College. Normal inquiries about the
institution, such as admission requirements, financial aid, educational
programs, etc. should be addressed directly to LaGrange College and not to
the Commissions of College's Office.

LaGrange College is also approved by the United Methodist University
Senate. It has membership in the National Association of Independent
Colleges and Universities and the Georgia Foundation for Independent
Colleges.

LaGrange College's teacher education undergraduate and graduate
programs are accredited by the Georgia Professional Standards
Commission to recommend candidates for certification in the areas of early
childhood, middle grades, or secondary education.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Payment of Charges

All charges for the semester are due and payable at the beginning of the
term, and each candidate is expected to make satisfactory arrangements at
that time.

Candidates who pre-register and pay in advance of the deadline each
semester are not required to attend final registration. Invoices not paid by
the due date will be assessed a Late Payment Fee as enumerated below.

The College offers a deferred payment option that allows candidates to
make monthly payments to cover educational costs. Interest will be
assessed to candidates utilizing this option.

Expenses

1 . Admission

Application for admission (non-refundable) 30.00

2. Tuition Graduate Education Courses

(M.Ed., M.A.T.) per credit hour 946.00

(Ed.S.) per credit hour 956.00

13

3. Fees Miscellaneous

Late Payment Fee 50.00

Personal checks failing to clear 25.00

Graduation Fee 150.00

Student Identification Card replacement fee 15.00

Parking Permit 30.00

4. Subscription Fee

A one-time $100 subscription fee is assessed to cover the cost of the
TK20 software use for assessment, portfolio development, and data
collection.

Refund Policy

No refund of any nature will be made to any candidate who is suspended or
dismissed for disciplinary reasons.

No refund will be made for individual courses dropped after the end of the
drop/add period as established by the school calendar.

Refunds will be processed within thirty (30) days of notification of a
Complete Withdrawal. A candidate withdrawing from the College must
submit a Complete Withdrawal Form, which may be obtained through
the Registrar's Office. A Complete Withdrawal date is defined by:

the earlier of date candidate began school's withdrawal process or date
candidate otherwise provided "official" notice; or

if candidate did not notify school, the midpoint in the term; or the date
of candidate's last attendance at documented academically-related
activity; or

if candidate did not notify due to circumstances beyond
candidate's control, date related to that circumstance.

The candidate should also consult the Financial Aid Office and the
Business Office to determine the financial consequences of a Complete
Withdrawal.

The U.S. Department of Education requires all unearned Title IV funds to
be returned to the program from which such aid was awarded. The College
will credit the candidate's account for all unearned institutional charges.
The U.S. Department of Education defines institutional charges as "all

14

charges for tuition, fees, room and board, and expenses for required course
materials, if the candidate does not have a real and reasonable opportunity
to purchase the required course materials from any place but the school."

In the event of a Complete Withdrawal, refunds of institutional charges
will be calculated using the number of days attended. The College will
calculate the dollar amount of federal grant and loan funds the candidate
has earned during the term by dividing the number of days a candidate
actually completed by the total number of days within the term (excluding
breaks of five days or more). The resulting percentage is then multiplied
by the amount of federal funds that were applied to the candidate's
account. This is the amount of Title IV funding the candidate actually
earned. The remainder is returned to the originating program. If the
resulting percentage exceeds 60 percent, the candidate would be entitled to
100 percent of the federal funds. Refunds of tuition will be applied to the
candidate's account in the same manner as the return of federal funds.
After the candidate has completed 60 percent of the term, there will be no
refund of institutional charges.

In certain cases, these refund requirements may leave an indebtedness on
the candidate's account. This may also require the candidate to reimburse
the U.S. Department of Education for some or all of the applicable Federal
Pell and SEOG funds. It is, therefore, imperative that the candidates fully
discuss the ramifications of a Complete Withdrawal with the Financial Aid
Office prior to making a final decision.

A candidate will not receive a refund until all financial aid programs have
been reimbursed. Refunds will be returned in the order indicated below:

Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan Program

Subsidized Federal Direct Loan Program

Federal Perkins Loan Program

Federal PLUS Program

Federal Pell Grant Program

Academic Competitiveness Grant Program

National SMART Grant Program

Federal SEOG Program

TEACH Grant Program

Other Title IV Programs

Other State, private, or institutional assistance programs

Candidate

15

Credit Balances

Candidates who have a credit balance on their account may obtain a credit
balance refund within fourteen (14) calendar days whichever is the latest
of:

the date the balance occurs;

the first day of classes of a payment period or enrollment period, as
applicable; or

the date the candidate rescinds authorization given the school to hold
the funds.

Candidates must certify they are enrolled and regularly attending class at
the time they receive the refund.

Federal Tax Credits

The Tax Reform Act of 1997 provided two tax credits for higher education.
The "Hope Scholarship Credit" provides up to a $1,800 tax credit for the
first two years of postsecondary education in a program that leads to a
degree, certificate, or other recognized educational credential. The
candidate must be enrolled at least halftime. Qualified expenses are for
tuition and fees and do not include room, board, books, insurance, and
other similar expenses.

The "Lifetime Learning Credit" provides up to a $2,000 per year tax credit
per family after the first two years of higher education. These tax credits are
phased out as the modified adjusted gross income exceeds certain limits.
Please check with your tax advisor regarding these limits. For additional
information about these credits, please consult the Business Office or your
tax preparer.

Miscellaneous

Depending upon individual requirements, a candidate may expect to
spend $1,000 per year on books. Bookstore charges for the fall term
are normally higher than for the spring term.

All candidates must present the College with proof of health insurance
at the time of Registration and complete a Waiver Form including
provider name and policy number. If the candidate does not have
insurance, the College will assess the candidate for limited coverage
group sickness and accident insurance coverage.

Official transcripts and diplomas are withheld for any candidate who
has a financial obligation owed to the College.

16

FINANCIAL AID

Philosophy

LaGrange College believes that the candidate should contribute to the
educational expenses of attending a college or university to the extent of
their ability. The Financial Aid Office is available to assist candidates in
meeting the difference between the cost of education at LaGrange College
and what the candidate can contribute. The Financial Aid Office at
LaGrange College attempts to defray the cost of education from all
available Federal, State, and institutional sources. The candidate should be
prepared to assume a measure of responsibility in meeting educational
expenses through self-help financial aid sources such as candidate loans.

General Information

Candidates seeking financial assistance must complete a federal need
analysis form, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The
FAFSA collects student and spousal, if applicable, income and asset
information needed to determine eligibility for financial aid. This
information is used in a federal need analysis formula to determine the
Expected Family Contribution (EFC).

The Financial Aid Office establishes a Cost of Attendance Budget each
year. A Cost of Attendance Budget includes tuition, fees, room, board,
books and supplies, and living expenses. Other components of the Cost
of Attendance, which is applied on an individual basis, are childcare
expenses, study abroad, and the purchase of a computer. These items
may require documentation from the candidate. Below is the Projected
Cost of Attendance for the 201 1-2012 academic year.

Master of Education $2 1 ,7 1 4

Master of Arts in Teaching $36,507

Education Specialist $21,933

The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is deducted from the Cost of
Attendance at LaGrange College to determine whether a need for financial
assistance exists. If the candidate's EFC is less than the Cost of
Attendance, a financial need is established. The Financial Aid Office
attempts to meet the demonstrated financial need of applicants from federal,
state, and institutional sources.

17

Financial Aid Application Procedures

Applicants for financial aid must:

Apply and be accepted as a regular degree-seeking candidate in an
eligible program at LaGrange College. Candidates conditionally
accepted into a master's program are not eligible for financial
assistance until all admission requirements are met for entry into
their chosen program. This includes submission ofGRE or GACE
test scores.

Complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) annually.

Submit all required documents for verification, if selected.

Verification

Verification is the process of evaluating the accuracy of financial
information provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The
U.S. Department of Education randomly selects approximately 30% of all
financial aid applications for verification. The Financial Aid Office may
select additional applications for verification if conflicting or incomplete
information exists. A financial aid award cannot be provided until the
verification process is completed.

Candidates selected for verification will be asked to verify, at a minimum,
the following: adjusted gross income, federal income tax paid, earned
income credit, family size, number of family members in college, and
untaxed income. Most candidates will be asked to complete a verification
worksheet and provide copies of applicable federal tax returns. If
discrepancies are found during verification, the Financial Aid Office will
transmit the corrected information to the Central Processor. The results are
usually received within seven days. Once the corrected financial aid
information is received and provided all other eligibility requirements are met,
an official financial aid award letter will be mailed.

18

Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements

In general, to be eligible for financial assistance, the applicant must:

Be a U.S. Citizen or permanent resident alien of the United States;

Be admitted or currently enrolled in an approved degree-seeking or
teacher certification program;

Be making Satisfactory Academic Progress towards the completion of
their degree program;

Not be in default on any federal educational loan or have made
satisfactory arrangements to repay the loan;

Not owe a refund on a federal or state grant;

Not have borrowed in excess of federal loan limits;

Be registered with Selective Service, if required.

Not have a drug conviction for an offense that occurred while
receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and work).

Candidate Financial Aid Rights and
Responsibilities

Candidates have the right to know:

The procedures for applying for financial assistance and eligibility
requirements;

Financial aid resources available and eligibility requirements;

Refunds and Repayment Policy in the event of complete withdrawal
from school;

Cost of Attendance at LaGrange College;

Deadlines for applying for financial aid;

When and how your financial aid award will be disbursed;

Your loan indebtedness and estimated monthly payments;

Academic Programs available at LaGrange College;

Name of associations and agencies accrediting the institution and its
programs;

Campus Security Statistics;

19

Athletic Program Participation Rates and Financial Support Data;

Completion and Graduation Rates.

