Annual message to city council of Hon. Wallace J. Pierpont, mayor, on the finances and improvements of 1917 together with the reports of the city officers of the city of Savannah, Georgia year ending December 31, 1917

Collection:
Annual Reports of the Mayor of Savannah, Georgia, 1855-1923
Title:
Annual message to city council of Hon. Wallace J. Pierpont, mayor, on the finances and improvements of 1917 together with the reports of the city officers of the city of Savannah, Georgia year ending December 31, 1917
Creator:
Savannah (Ga.). Mayor
Contributor to Resource:
Pierpont, Wallace J.
Date of Original:
1917
Subject:
Savannah (Ga.)--Politics and government--Periodicals
Savannah (Ga.). Mayor
Location:
United States, Georgia, Chatham County, Savannah, 32.08354, -81.09983
Medium:
annual reports
Type:
Text
Format:
application/pdf
Metadata URL:
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/id:dlg_zmos_1917
Digital Object URL:
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/savannahmayor/pdf/1917.pdf
Holding Institution:
University of Georgia. Libraries
Rights:
Rights Statement information

ANNUAL MESSAGE
TO
CITY COUNCIL
OF
HON. WALLACE J. PIERPONT
MAYOR
ON THE
FINANCES AND IMPROVEMENTS OF 1917
TOGETHER WITH THE
REPORTS OF THE CITY OFFICERS
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1917
OFFICIALS OF THE CITY FOR 1917
REPORTS OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS
BUDGETS FOR 1917
ORDINANCES PASSED DURING 1917
STATE LAWS RELATING TO SAVANNAH ENACTED 1917
:IM- LITHOMIM^H Ik MHTTIM CO.
UVANHAH. (A.
: -.
.:
INDEX
Acts of Georgia Legislature 1917, 35-42
Act of Legislature Recreation Commission............ 38-42
Arrests for Year 1917...........-. 187
Arrests for 1917, Causes of......... 182-186
Assets and Liabilities of City, Dec. 31, 1916... 45-46
Bacteriologist's Report, Extracts from......... 351-369
Bonaventure Cemetery, Report of............................ 317-318
Budget for 1917...... 20-23
Building Inspector, Report of.................................... 270-271
Chief Engineer, Report of 203-252
City Attorney's Report......................................... 253-261
City Officers for 1917............ 18-19
Cleaning Streets and Lanes, Report on.. 210-216
Commissions for 1917......... 12-14
Committees of Council for 1917................................ 15-17
Comptroller's Report........................ 43-136
Deaths in 1917....-.- 370-376
Dispensary, Report of City.. 341-345
Electrical Examiners, Report of Board of... 156
Electrical Inspector's Report............................ 149-151
Electrician, Report of City.................................. 151-155
Engineer, Report of Chief....... 203-252
Fire Alarms for 1917._............ 154-170
Fire Department, Report of Chief of. 137-174
Fire Department, Report of Supt. of Machinery 161-162
INDEXContinued
Fires During 1917............................ 163-169
Fire Inspector, Report of Chief.................................. 158-161
Food Inspector...................................................... 331-337
Gamewell System, Report of.................................... 179-198
Harbors and Wharves, Report on._....................... 225-226
Harbor Master, Report of.......................................... 262-263
Health Officer, Report of............................. 325-380
Hospitals, Reports of........................................... 346-350
Laurel Grove Cemetery, Report of.......................... 319-321
Marshal, .Report of City............................................ 272-275
Mayor and Aldermen for 1917-.......................... 11
Mayor's Message Reviewing Operations for 1917.. 25-33
Moving Picture Operators Report............................ 157
Park and Tree Commission, Report of.................... 301-316
Paving, Report on New Street.................................. 222-225
Pawnbrokers' Pledges.................................................. 197
Physicians, Reports of City........................................ 338-340
Police Court Cases, Disposition of..... 181-189
Police Court Fines......._......................................... 187
Police Matron's Report.............................................. 181
Police, Report of Chief of.......................................... 175-201
Property Recovered by Police.................................... 194
Public Library, Report of.__................................... 277-296
Public Library (Colored Ckngu>i; Report of.... 297-299
INDEXContinued
Sanitary Commision, Board of.................................. 325-330
Sanitary and Storm Water Sewers, Maintenance of 215
Sanitary and Storm Water System, Extension of 227-235
Sinking Fund Commission, Report of...................... 268-269
Tax Assessors, Report of............................................ 266-267
Water Mains, Extension of........................................ 227
Water Meters, Report on............................................ 246-252
Water Works Department........................................ 238-252

CITY GOVERNMENT
FOR THE
I YEAR 1917

MAYOR AND ALDERMEN FOR 1917
MAYOR
WALLACE J. PIERPONT
CHAIRMAN OF COUNCIL
Alderman W. H. WEIGHT
VICE-CHAIRMAN OF COUNCIL
Alderman J. C. SLATER
ALDERMEN
J. A. G- CARSON
J. W. DANIEL
S- N. HARRIS
J. E. FOY
H. L. KAYTON
JOSEPH A. LOGAN
H. H. LIVINGSTON
W. A. PIGMAN
E A. M. SCHRODER
J. C. SLATER
W. W. WILLIAMSON
W. H. WRIGHT
COMMISSIONS
PARK AND TREE
P. D. DAFFIN, Chairman, term expires January 1, 1918.
T. H. McMILLAN, term expires January 1, 1920.
R. M. BUTLER, term expires January 1, 1920.
CHARLES S. ELLIS, term expires January 1, 1922.
I. A. SOLOMONS, Secretary, term expires January 1, 1918.
PILOTAGE
J. FLORANCE MINIS, Chairman, term expires February
13, 1918.
JOSEPH HULL, Vice-Chairman, term expires February 13,
1919.
J. A. G. CARSON, appointed January 31, 1917, to fill unexpired term of James M. Barnard, who died at Hyannisport, Mass., August 17, 1916, and whose term would
have expired February 3, 1920.
W. W. WILLIAMSON, term expires February 13, 1921.
VAN B. AVERY, term expires February 13, 1922.
E. A. ARMAND, Secretary, term expires February 13, 1923.
GEO. F. ARMSTRONG, reappointed February 28, 1917, for
term ending February 13, 1924.
COMMISSIONS(Continued)
MASSIE SCHOOL
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT
C. G. BECK W. G. SUTLIVE
RECREATION COMMISSION
W. A. PIGMAN, JOHN W. DANIEL, C. B. GIBSON, J. C.
SLATER, term expires January 1, 1918.
H. L. KAYTON, JOSEPH A. LOGAN, S. N. HARRIS, E. M.
LOKEY, term expires January 1, 1919.
E. A. M. SCHRODER, THOMAS JOHNSON, N. B. F.
CLOSE, WM. H. ROBERTSON, term expires January
1, 1920.
SANITARY COMMISSION
Mayor W. J. PIERPONT, Chairman
Aldermen DANIEL, WILLIAMSON
Citizens: DR. WM. R. DANCY, MR. JOSEPH M.
SOLOMONS, COL BEIRNE GORDON
SINKING FUND
GEORGE J. MILLS, Chairman.
LEOPOLD ADLER JOHN F. PAULSEN
CHARLES G. BELL
(One vacancy, January 1, 1917)
COMMISSIONS(Continued)
BOARD OF MANAGERS FOR PUBLIC LIBRARY
Mayor PIERPONT
Alderman J. A. G. CARSON
Mrs. WALTER S. WILSON, Mrs. P. W. MELDRIM,
Mrs. J. G. SMITH, Miss HORTENSE ORCUTT
Messrs. W. F. McCAULEY, JOHN M. THOMAS,
JOHN L. TRAVIS, J. W- GRIFFITH, THOMAS GAMBLE,
H. W. WITCOVER, J. RANDOLPH ANDERSON
(Chairman, J. RANDOLPH ANDERSON; Vice-Chairman,
H. W. WITCOVER)
BOARD FOR CONSTRUCTION MUNICIPAL
AUDITORIUM
Mayor PIERPONT, Aldermen KAYTON, WILLIAMSON
Messrs. GEORGE M. GADSDEN, FRANK G. BELL,
THOMAS M. HOYNES, M M. HOPKINS
Architect HENRIK WALLIN
STANDING COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL
FOR 1917
ACCOUNTS
Aldermen HARRIS, LIVINGSTON, LOGAN
ASSESSMENTS
Aldermen LOGAN, FOY, DANIEL, PIGMAN, SCHRODER
BOARD OF PURCHASE
Mayor PIERPONT
Aldermen WRIGHT, SLATER
CITY LOTS AND OPENING STREETS
Aldermen SLATER, SCHRODER, PIGMAN
DRAINAGE
Aldermen KAYTON, DANIEL, LOGAN, FOY, SCHRODER
FINANCE
Aldermen WILLIAMSON, CARSON, SLATER, LOGAN,
KAYTON
STANDING COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL 1917
(Continued)
FIRE
Aldermen PIGMAN, SLATER, WILLIAMSON
HARBORS AND WHARVES
Aldermen WILLIAMSON, LOGAN, HARRIS
HEALTH
Aldermen DANIEL, LIVINGSTON, PIGMAN
MARKET
Aldermen LIVINGSTON, HARRIS, SLATER
POLICE
Aldermen SCHRODER, WRIGHT, HARRIS
STREETS AND LANES
Aldermen WRIGHT, HARRIS, PIGMAN, SCHRODER
LOGAN
STANDING COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL 1917
(Continued)
TRADE AND COMMERCE
Aldermen CARSON, WILLIAMSON, DANIEL
WATER
Aldermen KAYTON, WILLIAMSON, SLATER
PENSION BOARD
Aldermen WEIGHT, PIGMAN SCHRODER
Dr. F. WAHL, Examining Physician
PURCHASE BOARD
Mayor PIERPONT
Aldermen WRIGHT, SLATER
Chief Engineer CONANT
CITY OFFICERS 1917
WALLACE J. PIERPONT..............................................Mayor
THOMAS GAMBLE.-....................-.Secretary to the Mayor
THOMAS HALLIGAN...........,.....,..................Clerk of Council
CHAS. V. HERNANDEZ..............Assistant Clerk of Council
B. S. BRYANT..............................................Chief of Police
JAMES H. WOOD, First Lieutenant of Police, Resigned Oct.
8, 1917.
WALTER H. FLEMING............Second Lieutenant of Police
J. F. BERNHARDT....-.....Clerk of the Police Department
C. S. HARDEE..................................................City Treasurer
G- B. PRITCHARD....-..................Assistant City Treasurer
JAMES FURSE........,.--............................................ComptrolIer
E. R- CONANT.......---..............................-Chief Engineer
W. O'D ROCKWELL........................Assistant Chief Engineer
ROBERT J. TRAVIS......................................City Attorney
D. S. ATKINSON.....--.-............--Assistant City Attorney
FRANK WILBY................................Manager Traffic Bureau
CLARENCE GOETTE.....................Director of Playgrounds
GEORGE D. SEMKEN......................................City Marshal
J. H. PAPOT..........................................Deputy City Marshal
DR. L.B.TAYLOR*............................. < White
DR. HOWARD T. EXLEY..._................ )City Physicians
DR.C.C.MIDDLETON...................... ) Colored
DR. F. S. BELCHER.............................. 'City Physicians
GEO. LEWIN....................................................Clerk of Market
E. B. HARTLEY............................Assistant Clerk of Market
THOS. H. LAIRD................................................Harber Master
DR. W. F. BRUNNER.....-................................Health Officer
DR. V. H. BASSETT......................................... Bacteriologist
C- J. MELVIN................................Chief Sanitary Inspector
DR. D. C. GILLES.....-...--.-....-..--Chief Food Inspector
CITY OFFICERS 1917(Continued)
THOMAS F. FLEMING...............................Food Inspector
Inspectors) LEWIS BLISS, C. R. SHOUSE, J. T. WELLS,
of Naval > G. W. ROBINSON, NAT HARRISON, J. E.
Stores I REGISTER, J.F. BLISS and R.B.JEWETT
*Dr. J. E. Morrison acting as substitute in absence Dr.
Taylor in army service.
JOHN R. EASON.......Building Inspector
A. B. LA ROCHE................Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery
J. T. McCORMICK.....Keeper Bonaventure Cemetery
HENRY WILLIS (Colored)...............................:................
............Keeper Colored Section Laurel Grove Cemetery
F. M. HULL..-.........................Port Warden
C. W. TANNER............Plumbing Inspector
JOHN E. SCHWARZ...-.---.-.-.-....-..--.........Recorder
L. A. EAST....Superintendent Scavenger Department
A. P. McFARLAND.Chief Engineer Fire Department
A. J. TOSHACH, Assistant Chief Engineer Fire Department
J. P. FIGG..........................Superintendent Waterworks
G. NOBLE JONES.-.-.--.--..-.-.Chairman Tax Assessors
HENRY M. WARD................._.....
JOSEPH M. BREYER, Resigned Dec. 5 ' TaX Assessors
JOHN J. HORRIGAN, Elected Dec. 19.
J. CHRIS WERNTZ.....Custodian City Hall
BUDGET FOR THE YEAR 1917
Operating ExpensesGeneral Government:
Executive and Legislative:
Salaries of Aldermen and salaries and ex-
- penses of offices of Mayor and Clerk of
Council, including publishing of Council Proceedings and of Mayor's Annual
Report.,.........___......_.... $ 21,335.00
Finance and Accounts:
Comptroller's office, salaries and expenses .. $ 7,650.00
Treasurer's office, salaries and expenses__ 8,170.00 15,820.00
Assessment of Taxes:
Tax Assessor's office, salaries and expenses.. 6.220.00
Marshal's Office:
Salaries and expenses.................... 6,000.00
Law Department:
Salariesand expenses..............._.. 10,000.00
Municipal Building:
Salaries and expenses of custodian and assistants, and fuel, lights, elevator operation
and other expenses of city hall building, ining clock expense...................... 6,840.00
Police Court:
Salaries of Recorder and of Clerk and other
expenses...._.____.............. 3,610.00
Pensions:
Police department__.___________ $ 6,176.16
Fire department______________ 4,110.00
Health department. _____._______ 810.00
Highway and Sanitation departments.----- 4,5QO.OO
Widows and orphans, Police and Fire departments._________________ 1,488.00
Various departments___...____..__ 1,600.00 $ 18,684.16
Municipal Court:
Salaries and expenses.---...-.-.--.-.-,.- 11,085.00
Freight Traffic Bureau:
Salaries and expenses..------------------ 7,500.00
Miscellaneous:
Salary and expenses of building inspector.... 1,855.00
Salary of keeper of powder magazine__... 300.00 2,155.00
Total general government ------- _ $109,249.16
BUDGET FOR THE YEAR 1917Continued
Police Department:
Salaries and expenses, including new uniforms and military reserve .--.-...--.--- 163,944.00
Fire Department:
Salaries and expenses, including new uniforms and chimney sweeping expenses. _ - - . 130,420.00
Board of Health:
Salaries and expenses, office of health officer 31,525.00
Salaries and expenses, bacteriological laboratory....._._..-.._...-....... . 8,262.00 39,787.00
Plumbing Inspection:
Salaries and expenses............___.__ 2,700.00
Sanitation Department:
Salaries and expenses.____.________._.._-._ 158,700.00
Highway Department:
Street Lighting_ ..________.. 48,400.00
Ornamental street post lighting........... 3,300.00
Salaries and expenses....__________ 40,460.00 92,160.00
City Stables and Shops:
Salaries and expenses..........--..--..-. 2,535.00
Harbor and Wharves:
Salaries and expenses...-...-..-...---.-. 3,800.00
Board of Purchase:
Salaries and expenses.-.--.--..---------- 800.00
Waterworks Department:
Salaries and expenses.---.-..------------ 79,593.00
City Market:
Salaries and expenses.-.-_..______..__..__ 7,875.00
Park and Tree Commission:
Baffin Park...--.-......-.-........-..-. $ 2,500.00
Other parks and squares....____-.---_... 15,000.00
Bonaventure Cemetery..--............... 8,000.00
Laurel Grove Cemetery................. 6,500.00
Tree planting..-... .................. 1,000.00 $33,000.00
Recreation Commission:
Salaries and expenses.._............... 14,655.34
Industrial Farm:
City's proportion of expenses............. 2,600.00
Public Libraries:
Savannah Public Library (white)..____. 14,000 00
Carnegie Public Library (colored) ....... 1,350.00 15,350.00
BUDGET FOR THE YEAR 1917Continued
Charities:
Outdoor poor relief-____________ 650.00
Poor in institutions_____________. 1,260.00
Contributions to associations_____... 5,220.00
Contributions to hospitals (white)______ 9,616.66
Contributions to hospitals (colored)....._. 6,550.00
City physicians-._ _ ___________ 3,000.00
City dispensary....----.....-......-.._. 5,099.54
Donations for purpose of tax payments__ 4,000.00 35,396.20
Total Operating Expenses. ..... __ . . $ 892,564.70
Interest on Bonded Indebtedness:
Bonds maturing in 1959_____._____ $104,400.00
Bonds maturing in 1943__________ 9,405.00
Drainage bonds (serial) dated 1914.____ 26,220.94
Auditorium bonds (serial) dated 1914____ 8,769.36
Drainage bonds (serial) dated 1916_...... 17,850.00 166,645.30
Sinking Fund:
Bonds maturing in 1959___________ 32,000.00
Bonds maturing in 1943___________ 2,000.00
Drainage (serial) bonds maturing April 15,
1917....-.-....,..--... ......_.. 7,500.00
Auditorium (serial) bonds maturing October
15, 1917___.............____..... 3,000.00
Drainage (serial) bonds maturing March 1,
1917................................. 4,000.00 48,500.00'
Payment of Obligations:
Principal and interest on advances for the
payment of municipal obligations__.... 20,000.00
Total operating expenses, interest and
other fixed charges-_____..... $1,127.710.00
BUDGET FOR THE YEAR 1917Continued
NEW IMPROVEMENTS, ETC., TO BE MADE IN 1917 TO BE
PASSED ON BY COUNCIL BEFORE EXPENDITURES:
General Government:
New horse and buggy for building inspector.- 325.00
Police Department:
Livestock.__-._ __----. ------- 500.00
Camewell system extensions-------------- 500.00
Motorcycles..........__.________ 600.00 1,600.00
Fire Department:
Fire alarm system (extensions)..--...-.--. $ 1,875.00
Livestock......-..-..--.......-.---.-. 300.00 $ 2,175.00
Health Department
Automobile for Health Officer............. 800.00
Sanitation Department:
Motor chasis for street sprinkler_........ 2,800.00
Automobile for Superintendent (exchanged). 300.00
Drainage, Casey canal.. .--.-.. ---- 25,000.00 28,100.00
City Stables and Shops Department: <
Livestock......._____-._...._ 5,000.00
Power tools (lathe)....__--___-_-..__- 500.00 5,500.00
Highway Department: ,
Automobile for Superintendent (exchanged). 300.00
Opening and grading new streets........_- 26,500.00
Paving streets (city's proportion).......... 31,500.00
Sidewalks and curbing (on city's property).. 1,000.00 59,300.00
Harbor and Wharves Department:
Municipal wharf, upper reaches of Savannah
river..--.-..-.-...--.-.....-.-...-..- 10,000.00
Waterworks Department:
Extension, distribution system..-_---.- 13,500.00
Meters....-..--..--__.-____------- 10,000.00
Automobile truck...____________ 800.00
Improvements to plant__.____ .:..... 30,000.00 54,300.00
Park and Tree Commission:
Extending and renewing mains Bonaventure
Cemetery_________-_-._-__ 400.00
Pavingroads, Bonaventure Cemetery____ 400.00
Paving roads, Laurel Grove Cemetery...- 400.00
Repairs to keeper's residence, Bonaventure
Cemetery......--.-.--------.---.-___ 300.00 1,500.00
Total new improvements, etc._...... $ 163,600.00
Total budget...-.-...........------ 5 1,291,310.00