Candidates have the responsibility to:

Submit complete and accurate financial aid applications;

Observe all deadlines for submission of financial aid documents;

Maintain regular class attendance in all courses for which financial
assistance was awarded;

Maintain satisfactory academic progress towards the completion of
their chosen degree or certification;

Notify the Financial Aid Office and lenders of any change in address
or name;

Complete required Entrance and Exit Interviews for Federal Direct and
for Federal Perkins Loan;

Respond to all communications regarding candidate loans and
financial aid awards;

Comply with all eligibility requirements for financial aid award funds;

Repay student loan(s) received for education pursuits regardless of
whether he/she graduates;

Notify the Financial Aid Office of any financial assistance to be
received from an external source (VA Educational Assistance,
Vocational Rehabilitation, Employer Reimbursement etc.).

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

Federal regulations require institutions of higher education to establish
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards for recipients of financial
aid. The purpose of satisfactory academic progress standards is to measure
a student's progress toward the completion of their educational program.
The Financial Aid Office is responsible for ensuring that all students
receiving federal, state, and institutional financial aid are meeting these
standards by conducting an evaluation at the end of each semester.
The satisfactory academic progress standards established in this Policy
apply to all financial aid programs including, but are not limited to, Federal
aid programs- TEACH Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Loan,
Graduate PLUS, Federal Work Study, and LaGrange College Teacher
Discount.

20

A satisfactory academic progress policy is comprised of a qualitative
(grade-based) and quantitative (pace and time frame) standard. The

qualitative standard assesses the quality of the academic work as measured
by an overall grade point average. The quantitative standard establishes
the pace at which the student must progress to ensure completion of the
degree program within the allowable maximum timeframe. Financial aid
recipients must meet all of these standards to be making satisfactory
academic progress and to receive financial aid.

Qualitative Standard

Grade Point Average

A student must be in "good academic standing" based on the cumulative
grade point average of all courses taken at LaGrange College to meet the
qualitative standard. Graduate students are required to maintain a
cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 to remain in good academic
standing. The Chair of the Education Department monitors the grade point
average of degree candidates each semester. A student whose grade point
average falls below the required 3.0 will be placed on academic probation.
If a student's grade point average remains below a 3.0 for two consecutive
semesters, the student is subject to dismissal from the program.

Quantitative Standard

Rate of Progress (Pace)

A student receiving financial aid is expected to progress through the degree
program of study at a pace that ensures the completion within the
maximum timeframe defined below. The rate of progress (pace) is
computed by dividing the cumulative number of hours the student has
successfully completed (earned credits) by the cumulative number of hours
the student has attempted. A student is considered to be making
measurable progress toward the completion of their degree program by
maintaining an overall rate of progress of 67%. This standard applies to all
financial aid recipients, regardless of full-time or part-time enrollment
status.

Attempted hours are those credit hours for which the student is registered
on or after the conclusion of late registration (drop/add). Earned hours are
successfully completed courses in which grades of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-,
C+, C, C-, D+, D, or P are awarded, as long as credit is earned. Grades of
F, Incomplete (I), withdrawal (W), No credit (NC), Not Reported (NR),
Audit (AU), or Audit withdrawn (AW) do not count as successful
completion of a course. In evaluating the rate of progress, please note the
following:

21

Withdrawals, incompletes, and failed courses are considered
attempted hours but not earned hours. If an incomplete course
impacts a student's satisfactory academic progress standing, it is
the student's responsibility to notify the Financial Aid Office when
a final grade is reported.

Audited courses are not considered attempted or earned credit
hours.

Transfer credits, including courses taken as a transient student, do
not count in the calculation of LaGrange College GPA, but are
included in the attempted hours, earned hours, and maximum time
frame standards.

Repeated courses, for which a passing grade was previously
awarded, are included in attempted hours and grade point average
calculation but not earned hours.

Example of Rate of Progress Calculation

At the end of the Fall semester, Evelyn had attempted 12 semester hours
and passed (earned) 9 credit hours. Evelyn's rate of progress (pace) would
be determined by dividing the 9 credit hours he has earned by the total
hours attempted, which is 12. Her rate of progress is 75% (9/12). Evelyn
would be considered to be meeting the quantitative standard.

Maximum Time Frame

By Federal regulation, a student is expected to complete the degree
program within 1 50% of the credit hours required to complete the degree
program. For example, a graduate student pursuing a Master of Education,
which has a total of 30 semester hours, as published in the Graduate
Bulletin, could receive financial aid for no more than 45 semester hours.
Frequent withdrawals from courses or school, changes of major, failed or
repeated courses, or taking courses that are not related to the degree
program could jeopardize financial aid eligibility. All attempted hours at
LaGrange College and transfer credits accepted into the degree program
will count toward the maximum time frame. A student's eligibility for
financial aid will terminate at the time the student has completed the
required course work in the degree program or when it is determined that
the student has exceeded the 150% maximum time frame, or it is
determined that it is mathematically impossible for the student to complete
the degree program within the maximum timeframe.

22

Satisfactory Academic Progress Evaluation Process

After final grades are reported for the semester, the academic history from
all periods of enrollment, regardless of full-time or part-time enrollment
status, will be reviewed to determine if the student is maintaining the
standards established in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. This
includes all courses attempted regardless of whether financial aid was
received. Transfer grade point averages are not considered in either of the
standards; however, accepted transfer credit hours will be included in
attempted hours, earned hours, and the maximum time frame. Once
evaluated, the student will be placed into one of the following Satisfactory
Academic Progress statuses and notified, if applicable:

Good Standing status assigned to a student who is in full compliance
with the satisfactory academic progress standards. The student will not be
notified.

Financial Aid Warning status assigned to a student that is deficient in
the grade point average and/or rate of progress standards of the satisfactory
academic progress policy. A student on "financial aid warning" is eligible
for financial aid for one additional semester. The financial aid office will
notify the student of his status and the area(s) of deficiency that must be
resolved by the end of the next semester.

Financial Aid Suspension status assigned to a student that remains
deficient in grade point average and/or rate of progress standards after
being placed on "financial aid warning" or has exceeded the 150% time
frame for complete his/her degree program. A student placed on "academic
suspension" by the Provost is also placed on financial aid suspension
regardless of actual satisfactory academic progress status. A student on
"financial aid suspension" will be notified of his/her ineligibility for future
financial aid and the appeal process~(See Appeal Procedures below.)

Financial Aid Probation status assigned to a student who has failed to
make satisfactory academic progress and who has appealed and had
eligibility for financial aid reinstated. A student placed on financial aid
probation is eligible for financial aid and has one semester to comply with
the satisfactory academic progress standards or meet the requirements of an
academic plan developed by the student and Provost.

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Appeal Procedures

A financial aid recipient who is placed on financial suspension loses
eligibility for financial aid. The student can appeal to the Financial Aid
Appeals Committee for reinstatement of financial aid eligibility provided
there is a mitigating circumstance that affected the student's academic
performance. Mitigating circumstances are those events that are beyond
the student's control such as serious injury, illness or mental health
condition involving the student or an immediate family member, death of
an immediate family member, and other extenuating circumstances. An
Appeals Form must be submitted to the Director of Financial Aid with a
written statement detailing the mitigating circumstance, documentation of
circumstance (i.e. letter from physician or health care provider detailing the
onset and the duration of the illness, statement form a law enforcement
agency or social services agency, etc.) and the manner by which the
deficiency was/will be resolved and not interfere with future terms of
enrollment. Appeals without supporting documentation will not be
considered. Appeals must be submitted within 2 weeks of notification of
ineligibility for financial aid.

The Director of Financial Aid will convene the Financial Aid Appeals
Committee to review the request for reinstatement of financial aid
eligibility. The Director of Financial Aid will notify the student in writing
at the student's home address or campus e-mail account of the decision of
the Committee and any conditions associated with reinstatement within two
weeks of receiving the appeal. The decision of the Financial Aid
Appeals Committee is final. A student whose appeal is approved will
receive financial aid on "financial aid probation" status for one additional
semester and their academic performance will be reviewed at the end of
that next semester for continued financial aid eligibility.

Re-Establishing Financial Aid Eligibility

A student who is unsuccessful in appealing for reinstatement of his/her
financial aid or a student who does not have a mitigating circumstance that
warrants an appeal can only regain eligibility by complying with the
satisfactory academic progress policy. The student is encouraged to take
advantage of counseling, tutoring, and study skills resources available
through the College's Counseling Center and the Source Center.
It should be noted that taking courses at the student's expense, sitting out a
semester, or taking courses at another institution does not automatically
restore a student's eligibility for financial aid. If the student has resolved
the satisfactory academic progress deficiencies that resulted in the
termination of financial aid eligibility, the student should contact the
financial aid office and request a satisfactory academic progress review.

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Financial Aid Sources

Financial assistance for graduate study is primarily limited to student loans
and a few state and institutional grants or scholarships. Available financial
aid sources are outlined below.

Federal William D. Ford Direct Loan is a low interest, repayable loan
available to undergraduate and graduate degree-seeking students made
through the U.S. Department of Education, which is the lender instead of a
bank or credit union. The interest rate is a fixed rate of 6.80% for loans
disbursed after July 1 , 2006. The Federal Direct Loan Program consists of
a subsidized and unsubsidized loan. Subsidized loans are awarded on the
basis of financial need with the federal government paying the accruing
interest until repayment begins. Unsubsidized loans are available to
students regardless of financial need; however, interest accrues from the
time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. The borrower has the
option of paying the accruing interest or to allow the interest to accrue and
capitalize.

The maximum Federal Direct Loan a graduate student may borrow each
academic year is $20,500- no more than $8,500 may come from the
Federal subsidized Direct Loan . The Federal Direct Loan. Program has a
maximum aggregate (lifetime) limit on the amount of funds a student may
borrow. The aggregate loan limit for graduate students is $138,500, which
includes loans received as an undergraduate student.
Repayment of a Federal Direct Loan begins six months after the borrower
graduates, withdraws, or ceases enrollment as at least a half-time student.
The standard repayment period for a Direct Loan is 10 years.

Graduate PLUS Loan is a new Federal loan program available to
graduate students beginning July 1 , 2006. The Graduate PLUS Loan
allows eligible graduate students to borrow up to their cost of attendance
minus other financial assistance. Unlike the Federal Direct Loan,
borrowers of a Graduate PLUS Loan are subject to a credit check to qualify
for this loan program. The interest rate is fixed at 8.5% and repayment
begins on the date of the last disbursement of the loan. Students must
complete a FAFSA and apply for their maximum annual loan limit under
the Federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized Direct Loan Program before
applying for a Graduate PLUS Loan.

Federal Perkins Loan is a low interest, repayable loan awarded to
undergraduate and graduate students with exceptional financial need. The
interest rate is 5% and no interest accrues on the loan while the borrower is
enrolled half-time and during the grace period. Repayment begins nine

25

months after graduating or withdrawal from school. This loan program has
cancellation provisions for critical fields of study. Contact the Financial
Aid Office for more information.

Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education

(TEACH) Grant Program provides grants assistance of up to $2000 per
semester (with an $8000 maximum for graduate study) to full-time
graduate students pursuing a Master of Education degree (M.Ed.) who
intend to teach in a public or private elementary or secondary school that
serves students from low-income families in a designated high-need field.
In exchange for the TEACH Grant award, the recipient agrees to serve as a
full-time teacher for four academic years within in eight calendar years of
completing the program for which the TEACH Grant was received. For
more information on this program, contact the Financial Aid Office or the
LaGrange College Department of Education.

LaGrange College Financial Assistance Programs

LaGrange College Teacher Discount is available to teachers pursuing a
Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction or Education Specialist
degrees. The discount is 31% of assessed tuition only. This discount
cannot be received in conjunction with any other discount offered by
LaGrange College.

Master of Art in Teaching candidates admitted for Summer 201 1 and
beyond are eligible for a 6% discount on assessed tuition. This discount
cannot be received in conjunction with any other discount offered by
LaGrange College.

Disbursement of Financial Aid

All financial aid funds are credited directly to the candidate's account. The
funds are applied towards current tuition, fees, room, board, and other
charges as authorized by the candidate. Financial aid funds are for
educational expenses and those candidates who fail to enroll or attend
classes are not eligible for their financial aid award. Disbursements will
only be made to candidates who have submitted all required documents for
disbursement, are registered and have begun attendance in all classes, are
meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress standards, and are enrolled for the
appropriate number of credit hours to establish eligibility for individual
financial aid programs. Financial aid disbursements are based on the
recipient's enrollment status at the conclusion of late registration.

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Disbursement of Excess Financial Aid

Candidates with residual financial aid funds after tuition, fees, room, board,
and other authorized charges are paid will receive a refund of the
remaining credit balance within 14 days of the first day of classes or 14
days from the date the credit occurs (if after final registration). All refunds
must be retrieved from the Business Office and requires a picture ID
before disbursement.

If the candidate wishes to leave the credit balance on their account for
subsequent terms, he/she must sign an authorization form with the
Business Office.

Candidate Financial Aid and Federal Tax
Implications

Candidates receiving scholarships and grants that exceed their tuition, fees,
book and supplies should be aware that these funds are taxable under
federal and state tax law. It is important that candidates maintain records of
their grants and scholarships and documentation of educational expenses for
reporting purposes.

Federal tax law allows for only qualified scholarships and grants to be
excluded from income. Qualified scholarships are any amount of grant and
scholarship received that is used for tuition, fees, books, supplies and
equipment required for course instruction. Scholarships and grants that are
specifically designated for educational expenses other than those described
under qualified scholarships (room, board, transportation, or living
expenses) are taxable.

For information, please read IRS Publication 970, Tax Benefits for
Education, for more details on reporting requirements or consult a tax
professional.

Suspected Fraud

Institutions are required to report cases of suspected fraud to the Office of
the Inspector General of the Department of Education, or, if more
appropriate, to the state or local law enforcement agency having
jurisdiction to investigate these allegations. Fraud may exist if the
institution believes the applicant misreported or altered information in order
to increase their financial aid eligibility or fraudulently obtain federal funds.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

Orientation and Advisement

Prospective and newly admitted graduate candidates in the M.Ed., M.A.T.,
and Ed.S. programs are initially oriented and advised by the Chair of the
LaGrange College Department of Education. At this time, the Chair orients
the candidate to the program and to the College. Additional orientation is
handled for the M.A.T. program during summer classes when candidates
enter as a cohort group.

The Chair of the LaGrange College Department of Education serves as the
academic advisor for graduate candidates. Prior to the beginning of each
academic term, academic progress is assessed and classes are scheduled for
the coming term. The faculty in the Education program utilizes exit surveys
during the last semester of the program to assess the effectiveness of their
advising and orientation programs and to revise these efforts as needed.

Class Attendance Regulations

A candidate is expected to attend all classes, including labs, for all courses
for which he or she is registered. The candidate is solely responsible for
accounting to the instructor for any absence. Candidates will be required to
withdraw from the class when 25% or more of classes are missed. Since
classroom participation is part of the final grade, the professor reserves the
right to deduct up to 10% points for all absences and lack of preparation
and participation.

Children of Students

LaGrange College is committed to providing an environment conducive to
teaching and learning for all enrolled students. To maintain that
atmosphere of learning, in general, children of students are not permitted in
the classroom or on campus while the parent is attending class. The
presence of children in a college classroom presents a distraction to
engaged learners and may lead to the modification of content to exclude
information inappropriate for children. Unsupervised children create a
liability for both he parent and the college. Any temporary exception to
this policy due to extraordinary circumstances is at the discretion of the
instructor.

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Academic Calendars

The Graduate programs in Education follow the academic calendar of the
Day program, with slight variation to the Summer I and II semester
schedules. The calendar is printed at the front of this Bulletin.

Probation

Graduate candidates whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 at the end of a
term or who fail to make sufficient academic progress will be placed on
academic probation. Candidates will receive a letter from the Provost
informing them of their status. Candidates may remain on academic
probation for one term. The Summer term is considered a regular term in
the College's graduate programs. Candidates are no longer on probation
when their cumulative GPA becomes 3.0 or above. In the event that their
GPA does not rise to 3.0 or above within one term from the date of
academic probation, candidates are subject to dismissal from the College.
Only graduate courses taken at LaGrange College will be used to compute
GPA.

Dismissal

Graduate candidates may not be dismissed from graduate studies for
academic reasons unless they were first placed on academic probation.
Graduate candidates who have been dismissed from graduate studies
normally will not be readmitted unless it is mathematically possible that
they can achieve a GPA of 3.0 or above prior to completing standard
degree requirements. Candidates who are dismissed for academic reasons
may appeal their dismissal to the Provost within ten (10) working days
following receipt of their notice. Candidates may be dismissed for non-
academic reasons relating to dispositions or violation of the Georgia
Professional Standards Commission's Code of Ethics. A complete
description may be found in the Department's Field Handbook.

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Policy for Remediation of Inappropriate
Dispositions and/or Inadequate Performance

Dispositions

Because appropriate dispositions enhance teaching and learning, LaGrange
College's Department of Education believes that teachers should project
positive and productive attitudes toward students, colleagues and
professors. It is not the intent of LaGrange College's Department of
Education to produce identical personalities. Rather, acceptable
dispositions refer to positive attitudes, respect for the diverse
characteristics of others and taking grievances to the appropriate person in
a professional manner. In the pursuit of knowledge of learning, childhood
and society, appropriate dispositions reflect the teachers abiding respect for
the intellectual challenges set before them by their professors. Teachers are
committed intellectuals who value rigorous inquiry, critique and informed
skepticism as ways to expand their ethical, cultural and intellectual
universes. To engage in professional exchanges, committed teachers must
demonstrate constructive dispositions at all times. If a classroom professor
observes or becomes aware of inappropriate dispositions, she or he will
issue a written warning to the candidate. Upon the second time, the
candidate will be required to attend a hearing of the LaGrange College's
Department of Education Faculty for possible disciplinary action. At the
discretion of the faculty, disciplinary action may result in a reduction in
grade or in severe situations, expulsion from the program. Appropriate
dispositions are also expected and assessed during field and clinical
experiences.

Performance

Candidates who exhibit poor content knowledge, content pedagogical
knowledge, professional skills and/or fail to demonstrate a positive effect
on student learning based on specific criteria stated in the Field Experience
Handbook (FEH) may be required to complete a remedial Professional
Development Plan (PDP). Dismissal from the program is possible if the
candidate fails to meet the minimum scores on the PDP. Specific
procedures, instruments and scoring criteria used to assess dispositions and
performance are described in the FEH.

30

Honor Code

Students at LaGrange College abide by the Honor Code, which states,

As a member of the student body of LaGrange College, I
confirm my commitment to the ideals of civility, diversity,
service, and excellence. Recognizing the significance of
personal integrity in establishing these ideals within our
community, I pledge that I will not lie, cheat, steal, nor
tolerate these unethical behaviors in others.

The Honor Code is the responsibility of every student, faculty member, and
staff member at LaGrange College. All members of the College
community are needed to support the enforcement of the Code which
prohibits lying, cheating, or stealing when those actions involve academic
processes.