ANNUAL MESSAGE
OF
WALLACE J. PIERPONT
MAYOR
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
REVIEWING, OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR
1917

ANNUAL MESSAGE OF WALLACE
J. PIERPONT, Mayor.
TO THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, CITY.
Gentlemen:
It is gratifying to report that while the increase in the
city's income in 1917 from its regular sources of revenue was
meager, but $16,641, the financial condition of the municipality at the close of December showed a further substantial
improvement, its indebtedness to the banks having been reduced by $59,000, a slightly larger reduction having been made
in 1916, so that the notes outstanding on Jan. 1, 1918, aggregated $265,000.
This reduction was not made at the expense of the several
departments, all of which were properly maintained in equipment and the efficiency of their working forces. Nor was it by
the further diminution of public betterments, the expenditures
for such improvements in 1917 having been in excess of 1916.
In the main, the ability to reduce the outstanding debt
has been the result of the continued co-operation of the Mayor
and heads of councilmanic committees with the executive
officers of the several departments in close supervision of
expenditures and the elimination of extravagance or waste.
Every effort has been made to limit the.city's forces to
its actual needs, and while it was necessary to increase wages
in a number of instances, in keeping with the general trend
throughout the country during the year, the total payrolls of
the city are found to have been about $11,000 below what they
were during 1916. There is no evidence that the service rendered the people by any department was impaired by this
persistent, careful scrutiny of department expenses and determination to exercise a wise economy in the use of the public
money.
28____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ____
The same policy will be pursued during 1918, but as there
will be a considerable increase in the payrolls, even with the
same or a less number of employees, as well as in the cost of
fuel, feed and other essential supplies, the opportunity to
maintain improvements on the same scale and further reduce
the note indebtedness will not exist.
During 1917 the cost of fuel purchased by the city was
$23,000 more than in 1916, while feed cost nearly $8,000 more,
the consumption in either case being approximately the same.
Other supplies were proportionately more costly than heretofore.
The cost of all supplies for 1918 is more apt to show an
increase than otherwise, and on the basis of increases in pay
already authorized by Council the expenditures for labor,
with no additional employees, will be at least $50,000 greater
than in 1917. The same labor and supplies in 1918 will cost
probably $100,000 more than in 1916.
Citizens generally must appreciate, from their own
personal experiences, the position in which their municipal
government finds itself with its income restricted to its usual
volume and its necessary expenditures so greatly expanded.
Building operations are limited to a minimum, condition
do not justify material increase in tax assessments on the older
properties, the burdens on business cannot be increased, and
with the purchasing power of its income cut down as it has
been the most rigid economy is unavoidable in all municipal
outlays.
The fact must never be lost sight of by our citizens, in
studying the operations of their city government, that
nearly $217,000 of its ordinary income is set aside for the
redemption of bonds and interest. The receipts from taxes
and other regular sources of revenue in 1917 were $1,384,000.
Of this $1,167,000 was available for operations and $59,000
of this was used in reduction of the notes. Of the remaining
$1,102,000 there was expended on betterments $113,181 as
follows:
_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________29
Kayton canal.................................................................... $29,561
Land for drainage......................................................... 1,018
Opening streets............................................................. 19,387
Paving streets (city's portion)........................................ 19,171
Paving streets, materials paid for and on band.......... 10,442
Water mains.-........-......................... 8,82g
Water meters............................. ...........,... 10,402
New wells and conduits.................................... 14,372
The largest part of the money available for betterments
was expended on drainage and water supply, two matters of
most pressing importance.
The drainage work provided for by the bond issue has been
entirely completed, supplemented by the construction of the
Kayton canal which gives a natural drainage to the Granger
Tract and a large outlaying section and is one of the most important drainage works the city has ever undertaken, doing
for a considerable area on the east side what the Fell street
sewer does for the west side and adjacent territory. The city
is now completely supplied with storm and sanitary drainage
trunks, and a large surrounding district, which will probably
speedily develop when the war ceases and in a few years be
brought within the city limits, is also provided for as to surface
drainage. The construction of laterals as occasion arises is
all that is required to meet apparent necessities for many years
to come. In addition to the expenditures from the municipal
treasury, entirely outside of the bond money, for the Kayton
canal, the County Commissioners co-operated in the excavating, the work done by the county forces representing an outlay of approximately $16,000. It is gratifying to acknowledge
the willingness of the county to unite with the city in drainage
operations that redound to the benefit of the city and county
alike.
The water supply has been carefully protected during the
year and earnest efforts made to conserve its use as well as to
increase the volume available at the Gwinnett street station.
30__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT____________
In response to what seemed to be a general demand and
at the instance of civic organizations that called for an election,
the question of a bond issue for the rehabilitation of the water
works plant was presented to the people and lost by an overwhelming vote on Oct. 19- Public opinion apparently does
not justify any further efforts in this direction at this time.
Two new wells were bored giving a combined daily flow of
3,000,000 gallons. It was realized, though, that no matter
how many wells are provided if the waste of water is permitted
to continue the supply cannot be made adequate to permit of
the cutting off of the River station. The experience of other
cities, as well as the necessities of our own, justifies the rapid
expansion of the meter system. During the year 995 meters
were bought and 421 installed, giving a total in use at the
close of December of 773. This is merely a start toward the
complete metering of the city, which sound policy dictates and
the work on which must run over a period of years as labor
conditions now are. The rapid expansion of the city that the
years following the war will bringthe unmistakable signs of
which are now so evidentwill bring an extra strain on our
water supply and the conservation of it by the use of meters
must then be vigorously forced. The enforcement of new
plumbing regulations will also materially assist in this. The
experience of the municipality and individual property owners
during the freezes has shown that more adequate steps are
necessary to prevent a repetition of the waste of water, annoyance to house holders, and menace to health from which so
many suffered. Over ten thousand bursted pipes and an extra
expense on the municipality of $8,000, together with the expense of many thousands of dollars to which property owners
were subjected, furnish an adequate object lesson to support
the efforts to compel precautionary plumbing.
From the report of the health officer it appears that the
health record of Savannah in 1917 compares favorably with
any previous year.
While the preceding year, 1916, showed a lower mortality
it is the only year that has made such an exhibit.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 31
In the latter part of the year an increasing death date
among young children directed attention anew to the fact that
higher cost of milk inevitably exacts a toll of lives among the
babies, the substitution of cheaper and less natural foods resulting in illness that all too frequently terminates in death.
This matter has been viewed from every standpoint by the
Sanitary Commissioners but no solution of the problem is at
hand, the high price of milk being beyond the control of the
municipality. It is regrettable that while Philadelphia, for
instance, secures its milk, at retail, at 12 cents a quart, and
Massachusetts cities have their wants supplied at 13 and 14
cents a quart, Savannah must pay 18 or 20 cents. The fact
that there is a shrinkage in the local dairy business indicates
that it is not one of extreme profits.
Outside of this the conditions affecting health have improved. The sudden growth in population at manufacturing
plants beyond the limits of the city may bring problems,
though, thai will react upon the health of Savannah, and the
county and city should be brought into the closest possible
co-operation in handling health matters. There is abundant
reason to believe that the industrial communities which are
springing up along the river front will be largely permanent
and that their populations will show a remarkable expansion
in coming years. The closest supervision should be maintained over all things affecting their health, and as the city is
directly interested there is ample reason for it to co-operate in
every possible way with the county authorities.
I will not enter into details as to the ordinary operations
of the departments, the full reports of which are worthy of
attention from interested citizens. In the broader matters
of public policy the administration has endeavored at
all times to keep before it the honor and the moral and material
interests of Savannah. The Mayor has felt that in the words
of the Apostle Paul, we are "citizens 6f no mean city," and that
whatever influence and power he is vested with should be used
at all times with that thought in view. Every citizen should
feel that this is "no mean city", that it has glorious traditions
32______ MAJOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
he should seek to uphold at any cost, that it has a wonderful
future to be built on the foundations laid by the forefathers
and the men of to-day, and that those foundations cannot be
made broad and deep and secure unless the principles of truth
and justice and righteousness enter into their composition.
Material welfare cannot be disassociated from moral welfare
and it has been the administration's determination to seek to
promote the one %s well as the other. To that end it has
zealously sought to enforce the statutes of the state directed
at the iniquitous outlawed liquor traffic and has ample reason
to believe that as a result the standards of life have been perceptibly raised and the business interests of the city promoted.
Feeling, too, that any municipality which failed to heartily
co-operate with the national government in all of its measures
for the protection of the army and navy justly deserved the
accusation of being a slacker, it has endeavored to join hands
with the officials at Washington in the campaigns for the
suppression of vice, for the conservation of food, for Liberty
Loans and for every other species of activity in which it could
serve the country and stand as the official representative of a
thoroughly patriotic community.
The auditorium, which was completed during the year,
has served on many occasions as the people's gathering place
for patriotic demonstrations and has become the center of activities that will continue to play an important part in the life
of the community when peace has been restored to the world.
The war has served, as probably no other agency could
have done, to knit our people together, to remove the stigma
of continued division that has marred all public efforts in the
past, and with the exception of that small minority which
allows selfish motives to guide and direct it and hangs like a
brake on the wheels of progress and a check on moral and social
betterment, there has been a wonderful union of Savannahians
in spirit and activities. This sentiment of unity will undoubtedly grow greater this year and next. As long as hostilities
continue our people will find common ties that draw them
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
closer to one another and permit and encourage them to work
effectively in harness. This personal attachment and recognition of common duties and common opportunities and intensified desire for helpful public service should not be permitted to lapse with peace, but should be encouraged in every
possible way. A great city, it is said, is the type of some great
idea. Savannah should have as its soul some great idea
around which its people can rally and remain united through
all coming time. Then it can become not only the city of wider
trade connections, of broader commercial relations, of vastly
extended industrial operations, which we all look forward to,
but a city of superior type in all the higher attributes of the
ideal urban life.
Surely we should all cherish thea mbition that this shall
be "no mean city" in coming years, but a city whose character
not only for beauty and wealth and culture, butf or integrity,
for honor, for cleanness of life and elevation of ideals, shall give
it a peculiar luster and an unique position among the municpalities of America.
There should be no standard too high for Savannah.
Respectfully submitted,
WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor.

ACTS
OF THE
GEORGIA LEGISLATURE
RELATING TO
THE CITY OF SAVANNAH
ENACTED
1917

SAVANNAH STREET LANE, FOR CLOSING.
No. 42
Georgia Laws 1917, page 860.
An Act to authorize the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah to close and convey to H. H. and William
Lattimore, that lane known as the old Fifty-fourth
Street Lane in the City .f Savannah, extending from
a lane one hundred and fifty feet east of Bull Street
to the McClesky tract, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
State of Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by authority of the
same, that the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah
are hereby authorized and empowered to close and convey by
proper deed that lane known as the old Fifty-fourth Street
Lane, ten (10) feet in width and extending from a lane one
hundred and fifty (150) feet east of Bull Street to the McClesky tract, in consideration of which the said H. H. and
William Lattimore will convey to the said Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah that lane known as the new
Fifty-fourth Street Lane, extending from Bull Street to the
McClesky tract, the same being twenty-two (22) feet in
width, and shown upon a map of same on file in the engineer's
office of the City of Savannah, the same being made by W.
O.'D. Rockwell, assistant chief engineer of the City of
Savannah, on January 12, 1917, and the said Lattimores
shall also convey and additional strip of land nine and four
tenths (9.4) feet in length, extending from Fifty-fourth Street
Lane northwardly, so as to connect the new Fifty-fourth
Street Lane with the lane east of Bull Street, above mentioned.
Section 2. Be it further enacted by authority aforesaid,
that all laws and parts of laws in conflict with this Act be and
the same are hereby repealed.
Approved August 4, 1917.
38__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
SAVANNAH STREET LANE, FOR CLOSING.
No. 38.
Georgia Laws, 1917, page 861.
An Act to authorize the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah to close and abolish that portion of Henry
Street Lane in the City of Savannah, lying between
the western line of Cuyler Street and the Eastern line
. of Magnolia Street; and to authorize and empower
the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah to
vest the fee simple title to said portion of Henry
Stree Lane in any purchaser thereof.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
State of Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of
the same, That the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah are hereby authorized and empowered to close and
abolish that certain portion of Henry Street Lane in the City
of Savannah, lying between the Western line of Culyer Street
and the Eastern line of Magnolia Street, and to vest the title
to said portion of said Henry Street Lane in any purchaser,
his heirs and assigns, upon such consideration as to said Mayor
and Aldermen may seem best.
Section 2. Be it further enacted, That all laws and parts
of laws in conflict with this Act be the same are hereby repealed.
Approved August 4, 1917.
SAVANNAH RECREATION COMMISSION AMENDMENT.
No. 36.
Georgia Laws, 1917 page 862.
An Act to amend the Act of the General Assembly of Georgia,
approved August, 19, 1916, and published in the
Georgia Laws 1916, pages 957 et seq., and entitled
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 39
"An Act to create and organize a recreation commission for the City of Savannah; to define its powers and
jurisdiction; to provide for the appointment and selection of its members; their powers and duties; to define
the duties and qualifications of the superintendent of
recreation and other employees; to provide for the
manner of selection by civil service examination; to
empower said commission to receive and invest
moneys to be used by it; to have police authority,
and for other purposes."
Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
State of Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by the authority
of the same, That section 5 of said Act be amended by striking
therefrom the words, "council shall appropirate annually
funds sufficient for the management and operation of said department, and from time to time such additional funds as
may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this Act," and
inserting in lieu thereof the following words: "The Mayor
and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, at its discretion, may
appropriate annually such funds as it may see fit for the
management and operation of said department and from time
to time such additional funds as the said Mayor and Aldermen
may see fit to carry out the purposes of this Act," so that said
section 5 when so amended shall read as follows: "Section 5.
The commission shall have the power to expend for the purposes enumerated above all sums of money appropriated and
turned over to them by council for such purposes, and shall
have the entire charge and control of the expenditures of
money so appropriated. The Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah, at its discretion, may appropriate annually
such funds as it may see fit for the management and operation
of said department and from time to time such additional
funds as the said Mayor and Aldermen may see fit, to carry
out the purposes of this Act. Council shall make special
appropriation to provide for the management of said department for the period between the passage of this Act and the
day in January for the following year, when its annual ap-
40__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
propriation shall be made. The money appropriated shall he
drawn from the city treasury on warrant of said recreation commission and shall be paid out from time to time for the expense of the department of recreation. The commission shall
apportion the amount so appropriated among the items of its
budget, shall fix the salaries of all employees, including the
superintendent of recreation."
Section 2. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That section 7 of said Act shall be amended as follows:
By striking the word "must", from the eighth line of said
seventh paragraph as published, between the words "examination" and "Be" and inserting in lieu thereof the word "may,"
by striking from the twelth line of the seventh paragraph the
words "folk dancing and music, command of English," by
striking from the seventeenth and nineteenth lines of said
paragraph the words "recreation commissioners shall elect a
superintendent recommended by said board of examiners,"
and inserting in lieu thereof the following: "The commission
may waive the examination of a candidate for re-election who
has previously qualified hereunder;" by striking from the
twentyseventh and twenty-eighth lines of said paragraph the
words, "said employees shall be appointed on recommendation of the board of examiners," by adding to the first paragraph of said section 7 the following: "The tenure of office of
the superintendent of recreation shall be for a like term as
City officials elected by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City
of Savannah, and shall expire contemporaneously with the
term of office of said city officials so elected, subject, however,
to discharge upon charges as herein provided," so that said
section when so amended shall read as follows: "Section 1.
The superintendent shall be selected in the following manner:
The commissioners shall appoint a board of five examiners,
chosen because of recognized training and experience in educational and recreational work, whose duty it shall be to examine
appli cants for the position of superintendent of recreation. Recreat ion commissioners are not disqualified from serving on
this board of examiners. The examination may be both oral
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 41
and written, and must cover a statement of educational
preparation, previous teaching, and recreational experience,
theory and practice of games, atheletics, gymnastics, character,
personality, natural fitness, including moral, mental and physical qualification. Said examination shall be advertised in the
local papers, and in at least two educational or recreational
publications, at least thirty days in advance of the holding of
said examination. The commission may waive the examination of a candidate for re-election who has previously qualified hereunder. Other employees of the recreation commission
shall, before appointment, pass a competitive examination before a board of three examiners appointed by said
commission, one of whom shall be the superintendent of recreation, said examination to cover educational preparation,
playground theory and practice, and personal fitness, or to be
arranged at the discretion of the superintendent along lines
will show fitness for a special position. Wherever possible,
appointments shall be for one year and employees shall be reappointed annually on recommendation of the superintendent, provided, this does not prevent special appointments
which may be found necessary or desirable in conducting
special activities or classes for a limited time. The tenure of the
superintendent of recreation shall be for a like term as City
Officials elected by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, and shall expire contemporaneously with the term
of office of said city officials so elected, subject, however, to
discharge upon charges as herein provided. If no person passes
the examination and becomes eligible for appointment, the
board of examiners shall certify that fact to the commission,
and may in its discretion certify to the commission the name
and address of a person for temporary appointment, with or
without examination; and the commission shall forthwith
appoint said person from day to day, not to exceed sixty
days, pending examination. The board of examiners shall pro
ceed to hold an examination whenever suchtem porary appointment is made. If, after examination is held, no eligible list
results, the commission may the n authorize the continuance
of said temporary appointment, but not otherwise. The same
42__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
method shall be applied in filling vacancies as is provided
above for filling temporary appointments when no eligible list
results from an examination. The markings and examination
papers of each candidate shall be open to his own inspection,
and the markings and examination papers of all persons upon
any list of eligibles shall be open to public inspection within
ten days after an eligible list has been prepared.
Section 3- Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That section 9 of said Act be amended by striking therefrom the following words, "thirty days' notice must be given
before any dismissal takes effect" and also the following
words, "and shall be entitled to thirty days' notice before said
dismissal takes effect," so that said section, when so amended
shall read as follows: "Section 9- The recreation commissioners shall have the right, upon the recommendation of the
superintendent, to dismiss any employee for incompetency or
neglect in the discharge of duty or on charges involving moral
turpitude. The commissioners shall have the right to dismiss
the superintendent for incompetency or neglect in the discharge of duty or on charges involving moral turpitude. Said
Superintendent shall have the right to a hearing before the
commission on the charges preferred."
Section 4. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all Acts and parts of Acts in conflict with this Act
be and the same are hereby repealed.
Approved August 4, 1917.
I
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
COMPTROLLER
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1917
E. R. BANKS
COMPTROLLER