The 201 1-2012 Honor Council Members are:

Trae Long , Honor Council President
Hannah Butts Sarah Gobin

Robert Harste Tara Hill

Stephanie Rojas Cassie Jo Sharman

Hannah Williams Drew Williamson

Emily Claire Worthey

Drs. John Tures and William Pascal, Advisors

The Honor Council is selected each spring by the outgoing President of the
Honor Council, the outgoing President of the SGA, the Provost, the
President of the Faculty Assembly, and the Advisor to the Honor Council.
A member of the faculty serves as advisor to the council. Both members of
the faculty and the student body are expected to report any suspected
violation of the Honor Code to the Honor Council, either to the Provost or
to the President of the Honor Council. Students who suspect a violation
may, in a course-related case, first report the suspected violation to the
course instructor. (For a complete description of the Honor Code and
policies, please refer to the Honor Code Student Handbook.)

The following are examples of violations of the Honor Code:

Lying in any academic matter;

Cheating by either giving aid to or receiving aid from a student or
other source without the consent of the instructor;

Plagiarizing (using another's words or ideas without proper citation);

Failure to report a violation of the Honor Code;

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Failure to appear before the Honor Council as requested by written
notice;

Failure to maintain confidentiality regarding an Honor Council case.

Sanctions include the following:

Assigning a grade of zero to the related academic work (assignments,
exams, reports, projects, case studies, etc.);

Lowering the final grade in the course by one letter, in a grade-related
offense;

Assigning a grade of F in the course, in a grade-related offense;

Suspension for the next semester, either fall or spring; or suspension
for the next semester and an F in the course, in a grade-related offense;

Dismissal from the College; or dismissal from the College and an F in
the course, in a grade-related offense.

When a student accused of a violation does not appear for a preliminary
interview when notified to do so, a hold will be placed on the student's
transcript. A hold will also be placed on the transcript when the President
of the Honor Council and the Provost determine that the case will proceed
to a hearing. This hold will be removed when the case has been resolved.
If a case cannot be heard before the end of a grading period, the instructor
will submit the grade of "I" until the Honor Council acts on the case. The
Honor Council reserves the right to conduct a hearing in absentia when a
party to the case fails to appear as directed.

An investigation and hearing shall be confidential and those within the
bounds of confidentiality shall not divulge anything that is said or done
with regard to these proceedings to anyone outside the bounds of
confidentiality. Should anyone outside the bounds of confidentiality
receive information which is considered to be confidential, he or she will
automatically be bound by confidentiality. Those within the bounds of
confidentiality include Council members, the faculty advisor to the
Council, the Provost, the President, accusers, the accused, witnesses,
persons interviewed during the investigation, and the College's attorney. In
addition, the accused may include within the bounds of confidentiality his
or her parents, faculty, staff, minister, personal or legal counsel.

32

All tests at the College are conducted under the Honor Code. Accordingly,
instructors may leave the room during the examination and students are on
their honor to do their own work. The Honor Code should be abbreviated
on the outside of the test and signed by the student before handing in the
examination. Students should leave all books and materials not pertaining
to the test either in the hall outside the classroom, or next to the wall in
front of the classroom. Students should take the test in the designated
classroom, except under extenuating circumstances or by prior
arrangement.

Work prepared out of class should be that of the individual. Any assistance
from fellow students, books, periodicals, or other materials should be
carefully acknowledged. Instructors should give specific guidance
regarding what constitutes a violation of the Honor Code. If any doubts
about plagiarism arise, a question should be raised by the instructor.

As early as possible in the term, the instructor should make clear to his or
her classes how the specifications of the Honor Code apply to class
requirements. For example, what constitutes a legitimate use of source
material, especially material on the Internet, should be made clear.

Academic Appeals

Graduate candidates at LaGrange College have the right to appeal
academic decisions including grades. Appeals by candidates must be in
writing and the response to the candidate must be written. Appeals must
first be submitted to the level which originated the decision.

Grade Appeals

The initial determination of a candidate's grade is entirely the prerogative
of the instructor. However, a candidate who wishes to contest a course
grade or other academic decision may initiate an appeal by the procedures
outlined below. Grade appeals must be initiated no later than mid-term of
the academic term following that in which the grade was assigned. The
date of the academic term is defined in the College calendar in the front of
this Bulletin.

The following procedures govern all candidate requests for grade changes:

The candidate should first attempt to resolve the matter by discussing
the question with the course instructor.

If the candidate and the instructor are unable to reach a resolution, then
the candidate must submit a written appeal to the Provost. The appeal
must state the manner in which the course syllabus was violated.

33

The Provost shall then seek an informal conference between the
candidate and the instructor to settle the grievance to the satisfaction of
the two parties involved. If no resolution can be found, then the Provost
will deliver the candidate's appeal, together with any other pertinent
documents provided by the candidate and/or the instructor, to the
Review Panel of the Academic Policies Committee for its
determination.

The Review Panel shall then convene to conduct a preliminary review
of the appeal, after which the Chair of the Review Panel will set times
convenient to the candidate and the instructor for hearing both sides of
the dispute.

Upon completion of its hearings, the Review Panel will report its
findings to the Provost. The Provost will, in turn, inform the principal
parties involved of whether the candidate's request for a change of grade
or other decision was denied or approved.

It is the responsibility of the Review Panel to make every reasonable
effort to complete its deliberations prior to the end of the term in which
an appeal was initiated.

Other Non-Academic Appeals

The College and the Department of Education at LaGrange College are
committed to mutual respect among all constituents of the college and
departmental community. This commitment includes students, faculty,
staff, and administration. In all concerns about fair treatment, we seek to
work together to understand and address those concerns without having
to resort to formal grievance procedures. When that is not possible, we
are at all levels committed to a fair and reasonable resolution of issues
through a formal grievance process guided by the information and
documentation provided in the process. The regulation described on the
Department of Education's Website describes an orderly procedure of
grievance and attempts at resolution. A complete explanation of
procedures to follow when making a non-academic grade grievance can
be found online at: http://home.lagrange.edu/educate/grievance.htm

If the grievance is not resolved after these procedures are followed, then the
candidate may appeal to the Provost, and ultimately, the President. As a
rule, an appeal of a policy or decision must be submitted to the Department.
An appeal of a college requirement must be submitted to the Provost.

34

Grades and Credits

The definitions of grades given at LaGrange College are as follows:

A+

4.0

A

superior

4.0

A-

3.75

B+

3.25

B

above average

3.0

B-

2.75

C+

2.25

C

average

2.0

C-

1.75

D+

1.25

D

below average

1.0

F

failing

0.0

I

incomplete

This grade is assigned in case a
candidate is doing satisfactory work but
for some reason beyond the candidate's
control has been unable to complete the
work during that term.

P

pass

NC

no credit or nor

-credit

W

withdrawn

A student who chooses to withdraw fror

a class on or before the "Last Day to
Withdraw with a W" will receive a W on
his or her official transcript, regardless of
standing in the class. The "Last Day to
Withdraw with a W" will normally occur
two weeks prior to the last day of
classes.

AW audit withdrawn

AU audit complete

NR grade not reported by instructor at the time the report
issued.

A candidate may register for a course on a non-credit basis, for which he or
she pays full tuition. To have a grade of "NC" recorded, he or she must
fulfill all course requirements.

A candidate may audit a course by paying the audit fee. All requests for
audit courses must be approved in writing by the instructor and Provost.
Only lecture courses may be audited.

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An "I" is a temporary grade, assigned by an instructor within the last three
weeks of the term to candidates who are doing satisfactory work and who
cannot complete the course due to circumstances beyond their control.
Should conditions prohibiting completion of a course arise within the first
eight weeks, candidates should withdraw.

An "I" is to be removed by the date indicated by the Registrar. Failure to
remove an "I" by the date set initiates the following action: The Registrar
will write a letter to the candidate using the address on file. The letter
indicates that the candidate has two weeks to respond. Otherwise the "I"
grade will be converted to an "F."

Grades are assigned and recorded for each course at the end of each term.
Grades are available to candidates on the Web. Transcripts are withheld
for any candidate who is under financial obligation to the college.

GRADUATE EDUCATION
PROGRAMS

Introduction to Programs

LaGrange College's Department of Education offers two masters degree
programs and a specialist in education degree program. The Master of Arts
in Teaching (M.A.T.) induction program is an alternative route to
certification designed for those with a four-year degree who wish to
become secondary teachers in high schools or middle schools. The Master
of Education in Curriculum and Instruction (M.Ed.) is an advanced degree
for practicing educators. The Education Specialist Degree (Ed.S.) in
Curriculum and Instruction is designed for experienced teachers who desire
to increase their content knowledge, improve their teaching skills and
become teacher leaders in schools. Candidates entering the Ed.S. program
would be expected to hold a Masters degree and already hold teacher
certification.

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Learning Outcomes

For the Master of Arts in Teaching degree, the LaGrange College
Department of Education faculty have adopted the core proposals of the
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards as goals for the
program. While using best practices, the expected learning outcomes for
M.A.T. candidates are as follows:

Candidates are able to demonstrate a commitment to students and their

learning.

Candidates are able to demonstrate a knowledge of their content and

how to teach their content.

Candidates are able to manage and monitor student learning.

Candidates are able to think systematically about their practice.

Candidates are members of learning communities.

For both the Master of Education and the Education Specialist degrees in
Curriculum and Instruction, the expected learning outcomes are as follows:

Candidates are able to plan, implement, and evaluate instruction to
improve student achievement in P-12 settings.

Candidates are able to use a theoretical perspective to plan, implement,
and evaluate curriculum that promotes student growth.

Candidates demonstrate advanced depth and breadth of knowledge and
skills in their academic discipline and pedagogy.
Candidates are able to use research to promote student achievement
and contributions to the teaching profession.

Candidates demonstrate advanced knowledge of the student through
the lens of cognitive, physical, emotional, cultural, environmental, and
economic factors.

Candidate are able to collect, analyze, and evaluate data from multiple
sources in order to maximize student learning.

Guidance and Counseling

Upon acceptance, the candidate is assigned an advisor.

With the help of the advisor, each candidate plans a program of study
to satisfy the requirements of the selected masters program.

In order to establish definite goals as well as intermediate objectives, a
periodic checklist and definite timetable will be mutually agreed upon
by the candidate and advisor.

Candidates are responsible for seeking advisement and meeting
graduation requirements.

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Transfer Credit

With the approval of the Department Chair, up to 6 semester hours of
credit in appropriate courses taken within the last five years from a regionally
accredited degree program may be applied toward a degree as transfer credits
at admission. Petitions for approval of transfer credit should be made to the
Department Chair. The final 12 hours of study must be completed at
LaGrange College.

Transient Credit

Transient credits are not typically permitted. Any requests for transient
credit must be made to the Department Chair.

Credit by Examination

Applicants entering LaGrange College Education program as well as
current students may earn college credit as a result of their participation in
the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP). A CLEP exam grade of
"C" or better is needed to receive credit; only 6 CLEP credit hours will be
accepted for courses. CLEP credits do not count towards residency
requirements and are not included in the cumulative GPA.

Consultation with and approval from the Department Chair is required
before credit is awarded. If a waiver of requirements is granted, the score
on the examination used will be recorded on the student's record in lieu of
a letter grade.

Extension, Correspondence, and On-line
Coursework

Graduate credit is not allowed for work done in extension, correspondence,
or on-line coursework to meet program requirements. With the approval of
the Department Chair in consultation with the content area chair or liaison,
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) candidates may apply on-line
coursework from a regionally accredited institution to satisfy content
requirements for their certification area.

Grades

All graduate programs require the candidate to maintain a grade point of
3.0. No credit toward the degree will be awarded for any grade below 1.75
(C-).

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Probationary Status

No grades below a 1.75 (C-) will be accepted. In the event a candidate's
GPA falls below 3.0 the candidate will be placed on probationary status.
The candidate has one semester in which to remove the probationary status.
Failure to do so will result in being dropped from the program. All requests
for exceptions must be addressed to the Provost.

Course Repetition

A student is prohibited from repeating a course in which he has made a
"C-"or better (while enrolled at LaGrange College or any institution)
without the approval of the Provost, and the Academic Council. Should a
case arise in which counting "C-"grades means the student's average drops
below a 3.0, the student could petition to repeat a course in which a "C-"
or lower was awarded. All courses in which a student receives an
unsatisfactory grade must be repeated at LaGrange College. A student may
not remove from the transcript an unsatisfactory grade earned at LaGrange
College or elsewhere even if the course is repeated.

Time Limitations

Candidates must complete all requirements for their degree within five
years starting from the date of admission to the program. All courses or
requirements that do not meet this requirement must be repeated.

Applying for Graduation

One semester prior to the anticipated date of graduation, the graduate
candidate must file, through the advisor, an application for graduation with
the Provost. Any changes must be approved by the advisor and the Provost.
The applications for graduation are available from the Department of
Education office.

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Master of Arts in Teaching Program

Mission of Department of Education

The Master of Arts in Teaching program is designed for those with a four-
year degree who want to become high school or middle school teachers.
The MAT program prepares high school and middle grades teachers for
certification in many areas through real-world study. Each student is
guided by mentors from among the LaGrange College faculty and faculty
from Troup County high schools and middle schools.

Admission Requirements

Candidates apply for admission to LaGrange College graduate programs
through the Graduate Admission Office. At the time of admission, all
candidates are assigned an academic advisor. Candidates for the M.A.T.
induction program begin courses in June of one year and conclude the
program in July of the following year. The Department of Education will
maintain records of admission and supporting documents, a checklist of
entry requirements, and candidacy status. Transcripts and coursework will
be examined to determine appropriateness for the Master of Arts in
Teaching induction program. Candidates are required to maintain a 3.0
grade point average.

For unconditional acceptance to the Master of Arts in Teaching program,
an applicant must:

Submit satisfactory official transcripts from each graduate and
undergraduate institution attended;

Supply three recommendations using the on-line application system;

Complete an interview with the Chair of LaGrange College's
Department of Education;

Provide criminal background check and verify that no criminal record
or dishonorable discharge from the armed services will prevent teacher
certification;

Earn a minimum score on the TOEFL exam of at least 550 if English is
not the applicant's primary language;

Provide passing scores for the GACE Basic Skills requirement and the
candidate should have a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0
scale or higher,

Present a completed application through the Department of
Education's on-line application system.

40

Conditional Admission

If one or more of the admission requirements is not completed, candidates
may be admitted on a conditional basis. The candidate must remove the
conditional status within 9 semester hours of coursework. Failure to do so
will result in being dropped from the program.

Field Experience

School attendance is an essential factor in the professional development of
a teacher. It is a main factor of consideration as Cooperating Teachers,
Supervising Faculty, and School Principals offer references to prospective
employers. Attendance for all field experiences is mandatory. Therefore,
there are no excused absences. The teacher candidate must sign in and sign
out during each visit to the cooperating school. Tardiness, or leaving the
assigned school early, will not be tolerated as part of the teaching
assignment. The teacher candidate is to function as a member of the staff
of the cooperating school, and keep the same hours as other faculty
members, particularly your cooperating teacher. Attendance at faculty and
PTO meetings, teacher-parent conferences, and other after school and
evening activities is expected.

The teacher candidate will be required to make up any missed field
experience time. After two absences (or a pattern of late arrivals/early
departures) during any field experiences course, the Supervising Faculty
contacts the Director of Field Placement regarding the school attendance
problem. Then the Director of Field Placement will issue a Field
Experience Probation Letter to the Teacher Candidate. A third absence
may result in the termination of the Teacher Candidate's field experiences
for the semester. The submission of documentation of absences for any
reason, particularly illness or family emergency, is the choice of the
Teacher Candidate. Specific procedures for addressing absences are
described in the Field Experience Handbook [FEHJ.

During both Internships I and II candidates who exhibit poor content
knowledge, content pedagogical knowledge, professional skills and/or fail
to demonstrate a positive effect on student learning based on specific
criteria stated in the Field Experience Handbook may be required to
complete a remedial Professional Development Plan [PDP]. Dismissal
from the program is possible if the candidate fails to complete or meet the

41

minimum scores on the PDP. Candidates must successfully complete
Internships I and II within three attempts. If a candidate fails to
successfully complete Internships I and II in three attempts, the candidate
may be dismissed from the program. Specific procedures, instruments and
scoring criteria used to assess dispositions and performance are described
in the FEH.

Before participating in required field experiences, MAT candidates must
show proof of liability insurance obtained through the Student Professional
Association of Georgia Educators [SPAGE].

Certification

LaGrange College is approved to offer initial certification at level 5, T-5,
Master of Education level for Middle Grades, biology, mathematics,
history, and English.

Because certification requires that specific standards be satisfied, an
applicant seeking certification through the Master of Arts in Teaching
program must take a Content Diagnostic Examination during the first
semester of the program. An applicant who does not possess a degree from
an accredited institution of higher learning in the field of certification must
have approval from the Chair of the Department of Education to pursue
secondary education certification.

The candidate will be assessed for content knowledge with a Content
Assessment Analysis and a Content Diagnostic Examination. The Content
Assessment Analysis is a transcript evaluation by the Data Assessment
Manager and the Department of Education Chair in consultation with the
content area chair or liaison to determine if the candidate has sufficient
academic credit for the certification area. Additional content coursework
deemed necessary by the Chair of the Education Department must be
completed before the candidate will be recommended for certification. No
content grades below a 1 .75 (C-) will be accepted.

The Content Diagnostic Examination is an internal instrument that assesses
knowledge of the content standards prescribed by the related Specialty
Professional Association. The determination of what coursework and/or
experiences will be made by appropriate college content faculty.

Admission decisions may be appealed to the Provost.

After admission to the program, a review occurs each semester for each
candidate to determine retention in the teacher education program.

42

To ensure that content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge
meets state and professional standards, extensive internships are required at
certain transition points in the program.

Candidates must successfully complete fieldwork assignments and receive
satisfactory ratings on all Teacher Performance Observation Instruments
(TPOI) and Dispositions Evaluations or show evidence of successfully
completing a Professional Development Plan.

In addition, candidates must take and pass appropriate GACE tests to be
recommended for teacher certification in Georgia. GACE scores are
collected from all candidates seeking initial certification.

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for graduation from LaGrange College, candidates must
complete an approved program and satisfy other criteria as indicated in this
Bulletin. All candidates shall successfully complete 30 42 hours of
coursework (depending upon program ) with a 3.0 (B) average or better.
Artifacts collected at this time include transcripts, GPA, Lesson Plan
Rubrics, Documentation of Student Learning: Internship II, Teacher Work
Sample, Professional Logs, Teacher Performance Observations,
Disposition Evaluations, PDPs (if needed), and Content Portfolios.

Post Graduation

After completing an initial program, graduates are contacted by letter and
asked to respond to a survey based on the Georgia PSC and GSTEP
Standards. The survey is designed to elicit responses regarding candidates'
perceptions of their preparation at LaGrange College. Employers of
LaGrange College graduates are also contacted and asked to complete a
brief survey for each LC graduate whom they supervise. The survey asks
employers to rate candidates on job performance.