REPORT OF COMPTROLLER.
HON. WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah, Ga.
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1918.
Dear Sir:
I herewith submit the report of the Accounting Department of the City for the year ended December 31, 1917. The financial condition of the City in condensed form is, as follows:
FINANCIAL CONDITION
ASSETS
Current Assets.. .... _ ........--.-
Deferred Assets ............ ... .
Capital Cash Account.. ... .......
Land, Buildings, Permanent Improvements and Equipment _ ...__-
Total...... .-...-
Years Ended December 31
1917
$ 342,147.12
9,426.93
19,974.11
12,156,164.17
$12,527,712.33
1916
$ 303,626.67
5,744.31
336,030.09
11,763,444,21
$12,408,845.28
Incresae
$38,520.45
3,682.62
392,719.96
118,867.05
Decrease
316,055.98
1CO
&
ft
FINANCIAL CONDITIONContinued
LIABILITIES
Current Liabilities .... _ ..........
Deferred Liabilities.... _ ....................
Funded Debt, Less Sinking Fund. .. ...........
Total Liabilities.... ..........................
Excess of Assets Over Liabilities. ... _ ... _ _
Total....................
Years Ended
1917
$ 304,422.70
65,516.94
3,631,000.00
$ 3,990,939.64
8,536,772.69
$12,527,712.33
December 31
1916
$ 356,485.14
56,845.31
3,679,500.00
$ 4,092,830.45
8,316,014.83
$12,408,845.28
Increase
$ 220,757.86
$118,867.05
$52,062.44
1,328.37
48,600.00
$101,890.81
2
I
CO
I
The increases and decreases are shown in detail on the General Balance Sheet Statement, Exhibit A.
The Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the year are shown in the following condensed statement.
For detail of Cash Receipts, see Schedule 1,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 47
OS
E
<
a
a
<x
n
cc
1
w

8
Snijpng
sptmj
3AOJQ
spunj puog
ranwo^tpny
spnn.j
OiOlOO O C OO
OOt^
o r- M *
eof-ri<
CO
IN
os
co
oo
8888
Q
8
ffl
8
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1917.
Balance January 1, 1917 __
Receipts during the year:
Current Fund Receipts
(Sched. No. 1)... ......
Interest on Deposits. . ...
Cemetery Trust Funds. - -
Sinking Fund ... __ _ .
Total Receipts ......
Total- ............
Current
Funds
$ 3,852.69
1,385.421.30
$1,385,421.30
$1,389,273.99
&
51
.HT3TJ
llQflfn
$199,444.57
2,679.82
$ 2,679.82
$202,124.39
Auditorium
Bond Funds
$136,585.52
3,664.21
$ 3,664.21
$140,249.73
Trust Funds Bonaventure
Cemetery
$19,513.12
2,975.00
$ 2,975.00
$22,488.12
Trust FundsLaurel Grove
Cemetery
$ 4,275.00
425.66
$ 425.00
$ 4,700.00
9
31wfi
$33,000.00
48,500.66
$48,500.00
$81,500.00
3
S
$ 398,670.90
1,385,421.30
6,344.03
3,400.00
48,500.00
$1,443,665.33
$1,840,336.23
1
GO
I
g
I
The Income Account for 1917, as compared with the previous year, is stated in condensed form, as follows:
INCOME STATEMENT.
Operating Revenues (Schedule 5). _ .... ._--.-
Additions to Income (Exhibit B) ...-._-_....--
Total -- ..--.
Operating Expenses(Schedule 6) __ .............
Deductions from Income (Exhibit B).. ...... _ _ _ . .
Total ....................
Additions to Property Through Income. ..........
Surplus. --_---.---__--_.
Net Income.. .... _
Deficit.. _ .............
Years Ended December 31
1917
S 1,323,042.60
9,260.32
$ 1,332,302.92
907,323.72
226,463.21
$ 1,133,776.93
$ 198,525.99
111,658.84
S 86,867.15
1916
$
$
S
$
$
1,307,202.59
8,659.61
1,315,862.20
872,443.05
211,142.43
1,083,585.48
232,276.72
146,396.20
85,880.52
Increase
15,840.01
600.71
S 16,440.72
34,880.67
15,310.78
$ 50,191.45
S 986.63
Decrease
$ 33,750.73
34,737.36
I
GO
The total of the pay rolls for the year amounts to 1676,118.54 the distribution of which, by departments, is shown on
the following page.
DISTRIBUTION OF PAY ROLLS.
OPERATING EXPENSES (Pay Rolls Only)
General Government:
Freight Traffic Bureau __ ---..__.---_..._.-.
Police Department. -----------..________._...___
Fire Department ...-...--.-..-........-.......
Board of Health:
Health Department. ., ....................
Bacteriological Laboratory. ...................
Sanitation Department- ._..--.._...............
City Stables and Shope...-..---........ ........
Highway Department _ ..... ...............
Board of Purchase .........................
Plumbing Inspection _ ........................
Water Works Department-..----....-.... ..__--
City Market. ............ .......... .........
Charities:
City Physicians ---------- _ .. _ ........
Dispensary __ ..............................
Savannah Public Library............. ..........
Recreation Department ___ ...................
Years Ended December 31
1917
5 10,645.00
5,577.75
14,778,79
51,907.04
134,736.94
106,709.36
30,011.64
6,407.42
115,850.60
20,008.74
34,009.02
3,012.00
750.00
3,283.08
40,106.54
5,622.75
3,000.00
1,318.50
8,055.16
11,001.70
1916
$ 14,826.00
3,191.67
16,148.91
52,255.75
137,718.20
108,101.46
25,491.41
6,530.00
111,674.14
19,039.92
35,468.50
3,023,25
750.00
1,834.87
40,797.73
5,564.30
3,000.00
1,970.00
2,707.00
12,624.25
Increase
. 2,386.08
4,520.23
4,176.46
968.82
1,448.21
58.45
5,348.16
Decrease
$ 4,181.00
1,370.12
348.71
2,981.26
1,392.10
122.58
1,459.48
11.25
691.19
651.50
1,622.55
REPORT ANNUAL MAYOR'S 50
DISTRIBUTION OF PAY ROLLSContinued
OPERATING EXPENSES (Pay Rolls Only)
Park and Tree Commission:
Baffin Park _______ _..____._-..___._..--
Other Parks and Squares. ........ ............
Bonaventure Cemetary....... _ .... __ ....-
Laurel Grove Cemetary.. .. .................
Tree Planting. ___ ...... ___ . __ .......
MificelLuienufi Items
Total Operating Expenses . . ....--.-.--
Outlays:
Openbg and Grading New Streets.. ......... ..
Placing Street Signs.. _______ ... .......
Extensions Water Mains __ .^....... .........
Miscellaneous Items __ _ ..................
Market Improvements. -.-....-. _ .. .......
Water Works Improvements ..................
Total Outlays ____ .. _ .. ____ ...
Construction in Progress:
Paving Streets.-..--..-..-..-- ...--.--.-
Repairing and Constructing Sidewalks ..........
Storm and Sanitary Drainage. _.-._____..___
Completion of Kayton Canal _ ..-.----.-_____
Total Construction in progress ............
Total Pay Rolls.. .......-. ......-....
Years Ended
1917
796.93
10,242.31
6,236.47
5,360.45
837.45
100.00
S 630,365.64
5,976.28
958.43
401.17
404.61
$ 7,740.49
9,127.81
1,306.29
22,788.17
336.05
4,454.09
$ 38,012.41
S 676,118.54
December 31
1916
843.53
11,266.80
5,867.93
5,484.25
737.00
900.00
$ 627,816.87
5,574.28
177.50
4,714.30
100.00
10,566.08
15,100.30
7,845.77
24,047.96
1,101.41
$ 48,095.44
$ 686,478.39
Increase
368.54
100.45
$ 3,548.77
402.00
401.17
404.61
4,454.09
T^WTAftflf*
46.60
1,024.49
123.80
800.00
177.60
3,755.87
100.00
$ 2,825.59
5,972.49
6,539.48
1,259.79
765! 36
$ 10,083.03
$ 10,359.85
2

CO
I
1
X. A 1
T -S S *js
I *
eg
S ac
0 g.S
'1 S3
& i J "
* eg
5 <
'* s
"8 3 *"
g .g s

g. 020
H
g S
S CQ
"
w
*-"
S ^? 55
2
3
<
,- -<
CO gj
1
Lt
1
i o
c
f
"8
"

^
5- .
H
S | o.
| *
o
** o
c
^- CJ=
O CJ/J
*?
c
1 *
^
ps?
^is|
e.
g<3
r=
PS &S|
iia^
2311
-.i
?Ss
1
3 J2
-&
2
t;
a
ac
101j
K
"g
"8QS
XI &1 <S

-
rH
r~1
e
COSg
COi
OO5
oo
co
8
5
*"* ^S
""CM CO
2
g

^
i [1i
Ci
ffl'l
II
iSgj
c "^
W
a

0 ^1
S
S8S
U3
o
e SS9
e>o
O5 5OO S
^*
rt
o$
oT co
to
*
^52 .
ci co t-H
H^
1-
Pd
OS
'C
1 |
O&H
eg
5?
S
-t
>o
t sgt

DOCK
'*" ss
1 GO
^"

co~oo
00
3
cjsoo' 1
t-l 1
."*"^ J
a"
.3
"3
1
J2jM
1
JJ
00
t*-
CO
10M
t00s
s" s9
|S111c111
-SMo3
at oI
-*
os
TJ
.s'o1
f
SINKING FUND BALANCE SHEET
ASSETS
Cash on Deposit for Redemption of Bonds maturing
in 1943 _ _ .... _ . .
Cash on Deposit for Redemption of Bonds Maturing in 1959 __ ......................... _ .
Total..-.---.-.. -..... .
LIABILITIES AND RESERVES
Sinking Fund Reserve.-..---.-.. ... _ ...-...-
The Sinking Fund for the year is as follows:
Cash on Deposit December 31, 1916...- _____
Sinking Fund Provided during 19 17. ._.-...-.....
Total... __ .. ___ ..... ____
Par Value of Bonds Redeemed during 19 17 ___...-
Cash on Deposit December 31, 1917, as above. . .
Years Ended December 31
1917 i 1916
$ 2,000.
27,000.
$ 29,000.
S 29,000.
00
00
00
00
33,000.
$ 33,000.
S 33,000.
00
00
00
For Redemption of Bonds
Maturing in
1959
S 33,000.
32,000.
$ 65,000.
38,000.
$ 27,000.
00
00
00
00
00
1943
2,000.
$ 2,000.
$ 2,000.
00
00
00
Increase Decrease
$ 2,000.00
6,000.00
$ 4,000.00
$ 4,000.00
2
S{d
CD
a
I
3
H
TRUST FUND BALANCE SHEET
en
ASSETS
Cash on Deposit for Perpetual Care of Lots in
Bonaventure Cemetary. ....................
Cash on Deposit for Perpetual Care of Lote in
Laurel Grove Cemetary....................
Total _ ...-..--.-.,...... _ ...
LIABILITIES AND RESERVES
Bonaventure Cemetary Perpetuity Fund Account .
Laurel Grove Cemetary Perpetuity Fund Account .
Total..........................
Years Ended December 31
1617
S 22,488.12
4,700.00
$ 27,188.12
$ 22,488.12
4,700.00
S 27,188.12
$
S
S
$
1916
19,513.12
4,275.00
23,788.12
19,513.12
4,276.00
23,788.12
Increase
$ 2,975.00
425.00
$ 3,400.00
$ 2,975.00
425,00
$ 3,400.00
Decrease I05
n

3
CURRENT ACCOUNT BALANCE SHEET
ASSETS
Current Assets -.___-___..--_._.._______.__.____
Deferred Assets.. __--__-.-._.__.__ _ ...-....-.
Total Assets..... __ ..................
Deficit of Assets over Liabilities ___ . . . . . _ . . . . .
Total.-.--.--..-....-...... ........ .
LIABILITIES
Current Liabilities ___ . ........................
Deferred Liabilities __ ..........................
Total......... .-.--
Years Ended December 31
1917
5 340,468.05
1,679.07
9,426.93
$ 351,574.05
8,365.59
$ 359,939.64
S 304,422.70
55,516.94
$ 359,939.64
1916
S
$
S
S
*
299,313.05
4,313.62
5,744.31
309,370.98
103,959.47
413,330.45
356,485.14
56,845.31
413,330.45
Increase
S 41,155.00
3,682.62
$ 42,203.07
Decrease
S 2,634.55
$95,593.88
$53,390.81
$ 52,062.44
S 1,328.37
153,390.81
2
I
55
1
The Revenues and Expenses of the Municipal Industries exclusive of Additions to Property Charged Income are,
aa follows:
Water Works Department
Revenues. ..................................
Expenses. ..................................
Net Revenue _ ...............................
City Market:
Revenues. ....-....-....-...---.-.........
Expenses. ................................
Net Revenues. ............................
Municipal Court
Revenues. ................................
Expenses. ................................
Net Loss.................................
Bonaventure Cemetary
Revenues. ................................
Expenses.. _ ............... _ ..........
Net Loss..................................
Laurel Grove Cemetary
Revenues.. ___ .... _ ..................
Expenses. ................................
NetLow. .._..-.. ...... - ---.....-_
Years Ended December 31
1917
$
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
$
S
190,620,38
103,117.41
87,502.97
18,863.37
6,876.48
11,986.89
5,864.90
11,111.72
5,246.82
8,493.58
8,657.23
163.65
1,318.50
6,674.26
5,355.76
1916
$
$
$
S
$
$
S
$
$
$
157,720.54
71,124.10
86,596.44
19,718.94
7,413.44
12,305.50
6,126.24
18,626.67
12,500.43
6,671.32
8,245.94
1,574.62
1,503.75
6,525.02
5,021.27
Increase
$ 32,899.84
31,993.31 .
S 906.53
S 1,822.26
411.29
$ 1,410.97
149.24
$ 334.49
Decrease
S 855.57
536.96
S 318.61
S 261.34
7,514.95
$ 7,253.61
$ 185.25
S
I03
w
3
SI
The Operating Expenses of the several departments for the year exceeded the estimated budget authorizations thereof
by 814,750.02 as follows:
General Government, including Pensions __ _.-.-.
Police Department- .._--._----._-..--.-.-..---.
Fire Department. ..-_--._-._-..--..._.._-.---.
Health Department _ --__--.--..-.-..--- .....
Bacteriological Laboratory. .....................
Sanitation Department- ..-.-_-...-...--..----.-
Highway Department. _._-._-_--._-....._.----
City Stables and Shops.- ..-.....-........-.--..
Water Works Department- -..--. ...............
City Market--.--.... ___ ...................
Park and Tree Commission.-.-.....-.....-.---.
Recreation Commission . ......-.-.........--
Charities- -.-----..--- -..--..--.-.--..-...-..-
Libraries .................................
Municipal Auditorium __ ......................
Total __ ----.-..--. .----..---
Actual
Expenses
$ 102,374.01
162,357.10
124,578.45
36,240.52
8,109.13
158,179.35
92,783.20
1,695.27
3,366.20
843.75
3,626.00
103,117.41
6,876.48
33,687.70
14,805.18
3,300.00
33,311.89
15,386.08
1,975.17
710.83
$ 907,323.72
Budget
Authorizations
S 109,027.91
163,944.00
130,641.25
36,845.00
8,562.00
158,100.00
90,960.00
1,935.00
3,800.00
800.00
2,700.00
77,373.00
7,875.00
33,000.00
14,655.34
2,600.00
35,396.20
15,350.00
$ 892,564.70
Over
Draft
395.52
79.35
1,823.20
43.75
926.00
25,744.41
687.70
149.84
700.00
36.08
1,975.17
710.83
S 14,759.02
Under
Draft
$ 6,653.90
1,586.90
6,062.80
452.87
239.73
433.80
998.52
2, 084.. 31
I
OS
I
This increase is caused by increase in cost of fuel and supplies and increase in pay of labor during year 1917.
The Comparative Operating Expenses may be summarized as follows:
rvntt1 1> A fTM/"* t**'VT*'E*\TC!T?C!
Health Department. ............._.--.-..-.-.-.
Bacteriological Laboratory. , _........_._....----.
Sanitation Department. .-----.-...._..---.-----
City Stables and Shops.............. ...........
Highway Department --...-.....------.-.-----.
Harbor and Wharves Department- ...............
Board of Purchase Department _ . .---.-....-.-.
City Market... ............... ................
Publicity or Advertising. .. .......... ...........
Daffin Park..... ..............................
Other Parks and Squares. .......................
Bona venture Cemetary . . .......'..........--..
Laurel Grove Cemetary __ .....................
Tree Planting .................................
Auditorium -..........-..-.....-----...-..----
Total. ................ .......
Years Ended
1917
? 102,374.01
162,357.10
124,548.45
36,240.52
8,109.13
158,179.35
1,695.27
92,783.20
3,360.20
843.75
3,626.00
6,876.48
33,311.89
3,300.00
15,386.08
14,805.18
1,975.17
2,500.00
14,856.21
8,657.23
6,674.26
1,000.00
710.83
103,117.41
S 907,323.72
December 31
1916
$ 107.499.22
161,652.29
123,780.47
30,765.01
8,244.43
158,312.53
3,117.92
93,341.39
3,454.56
823.80
2,104.42
7,413.44
35,025.04
3,600.00
11,200.00
15,528.47
2,277.35
2,499.97
14,907.74
8,245.94
6,525.02
999.94
71,124.10
$ 872,443.05
704.81
767.98
5,485.51
19.95
1,521.58
4,186.08
.03
411.29
149.24
.06
710.83
31,993.31
$ 34,880.67
$ 5,125.21
135.30
133.18
1,422.65
558.19
88.36
536.96
1,713.15
300.00
723.29
302.18
51.53
w
co
This increase is caused by increase in cost of fuel and supplies and increase in pay of labor during the year 1917.
.I
The Assets shown on Exhibit A, classified as land, buildings, permanent improvements and
equipmentremunerative and realizableconsist of the following:
WATER WORKS
Lands................................................................................................ $ 90,000.00
Buildings.......................................................................................... 80,000.00
Wells and Conduits........................................................................ 90,000.00
Distribution System...................................................................... 450,000.00
Machinery and Equipment...................................................- 107,950.00
Live Stock and Vehicles.............................................................. 1,000.00
Furniture and Fixtures................................................................ 40.00 818,990.00
MARKET
Land.............................................................................................. 125,000.00
Buildings.......................................................................................... 150,000.00 275,000.00
BONAVENTURE CEMETARY
Land................................................................................................ 157,103.47
Buildings........................................................................................ 400.00
Pumping Plant......................................................................... 6,000.00
Equipment...................................................................................... 420.00 163,923.47