43

Program Course Plan Master of Arts in Teaching
Secondary (39 Credit Hours)

Semester

Course

Title

Credit Hours

First

EDUC 6040

Foundation in Curriculum

3

Summer I

and Instruction

EDUC 5000

Summer Field Experience

3

First EDUC 6020

Summer II

Educational Technology

Fall EDUC 5060 Secondary/Middle Grades

Exceptional Child

Methods of Teaching and Learning (choose one)
EDUC 5020a Teaching Mathematics in the Middle

and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5021a Teaching Social Studies and History

in the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5022a Teaching Science in the Middle

and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5023a Teaching English Language Arts in

the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5700a Internship I (formal observations)

Interim EDUC 5040 Affirming Diversity

Spring Methods of Teaching and Learning (choose one)

EDUC 5020b Teaching Mathematics in the

Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 502 1 b Teaching Social Studies and History

in the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5022b Teaching Science in the

Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5023b Teaching English Language Arts in

the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5700b Internship II (formal observations)

Second
Summer I

EDUC 6030 Problems of Reading

Second EDUC 6010 Assessment and Accountability 3

Summer II

Total Credit Hours 39

44

Program Course Plan Master of Arts in Teaching
Middle Grades (39 Credit Hours)

Semester

First
Summer I

Course Title

EDUC 6040 Foundation in Curriculum

and Instruction
EDUC 5000 Summer Field Experience

Credit Hours

3

First EDUC 6020

Summer II

Educational Technology

Fall EDUC 5060 Secondary/Middle Grades

Exceptional Child
Methods of Teaching and Learning
(choose one concentration area)

EDUC 5020a Teaching Mathematics in the Middle

and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5021a Teaching Social Studies and History

in the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5022a Teaching Science in the Middle

and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5023a Teaching English Language Arts in

the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5700a Internship I (formal observations)

Interim EDUC 5040 Affirming Diversity

Spring

Second
Summer I

Methods of Teaching and Learning
(choose second concentration area)

EDUC 5020b Teaching Mathematics in the

Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5021b Teaching Social Studies and History

in the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5022b Teaching Science in the

Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5023b Teaching English Language Arts in

the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5700b Internship II (formal observations)

EDUC 6030 Problems of Reading

Second EDUC 6010 Assessment and Accountability 3

Summer II

Total Credit Hours 39

45

Program Course Plan - Master of Arts in Teaching
with a Concentration in Reading for Middle Grades
(42 Credit Hours)

A Master of Arts in Teaching with a Concentration in Reading is offered
for candidates who desire an additional concentration area in reading. The
Master of Arts in Teaching with a Concentration in Reading may also be
required if the Chair of the Education Department determines that an
additional concentration area in reading is necessary for candidates seeking
middle grades certification standards.

The reading concentration for middle grades consists of five courses for a
total of fifteen semester hours. The courses are based on the standards for
classroom teachers of reading published by the International Reading
Association, GAPSC standards, and GACE standards and reflect current
scientific based research from the National Reading Panel. The coursework
focuses on reading theories, assessment, adolescent literature, materials,
problems in reading, multicultural literature, curriculum, and strategies for
addressing the needs of diverse learners. Upon completion of the reading
concentration, candidates should be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge of a wide range of instructional strategies to
accommodate the needs of all students;

Select instructional materials on the basis of students' reading levels,
interests, and cultural backgrounds;

Administer and analyze data from informal literacy assessments to
identify students' strengths and problem areas; link assessment and
instruction;

Understand and apply theories of reading and the reading and writing
process;

Implement literacy strategies across the curriculum;

Influence students to become lifelong readers;

Reflect critically on teaching experiences and adapt literacy instruction
for all learners.

The five courses for the reading concentration are as follows:

EDUC 5050 Affirming Diversity: Teaching Reading

for Success in Changing Times 3

EDUC 5070 Assessing and Improving Literacy 3

EDUC 5080 Essentials of Adolescent Literature 3

EDUC 5090 Foundations of Reading Theories 3

EDUC 6030 Problems in Reading 3

46

Semester Course Title Credit Hours

First EDUC 6040 Foundation in Curriculum 3

Summer I and Instruction (after 90 credit hrs.)

EDUC 5000 Summer Field Experience 3

First EDUC 6020

Summer II

Educational Technology

Fall EDUC 5060 Secondary/Middle Grades 3

Exceptional Child

Methods of Teaching and Learning 3

(choose one concentration area)

EDUC 5020a Teaching Mathematics in the Middle

and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5021a Teaching Social Studies and History

in the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5022a Teaching Science in the Middle

and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5023a Teaching English Language Arts in

the Middle and Secondary Grades
EDUC 5700a Internship I (formal observations) 4

Interim EDUC 5050 Affirming Diversity: Teaching 3

Reading for Success in Changing
Times

Spring EDUC 5090 Foundations of Reading Theories 3

EDUC 5700b Internship II (formal observations) 8

Second
Summer I

EDUC 6030 Problems of Reading

Second EDUC 5070 Assessing and Improving Literacy 3
Summer II EDUC 5080 Essentials of Adolescent Literature 3
Total Credit Hours 42

47

Master of Education in
Curriculum and Instruction

Mission of the Department of Education

The Master of Education program in Curriculum and Instruction prepares
master teachers who use and produce research for instructional
improvement and to make informed curriculum decisions school-wide.

Admission Requirements

Candidates apply for admission to the M.Ed, program through the
Education Department. At the time of admission, all candidates are
advised by the Chair of the Education Department. There are two course
plans available for M.Ed, candidates: a 14 month and a 23 month plan. The
Education Department will maintain records of admission and supporting
documents, a checklist of entry requirements, and candidacy status.

Before an applicant can be admitted as a regular candidate qualifying for
financial aid, the college must have received copies of official
undergraduate transcripts, GRE or M.A.T. scores (if required), three letters
of recommendation from supervisors, fellow teachers, parents of former
students or others who can attest to the candidate's potential in the
program, and other information required of the applicant by the Education
Department. The candidate should have a cumulative undergraduate GPA
of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale or higher or a GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 semester
hours. If an applicant does not have a 2.75 GPA or higher at the time of
admission, she or he is required to take the GRE or MAT within the first
1 2 credit hours of the program. Test scores must not be more than five
years old.

Program specific requirements:

Candidates are required to maintain a 3.0 grade point average;

Have a successful interview with the Department Chair;

Hold a current or renewable teaching certificate;

Must hold an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or
university;

Earn a minimum score on the TOEFL exam of at least 550 if English
is not the applicant's primary language;

Verify that no criminal record or discharge from the armed services
will prevent continuing teacher certification;

Present a completed application.

48

Conditional Admission

If one or more of the admission requirements is not completed, candidates
may be admitted on a conditional basis. The candidate must remove the
conditional status within 12 semester hours of coursework. Failure to do so
will result in being dropped from the program.

Graduation Requirements

All candidates shall successfully complete 30 hours of coursework with a
3.0 (B) average or better and complete and defend their Graduate Thesis.

The Master of Education program offers candidates a diverse educational
background and prepares them for a future as creative educational leaders.
This program consists of 30 semester hours comprised of ten courses that
can be completed over 14 or 23 months.

14 Month Program Course Plan Master of
Education in Curriculum and Instruction
(30 Credit Hours)

This plan requires five academic semesters to complete, beginning in June
of one year and completing in July of the following year. Courses are to be
taken in the prescribed sequence as listed below. EDUC 6300 Graduate
Thesis Seminar is taken in the exiting second summer session or during the
last semester of academic coursework.
Semester Course Title Credit Hours

First

EDUC 6090

Summer I

EDUC 6035

First

EDUC 6066

Summer II

EDUC 6050

Fall

EDUC 6015

EDUC 6100

Interim

EDUC 6080

Spring

EDUC 6065

EDUC 6200

Second

EDUC 6300

Summer

Total Credit

Research and Thesis Preparation 3

Social Foundations 3

Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3

Historical Perspectives in Education 3

Educational Assessment and Decision 3

Making in the Content Areas

Theories of Constructivist Learning 3

Education of Culturally Diverse

Students in the Content Areas 3

Reading in the Content Areas
Internship in the Content Areas

Graduate Thesis Seminar

Hours

30

49

23 Month Program Course Plan Master of
Education in Curriculum and Instruction
(30 Credit Hours)

This plan requires seven academic semesters to complete. There is more

flexibility in the course plan as to when courses to be taken, although a

prescribed sequence as listed below. EDUC 6300 Graduate Thesis Seminar

is taken in the exiting semester or during the last semester of academic

coursework.

Semester Course Title Credit Hours

First EDUC 6015 Educational Assessment and Decision 3

Fall Making in the Content Areas

Interim EDUC 6080 Education of Culturally Diverse 3

Students in the Content Areas

First
Spring

EDUC 6065 Reading in the Content Areas

First EDUC 6090 Research and Thesis Preparation 3

Summer I EDUC 6035 * Social Foundations 3

First EDUC 6066 * Issues in Curriculum and Instruction 3

Summer II EDUC 6050 * Historical Perspectives in Education 3

Second EDUC 6100 Theories of Constructivist Learning 3
Fall

Second EDUC 6200 Internship in the Content Areas 3
Spring

Second EDUC 6300 Graduate Thesis Seminar 3
Summer

Total Credit Hours

30

* these courses can be taken either in the first summer or the second
summer

50

Education Specialist (Ed.S.) in
Curriculum and Instruction

Mission of the Department of Education

The LaGrange College Education Specialist Program is designed for
experienced teachers who desire to increase their content knowledge,
improve their teaching skills and become teacher leaders in schools.
Through an international comparative education perspective, candidates
learn how countries around the globe teach their children.

Admission Requirements

A graduate degree in education from an accredited institution and level 5
certification;

A cumulative minimum graduate GPA of 3.0;

Target composite GRE score of at least 900 or a target MAT score of 388.
Applicants with a score less than suggested target score will be subject to
review by the Education Faculty;

Three letters of recommendation from individuals knowledgeable of your
professional and academic abilities; one of the three recommendations
must be submitted by your most recent principal;

Vitae listing education and employment history. Applicants must have
three years public/ private school experience with clear-renewable
certification;

Successful interview with department chair.

Conditional Admission

If one or more of the admission requirements is not completed, candidates
may be admitted on a conditional basis. The candidate must remove the
conditional status within 12 semester hours of coursework. Failure to do so
will result in being dropped from the program.

Graduation Requirements

All candidates shall successfully complete 30 hours of coursework with a
3.0 (B) average or better and complete and defend their Ed.S. Graduate
Project.

51

Program Course Plans Education Specialist in
Curriculum and Instruction (30 Credit Hours)

The Education Specialist program offers candidates a diverse educational
background that meets five specific teacher leader curricular objectives:

Provide for the advanced knowledge in classroom, departmental and
school-wide assessment.

Extend the candidate's content knowledge.

Prepare candidates as inquiry-based teacher leaders through an
extensive faculty reviewed action research graduate project that
prepares them to affect instructional and school improvements as well
as the acquisition of skills necessary for future doctoral work.

Increase pedagogical knowledge and skills.

Promote dispositions that result in observable professional behaviors
such as effective peer collaboration and teacher leadership qualities.

Two cohorts are offered one beginning in the summer and one in the fall.

Cohort Starting in the Summer

Semester Course Title

First
Summer I

EDUC 7090
EDUC 7035

Research Methods
Leadership in Curriculum
and Instruction

Credit Hours

3
3

First
Summer II

EDUC 7050

Comparative Education I

3

Fall

EDUC 7100
EDUC 7080

Research Topics and Methodology
Theories and Models of Leadership

3
3

Interim

EDUC 7070

Internship in Leadership in
Curriculum and Instruction

3

Spring

EDUC 7015
EDUC 7200

Management and Analysis
of Educational Data
Directed Research Seminar

3
3

Second EDUC 7060 Comparative Education II
Summer EDUC 7300 Specialist Project Seminar

Total Credit Hours

30

52

Cohort Starting in the Fall

Semester Course Title

First EDUC 7080 Theories and Models of Leadership

Fall

Credit Hours

3

First
Spring

EDUC 7015

Management and Analysis
of Educational Data

3

First
Summer I

EDUC 7035
EDUC 7090

Leadership in Curriculum
and Instruction
Research Methods

3
3

First
Summer II

EDUC 7050

Comparative Education I

3

Second
Fall

EDUC 7100

Research Topics and Methodology

3

Interim

EDUC 7070

Internship in Leadership in
Curriculum and Instruction

3

Second
Spring

EDUC 7200

Directed Research Seminar

3

Second
Summer

EDUC 7060
EDUC 7300

Comparative Education II
Specialist Project Seminar

3
3

Total Credit Hours

30

53

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EDUC 5000 Summer Field Experience (3) Summer

Taken in the first summer of the program, this course centers on the basics
of classroom instruction and management to prepare the M.A.T. candidate
for teaching in the middle schools. Instruction is delivered through small
group seminars led by the professor to prepare M.A.T. candidates to assist
master classroom teachers in the instruction of 4-8 grade-aged students in a
three week summer field experience operated by the college for area
children. The objectives for the course are for the candidate to show
positive dispositions for teaching as well as provide evidence of a
classroom instructional and management plan supported by best teaching
practices. Beginning with lesson planning evaluations, middle grades
candidates will have supervised field experiences teaching 4-5 grade-aged
children, whereas high school candidates will have supervisedfield
experiences teaching 6-8 grade-aged children.

EDUC 5020 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle and Secondary
Grades (3) Fall and Spring

This course explores what mathematics content is necessary to know, what
methods are available to teach mathematics , how to create healthy
classroom environments conducive to high levels of academic achievement
and how to design and create instructional experiences based on
mathematics content and curriculum, students learning environments and
assessment. This course consists of two parts each of which are weighted
at 1.5 semester hours. Both the content part and the pedagogical part of the
course must be passed with a "C-" or above to receive 3 semester hours of
credit. If both portions are not passed with a "C-" or above, candidates will
have to reenroll for 1 .5 semester hours for the part that they failed.

EDUC 5021 Teaching Social Studies and History in the Middle and
Secondary Grades (3) Fall and Spring

This course explores what social studies and history content is necessary to
know, what methods are available to teach social studies and history, how
to create healthy classroom environments conducive to high levels of
academic achievement and how to design and create instructional
experiences based on social studies and history content and curriculum,
students learning environments and assessment. This course consists of two
parts each of which are weighted at 1 .5 semester hours. Both the content

54

part and the pedagogical part of the course must be passed with a "C-" or
above to receive 3 semester hours of credit. If both portions are not passed
with a "C- M or above, candidates will have to reenroll for 1 .5 semester
hours for the part that they failed.

EDUC 5022 Teaching Science in the Middle and Secondary
Grades (3) Fall and Spring

This course explores what science content is necessary to know, what
methods are available to teach science, how to create healthy classroom
environments conducive to high levels of academic achievement and how
to design and create instructional experiences based on science content and
curriculum, students learning environments and assessment. This course
consists of two parts each of which are weighted at 1 .5 semester
hours. Both the content part and the pedagogical part of the course must be
passed with a "C-" or above to receive 3 semester hours of credit. If both
portions are not passed with a "C-" or above, candidates will have to
reenroll for 1 .5 semester hours for the part that they failed.

EDUC 5023 Teaching English Language Arts in the Middle and
Secondary Grades (3) Fall and Spring

This course explores what English language arts content is necessary to
know, what methods are available to teach English language arts, how to
create healthy classroom environments conducive to high levels of
academic achievement and how to design and create instructional
experiences based on English language arts content and curriculum,
students learning environments and assessment. This course consists of two
parts each of which are weighted at 1 .5 semester hours. Both the content
part and the pedagogical part of the course must be passed with a "C-" or
above to receive 3 semester hours of credit. If both portions are not passed
with a "C-" or above, candidates will have to reenroll for 1 .5 semester
hours for the part that they failed.

EDUC 5040 Affirming Diversity in the Classroom (3)

Candidates will read and discuss articles and critiques by scholars who are
concerned with issues of equity, social justice, community and
responsibility in a democratic, multicultural society. Because teachers are
advocates for curriculum, instruction, learning environments and
opportunities that support the diverse needs of and high expectations for all
students, an emphasis will be given to the implementation of multicultural
teaching in the classroom. This course will encourage teachers to think
theoretically about their practice and learn from experience through
contemplation of how the research in multicultural education relates to the
classroom today.

55

EDUC 5050 Affirming Diversity in the Classroom: Teaching
Reading for Success in Changing Times (3)

This course is designed to enhance candidates' knowledge of the culture of
American ethnic minorities and changing global societies. Emphasis will
be on rethinking curriculum from multiple perspectives with special focus
on reading instruction.

EDUC 5060 Students with Special Needs (3)

A study of identification and diagnostic techniques for secondary teachers
as related to areas of exceptionality among students, alternative styles of
teaching to meet special needs, and related legal issues.

EDUC 5070 Assessing and Improving Literacy (3)

Assessing and Improving Literacy in the Middle Grades will focus on the
identification and correction of reading problems in middles grades
students. Special attention will be given to formal and informal assessment
as well as teaching materials and strategies for intervention. A variety of
assessment techniques and technology sources will be incorporated
throughout the course.

EDUC 5080 Essentials of Adolescent Literature (3)

Essentials of Adolescent Literature is designed to increase students'
understanding of various genres of literature, elements of fiction, literary
devices, and organizational structures of informational texts. Candidates
will learn to select books for instruction, pleasure, and enrichment of the
curriculum. This course explores a variety of effective methods for sharing
and responding to literature and includes a study of multicultural and
international literature and ways to connect adolescents of all cultures to
literature.

EDUC 5090 Foundations of Reading Theories (3)

Foundations of Reading Theories explores the psychological, sociological,
and linguistic foundations of reading and writing as a communication
system and as a learned behavior. This course includes a study of recent
reading research and the histories of reading. Candidates will understand
the theories behind the reading process and how reading research
influences teaching.

EDUC 5700 Internship I (4) and II (8)

Student Teaching is a full semester (13 week) internship in specific middle
and high schools with pre-service teachers gradually assuming total
responsibility for the class. They are evaluated through a rigorous
performance-based assessment process based on national standards. They

56

will participate in classroom teaching and observation, planning and
evaluation conferences, and other school-related experiences with guidance
provided by the cooperating teachers and college supervisor. Several
seminars will be held in conjunction with these experiences and will
address a variety of topics. Portfolio elements required.
Pre-requisite: Proof of SP AGE liability insurance.

EDUC 6010 Assessment and Accountability (3)

This course is designed to acquaint candidates with the basic principles of
assessing learning using different techniques and strategies. Among the
areas addressed will be theory, methods, standardized tests, and
fundamental statistical concepts. In addition, candidates will study testing,
grading, ethical considerations, and current issues in educational
assessment

EDUC 6015 Educational Assessment and Decision Making (3)

To enable teachers to become competent instructional leaders through the
analysis and use of data about their classrooms and schools, this course
expands teachers' knowledge and skills in assessment techniques for all
students. By conducting and using research and through varied
assignments, teachers will be prepared to improve instruction using varied
assessment techniques and data-driven decision making.

EDUC 6020 Educational Technology (3)

Educational Technology is offered to graduate middle and secondary
M.A.T. majors during the summer semesters. This course will meet the
expected performances found in the Georgia Technology Standards for
Educators. It is designed to teach Global Communication Skills,
Application Skills and Integrative Strategies. All candidates will be
responsible for designing a professional web site and electronic portfolio
that will contain evidence of their expertise in classroom technology. The
evidence will be aligned with the Georgia Technology Standards.

EDUC 6030 Problems in Reading (3)

A study of reading problems encountered in public education. This course
addresses reading skill development in special populations including those
with limited English abilities, problems in content reading assignments,
and non-readers in elementary, middle, and secondary school settings.
Special attention is given to developing strategies for teaching reading and
writing to readers at various skill levels. Candidates will develop resources
for effective teaching based on the Georgia Performance Standards and
standards from IRA and NCTE.