LAUREL GROVE CEMETARY
Land................
Buildings.........
Green House.
Equipment.....
4,323.85
5,300.00
500.00
190.00
GROUND RENT LOTS.
WHARF LOTS
Nos. 7, 8 and 9, between Bull and Drayton Streets.
10,313.85
69,671.19
64,556.61
$1,402,455.12
i
CO
I
The classification of the properties (See Exhibit A) under the head of land, buildings, permanent
improvements and equipmentunrenumerative and realizableis as follows:
Land.................................
Buildings...........................
Equipment.......................
Furniture and Fixtures..
..* 454,920.40
531,430.00
282,086.70
52,274.05
Parks and Squares...................................................................................................................... 4,286,000.00
$ 5,606,711.15
Detail statements of the land, buildings, parks and squres are shown in this report, see
schedules 2,3 and 4.
2
I
co
3
3
os to
The following is the summary of the assets classified on Exhibit A, as land, buildings, permanent
improvements and equipmentunrenumerative and unrealizable.
New Streets........................................................................................... .................................$ 1,097,312.88
Storm Water Sewers.................................................................................................................. 670,600.00
House Drainage Sewers...................................................... . .......................................... 289,561.08
Storm Water and House Drainage Sewers......................................................................... 1,021.248.00
Bridges...................................................................................................................................... 11,001.94
Pavements........ ....................................................................................................................... 1,392,021.52
Sidewalks................................................................................................................................... 381,178.77
Street Landings........................................................................................................................... 99,075.38
Street Signs................................................................................................................................. 1,698.04
2
en
$ 4,963,697.61
The expenditures during the year from the proceeds ($416,451.00) from sale of $400,000.00
drainage bonds, dated March 1, 1916, to which should be added the unexpended balance from the first
issue of drainage bonds $1,529.49 making a total of $417,980.49, were stated in the 1916 annual report
as $222,849.54, leaving unexpended, as of December 31, 1916. $195,130.95.
Unexpended Balance, as of December 31, 1916.........,..-................-.....................................$ 195,130.95
Interest on Deposits accrued for the year 1917........-................................................... 6,993.44
Total Cash.................................................................................................. $ 202,124.39
The Items of the expenditures for the year 1917, are as follows: >
SalariesClericaL...............-...............-......-....-..............-...................-......... $ 1,858.67 g
SalariesSupervision................................................................................ 225.00 W
SalariesInspectors................-........................................... 6,201.50
Telephone and Telegraph.................................................................................................. 1.23
Office Expenses and Supplies............................................................................................ 117.09
Engineering Service........................................................................................................ 2.00
Right of Way.......................................................................................................... 995.75
Advertising for Bids.......................................................................................................... 3.55
AutomobileSupplies and repairs to same................................................................. 20.68
Testing Cement, Pipe etc.,.................................................................................... 173.17
Drainage work done by the City (not under contract)................................................ 17,384.62
Payments to Contractors:
Beasley Contracting Co................................................................. $ 55,227.15
Gadsden Contracting Co., and Guild Co................................... 35,979.89
Obenshain Bros. Eng. & Con. Co................................................ 60,920.74
Carolina Construction Co............................................................ 18,452.02
S. W. Copeland......................-.-..- 4,561.33 175.141.13
Total........-.-....-.................................... $ 202,124.39 8
The unexpended balance as of December 31, 1916, of the proceeds from sale of Auditorium
Bonds ($203,274.40) amounted to $136,585.52................................................... $ 136,585.52
Intereston Deposits accrued during the year 1917....-.................................... 3,664.21
Total....................................................................................................... $ 140,249.73
g
Expenditures during the year 1917, are as follows:
Payments to Architect and Contractors: 0
Henrik Wallin, Architect............................................... $ 2,546.18
Wise Granite & Construction Co. ....................____............. 89,534.06
Peerless Plumbing Co..................................................... 4,839.00 ^
Savannah Heating Co...-.................................................. 4,155.65 ^
J. M. Electric Co.................................................................... 6,369.85
Toomey& Volland......................................................... 3,209.40
W. C. Bryant & Co............................................................ 1,000,00
Lindsay & Morgan......................................................... 5,781.97 O
Refund of advances............................................. 2,839.51 120,275.62 *
Total Unexpended balance, as of December 31, 1917.................. 19,974.11
The property within the City of Savannah, assessed for the purpose of taxation, as shown on
the books, as of December 31, 1917, is as follows:
&
Real Estate.-.......-.-.-....-...-..-..-...-.....-.--...........................................$41,381,878.00 i
Personal Property.............................................................................................................. 18,582,423.00 t
Franchise Assessments of Public Service Corporations...... 1,306,781.00
Total..........-.-.--...-....-..-.-.--..--...--.-.-.--..--..--.$61,271,082.00
The bonded indebtedness of the City is limited to 7% thereof or to...........................$ 4,288,975.00
The actual funded debt (outstanding bonds less sinking fund) as of December 31,
1916, is........-......--.........-..---.--.-------.-.-.-....-.-.......... 3,631,000.00
The funded debt of the City is accordingly within the constitution limit by..... $ 657,975.00
Included in Operating Expenses, under the head of Charities, the donations during the year for
the purpose of payment of taxes, etc., are as follows:
Christ Church, Protestant Episcopal Church.......,..Real Estate Taxes 1916............................$ 127.51
Female Orphan Benevolent Society................. ......Paving 1916............................................ 206.91
First Christian Church.................... ..........................Repairing Sidewalk, 1916.......................... 4.20
Georgia Seventh Day Adventists..............................Real Estate Taxes, 1916............................ 4.62
Mission of the Lutheran Church of the Ascension Real Estate Taxes, 1916......................... 18.34
Orphan Home, Protestant Episcopal Church..........Real Estate Taxes, 1916............................ 409.33
Park View Sanitarium.................................................Real Estate Taxes, 1916.................... 387.66
Salvation Arrny............................................................Real Estate Taxes, 1916............................ 234.33
South Side Baptist Church........................................Real Estate Taxes, 1916............................ 79.33
Union Society..............................................................Real Estate Taxes, 1916.......................... 2,144.33
S
I
Total....................................................................................................................! 3,616.56
The budget for 1918, adopted December 28, 1917, was planned by City Council very carefully,
every effort having been made not to under estimate necessary expenditure and not to over-estimate
probable revenues. With all departments endeavoring under directions of the Mayor to operate very
economically, it is confidently anticipated, notwithstanding the increased cost of labor and supplies,
that the result of the operations for 1918, will again show a surplus and a consequent further reduction
in the outstanding notes payable.
During the year 1917, $59,000.00 was paid put of current funds in reduction of outstanding
notes payable, and nb monies was borrowed at any time during the year 1917.
This department has earnestly endeavored to give the accounts, revenues and expenditures of
the City that c&reful attention expected by private Corporations and which an interested public demands of the accounting department of modern municipal corporations.
I desire to thank the various departments and especially my Office force, for their hearty cooperation and efficient work during the year.
I
CO
1
o> -i
The exhibits and schedules following are:
EXHIBIT
Schedule
EXHIBIT
Schedule
Mr. P. F. Curry, Chief Clerk.
Mr. R. E. L. Hunt, Accountant.
Mr. R. O. Shaw, Book-keeper, Water.
Mr. H. J. Norton, Secretary Board of Purchase
Mr. Wm. Barnwell, Collector and Turncock
Mr. G. R. Small, Meter Reader.
A.General Balance Sheet.
1.Cash ReceiptsCurrent Account.
2.Land, Unremunerative and Realizable.
3.Buildings ,Unremunerative and Realizable.
4.Parks and Squares, Unremunerative and Realizable.
B.Income Statement.
5.Revenues.
6.Operating Expenses.
Respectfully Submitted,
EDWARD R. BANKS,
Comptroller
t
X
EXHIBIT A.
General Balance Sheet
ASSETS
Current Assets:
Cash on Deposit and with Treasurer -----.-...-.-
Accounts Receivable:
Revenues Receivable:
Delinquent and Executions Issued ...............
Less Reserves for Discounts and Abatements __ ..
Materials and Supplies .....-...-_...._...........
December 31
1917
$ 4,927.34
3,225.20
26,229.32
272,816.08
28,426.07
301,242.16
32,182.88
269,059.27
37,026.92
1 340,468.05
1916
$ 3,852.69
4,122.41
31,257.63
252,006.41
20,993.66
273,000.07
32,985.34
240,014.73
20,065.59
* 299,313.05
Increase
$ 1,074.65
20,809.67
7,432.41
28,242.08
29,044.54
16,961.33
$ 41,155.00
Decrease
897.21
5,028.31
802.46

I
GO
EXHIBIT A.Continued
ASSETS
Deferred Assets:
Working Funds Clerk of Council and Librarian ._
Expenditures for sidewalks in Suspense .........
Expenditures for Street Pavements in Suspense ...
Expenditures in Suspense Badges. ...............
Total Deferred Assets. ...... ...... .........
Capital Account Cash:
Proceeds from Sale of Bonds of Oct. 15, 1914-Bal. ..
Proceeds from Sale of Bonds of March, 1916-Bal. .
Total Capital Account Cash .. _ ......-.-.
December 31
1917
386.36
296.60
140.00
65.96
8,548.01
S 9,426.93
19,974.11.
t 19,974.11
1916
1,195.20
39.89
140.00
270.00
3,744.72
354.50
$ 5,744.31
136,585.52
199,444.57
$ 336,030.09
Increase
256.71
4,803.29
3,682.62
$..-..........
Decrease
808.84
214.04
354.50
116,611.41
199,444.57
$316,055.98
I
so
da
i
3
S
EXHIBIT AContinued.
A GWG^TQ
Land, Buildings, Permanent Improvements and
Equipments:
Remunerative and Realizable ----- __ ... ____
Unremunerative and Unrea lizable. _. ...........
Construction in Progress Storm and Sanitary
Drainage-.---------..--... ___ _..._...
Total Land, Buildings, Etc., ...,_ _ ... _
Total..... ... ...........
Decembe
1917
$1.402,455.12
5,606.711.15
4,963.697.61
183,300.29
$12,156,164.17
$12,527,712.33
r31
1916
$1,395. 938. 4S
5,605,163.91
4,477,117.02
222,849.54
66,688.88
$11,767,757.83
$12,408,845.28
Increase
$ 6,516.64
1,547.24
486,580.59
116,611.41
$388,406.34
$118,867.05
Decrease
222,849.54
2
I
oa
as
I
EXHIBIT AContinued
LIABILITIES
Current Liabilities:
Notes Payable Demand _ ....................
Audited Vouchers Payable __ . .................
Audited Pay Rolls Pavable. ....................
Unclaimed Wages __ _ __ .....................
Coupons Due and Unpaid- .....................
Total Current Liabilities. .............. ...
Deferred Liabilities:
Interest on Funded Debt, Accrued Not Due. .....
Total Deferred Liabilities. ................
December 31
1917
$ 265,000.00
25,899.72
4,637.63
559.20
8,426.25
$ 304,422.70
55,516.94
S 55,516.94
1916
$ 324,000.00
19,323.17
5,629.04
524.18
7,008.75
$ 356,485.14
56,845.31
$ 56,845.31
Increase
6,576.55
35.02
1,417.50
Decrease
$50,000.00
1,091.51
152,062.44
1,328.37
$1,328.37
a
I
EXHIBIT AContinued
LIABILITIES
Trust Funds for Perpetual Care of Lots :
Bona vent ure Cemetery. . _ ._--_._.._.______..-
Laurel Grove Cemetery __ .-_._._.___..._ _ .--
Less Cash Deposited in Special Accounts ..........
Funded Debt Bonds Outstanding:
Series of 1909, Maturing in 1959 ____ _ _ __ -
Series of 1913 Maturing in 1943... _ ..... _ ...
Series of April 15, 1914 Maturing Serially. ......
Series of Oet 15, 1914 Maturing Serially _____
Series of March 1, 1916 Maturing Serially. __ .
Less Sinking Fund and Cash with Treasurer applicable to Redemption of Bonds ____ __ ___
Total Funded Debt..... ........... ___ ...
Total Liabilities........ ......... __ ........
December 31
1917
$ 22,488.12
4,700.00
S 27,188.12
27,188,12
$2,282,000.00
209,000.00
580,600.00
192,500.00
396,000.00
$3,660,000.00
29,000.00
$3,631,000.00
$3,990,939.64
1916
$ 19,513.12
4,275.00
$ 23,788.12
23,788.12
$2,320,000.00
209,000.00
588,000.00
195,500.00
400,000.00
$3,712,500.00
33.000.00
$3,679.500,00
$4,092,830.45
Increase
2,975.00
425.00
$ 3.400.00
3,400.00
Decrease
$ 38,000.00
7,500.00
3,000.00
4,000.00
$ 52,500.00
4,000.00
$ 48,500.00
101,900.81
CO
EXHIBIT AContinued.
LIABILITIES
Surplus of A snots Over Libilities :
Balance December 31, 1916. ....................
Sinking Fund Reserve.... _ ..-.....-.-.:..-_..
Additions to Property through Income.. _ ......
Deficit in Current Account as of Dec. 31, 1917.
Total Surplus ................................
Total.. -.
December 31
1917
7,779,180.07
29,000.00
736,957.61
8,365.59
58,536,772.69
$12,527,712.33
1916
$ 7,776,175.53
33,000.00
610,708.77
103,959.47
$8,316,014.83
$12,408,845.28
Increase
$ 3,005.14
126,158.84
S 220,757.86
S 118,867.05
Decrease
4,000.00
95,593.88
I
CASH RECEIPTSCURRENT ACCOUNTSCHEDULE NO. 1
Donated by the Ma.yor............. ..............
Real Estate Taxes. ......... .....................
Less Discounts..... ......... _ ............
Personal Property Taxes. . ..--...-....-...-.......
Less Discount. __ .......... _ .............
Franchise Taxes ........-....-..-.-...-..-.-._...
Less Discount.--..-...-.-....--....... _ ....
Specific Taxes -....---...----.....-.--.-.-.....-
Less Discount. .---.--...-.--......---........
S
$
S
$
S
$
S
S
$
Years Jfindec
1917
685,318.73
62,537.68
622,781.05
284,975.99
27,017.55
257,958.44
21,153.05
2,133.43
19,019.62
156,494.50
13,196.10
143,298.40
1 1)
1
$
S
S
S
$
$
f)
scember 61
1916
1,000.00
640,536.33
59,058.58
581,477.75
284,370.81
27,202.94
257,167.87
14,853.38
1,482.78
13,370.60
149,858.67
12,562.85
137,295.82
44,782.40
3,479.10
41,303.30
605.18
790.57
$ 6,299.67
650.65
5,649.02
6,535.83
633.25
S 6,002.58
$1,000.00
185.39
2
1
SCHEDULE NO. 1Continued.
Near Beer Licenses... .............. .----..__......
Less Discount...-...-. --......-_--------------
Badges-.....-,.,..-......-.......--.- ..........
Sink Cleaning Fees. . ..........._....,........
Less Discount. .....------...-...----..-.-..-.
Rents Meter Water... _ . _ . _ ...............
Less Discount. ......--..-...._....-....-_.-.
*
$
$
$
$
f
Years Ended
1017
21,797.25
1,226.02
20,571.23
2,786.15
165.22
2,630.93
30,916.13
2,618.62
28,297.51
Dec
*
$
$
1
S
S
*
sinber 31
1916
35,200.00
3,520.00
31,680.00
19,250.50
1,307.05
17,943.45
2,262.50
131.65
2,130.85
22,233.74
1,934.04
20,299.70
Increase
.
,
$ 2,546.75
2,627.78
$ 223.65
23.57
S 500.08
$ 8,682.39
684.58
S 7,997.81
Decrease
835,200.00
3,520.00
31,680.00
81.03
I
S
SCHEDULE NO. 1Continued
Rents Flat Rate Water. ..... ___ ... __ ..._--
Less Discount...-.-.---.--. _.._.______...-.
Market Vaults and Stall Rents .'.---.....-....... .
Less Discount. .__-__--__--.-_..__....-._-..-
Market Fees. ___ ...... _ _ . __ .. __ .....
Police Court Fines..-...-. .....-..-.._... .......
Municipal Court Fees and Court Costs. ............
Harbor Fees.......... _ ... __ ................
Surveying Fees. .................................
Ball Permits... _ ........ __ ... .. __ .......
Miscellaneous Fees and Permits. ..................
Years Ended December 31
1917
$ 146,145.79
14,072.57
S 133,073.22
$ 15,410.45
24.00
$ 15,386.45
$ 3,620.45
22,191.00
6,015.47
981.60
1,161.75
3,290.90
455.00
1,185.00
3,206,71
1916
$ 148,918.92
13,357.16
$ 135,561.76
$ 15,738.28
24.00
S 15,714.28
$ 3,688.70
14,125.00
5,635.89
1,108.50
1,815.25
4,192.44
735.00
1,278.00
3,658.76
Increase
715.41
8,066.00
379.58
Decrease
$ 2,773.13
2,488.54
327.83
327.83
68.25
127.00
653. fiO
001.54
280.00
93.00
452.05
I
3
GO
SCHEDULE NO. 1Continued
Sidewalk Charges.- . .............................
Street Repair Charges... ..-...........--_.......-.
Paving Street Assessments. .......................
Water Main's, Outside Interests _ .................
Miscellaneous Charges. ..... __ .................
Miscellaneous Collections:
Fire Department. ............................
Health Department- ....._....--.-._.-.-.....
Highway and Sanitation Departments.. ........
Interest on Daily Cash Balances _ ................
Interest on Sinking Fund Deposits.. . _ ...........
Ground Rent Interest.......... ..................
Interest on Delinquent Accounts __ ..-.-..-.--...
Bonaventure Cemetery, Sale of Lots ________-_.___
Bonaventure Cemetery, Other Collections. __ . .....
Laurel Grove Cemetery, Sale of Lots. .-...--._-
Laurel Grove Cemetery, Other Collections. . ........
Years Ended
1917
$ 5,864.88
804.05
26,061.41
456.24
10,286.74
969.46
337.55
129.21
338.07
1,047.33
4,697.03
1,519.54
3,967.97
329.20
1,936.96
5,097.96
655.45
1,318.50
December 31
1916
$ 16,322.32
1,633.03
44,569.33
2,162.80
10,604.94
88.96
726.56
256.49
288.96
901.79
3,200,02
1,385.21
4,106.82
226.16
1,810.75
6,736.84
934.48
1,602.75
Increase
880.50
49.11
145.54
1,497.01
134.33
103.04
126.21
$10,457.44
828.08
17,007.02
1,706.56
318.20
389.01
127.28
138.85
1,638.88
.. 279.03
184.25
I
65
I
SCHEDULE NO. 1Continued.
Sales of Ground Rents, Lots and Other Land ....
Unclaimed Wages ... .... .... .... ...
Leased to Midland Railway of Right of Way along
Ogeechee Canal __ ................... ......
Current Fund Expenditures Refunded:
Storm and Sanitary Drainage .................
Total Receipts ____ ...................
Years Ended
1917
3,479.23
81.53
100.00
27,079.03
2,839.51
$1,385.421.30
December 31
1916
9,208.23
35.88
3,833.37
58,111.26
2,000.00
41,802.31
9,671.26
$1,472,000.14
Increase
45.65
$ 5,729.18
3,833.37
58,111.26
1,900.00
14,723.28
6,831.75
S86,578.84
gsco
ss d
o
S
SCHEDULE 2APPRAISED VALUE OF CITY LANDSUNREMUNERATIVE AND
REALIZABLE, AS OF DECEMBER 31,1916.
GENERAL CITY
City Hall Lot, 120x9a.....................-.-.........--............................ $100,000.00
Brampton Wharf Tract, 400 feet on Savannah River, west of city,
1,000 feet depth.............................................................................. 10,000,00
Fig Island (east part), originally contained 36J^ acres, now about
SO acres and still growing.............................................................. 30,000.00
Hutchinson Island, 5 acres on Back River (outside city limits).... 500.00
King's Island, in Savannah River, opposite Pipemaker Creek, 33
acres (outside limits)..................................................................... 9,900.00
BALLANTYNE WARD
Strip of Lot 19, 550.17 square feet.....................................-...:..-..... 100.00
BATTERY WARD (SpringBeld)
Lot 89, 3.84 acres............................................................................... ..$10,000.00
Lot 90, 4.25 acres................................................................................. 10,000.00 20,000.00
S
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 81
oo
OS
c
eo
>c
cc
><N
ec
>
-e -p
t-.
c
tc
<r
t
i^
l>
<N
1C
c
s
rCO
O3
c
^
oc
tc
i o
o
>eo
>o
-j
IM(N(NlNT-cin in
a
aegsss
2 era 2 2
Ere- 00 cro-Er
no to m QO oo oo
r~ CO | 00 CO
ico
a & c. a a & a,
'C'C'C'C'C'C'C
* --JJ? -t> i'^* ^i?1 jup1 -jii^* |-^
OJ 02 QQ CO CO CQ CQ
} fo t-t ^ >H
03 CO 03 03 03 CO -
PQ o
O
DEMERE WARD
North part of Lots 21, 22, 23 and 24 (triangle).............................
DANIEL WARD (Springfield)
Block from Bolton to Sycamore and from Magnolia to West
Boundry.....................................................................................
FIRE DEPARTMENT
Brown Ward, Lot 73, southwest corner Abercorn and Oglethorpe Avenue................................................................-........................$
Cuthbert Ward, east half of Lot 8, south side of Henry Street.... 2,500.00 Forsyth Ward, Lot 23, east side Barnard Street.............................. 5,000.00 Kelly Ward, Lots 1 and 2, southeast corner Gwinnett and Paulsen
Streets..............:....................................................................................... 4,000.00 North Oglethorpe Ward, Lot 1, northwest corner Indian and West
Broad Streets.................................................................................. 15,000.00
Solomons Ward, Lots 53 and 54, southeast corner Barnard and 38th
Streets.............................................................................................. 4,500.00 Washington Ward, west half of Lot 37, north side of Broughton
Street................................................................................................ 5,000.00
300.00
17,500.00
I
00
I
1
60,000.00
HAYWOOD WARD
Lots 29, 30, 31, 5,428.72 square feet..........................................$ 750.00
Strip of Lot 12, 1, 396.28 square feet.............................................. 250.00
HEALTH DEPARTMENT
Pest House Tract on Timber Landing Creek, 10 acres..................
HIGHWAYS DEPARTMENT
City Lots (Springfield) in Daniel Ward, adjoining Laural Grove
Cemetery, 1% acres................................................... .................$ 9,000.00
City Pound Lot, Abercorn and Perry Lane..................................... 10,000.00
GARRARD WARD
Strip of Lot 11, Block 16, 168.65 square feet....................................
GLATIGNY WARD
Strip of Lot 215, 1,147 square feet................................. ....................$ 229.40
Strip of Lot 218, 1,564 square feet............................................. 312.80
1,000.00
1,000.00
19,000.00
54.74
542.20
CD
6
DANIEL WARD
Strip of Lot 67, 1 acre......................................................................... 2,200.00
MELDRIM WARD
Lot 37, strip of land at Burroughs and 35th Streets..................... 100.00
MORRISON WARD
Southern 2/3 of Lot 51, 2.022 acres........... ............................... .... 7,501.35
NORWOOD WARD
Lots 61 and 63........................................................................................$ 1,000.00
Strip of Lot 13, 126 square feet.......................................................... 20.00
Strip of Lot 15, 324 square feet......................................................... 50.00
Strip of Lot 11, 126 square feet.................................. ...................... 20.00
Strip of Lot 13, 324 square feet........................................................ 50.00 1,140.00
PARK AND TREE DEPARTMENT |
Forsyth Ward, Lot 24 (Greenhouse)................................................. 3,995.00
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Police Headquarters Lot, Habersham and Oglethorpe Avenue...... 25,000.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 85
3
o
c
O5 Oi
O
o
O
o<
Ol
>OO O
0050 t~i-i(M IO O COIXN
CO

J a i g
t-H O X
W .-Sfe
o
g^j
W^rt
-^
S l
w o as
O
'
+J
^
<u
a J
eo
OOCJ
to
O CO
^ K5
3
|ls g
8 8
<B 0>
t-i -.
a1 a*
00 00
1-4<3>
CBCCCCOQ
+>
H,"H
42
O O
CUO<
OQOO
43^3
'C'C
CO
O
8
SOUTHVILLE WARD
Lot N, 4,520 square feet........................................................................$ 800.00
Lot C, 42nd Street, 4,050 square feet.............................................. 600.00
Lot 21, 2,700 square feet...................................................................... 500.00
Triangular Lot, D, 408 square feet..................................................... 100.00
Triangular Lot 23, 215.6 square feet................................................ 50.00
East strip of Lot 41, 1,240 square feet................................................ 250.00
Lot R, 2,295 square feet....................................................................... 450.00
LotS, 2,295 square feet........................................................................ 450.00 3,200.00 co
THOMAS WARD ^
(Savannah Public Library) Lots 33, 34, 35; west part of Lot 36;
north part Lots 52,53 and 54.........................'............................. 16,000.00
TURNER WARD
Artesian Well Lot, Gwinnett and Philpot.......................................... 300.00
TRIANGULAR LOT A #
Northwest corner Blue Avenue and Alien Street, containing 2.65
acres (outside city limits).......................................................... 1,590.00
TRIANGULAR LOT 99
(Springfield) 4.62 acres (outside city limits)...-...- .......................... 1,386.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 87
c
CO
o
o
o
eo
O CM
tCO
<N
O
O
<e
o
<>
I **
i&
CO
a
s
CO
OS
-- 8
O
SS
OJ
"H
1
a
I
S
C3J
>;
CO
cr
I
J
0*- s s
e-iooo
03"
eq o o
0
o
iO CO *
N i-t<N
i-l 1-1 of
n
D<
t3
a
S
8 o
^ c ^ i i SIS I
S1J. fefe? b *, j
W
|ig!l51lfllliiii
l!lipiS^I|f^!^
UElAJfefcSB^
vm j-c^ S r^.Sffl-rS Sw*^*>*
O Q
H O
88 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
>o QO to
> CO * >-<
o> a* CD
o
) CO
I<N
)QO : 2"55
AH
< 3
COo
c
OQ
*
*s
rft
f*!* N
'I"**& :
"oo
AH
c3
"3o
CO
-k>
*s
8
cfi
^aOS
<e)
*o
-S
i i : i
Lot No. 131......................................................................................... 1,299.84 sq. ft.
Lot No. 130....................-.....-..............-......................... 1,316.52 " "
Lot No. 129........-.............-....................-....................................... 1,333.20 " ."
Lot No. 128Matilda Williams retains a life interest in house, K------ 1,350.00 " "
Lot No. 127 on Lots 127 and 128................................................................ 1,366.68 " "
Lot No. 126............................................................................................... 1,070.61 " "
Lot No. 123..............................................-.......................................... 1,040.95 " "
Lot No. 122............................................................................................. 1,450.20 " "
Lot No. 121............-...............-........................................................ 1,466.88 " "
Lot No. 120............................................ __...-.................. 1,483.56 " "
Lot No. 119................,.............................................................. 1,505.04 " "
Lot No. 118,.............-...-.........................................................:............. 1,517.04 " "
Lot No. 117.................................................................................................... 1,533.72 " "
41,325.57
I
s
s
8,000.00
90 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ss
CM
**
O
* . . .
i i ',
"O
, S-d *
A *
O
CD
O
B
C*OC)rlfftr*cfi-<U3<X>r-HQ "g
5 .0.6.6.6 6 o d d 6^6 o ]p
m ^^.___^__^^_ Q "o'o'o'o'o'o'p'o'o'o'o
SCHEDULE 3APPRAISED VALUE OF BUILDINGSUNREMUNERATIVE AND REALIZABLE, AS OF DECEMBER 31,1916.
GENERAL CITY
City Hall..................................................................................................$200,000.00
Powder Magazine................................................................................. 2,300.00
Savannah Public Library..................................................................... 90,000.00
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Police Headquarters.............................................................................. 50,000.00
Emergency Motorcycle Station, Thomas Park................................. 515.00
Emergency Motorcycle Station, Grayson Park................................ 515.00
FIRE DEPARTMENT
Engine House No. 1.............................................................................. 6,000.00
Engine House No. 2.......................................................................... 10,000.00
292,300.00
51,030.00
2
I
to to
Engine House No. 3 (Headquarters)................................................... 13,600.00
Engine House No. 4............ ............................................................. 7,000.00
Engine House No. 5...................-.........................................................$ 7,000.00
Engine House No. 6............................................................................ 8,000.00
Engine House No. 7........................................................................... 11,000.00 $ 62,600.00
HEALTH DEPARTMENT
Buildings on Pest House Tract: C>
1 two-story frame dwelling (Smallpox Hospital) ..............., 1,600.00
2 one-story frame detention barracks.....................................I
1 one-story frame building for ambulance ...................... .......j
SANITATION DEPARTMENT
Incinerator Plant.................................................... .... ..... ........... 107,000.00
HIGHWAYS DEPARTMENT
City Lot Buildings: 2
1 Office Building................................................. ................ 1,000.00
1 Main Building (City Stables).......................................... ....... 5,500.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 93
in"
o
o
o
O
C3
o
o
CO
CO
o
o
o
1 jsg
jOC
soc
t^ ^

i
,
"a
"3^
|j
03
'O

o1
+3 a
"l
fe C
_ 2
Shops (Carpenter, Paint,Storeroom, ofBlacl west
5
c
c
c
T
4
ffi
OG
^=
e
bl
'43
IH
S
C
<ri
&r

>c
>c
l~
o
c
O
1
ta1
'.
eo

[i
>c
C
=
l-H
> e
> c
i

1
|
^^^ ij
^i r-t
TDREE DEPARTME ;r's Residence. DaflBnPai
1 0
) . c
> c
; i
v

"B
"f>, _oa
m
^
s
^
|
>CQ1
o
"?
s
4J
^=
OQ

^
o
flj J*
>
)
.
t
1
-s
rt
SCHEDULE 4 APPRAISED VALUE OF PARKS AND SQUARES UNREMUNERATIVE AND
REALIZABLE, AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1916.
NAME PARKS
Adams............. ...................... ............................ .........
Baldwin.. .... .....................................:............ ..............
Cann. ....... ... ... .. .. .......................... ..........................
Dasher... ... ...... ...................... ..................................
Baffin... ... ....... ...... .. ......... ....... .. ... ... .... ................
Dixon........ ............... ............................ .........................
Entelman.. ........................................ .... ...............
Emmett....... ........................ ........ ........... ................. ....
Forsyth......... ... ............................................................
Gaudry.......... ........................................ ................... ..
Grayson......... ............ ..................................................
ACRES.
........................... 1.
.......................... 1.2
...................:....... 2.18
......................... .2
....................... 80.40
........................ 1.20
......................... 1.
......................... 4.75
......................... 10.
.................... .. 1.
. ................ .. . 1.75
AMOUNT.
$ 7,500,00
20,000.00
10,000.00
6,000.00
250,000.00
40,000.00
20,000.00
200,000.00
1, 000, 000. 00-
10,000.00
25,000.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
OOOCOO
OOOOOO*
oooooooooooo
oooooooooooo
(N
O
O
I O(
!
0)
0
M
o
|
<u >>
3 !
11S I I
"el
oJ
_4 K,
1-4 s3
o
05 ij
P^ OB
SQUARESNAME ACRES AMOUNT.
Chatham................................................................................................. 1.02 $ 70,000.00 Chippewa.......... ................................................................................... 1.40 200,000.00 >
Calhoun.................................................................................................... .91 75,000.00 o
Columbia.............................................................................................. .55 50,000.00 Crawford............................................................................. .56 40,000.00 Eibert............................................................................... .53 50,000.00 Franklin............................................................................................... .50 60,000.00 Green...................................................................................................... .50 40,000.00 Johnson.................................................................................................. 1.19 300,000.00 Lafayette.......................................................:...-..........................-...... .99 75,000.00 Liberty.................................................................................................. .50 50,000.00 Madison............................................................-.....-.... ........ .... 1.07 175,000.00 Monterey....... ............................................................................. .96 125,000.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 97
OOO
OOOOOOl
OOOi
o
O!
o<
<
IOO O O
> O OOO
'OOOOOOOO
IOOOOOOOO
>oooooooo
OO :
t- !> (
! O O O O OO 10
> O CO 10 ^ CO O O
o
o
8
s5
*4
s
s
OJS
cc
: '

i
; i i i ; i i
s i
tf^
>S3
1-3
1
c
: :

1
1
i i '
:
:
I
0
a
Ja a
111

-*:
i
I
S'S
EXHIBIT B.
Income Statement.
Total Revenues.. ___.___.._._..___.____..---.-_--
Additions to Income:
Ground Rents ___.--....___.__..._..-.-_-_-_
Interest _ ... ..............................
Miscellaneous .. _ ..___._. .......J. ...------
Total..................................
Total Revenues and Additions to Income. ..-..---.
Operating Expenses ......... _ _.___._,__.---....-.
Per Cent of Total Income _ ..................
Deduction from Income:
Sinking Fund Provisions Bonds of 1959. .......
Sinking Fund Provisions Bonds of 1943........
Drainage Bonds Matured April 15..... .......
Auditorium Bonds Matured October 15--------
Drainage Bonds Matured March 1.. ...........
Interest on Funded Debt. __ ........... ........
Interest on Notes Payable _ .... _ ..........
Total..... ........... ..................
Per Cent of Total Income _ .......... .......
Years Ended 1
1917
$1,323,042.60
3.967.97
5,292.35
$ 9,260.32
$1,332.302.92
007,323.72
68.10
32,000.00
2,000.00
7,500.00
3,000.00
4,000.00
158,226.34
16,307,61
3,180.00
239.2ft
$ 226,453.21
16.99
December 31
1910
$1,307,202,59
4,054.96
4,162.09
451.56
$ 8,659.61
$1,315,862.20
872,443.05
66.30
31,000.00
1,500.00
6,500.00
2,500.00
145,993.83
18,836.22
4,587.50
151.75
73.13
$ 211,142.43
16.05
$ 15,840.01
1,130.20
$ oOO.'l
$ 16,440.72
34,880.67
1,000.00
500.00
1,000.00
500.00
4,000.00
12,232.51
166.13
t 15,310.78
Decrease
$
77.99
451.56
2,528.61
1,407.50
151.75
$.. .......
s
IGO
2!
ri
I
INCOME STATEMENTContinued
Total operating expenses and deduction from income
Net Operating Income.. ... ...--.-_-._.--...._..
Per Cent, of Total Income __ ......
Additions to Property Through Income:
Furniture and Fixtures General Offices. ......
Horse and Buggy Building Inspector.. .......
Police Department:
Emergency Station East Side __ ............
Gamewell System Extensions. -_._._.__...__
New Live Stock. ........_...................
Automobiles.--.-------.. .. - .
Motorcycles. .................. .............
New Live Stock __ _ .......................
Automobiles. _ ___ ... ___ .--..--.....-
Highways and Sanitation Departments:
New Live Stock. _ ....._..._.. ..
Machinery and Equipment, ... . .. . .
Automobiles _ .......................... .
Health Department:
Automobile ___ .. ...
Water Works Department:
Liquid Chlorine Apparatus _ ...............
Wells and Conduits ___ . _ _ . __ .......
Automobile _ ........... .. . .. ..
Meters _ ............. ....
Meters _ ...................... - .... -
Years Ended
1917
'$1,133,776.93
198,525.99
14.90
25.00
109.35
160.00
835.00
1,110.00
1,262.00
265.00
4,200.00
150.00
618.50
1,179.75
8,828.92
14,372.74
774.20
10,402.24
10,402.24
December 31
1916
$1,083,585.48
232,276.72
17.65
568.35
863.80
535.00
1,147.02
1,300.00
1,050.00
1,555.13
550.00
689,20
3,944.00
3,091.39
500.00
19,438.53
600.00
$ 50,191.45
160.00
1,110.00
256.00
118.50
1,179.75
14,372.74
774.20
10,402.24
.-....- I
33,750.73
543.35
754.45
535.00
1,147.02
465.00
1,050.00
293.13
285.00
689.20
2,941.39
10,609.61
600.00

GO
I
INCOME STATEMENTContinued 8
City Market: .
Improvements. ... ..__.__... ..-_
Savannah Public Library:
Construction, Cost to the City - - ...........
Bonaventure Cemetery:
Park and Tree Commission:
New Live Stock __ .........................
Lawn Mowers. _._ __.._____ __ -.. -
Laurel Grove Cemetery :
New Street Signs _ ...... -
Cost of New Streets and Opening and Grading _
Thereof................ ... ..........
Construction of New Sidewalks on City's Prop. .
City's Proportion of Cost of Paving Streets __ .
Improvements to Wharf at foot W. Broart St. ..
Paid to Georgia Historical Society for Books ....
Drainage, Kayton Canal _______ _ .....
Miscellaneous Strips of Land acquired. . ___ .
Total... .......... ...- _ ...
Years Ended '.
1017
3,463.12
695.15
399.96
19,386.93
81.1-1
19,170.99
29,561.08
' 1,018.49
$ 118,069.56
December 31
1916
12,145.45
500.00
500.00
500.00
250.00
500.00
854.82
31,174.92
650.00
37,185.49
1,575.38
2,000.00
9,285.25
$ 132,953.73
3,463.12
695.15
29,561.08
Decrease
12,145.45
500.00
500.00
500.00
250.00
100.04
854.82
11,787.99
568.86
18,014.50
1,575.38
2,000.00
8,266.76
$14,884.17

fc
3
INCOME STATEMENTContinued
Less:
Sales of Bonaventure Cemetery Lots. -------
Sales of Laurel Grove Cemetery Lots. -------
Sales of Ground Rent Lots....- __ ...---_-
Sale of Part of Lot 70, Daniel Ward.. ...--.-
Sale of Other Land and Equipment -------
Inventory adjustments of Value of Live Stock
Total
Net Additions to Property Through Income.
Per Cent, of Total Income. ____ ._ __ ------
Notes Payable for Outlays Issued Prior to
January 28, 1913 _________ __ .-.--
Total Deductions from Net Operating Income . - .
Net Income:
Surplus _ _ _ _......___..-._...-.-_.-.
Deficit... ...... _ .......... _ .... -----
Per Cent, of Total Income....... ...-.-----
Years Ended!
1917
1,936.96
ARK if.
2,392.71
1,425.60
$ 6,410.72
$ 111,658.84
8.38
$ 111,658.84
$ 86,867.15
6.52
December 31
1916
1,810.75
933.48
731.36
7,500.00
3,060.00
1,037.23
$ 15,062.82
$ 117,890.91
8.96
28,505.29
2.17
$ 146,396.20
S 85,880.52
6.52
126.21
1,661.35
$ 986.63
278.03
7,500.00
1,624.40
1,037.23
.? 8,652.10
$ 6,232.07
28,505.29
834,737.36
cc
e3
Advalorem Taxes:
Less Discount. .--_.._--....------._-_
Personal Property Taxes. ..................
Franchise Taxes ___ .....................
Less Discount. ..-.--...........-...-.
Total Advalorem Taxes.. ..-.-..............._.
Per Cent, of Total Revenues. -.......-.
SCHEDULE 5.
Revenues.
Years Ended]
1917
$ 687,757.13
58,446.45
$ 629,310.68
$ 304,022.09
29,019.75
$ 275,002.34
$ 21,134.27
2,905.27
S 18,229.00
$ 922,542.02
69.72
December 31
1910
$ 682,731.00
66,631.72
$ 616,099.28
$ 295,738.41
28,636.87
$ 267,101.54
S 14,856.50
1,482.78
S 13,373.72
S 896,574.54
68.59
Increase
S 5,026.13
$ 13,211.40
$ 8,283.68
382.88
$ 7,900.80
$ 6,277.77
1,422.49
$ 4,855.28
S 25,967.48
ju/v i<ii"i r*u
8,185.27
g
S
O