57

EDUC 6035 Social Foundations (3)

This course engages the candidate in a comprehensive investigation of the
social forces that affect schools and communities. In combination with
research found in the field of education, social foundations relies on an
interdisciplinary approach where knowledge from history, philosophy,
sociology, anthropology, cultural studies and political science are studied
to develop interpretive, normative, and critical perspectives on education.

EDUC 6040 Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction (3)

This course provides candidates with an overview of the theories and
models that have shaped the way curricula have developed and the way
processes, tools, and applications affect instructional practices. The course
examines current educational issues that continue to shape curriculum and
instruction in our schools.

EDUC 6050 Historical Perspectives in Education (3)

From local histories and the beginnings of the American school to
contemporary events, EDUC 6050 Historical Perspectives of Education is a
multi-perspective journey through our collective pasts. This course
illuminates our present by using a historical lens to explain why
educational practices are as they are today.

EDUC 6065 Reading in the Content Areas (3)

This course addresses why literacy matters, evidence-based best practices,
RTI, new literacies, culturally responsive teaching in diverse classrooms,
instruction for content literacy, writing across the curriculum, and learning
with trade books.

EDUC 6066 Issues in Curriculum and Instruction (3)

Explores issues in curriculum and instruction from an educational literature
perspective. Candidates will investigate curriculum theory, development,
implementation, and evaluation as well as local and national standards.
Candidates will utilize texts and professional journals to become
knowledgeable practitioners with regard to curriculum and instruction.

EDUC 6080 Education of Culturally Diverse Students (3)

By increasing an understanding of the students they teach, teachers will
enhance their skills in developing engaging and culturally sensitive
curriculum for diverse students through the use of a repertoire of
instructional strategies that are appropriate for diverse learners to become
contributing members of learning communities.

58

EDUC 6090 Research and Thesis Preparation (3)

This course focuses upon theory, methods, and basics of educational
research. Candidates explore the inquiry process, fundamental statistics,
and consider issues of reliability and validity. Use of Galileo, references
and resources, statement of a problem, expression of hypotheses, research
design, organizing the review of literature, gathering data, basic statistical
analysis of data, reporting and discussing findings, and drawing
conclusions are components of the course. Candidates will consider
research opportunities for their Graduate Thesis.

EDUC 6100 Theories of Constructivist Learning (3)

This course explores scholarship that centers on the developmental, social
and cultural constructivist theories in educational practice. In addition to
the development of the methodology chapter, candidates will use
scholarship in constructivism to complete the theoretical framework and
literature review portions of the thesis. Pre-requisite: EDUC 6090.

EDUC 6200 Internship in the Content Areas (3)

Designed to meet individual needs of the graduate student who is preparing
his/her thesis. Pre-requisite: EDUC 6100.

EDUC 6300 Graduate Thesis Seminar (3)

Working under the guidance of the candidate's advisor, this course is taken
during the semester in which the candidate plans to defend her/his thesis.
Pre-requisite: EDUC 6200.

EDUC 7015 Management and Analysis of Educational Data (3)

This course explores current methods for collecting, organizing,
synthesizing, analyzing, and reporting data derived from sources at the
classroom, school, and district level. Emphasis will be placed on methods
of disaggregating data and the application of basic descriptive and
inferential statistics. Candidates will use data for decision-making purposes
to plan for a data driven framework for learning communities. The
candidate will investigate instructional strategies needed to close the
achievement gap for diverse populations in the United States. International
assessments will also be analyzed and critically reviewed.

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EDUC 7035 Leadership in Curriculum and Instruction (3)

This course is designed to strengthen and enhance competency levels for
candidates to serve as classroom teacher leaders. The course is designed to
provide candidates with knowledge of factors and processes related to
teacher leadership roles within schools. Topics such as mentoring, peer
coaching, community relations, organizational change, and advocacy will
be addressed. Candidates will be introduced to Team Based Improvement
techniques as advocated by Georgia's Leadership Institute for School
Improvement (GLISI).

EDUC 7050 Comparative Education I (3)

Through a national and international comparative education perspective,
candidates learn how other geographical regions in the United States and
countries around the globe teach their children subject content. Through a
holistic comparative study of different backgrounds, ethnicities and
languages, candidates will learn to consider many contextual factors that
influence instructional delivery. Candidates prepare and defend a thorough
bibliography of international and US literature resources that can be used in
the graduate project.

EDUC 7060 Comparative Education II (3)

This is a researched base course in which candidates are challenged to
critically evaluate educational systems, traditions and policy in other
nations and compare those systems to practices in the United States. Travel
outside of the United States may be a part of the course.

EDUC 7070 Internship in Leadership in Curriculum and
Instruction (3)

This course focuses on the development of applicable knowledge, skills
and dispositions that teacher leaders must possess for successful school
improvement. Students will work under the supervision of a field mentor
within the local school or system that agrees to assist the student with
conceptualizing and completing their field experience. The basis for this
course is performance based assignments which integrate student
knowledge, skills and dispositions with applicable issues and problems in
their school or system. Assignments will demonstrate that candidates show
proficiency in Georgia's standards for Teacher Leaders and best practices.

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EDUC 7080 Theories and Models of Leadership (3)

This course examines both classic and contemporary theories and models
of leadership. Candidates will analyze various perspectives, assumptions,
strengths, and weaknesses of leadership theories. Candidates will research
the connection between theory and practice in leadership settings.

EDUC 7090 Research Methods (3)

This course focuses upon theory, methods, and advanced assessment skills
required for educational research. To acquire the requisite skills for
subsequent original research, candidates will be able to apply those
qualitative and quantitative methods necessary to conduct, analyze and
evaluate program assessments. Demonstrated knowledge of descriptive and
fundamental inferential statistics and proficiency in the use of validity and
reliability concepts and measurements is expected. Satisfactory completion
of the Graduate Project's introductory chapter is required.

EDUC 7100 Research Topics and Methodology (3)

This course requires an extensive literature review of content, international
and domestic pedagogical practices and organizational change theory.
Following the literature review, the completion of the first four subsections
of the methodology chapter for the graduate project is also expected.
Specific instruction is given for conducting, analyzing and evaluating
qualitative data gathered through interview methodology. P re-requisite:
EDUC 7090.

EDUC 7200 Directed Research Seminar (3)

Directed Research Seminar is designed to meet individual needs of the
education specialist candidate to prepare for collecting and reporting on
his/her project's data. Final completion of the methodology chapter of the
Graduate Project is satisfied in this course through a discussion of validity
and reliability variables as well as a section that describes how results will
be analyzed and discussed. Data collection instruments and informed
consent letters will be designed. The candidate's fieldwork is typically
conducted at this time. All requisite permissions will be secured prior to
conducting research. P re-requisite: EDUC 7100.

EDUC 7300 Specialist Project Seminar (3)

Working under the guidance of the candidate's advisor, this course is taken
during the semester in which the candidate plans to defend her/his project.
The Graduate Project in its entirety is analyzed, evaluated and thoroughly
edited in this course. An oral defense of the candidate's project is required
to satisfy the research component of the specialist program. Pre-requisite:
EDUC 7200.

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GRADUATE FACULTY

Department of Education

Becky Alexander (2010)

Assistant Professor of Education;

B.S., Florida State University;

M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth University;

Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Ethyl Ault

Instructor of Education;

B.S., Georgia State University; M.S., Georgia State University;

Ed.S., Georgia State University

David Cason (2008)

Assistant Professor of Education;

A.A., Gordon College; B.A., LaGrange College;

M.S.Ed., Troy State University; Ph.D., Georgia State University

Joyce Hillyer-Nowakowski (1995)

Professor of Education;

B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Auburn University

Don Livingston (2001)

Associate Professor of Education;

B.S., Drexel University; M.Ed., West Chester University;

Ed.D., Georgia Southern University

Sharon Livingston (2006)

Assistant Professor of Education and Director of Assessment;
B.S., Drexel University; M.S. A., West Chester University;
Ph.D., Georgia State University

Vickie T. Pheil (2007)

Director of Field Placement of Education;
B.A., M.Ed., LaGrange College

Eric Rauch (2011)

Assistant Professor of Education;

B.A., Cornell University;

M.S.Ed., M.S. Reading, Ph.D., Hofstra University

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Margie Yates (2005)

Associate Professor of Education; Chair, Education Department;
B.S., University of Georgia; M.Ed., Columbus College;
Ph.D., Auburn University

Content Faculty and Advisors

Joseph J. Cafaro (1984)

Professor of History;

A.A., Manatee Junior College; B.A., Florida Atlantic University;

M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University

Lisa Crutchfield (2008)

Assistant Professor of History;

B.A., James Madison University; M.A., University of Georgia;

Ph.D., College of William and Mary

Joshua Van Lieu (2011)

Assistant Professor of History;

B.A. , Vassar College; M.A. (geography), University of Kentucky;

M.A. (international studies), Ph.D. (history), University of

Washington

Sarah Beth Mallory (1993)

Professor of Biology, Director of the Interim Term and Core

Curriculum; Chair, Biology Department;

B.S., M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Auburn University

Laine Allison Scott (1998)

Professor of English;

B.A., The College of William & Mary; M.A., Middlebury College;

M.A., Salisbury State University; Ph.D., University of Alabama

Kevin L. Shirley (1998)

Associate Professor of History; Chair, Division of Humanities and

Social Sciences;

B.A., M.A. (history), M.A. (religion), Ph.D., Florida State

University

Carol M. Yin (1991-1994, 1996)

Associate Professor of Mathematics;
B.S., M.A.M., Ph.D., Auburn University

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EARN

LAGRANGE COLLEGE

Summer Camp

for rising 5th -8th graders

June 11th June 29th

Contact
Lindsey Lingenfelter @

706-880-8087
for more information!

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Locations