CO
%
y. r<
>
h
S
M
3
REVENUESContinued.
Specific Taxes:
Specfic Tax Licenses __ .__.._....__._.----
Less Discount. .......................
Near Beer Licenses. ......,-......--.....--
Less Discount. .......................
Badges ..... . ...
Total Business Taxes. __._._._....._
Per Cent, of Total Revenues ...........
Years Ended '.
1917
$ 156,140.86
13,196.10
$ 142,944.76
$ 21,787.65
1,226.02
$ 20,561.63
$ 163,506.39
12.35
December 31
1916
$ 149,479.59
12,572.85
$ 136,906.74
$ 35,200.00
$ 3,520.00
$ 31,680.00
$ 19,219.50
1,307.65
$ 17,911.85
$ 186,498.59
14.27
$ 6,661.27
623.25
$ 6,038.02
$ 2,568.15
$ 2,649.78
835,200.00
$ 3,520.00
$31,680.00
81.63
$22,992.20
3
GO
fe!
CJ
v-j
s
REVENUESContinued.
Municipal Industries:
Water Rents Flat Rate.... ...............
Less Discount- ......-...-.-..-.....-..
Water Rents Metered ....................
Less Discount...... ..................
Rents of Land Old Water Works Tract.. . . .
Miscellaneous Water Charges __ --.-_---._.
Market Vault and Stall Rents ...............
Less Discount ........................
Market Pees...-. .............. ..........^
Years Ended December 31
1017
S
S
$
$
$
$
S
145,972.43
13,028.25
132,944.18
32,732.41
2,618.62
30,113.79
600.00
592.50
15,311.62
24.00
15,287.62
3,575-.75
1916
S
$
S
S
S
$
S
148,258.03
13,251.80
135,066.23
23,066.85
1,934.04
21,132.81
600.00
981.50
16,009.54
24.00
15.985.54
3,733.40
Increase
$ 9,665.56
684.68
S 8,980.98
Decrease
$ 2,285.60
223.55
$2,062.05
389.00
697.72
697.92
$ 167.65
I
GO
3
REVENUESContinued.
Municipal Industries Continued:
Bonaventure Cemetery:
Burial Fees.. ._-..--.-. ..-----....-
Care of Lots-...--..-. __-_--_...----,---
Watai* Pfmta
Laurel Grove Cemetery:
Municipal Court:
Court Costs and Other Fees. ...........
Total Municipal Industries -------
' Per Cent, of Total Revenues -----
Miscellaneous Revenues:
Chimney Sweeping Fees..----.. --------
Execution Fees. __ .. ..-._.-.---.
Years Ended 1
1917
$ 736.00
5,370.09
1,148.11
1,239.38
1,289.50
29.00
5,864.90
S 198,790.82
15.02
$ 176.30
1,207.00
3,031.00
1,714.00
S 1,317.00
December 31
1916
$ 657.00
3,499.68
1,029.19
1,485.55
1,449.75
54.00
6,126.24
* 191,740.79
14.66
$ 493.70
1,760.50
2,890.00
1,479.00
$ 1,411.00
S 79.00
1,870.51
118.92
$ 7,050.03
141.00
235.00
246.17
160.25
25.00
261.34
S 317.40
553.50
$ 94.00
I
00
I
REVENUESContinued
Miscellaneous Revenues Continued :
Gas Meter Inspection Fees. .._......-._..-.
Harbor Fees.
Sewer Connection Fees.. ....... ............
Sink Cleaning Fees.. . ......................
Less Discount. ........................
Surveying Fees.--.-.-.......-.-.-.-.... .
Wharfage Fees _ ..........................
Ball Permits _ ...........................
Moving Furniture Permits. ................
Police Court Fines... ......................
Police Department Services. . . .............
Rents Municipal Wharves ................
Rents Miscellaneous City Property ........
Miscellaneous Items.. ......................
Per Cent, of Total Revenues _ _ ......
Total Revenues ...... _ ..........
Years Ended
1917
$ 3,284.90
2S4.50
123.40
981.50
433.00
2,966.05
155.47
S 2,810.58
455.00
429.16
1,185.00
1.75
22,131.00
1,800.00
110.00
258.00
1,235.28
$ 38,203.37
2.88
f 1.323. 042. 60
December 31
1916
$ 4.00
4,198.44
166.50
23.50
1,108.50
320.00
2,195.70
131.65
S 2,064.05
730.00
1,023.03
1,278.00
2.00
14,094.65
1,800.00
110.00
257.00
1,543.80
S 32,388.67
2.48
S 1.307.202.59
Increase
OS. 00
99.90
113.00
770.35
23.82
$ 746.53
8,036.35
1.00
% 5,814.70
S 15.840.01
Decrease
$ 4.00
913.54
127.00
275.00
593.87
93.00
.25
308.52
I
OS
SCHEDULE 6
Operating Expenses
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Legislative:
Salaries of Aldermen ..-.---.-.....-.....--.-
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ............
Badges__._ ... ..... . .....
Total.. ....... ........ .- .. .....
Years Ended
1917
$ 3,120.00
4,525.95
235.86
14.24
1,908.50
78.59
$ 9,883.14
December 31
1916
S 3,120.00
4,940.34
173.97
14.28
1,206.50
100.21
$ 10,455.30
J.11U1 xitMKs
61. 89
Decrease
$ 414.39
.04
198.00
21.62
$ 572.16
S
I
#
00
I
108 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
sI
8 .
a: z
o H
CU
Cd ga !
1
S5
\
-i CO11
6
CO
-H
1 1 2 5Q
a;
5 w
"B
i o C ^
GENERAL GOVERNMEN
Ei i
^ oo
1 O O3
ir~
o
ICO O
I CO CO 1
CO CO
1C OO
" CM
si 1
CKi
ooO
Cwfe
*M
,Hc

88ngg$888
o i*- oo epic
Cw O5 *O t** C^
I
s*
i-^ ^i 1O CO CO
<O~Cif IH

iO
C
fa
S
o >* ^i" -^ e o o
o to t- oo "i1 o <M

O CO OO C CO UD CO
^5 u ^^ O^ O^ t^* &O
- IOCM CO CO **
ctTcxT ^
s
i 1

S
8
s
'S~ _>_!w
O1
&
"
e^
Salary-..- Salaryof Mayor's . -and Uniform ofSalary Porter .
Supplies. Office Expenses and Printing and Stationery ......Annual Publishing Mayors Repoi of Clerkommissions Salary o
*Xu

CO
*4
*2sg"

rH
<D
009
o>
*-^

rH
<D
1 *s
I s-2s
00
oa
cs
JSb
1 1 H
a
o1
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Comptroller's Office:
Salaries of Office Clerks.. ............ ........
Office Expenses and Supplies.. ...............
Printing and Stationery __ . _ ..--.-.......
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph. ...........
Total __ .......... _ ................
Years Ended
1917
$ 3,500.00
3,760.82
72.61
159.00
80.00
7,572.43
December 31
1916
$ 3,500.00
3,750.00
35.20
167.35
86.51
$ 7,539.06
Increase
10.82
37.41
S 33.37
Decrease
8.35
6.51
I
GD
I
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Treasurer's Office:
Salary of Office Clerks ___ ............. ...
Salary and Uniform of Porter __ .............
Office Expenses and Supplies. ................
Printing and Stationery......................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ............
Surety Bond Premiums .....................
Furniture and Fxtrs-Repairs and Replacements
Badges
Commssion on Coupons.. .,.-......--......-.
Total........................................
Years Ended
1917
S 2,300.00
4, 070, 00
736.00
66.54
202.75
304.09
132.28
12.00
695.69
131.55
S 8,650.90
December 31
1916
$ 2,300.00
4, 340. 00
735.75
92.71
347.65
346.57
144.12
9.10
224.85
61.67
$ 8,602.42
Increase
.25
2.90
470.84
69.88
$ 48.48
Decrease
270,00
26.17
144.90
42.48
11.84
2
|
GO
I
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
/~i^?xrlj*T> 1 T (~*f\\7T?T) XTTWC'TVtnn
Assessment of Taxes:
Salaries of Tax Assessors-....-----...----- ..
Salaries of Office Clerks..... _ ..............
Office Expenses and Supplies.. ...............
Printing and Stationery . . ___ ..............
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ..-----..--.
Surety Bond Premiums-. _ ._..... __ . _ ..
Furniture and Fixtures-Repairs and replacement
Total.. .
Years Ended
1917
$ 3.772,10
2,000.00
79.05
S2.50
117.00
16.88
130.90
$ 6,198.43
December 31
1916
S 3,800.00
2,226.00
53.34
253.00
75.00
16.92
1.00
$ 6,424.26
25.71
42.00
129.90
27.90
225.00
170.50
.04
$ 225.83
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Marshal's Office:
Salary of Deputies and Office Clerks. ..........
Office Expenses and Supplies... .. . .........
Printing and Stationery _ ...................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ............
Surety Bond Premiums.-------. -. ...........
Motor Vehicles Operation . .............
Motor Vehiclen Maintenance .... _ . .
Furniture nnd Fixtures-Repairs and replacement
Total.. .................... ............
Years Ended j
1917
$ 1,800.00
3,540.00
27.04
94.00
120.00
38.00
156.70
344.25
S 6,119.99
December 31
1916
$ 1,800,00
3,438.00
39.23
126.30
120.00
38.04
124.87
39.70
S 3.45
$ 5,729.59
Increase
102.00
1.83
304.55
$ 390.40
12,19
32.30
.04
3.45
z
I
a
3
OPERATING EXPENSES-Conrtnued.
Freight Traffic Bureau:
Salary of Office Clerks __ .....-_.---.-..-._
Printing and Stationery __ . __ ....... _ ..
Traveling...... _ .. ____ ___ ........ .
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Total _ ... . .... . ..... ..... _ ..
Years Ended
1917
S 3,999.98
1,577.77
217.36
254.13
275.57
10.00
649.24
2.35
$ 6,986.40
December 31
1916
$ 2,666.67
525.00
55.22
132.07
73.70
200.00
404.69
$ 4,057.35
$ 1,333.31
1,052.77
162. 14
122.06
201.87
244.55
2.35
$
0 QOQ f|E
190.00
i
*?02
%
I
8
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued,
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Municipal Build ing City Hall:
Salary of Engineers ....._._.........,...
Fuel _ ....................................
Insurance..... _-......---.-.----....----.--
Elevator Operation .........................
Elevator Maintenance... . ..................
Building Maintenance.. ....................
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Replacements. .........................
City Clocks Expense ........ - - ............
Towel Service. ._........-.. _ ..............
Surety Bond Premiums. .....................
Miscellaneous Items...... .1... .............
Total
Years Ended '.
1917
$ 1,200.00
803.96
622.50
391.84
256.89
147.10
484.56
797.25
44.18
299.28
196.94
128.75
496.00
128.01
130.00
5.00
35.66
S 6,227.92
December 31
1916
$ 1,200.00
840.00
637.50
184.00
513.85
137.50
486.29
1,053.06
351.50
103.23
100.43
300.00
493.00
122.06
122.50
5.04
82.20
* 6,732.16
Increase
23.96
207.84
9.60
196.05
96.51
3.00
5.95
5.95
15.00
256.96
1.73
255.81
307.32
171.25
.04
46.54
$ 504.24
S
I
CD
iry
S
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Registrations and Elections:
Printing and Stationery. _ _ . .
Total...... .....
Law Department:
Salaries of City Attorney and Assistant- .......
Salaries of Office Clerks.. _ . ...............
Damage Settlements and Judgments. .........
Total................ ...
Years Ended
1917
$ 495.00
212.92
77.00
$ 784.91
$ 4,200.00
373.74
433.16
113.10
398.83
5,518.83
December 31
1916
4,163.71
300.80
714.37
105.50
5,284.38
$ 495.00
212.91
77.00
784.91
36.29
373.74
132.36
293.33
$ 234.45
601.27
s
I*9
02
25
d
3
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Police Court:
Salary of Clerk _ .. ........................
Printing and Stationery. .. .....................
Maintenance of Court Building ...............
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Replacements. _ . . .....................
Total.................................
Municipal Court:
Other Salaries. ..............................
Office Expenses and Supplies. ................
Printing and Stationery.. .............. ......
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ...-..---...
Surety Bond Premiums............... .......
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Replacements..... . ...---.-.....-.-.....
Remodeling Quarters at Court House .........
Total.................................
Years Ended :
1917
$ 2,500,00
000.00
29.00
109.27
$ 3,538.27
4,740,00
5,865.00
47.49
212.55
184.75
17.48
44.45
$ 11,111.72
December 31
1916
S 2,500.00
900.00
270.85
8.40
$ 3,679.25
9,300.00
5,526.00
155.25
4flA 01
142.76
28.58
369.45
2,699.70
S 18,626.67
Increase
109.27
339.00
41.99
..............
241.85
8.40
140.98
4,560.00
107.76
192.38
11.10
325.00
2,699.70
7,514.95
ICO
g
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
Pensions and Gratuities:
Fire Department _ ._..--..-...-.-.-..-.-...
Health Department- __....-.- - ._. ..
Highway and Sanitation Departments .........
Widows and Orphans of Policemen, Firemen
and Other Employees __ ................
Employees Enlisted in U. S. Army .-........--
Total
Miscellaneous:
Care of Powder Magazine.. . .................
Total... :--..-. . -
General Government. ....-...--....-.-----.-...-.
Years Ended
1917
$ 6,121.35
2,820.00
810.00
3,845.41
1.916.75
Ij 182.03
16,695.54
1,500.00
378.22
364.40
$ 2,242.62
$ 102,374.01
December 31
1916
$ 6,068.68
3,538.75
582.50
3,944.45
1,788.00
2,022.28
17,944.66
1,500.00
273.51
300.00
$ 2,073.51
S 107,499.22
$ 52.67
227.50
128.75
104.71
64.40
$ 169.11
718.75
99.04
840.25
$ 1,249.12
$5,125.21
S
ICO
I
*TM
S
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
00
Public Safety Police Department:
Salaries of Subordinate Commanding Officers, ,. .
Salaries of Office Clerks..... .................
Other Salaries. .............................
Obtaining Evidence. ........................
Expenses and Office Supplies. . ...............
Printing and Stationery ..................
. Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ---.-..--..-
Lights. ....................................
Fuel.. ..... ...
Telephone System Operation and Maintenance .
Motor Vehicles Operation __ . ..............
Motor Vehicles Maintenance. ...............
Years Ended '.
1917
$ 2,600,00
17,066.10
93,505.70
10,176.21
569.00
1,800.00
5,765.12
708.75
328.62
367.02
812.26
340.61
411.94
151.68
28.48
1,628.13
1,897.15
3,542.54
ieeember 31
1916
* 2,600.00
17,701.71
95,431.96
10,172.78
1,800.00
7,007.00
212.51
318.20
632.01
472.09
374.20
156.48
28.56
1,516.45
1,446.29
2,573.36
Increase
3.43
569.00
708.75
116.11
48.82
180.25
37.74
111.68
450.86
969.18
Dcreasp
695.61
1,836.26
1,241.88
131.48
4.80
.08
2
o
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Public Safety, Police Department Continued:
Maintenance of Other Vehicles ..-_.-__--._.
Maintenance of Buildings---..----.---------.
Collars, Gloves, etc., for Patrolmen.. _ .........
Jail Operation...-....-. _-__-_----.-_--_.__
Dog Impounding Expenses. . ..--..----._..-..
Police Military Reserve.. ....................
Travelling. __ _ .... .. ......
Firearms and Other Equipment and Maintenance thereof.. --.---.-.------. ....
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and Keplacements. .._.-_ ... .......
Total __ .-.......-.-.....--...-.-.-.--
Years Ended
$ 12.65
1,311.85
7,430.98
429.75
4,880.65
96.10
2,095.06
215.23
3,000.00
245.30
401.30
96.80
26.40
577.92
S 162.357.10
December 31
14.70
505.92
6,481.86
41.79
4,314.98
* 139.85
1,949.78
3,000.00
227.11
838.87
156.20
94.50
1,443.13
$ 161,652.29
805.93
949.12
387.96
565.67
145.28
215.23
18.19
S 704.81
2.05
235.95
437.57
59.40
68.10
865.21
3
25
I
Credit
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Public Safety Fire Department;
Salaries of Chauffeurs and Drivers .--.-.......
Salaries of Office Clerks.... ..................
Other Salaries .._...............-...-.......
Expenses and Supplies Office. ...............
Expenses and Supplies Station Houses...-.--.
Printing and Stationery ...--.---.--..-.-..
Lights ........... . . _ ..
Fuel---.....-...-.........-.....-....--.-..
Fire Alarm System Salaries and Expenses
Motor-Drawn Apparatus Maintenance. ... _
Years Ended
1917
S 5.580.00
20,227.82
9,604.44
2,685.66
6,459.00
1,500.00
56,670.60
231.46
888.61
84.21
169.70
203,54
807.32
14.24
2,601.46
1,667.33
3,616.66
December 31
1916
$ 6,342.29
20,308.26
9,744,43
2,659.66
6,502.63
1,500.00
58,467.11
315.64
629.14
197.88
196.97
466.98
865.84
14.52
2,165.77
1,140.06
3,154.85
$ 337.71
259.47
445.69
627.27
460.81
Decrease
80.44
139.99
74.10
43.03
1,796.61
84.18
113.67
27.27
253.44
58.52
.28
1

en
I
8
3
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Public Safety Fire Department Continued.- .
Horse-Drawn Apparatus Operation __ ..... _
Horse-Drawn Apparatus Maintenance ...... _
Care of Live Stock ..........................
Maintenance of Buildings ....................
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Replacement. .. ___ ........ __ ... ...
Medical Attention __ -._-.----___.-__.._._.
Refreshments for Firemen on Duty __ ._.._--.
Replacement of Hose _ .....................
Electric Inspection Salaries and Expenses. .. _
Chemical Supplies _ .....................
Chimney Sweeping Salaries and Expenses _ ..
Travelling __ ..............................
Miscellaneous- ............. _ ...-..--..--
Total... ...............................
Years Ended
1917
$ 53.00
43.21
2,586.41
19.75
5,041.10
1,114.65
50.12
54.95
41.70
808.30
1,339.92
185,59
247.50
100.00
87.40
$ 124,578.45
December 31
1916
*$
40.15
1,380.74
2.50
4,144.30
1,470.09
195.94
96.93
27.00
763,82
1,543.99
131.55
221.87
19.14
90.42
$ 123,780.47
3.06
1,205.67
17.25
869.80
14.70
44.48
54.04
25.63
80.86
S 797.98
53.00
355.44
145.82
41.98
204.06
3.02
3
co
CJ&
S
8
Credit:
OPERATING EXPENSES Continued.
Public Safety Board of Health ....._...___.-.__._
Salary of Health Officer.... ...................
Salaries of Office Clerks........ ..............
Salary and Uniform of Porter. ................
Office Kxpenses and Supplies. ... .............
Printing and Stationery... ...................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ............
Salary of Chief Food Inspector _ _ ..........
Salary of Other Food Inspectors ...............
Salary of Inspector of Hotels, Resturants etc....
Other Food Inspection Expenses .......--...-.
Sink Inspection- ...-.--_..............-.--..
Years Ended
1917
$ 4,000.00
3,600.00
377.75
129.04
479.08
244.92
42.99
12,747.30
901.00
1,999.98
1,042.50
1,200.00
44.33
900.00
2,422.70
731.31
41.30
922.18
December 31
1910
$ 4,000.00
3,600.00
375.75
52.72
311.80
148.52
15.56
8,078.17
919.52
2,000.00
1,380,00
1,200.00
88.87
900.00
2,034.75
794.66
1.00
683.65
70.00
Increase
2.00
76.32
167.23
96.40
27.43
4,669.13
387.95
40.30
238.53
Decrease
....... ..... .
18.52
.02
337.50
44.54
63.35
70.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 122
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Public Safety Board of Health Continued:
Motor Vehicles Operation __ ..............
Motor Vehicles Maintenance .......... __ .
Other Vehicles Maintenance. ......... ___ .
Tetanus and Meningitis Serums __ ...-.--.-..
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Replacements _ ...................
Miscellaneous Items ____ -......--.-.....
Bacteriological Laboratory:
Salaries..... _ ..- _ _. __ _ ........
Chemicals Glassware & Other Supplies ......
Fixed Equipment....... ___ .--_.--..__
Library ........ ....................
Postage, Telephone, Printing and
Stationery..... ....... .............
Other Expenses. ---...------...-.--...--
Total..... _ ........... ... ..... .
Years Ended December 31
1917
S 683.20
421.83
239.25
45.38
2,382.95
228.50
9.31
104.84
37.92
261.01
6,407.42
582.73
110.25
372.68
241.67
394.38
$ 44,349.65
1916
$ 602.95
398.87
336.12
87.93
2,358.28
135.50
68.58
59.85
30.46
31.50
6,530.00
341.00
257.29
393.90
213.10
509.14
$ 39.009.44
Increase
$ 80.25
22.96
24.67
93.00
44.99
7.46
229^51
241.73
28.57
$ 5,340.21
Decrease
96.87
42.55
59.27
122.58
147.04
21.22
114.76
1
2
I
2

W
I
Increase caused by Transfer of water Inspections to health Department on June 1, 1917.
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Sanitation Department:
Cleaning Sheet Asphalt Streets __-..--...__._.
Cleaning Other Paved Streets. ................
Cleaning Unpaved ntreets and Lanes. .........
Garbage Collection. . ........................
Incinerator Operation ......................
Clinker Disposal. ._............_...-........
Weighing Refuse and Delivery of game to
Hoppers ..............._................
Steam Furnished Water Department "Credit"..
Maintenance of Storm Sewers. ...............
Maintenance of Sanitary Sewers. .............
Yen re Ended
1917
$ 1,200.00
6,624.67
9,007.20
32,495.01
6,071.17
58,912.78
18,518.16
1,501.75
1,537.50
3,246.13
8,379.20* .32*
4,196.24
3,038.92
December 31
1916
1,800.00
6,597.92
9,199.14
32,115.78
5,087.24
58,046.50
17,575.79
1,791.50
1,554.70
4,082.26
4,182.00*
1,093.43
2,519.90
1,392.74
2G.75
379.23
983.93
86(5.28
942.37
4,197.20*
1,676.34
1,646.18
$ 600.00
191.94
289.75
17.20
836.13
1,903.75
I
CO
1
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Years Ended December 31
1917 1916
Increase Decrease
Sanitation Department Contmued:
Dry Culture Expenses..... ..... ...........
Sprinkling Streets. .. ....-....--_..--.-.-...
Oiling Catch Basins. _.-..---.-_.....---..-.-
Garbage Disinifection... ................. ...
Cutting Weeds ------_----.--------------
Miscellaneous Items. ..-------------.-...--.-
Total
$ 1,587.32
4,085.78
3,365.11
1,184.28
1,614.51
6,173.02
72.25
1,644.80
431.27
51.00
S 158,179.35
( 1,535.64
4,470.17
2,205.43
1,157.49
565.81
6,469.08
92.50
2,358.91
488.60
294.00
S 158,312 53
$ 51.68
1,159.68
26.79
1,048.70
384.39
296.06
20.25
714.11
57.33
OAO Af|
S 133.81
oo
&ft)
1
S
Credit.
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Highway Department:
Salary of Chief Engineer Proportion .-...._
Other General Salaries------..------. ........
Office Expenses and Supplies. ................
Printing and Stationery. .-...-..--.........
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph. ...........
Inssurance. . ...............................
Surety Bond Premiums.. ....................
Salary and Uniform of Porter.... . ............
Street Lighting ..,.--......-....-.....-.-...
Ornamental Street Post Lighting. _ ..........
Years Ended
1917
$ 1,800.00
5,608.33
5,837.58
157.25
293.78
330.79
248.72
92.35
16.64
497.75
48,226.50
1,862.32
1,071.48
December 31
1916
S 2,400.00
4,850.00
6,517.38
143.68
204.73
405.09
268.50
114.00
16.68
495.75
47,448.61
2,842.73
1,004.21
Increase
758.33
13,57
89.05
2.00
777.89
67.27
Decrease
$ 600.00
679.80
74.30
21.78
21.65
.04
980.41
rj
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Highway Department Continued:
Grading and Shaping Unpaved St's and LanesSurfacing Streets with Gravel -City's Proportion
Maintenance of Bridges _ ......_ _ ---------
Maintenance of Equipment ----------------
Motor Vehicles Maintenance. ...............
Care of Live Stock-. .. ................
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs & and
Construction and Maintenance of Crossings....
Miscellaneous Items.. ------ _ __ ... __ .
Elimination of Grade Crossing, A. C. L. Road..
Travelling ___________ . _ .................
Total
Years Ended
1917
8,389.66
13,416.80
476.27
374.46
.32
865.32
1,399.72
396.84
138.60
47.90
182.54
611.10
379.68
62.50
$ 92,783.20
December 31
1916
9,574.72
11,589.83
379.35
116.96
273.36
420.06
822.66
383.90
64.25
1,198.30
1,158.46
440.18
69.00
139.00
$ 93,341.39
1,826.97
96.92
257.50
445.26
577.06
12.94
138.60
1,185.06
273.04
16.35
1,015.76
547.36
60.50
6.50
139.00
(,558.19
CO
55
I
KTl
3
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
City Stables and Shops Department:
Salary of Chief Engineer Proportion- ......
Other General Salaries.. . ................. .
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Replacement. .-...--..-....-..-...._...
Miscellaneous Items.. .. ........................
Total......... ..................... ..
YoarsEndcd
1917
5. . ...
1,199.00
290.22
129.29
4.00
72.76
$ 1,695.27
December 31
1916
$ 600.00
1,255.00
1,091.91
164.71
6.30
$ 3,117.92
Increase
60.46
$ 600.00
56.00
801.69
35.42
4.00
81,422.65
co
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Harbor and Wharves Department:
Salary of Harbor Master and Clerk __ .......
Office Expenses _____ __ __ .. __ ...
Motor Vehicles Maintenance. ...............
Municipal Wharves Repairs _ ......... . . . .
Total... ..... . ... .. .
Board of Purchase Department:
Salary Proportion ______ . ____ _ .. ...
Stationery and Printing, Postage and Other
Office Supplies.--....-.... _ ...... ....
Total..................................
Plumbing Inspection Department:
Salaries of Plumbing Inspectors.. .--..-.......
Total..................................
Years Ended December 31
1917
$
f
S
$
$
$
3.000,00
265.67
32.39
54.60
13.54
3,366.20
750.00
93.75
843.75
3,626.00
3,626.00
1916
S 3,000,00
251.70
26.08
1.00
175.78
3,454.56
$
$
S
$
750.00
73.80
823.80
3,104.42
2,104.42
Increase
13.97
6.31
53.60
19.95
$ 19.95
$ 1,521.58
* 1,521.58
Decrease
162.24
f 88.36
S
I
o5
I
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Water Works Department:
Salary of Chief Engineer Proportion . _ .....
Other General Salaries. ......................
Salaries of Office Clerks.. ....................
Inspection Salaries. .........................
Office Expenses and Supplies. ................
Printing and Stationery... . ..................
Posta e, Telephone ana Telegraph- ...........
I surance. .................................
Operation Guwinnett St. Pumping Station:
Fuel __ ........ .
Fuel Handling. .........................
Lubrecants and Waste. ..................
Wages........... ..
Other Expenses. _ .....................
Steam Furnished by Incinerator. .........
Years Ended
1917
$ 2,270.25
1,837 C2
1,500.00
3,300.00
219.79
218.73
268.44
262.36
5.92
25,522.36
810.16
1,005.63
14,208.00
322.04
8,379.20
December 31
1916
2,-OOO.GO
1,493.98
7,873.12
80.31
111.01
221.05
322.61
6 .00
13,951.95
243.56
991.70
13,792.28
84.37
4,182.00
Increase
$ 2,276.25
6.02
139.48
107.72
47.39
11,570.41
566.60
13.93
415.72
237.67
4,197.20
Decrease
162.38
4,573.12
60.25
.08
s *,
o$
M
ra
>
X
X
o
>
*
u
3
OPERATION EXPENSESContinued.
Water Works Department Continued:
Operation River Pumping Station:
Fuel ................. ...............
Lubricants and Waste ...................
Wages . _. - -
Other Expenses. ... . .... ....._.....
Maintenance Gwinnett St. Pumping Station:
Wages-.-.-.--.---.... .... -------
Material.. .. .... -.-..----.-
Maintenance River Pumping Station:
Wages.... ..........................
Maintenance Distribution System:
Watroa
Material-.-.--.-...--. -__._----..-_-_--_
Tools Repairs and Replacements. .............
Care of Live Stock- ...-..-.......- ........
Traveling. .......... ... ...--.-.----....
Connection Service Expenses .................
Years Ended
1917
$ 13,544.28
223.08
9,055.75
256.18
3,778.47
191.12
4,001.65
811.42
167.59
319.59
139.94
214.54
December 31
1916
$ 5,963.68
158.63
8,719.25
127.25
20.00
1,122.53
11.00
297.39
3,413.28
150.62
90.25
425.09
100.00
29.82
Increase
$ 7,580.60
64.45
336.50
128.93
2,655.94
588.37
660.80
77.34
39.94
184.72
20.00
11.00
106.27
105.50
SSfl
GO
W
to
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Water Works Department Continued:
Meter Service Expenses... ..._.-.._------.
Motor Vehicles Operation. ..................
Motor Vehicles Maintenance. ...............
Plumbing and Turncock Expenses. ....... __ .
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Miscellaneous Items. ........................
Soldiers Encampment. ... __ ...............
Total ...
Years Ended
1917
S 4,397.01
135.00
107.82
84.59
1,941.18
130.54
2,892.64
588.52
S 103,117.41
December 31
1910
S 1,922.14
82.78
28.12
53.14
1,573.20
10.25
1,471.74
$ 71,124.10
S 2,474.87
52.22
79.70
31.45
367.98
120.29
1,420.90
588.52
$ 31,993.31 1 , ._,
2
I
co
Increase caused by increase in cost of fuel and supplies and increase in wages of labor during year 1917
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
City Market Department:
Salaries of Superintendent and Assistant .......
Printing, Stationery and Office Supplies _
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ............
Surety Bond Premiums.. ....................
Lights
Maintenance of Equipment. ._.. ...........
Furniture and Fixtures Repairs and
Cleaning Labor. . _ ___.__._______._.._._._
Cleaning Material. ........... __ ..........
Miscellaneous Items. ........................
Total.................-.............'-..
Years Ended December 31
1917
S 2,990.00
127.77
40.00
7.12
515.99
166.41
183.79
7.70
2,632.75
196.95
8.00
* 6,876.48
1916
S 2,880.00
99.06
40.00
7.20
1,302.30
166.58
51.45
4.75
2,684.30
177.80
$ 7,413.44
Increase
$ 110.00
28.71
132.34
2.95
19.15
8,00
Decrease
.08
786.31
.17
51.65
$ 536.96
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Charities:
Outdoor Poor Relief ___ .. __ . ...........
Poor in Institutions ... .. .......
Contributions to Hospitals White. _--.___._._
Contributions to Hospitals Colored ..........
City Physicians' Salaries.... _ ..............
Dispensary Salaries. .. _ . __ __ .........
Dispensary Rent _ ...... ______ .......
Dispensary Medicines _ __ .. __ ... __ -
Dispensary Other Expenses.. _ ____ __
Donations for Payment of Tax Payments.
Total........................... .......
Years Ended
1917
$ 591.90
1,260.00
4,505.92
9,305.42
6,550.00
3,000.00
1,321.50
480.00
2,415.07
265.52
3,616.56
$ 33,311.89
December 31
1916
S 581.55
1,260.00
4,424.01
9,781.66
6,399.96
3,006.25
1,970.00
480.00
2,546.41
180.79
4,394.41
$ 35,025.04
Increase
10.35
81.91
150.04
84.73
Decrease
476.24
6.25
648.50
131.34
777.85
$1,713.15
S
I00
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 135
OPERATING EXPENSESContinued.
Libraries:
Public Library White....--..---.-.......-.
Public Library Colored. _.._....._._..._._..
Total..---.-... .-.....- ... ... .. ..
Publicity or Advertising. ....................
Total..--..-.....-.--.....-----.....-..
Auditorium................ __ ................
Total............... __ ........... ...
Total Operating Expenses ..-...--......
Years Ended
1917
$ 14,036.08
1,350.00
$ 15,386.08
1,075.17
$ 1,975.17
710.83
$ 710.83
$ 907,323.72
December 31
1916
$ 10,000.00
1,200.00
$ 11,200.00
2,277.35
$ 2,277.35
$ 872,443.05
$ 4,036,08
150.00
$ 4,186.00
710.83
9 710.83
$ 34,880.67
302,18
302.18
Ifa
00
d

s
TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PAID FIRE DEPARTMENT
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1917
A. P. McFARLAND
CHIEF ENGINEER
FIRE COMMITTEE REPRESENTING THE CITY
OF SAVANNAH, YEAR 1917
W. A. PIGMAN, Chairman
W. W. WILLIAMSON J. C. SLATER
FIRE DEPARTMENT
A. P. McFARLAND....................................................Fire Chief
A. JNO. TOSHACH................................First Ass't Fire Chief
THOMAS J. FOGERTY..................Second Ass't Fire Chief
VOLNEY B. JONES.................................................Secretary
J. C. McDOWELL, ....................................Electrical Inspector
(Resigned Sept. 15th, 1917)
D. B. McCRACKEN ..............................Electrical Inspector
(Appointed Oct. 15th, 1917)
T. P. SANDIFORD............................................City Electrician
E. H. TODD........................................................Ass't Electrician
J. T. OWENS............................................................ ..Lineman
WALTER L. ZEALEY..................Superintendent Machinery
S. W. PECK...........................................Ass't Sup't Machinery
J. C. TYSON...............................................Chief Fire Inspector
F. J. KILROY........................................................Fire Inspector
J. A. BERGMAN...............................................Fire Inspector
CHAS. W. TAYLOR............................................Fire Inspector
N. J. FRIZZELLE, JR.........................................Fire Inspector
J. P, CHAPLIN......................................................Fire Inspector
140_________MAYOR'S AXXUAL REPORT___________
INVENTORY OF THE SAVANNAH FIRE DEPARTMENT, JANUARY 1st, 1918
Lands upon which are erected the seven different
Engine Houses..........................................................$60,000 .00
Buildings........................................................................ 62,600.00
Three Hundred Forty-Nine Lengths2 J^-Inch Fire
Hose, or 17,450 feet, at $1.00, per foot........... 17,450.00
Twenty-two lenghts Chemical Hose, 1,200 feet,
at 45 cents per foot.............................................. 540.00
Seven Auto Pumping Eng's, American La-France
Fire Engine Co. make, at $7.650.00each........... $53,550.00
Four Automobile Combination Chemical and Hose
Wagons, American La-France Fire Engine Co.,
make, at $4.950.00each.__................................... $18,800.00
One Automobile Chemical Engine Complete,
American La-France Fire Engine Co. make,
with 3 tanks at.................................................... $ 5,000.00
One Fire Chief's Car, Haynes make, 50 Horse
Power......................._......................._............. $ 1,500.00
One First Assistant Fire Chief's Car 24 Horse
Power, StevensDurea make ............................ $ 1,200.00
One Thor Motorcycle............................................ $ 100.00
Two First Size Double Pumpers, American LaFrance Fire Engine Co. make, horse drawn,
at $3,500.00.......................................................... $ 7,000.00
One Double Extra First Size Pumper American
La-France Fire Eng. Co. make, horse drawn..... $ 4,000.00
Two City Service Trucks, Savannah Fire Department make, horse drawn, with one 65 gal. tank
hung under frame of one truck $1,750.00 each $ 3,500.00
One Levericks .Hook and Ladder Truck in reserve........................................................................ $ 50.00
One Rumsey's light frame truck with 35 gallon
Chemical tank hung under frame._..................... $ 1,500.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 141
One 75 foot American La-France Aerial Truck,
horse drawn.......................................................... $ 5,500.00
One Automobile Supply Wagon, Stevens Durea
make...................................................................... $ 500.00
One Auto Chemical Engine Savannah Fire Department make, on Stevens Durea Truck.............. $ 2, 500.00
Three (3) sets double harness, at $50.00........ 150.00
One Triple Set Harness.......................................... $ 100.00
Nine Horses, at $200.00.......................................... 1,800.00
One Hundred and Five Uniforms, Caps, and
Quick Hitch coats................................................ 1,050.00
Furniture and Fixtures in Engine Houses............ 4,500.00
Fire Alarm System................................................. 40,025.55
Shop Tools.............................................................. 2,500.00
Supplies at the Headquarters Station, as well as
at the other six different engine houses.............. 300.00
Total...........:......................... $295,715.55
142 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
FIRE CHIEF'S REPORT
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918
To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of
Savannah:
Gentlemen :
I have the Honor of Submitting to you Gentlemen my
second Annual Report of the Workings of this Department,
for the year ending December, 31st, 1917. This being the
Twenty-Eighth Annual report of this Department.
At the close of the year 1917. the total number of members
of the Department was as follows:
1 Fire Chief.
1 First Assistant Fire Chief.
1 Second Assistant Fire Chief.
1 Secretary.
1 Electrical Inspector.
1 City Electrician.
1 Assistant City Electrician.
1 Lineman.
1 Superintendent Machinery.
1 Assistant Superintendent Machinery.
1 Chief Fire Inspector.
4 Fire Inspectors.
3 Regular Drivers Chief's Cars
7 Captains Engine Companies.
1 Captain Truck Company.
1 Captain Chemical Company
7 Lieutenants Engine Companies.
1 Lieutenant Truck Company.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 143
1 Lieutenant Chemical Company.
6 Egineers Pumpers.
54 Privates.
12 Substitutes.
Total 106
During the year the following changes in the Department took place.
3 Privates dismissed.
16 Privates resigned.
3 Privates reinstated.
16 Privates appointed.
1 Private promoted to Engineer.
2 Privates promoted to Lieutenants.
1 Engineer resigned.
2 Lieutenants promoted to Captains.
1 Captain resigned.
1 Captain dismissed.
1 Electrical Inspector resigned.
1 Electrical Inspector appointed.
1 Chimney Sweeper dismissed (Ordinance abolished)
6 Privates at military duty.
144 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
FIRE DEPARTMENT BY COMPANIES.
FIRE STATION NO. 1
518-522 Broughton Street, East.
Name Rank Service
Jerry Murphy................CaptaiB..................................17 years
R. J. 0'Keefe................Lieutenant............................10 "
C. D. Henderson..........Engineer................................ 6 "
M. J. Roache................Private._.................................17 "
T. Welsh........................Private....................................l4 "
Geo. F. Byrnes.............Private.................................... 9 "
W. F. Fallon.................Private.................................... 3 "
J. J. Buttimere..............Private.................................... 8 "
J. P. Duffey..................Private....................................21 "
FIRE STATION NO. 2
Indian and West Broad Streets.
Name Rank Service
C. V. Egense.....-...-Captain..................................33 Years
W. J. Powers................Lieutenant............................ 6 "
Geo. F. Kilroy..............Engineer..........................13 "
L. F. Henderson........._.Private..................................19 "
Geo. Campsen..............Private.................................... 9 "
J. C. Hirt...................... Private....................................12 "
C. D. Quarles................Private.................................... 7 "
J. W. WheeIan..............Private..._...............................11 "
FIRE STATION NO. 3
Oglethorpe Ave. and Abercorn Streets.
Name Rank Service
J. J. Wheelan............Captain..........................14 Years
T. J. Duffy ..................Lieutenant............................ 8 "
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 145
J. C. Bailey....................Engineer................................14 "
J. Hunter......................Private._.................................10 "
T. Ryan..-............-..-.Private........--.......-:........... 9 "
A. Smith........................Private................................. .. 7 "
J. P. Kavanaugh..........Private....................................11 "
W. R. Woodrum..........Private.............................. ..... 2 "
U. R. Mitehell-.-.......Private............ .................. 1 "
R. L. Price...................Private.................................... 1 "
FIRE STATION NO. 4
606 Barnard Street.
Name Rank Service
D. P. Murphy,.............Captain..................................19 Years
T. J. Fogarty...............Lieutenant............................12 "
J. H Bell.........-...--.Engineer..--.-.-.-...-..... 9 "
Geo. C. Donnelly..........Private._.................................27 "
W. H. Remley............Private....................................16 " "
E. J. Seymour.,..........Private...................................11 "
J. B. Minor....................Private.................................... 4 "
T. G. Kearney...........-Private....................................14 "
L. E. Seaward..............Private................................... 2 "
FIRE STATION NO. 5
No. 11 Henry Street, East.
Name Rank Service
D. V. Whitaker............Captain..................................18 Years
M. F. Sullivan......Lieutenant.........................15 "
W. J. Futch ...........-Engineer...............--....19 "
Jerry O'Leary.....Private.............*......................24 "
F. E. Leonard.-.........Private.................................. 6 "
J. C. Anderson..............Private............................. 3 "
I. E. Moody............. Private............................. 1 "
146 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
FIRE STATION NO. 6
38th and Barnard Streets.
Name Rank Service
C- M. Burnham............Captain..................................21 Years
B. Blumberg..................Lieutenant............................ 6 "
C. Ch:istensen..............Engineer................................19 "
J. A. McGrath.............Private...................................17 "
M. F. Harvey................Private._.............................11 "
J. M. Smith..................Private.................................... 2 "
J- C. Shehan..................Private........:..........................14 "
C. W. Mobley..............Private.................................... 2 "
C. H. Zace....................Private................................... 6 "
FIRE STATION NO. 7
Paulsen and Gwinnett Streets.
Name Rank Service
C. W. Stein....................Captain..................................10 Years
B. Leddy._.........--......Lieutenant.............................19 "
S. W. Peck....................Engineer...............................12 "
W. E. Turner................Private.................................... 4 "
W. L. DuFour..............Private................................... 8 "
M. H. Franklin............Private.................................... 2 "
E. Beylette...................Private.................................. 1 "
J. Schuman....................Private................................ 2 "
S. E. Voltz....................Private....._............................ 1 "
TRUCK COMPANY NO. 1
Oglethorpe Ave. and Abercorn Streets.
Name Rank Service
C. W. Ellis...................Captain..................................l4 Years
B. Sheppard.................Lieutenant............................12 "
T. Flynn........................Driver....................................l9 "
B. F. Potter.................Driver (1st Asst's. Car.......... 6 "
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 147
J. R. Wohanka..............Ladderman.......,....................ll "
W. F. Carrick................Driver (Fire Chief's Car) ._.14 "
Geo. Schroder._...........:.Ladderman............................ 4 "
John Kavanaugh..........Ladderman............................ 1 "
W. B. Smith..................Ladderman............................ 2 "
W. G. Daughtry..........Ladderman............................ 1 "
P. E. Forehand............Ladderman............................ 6 "
J. E. McDonough........Ladderman............................ 3 "
CHEMICAL COMPANY No. 1
Oglethorpe Ave. and Abercom Streets.
Name Rank Service
Geo. E. Johnson............Captain..................................17 Years
J. F. Hartnoll._.............Lieutenant........................... 8 "
E. T. Morrisey..............Private.........:...................-.....16 "
J. L. Eady......................Private.................................... 4 "
F. F. Black...................Private.................................... 6 "
L. N. Crosby................Private.................................... 1 "
SUBSTITUTE FIREMAN ON DEPARTMENT
DECEMBER 31st, 1917.
Dan'1 O'Connor,
G. E. Haslett,
Thos. Lovett,
D. J. McCarthy,
H. M. McCarthy,
Wm. Mobley,
J. C. Newton,
G. H. Richberg,
W. A. Thomas,
R. L. Davis,
B. Bargain,
R. E. Biidue.
148 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
During the year the'following members of this Department asked for leave of absence, and joined the United States
Army, with the understanding that their positions would be
given back to them upon their return from the war.
R. B. Hearne................................................................18 Years
R. P. Shehan................................................................ 8 "
R. E. Long.................................................................... 5 "
A. C. Rollerson........................................................... 4 "
H. V. Summerlin.......................................................... 5 "
A. L. Alexander............................................................ 4 "
PENSIONERS OF THE DEPARTMENT
Per Month
C. A. Christians, Pensioned March 12, 1918...... ......$ 50.00
\V, W. Pringle, Pensioned Feb. 4th, 1914 ................ 45.00
Louis Treboney, Pensioned Feb. 18th, 1914........ ....... 50.00
J. J. Hearne, Pensioned Aug. 16th, 1916............... ..... 45.00
\V. J. deary. Pensioned Aug. 16th, 1916.................... 45.00
HOSE (2>< INCH) SUPPLY
Station Lengths Feet
Engine Co. No. 1......................50.... ..................................2,500
Engine Co. No. 2...... .. ...........51.......................... .............2,550
Engine Co. No. 3......................52...... .................................2,600
Engine Co. No. 4 .............. .....45.. ................................. ..2,250
Engine Co. No. 5......................50......................................2,500
Engine Co. No. 6.....................48......................................2,400
Engine Co. No. 7...:.......... .....48..... ................................2,400
Truck Co. No. 1...................... 2........................................ 100
346 17,300
In Supply Room. ................ 3 .150
349 17,450
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 149
CHEMICAL HOSE SUPPLY
Engine Co. No. I...................... 3................................. 150
Engine Co. No. 2...................... 3. .. 150
Engine Co. No. 3...................... 3.-150
Engine Co. No. 4...................... 3...150
Engine Co. No. 5...................... 3.......................... 150
Engine Co. No. 7._.................. 3......................................150
Chemical Co. No. 1.................. 4.................................. 200
22 1,100
LIVE STOCK
(9) Horses; at $200.00......................... .......... ..... $1,800
CITY ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT
YEAR 1917
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Mr. A. P. McFarland, Fire Chief,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I submit herewith my report for the year ending December
31st, 1917.
During the year there was 1,981 inspections made; included in this number, was 23,585 lights, 371 fans, 165 motors,
17 electric irons, 25 heaters, 6 electric pianos, 12 rectifiers, and
34 electric signs.
150 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
RECEIPTS FROM INSPECTIONS
January....................................:..................................... $ 118.25
February.......................................................................... 80.75
March............................................................................. 120.75
April........... .................................................................. 112.00
May............................................................................ 113.25
June............................................................................. 106.00
July...........:................................................................... 74.25
August........................................................................... 61.50
September..................................................................... 113.50
October......................................................................... 80.75
November................................................................... 70.25
December. ................................................................... 151.75
$1,203.00
DISBURSEMENTS
Salaries....... ............... ............,.$1,250.00
Uniforms.................................... 17.00
Printing and Stationery.......... 15.00
Oils and Gasoline.................... 67.50
1,349.50
On October 15th, 1917,1 succeeded Mr. J. C. McDowell,
as Electrical Inspector, and since this time the most of the
inspections made has been in the Fire District. One building
which I wish to mention in particular is the DeSoto Hotel
which has been thoroughly overhauled. It now has a Fire
Proof electrical insulation throughout. I am endeavoring to
see that the Ordinance governing the present District, is lived
up to strictly, and I might add that I have been rewarded with good results along this line.
At this time and for some months back there has been
very little building done, which of course accounts for the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 151
apparent decrease in inspection fees this year against that of
last year.
During the time I have been Electrical Inspector for the
City, I have had the co-operation of the entire Department,
as well as the Electrical Contractors of the City, which I
wish to thank each and all for.
Again assuring you as well as the other heads of the
various Departments, of my appreciation for your past
courtesies, I beg to remain,
Yours very truly,
D. B. McCRACKEN, Electrical Inspector.
REPORT OF CITY ELECTRICIAN FOR
YEAR 1917
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Mr. A. P. McFarland, Fire Chief,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I respectfully submit herewith a report on the operation,
maintenance, and extention of the Fire Alarm System, and an
outline of such other work as has been attended to in the
electrical division of the Fire Department during the year
1917.
FIRE ALARM SYSTEM
GENERAL CONDITIONS. The system generally is a
very satisfactory working condition, a number of improvements having been recently made, including the installation
of additional boxes, cables, wires, etc., also rewiring of main
switch board at City Hall.
152 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
NEW BOXES.
151Forty-Ninth and Abereorn Streets.
152Fortieth and Burroughs Street.
154Forty-fourth and Burroughs Street.
156Park ave. and Live Oak Streets
157Thirty-Fifth and Paulsen Streets.
158Thirty-Eighth and Waters Ave.
159Thirty-Ninth and Price Streets.
161Wheat on Street and Bilboa Crossing.
162Bay Street, West side Musgrove Creek.
163Park Ave. and West Broad Streets.
164Joe and Paulsen Streets.
165Gwinnett and Atlantic Streets.
167Railroad Street and Stiles Ave.
168Hull Street and Lathrop Ave.
Box No. 153, intended forForty-third and Stevens Streets,
has not yet been installed, due to there not being an available
pole route on which to string our wires to this point.
OTHER IMPROVEMENTS. Five hundred twentyfive feet, five pair underground cable added from No. 3 Fire
Station to Perry Lane and Abereorn Streets, and three hundred Seventy-five feet, three pair replaced with five pair from
Perry Lane and Abereorn Streets, to Perry lane and Lincoln
Street. These cables are for joint use of Fire and Police Departments; Old style metal cable head cut out boxes repaired
with new wooden ones, at Berrien and Prendergast Streets,
also at Waldburg Street Lane and West Broad Streets, and
at Thirty-Eighth and Abercorn Streets. Approximately
twenty-five fire alarm boxes repainted with aluminum bronze,
with red top and key guard .
RE-ARRANGEMENT OF EQUIPMENT: Residence
gong of Fire Chief McFarland, moved to 216 State Street, East.
Residence gong of Superintendent of Machinery Zealey, mved
to 127 Abercorn Street. House gong of the Savannah Elec-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 153
trie Company moved to their Riverside plant, and connected
to our box circuit No. 2, in place of tower bell circuit as before.
Fire alarm box No. 215 moved to Anderson and Paulsen
Streets.
SERVICE. The service for the past year has been good
although marked by more failures of equipment and interruptions to service, than was experienced last year. This, I
attribute to the increased mileage of our over-head lines.
Numerous violent wind and lightning storms, the receipt of a
greater number of alarms over the system, and more frequent
interruptions to service caused by construction men of the
Telephone and Electric Companies.
DAILY TESTS. One box each day has been pulled to
test the system, the boxes selected for this purpose being those
not recently pulled for fires. These tests are occassionally
ommitted, as on Sunday and when there are fires in progress.
INSTRUCTIONS. I have continued the individual instructions to Fireman, Policeman, and Citizens, in the proper
way to turn in fire alarms, that was inaugurated last year.
In addition to this I set up demonstrating apparatus at both
Fire and Police Headquarters, making two talks at each place
of approximately one hour each on subjects of fire and poJice
signal system operation, handling live wires, rescuing persons
from electric shock and methods of resuscitation. These four
lectures reached practically every member of the two departments, and was apparently much appreciated by them. By
invitation of Dr. Clay, I made a talk and gave demonstrations
to the nurses training class at St. Joseph's Infirmary on live
wires, rescue work, etc.
MOTOR DRAWN APPARATUS: Careful attention has
been given to the electrical equipment of the motor drawn
apparatus; keeping charged and in repair the storage batteries
of each; there are usually two to each machine. Advising
with and assisting the superintendent of machinery when
needed. For other service under head of "miscellaneous
154 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
work" see my report to the Chief of Police covering the work
done for Police Department, also report of Board of Electrical
Examiners of which I am by virture of my position, a member.
CITY CLOCKS
On April 26th, I was made keeper of City Clocks, relieving the Wells Jewelry Co. I shortly afterwards made a report
to Fire Chief McFarland, calling attention to the unsafe condition of the weights in the City Hall Clock. This has since
been remedied by workmen under direction of Chief Engineer
Connant.
ECONOMY OF OPERATION
As a measure of economy, we have discontinued the
practice of purchasing anything ready made, that can be made
by us at a saving in cost. As an example of this, we purchased material for six thousand fire alarm box glasses, for
$7.00 cutting and fitting them in our spare moments. The
saving on this item amounted to $65.00. >A11 motorcycle repairs on our three machines has been made by us. The cost
of parts, oils, and gasoline being the only expense incurred.
ALARMS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR
During the year this department had a total number of
478 alarms for fire as follows: 112 box alarms, 25 of which
were false. 314 telephone alarms, 19 of which were fasle.
22 local alarms, no false.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 155
INVENTORY.
City Hall Equipment.......................................... $4,000.00
Engine House Equipment.................................. 3,500.00
Outside Gongs and Indicators............................ 300.00
Tower-bells and equipment................................ 4,000.00
Fire Alarm Boxes._........................................... 16,750.00
Overhead wire and fittings................................. 3,481.30
Cables, conduits, manholes and posts.............. 7,744.25
Extra material and equipment.......................... 250.00
RECOMMENDATIONS.
No recommendations will be made in this report, it being
my intention to make these separate during the year as the
needs of the system require and the available fund will permit
of expenditures. I will then be able to show in succeeding
annual reports, improvements made as a result of these recommendations, where they have been approved and adopted, or
if they have not been carried out, they will stand as a record
of our needs for the future.
COMMENDATION
I have nothing but praise for the efforts of Assistant City
Electrician E. H. Todd, and Fire Department Electrician
J. P. Owens, who have labored hard and faithfully to produce
satisfactory results in the electrical work of the department,
and I commend them for their conscientious attention to all
duties assigned them.
Respectfully,
T. P. SANDIFORD, City Electrician.
156 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF BOARD OF ELECTRICAL EXAMINERS
FOR THE YEAR 1917
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1918.
Mr. A. P. McFARLAND, Fire Chief,
Savannah Fire Department
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
We respectfully submit herewith a report of the examinations held by this Board during the year 1917.
Certificate issued to W. B. Jarvis, Examinations................. 2
Certificate issued to R. L. Gruver, Examinations................ 2
Certificate issued to J. C. McDowell, Examinations............ 1
Certificate refused to Geo. L. Hemingway, Examinations 2
Certificate refused to J. T. Hill, Examinations._............... 1
Total Number examinations held.............................. 8
Number of Certificates issued to date......................................36
None of which have been withdrawn or surrendered.
Respectfully,

J. E. JORDAN, Chairman.
T. P. SANDIFORD,
D. B. McCRACKEN.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 157
REPORT OF MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS EXAMINING BOARD FOR THE YEAR 1917
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Mr. A. P. McFARLAND, Fire Chief,
Savannah Fire Department
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
We beg to submit herewith our Annual Report for the
year 1917.
REPORT OF EXAMINATIONS HELD
First Class Operators Passed on 1st Examination................. 4
Second Class Operators Passed on 1st Examination.............. 1
Second Class Operators Passed on 2nd Examination............ 1
Permits Granted to Apprentices................................................ 4
Failed to Pass on 1st and 2nd Examination .......................... 1
SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS HELD FOR
TRAVELING OPERATORS
Passed................................................................................... 6
During the year, we declined to issue license to four, two
on account of being under age, and two women.
158 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
RECOMMENDATIONS
We respectfully recommend that the ordinance introduced
several months ago be adopted.
Respectfully submitted,
D- B. McCRACKEN, Electrical Inspector
J. C. TYSON, Chief Fire Inspector
J. J. REBESKE, Moving Picture Operator
CHIEF FIRE INSPECTOR'S REPORT FOR THE
YEAR 1917
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Mr A. P. McFARLAND, Fire Chief,
Savannah Fire Department
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit herewith my Annual Report
for the year 1917.
During the year there were 57,498 Inspections made by
this department. The majority of the defects were from
defective fire places and flues, defective stoves pipes, and
inflamable material in buildings.
The number of fire calls during the year were as follows:
Box Alarms 142 of which 25 were false.
Phone Alanne 314 of which 19 were false.
Local Alarms 22.
Total Calls 478 44 False.
Of the 478 fire calls, were caused by burning grass,
and 44 were fire calls beyond the City's limits, which includes
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 159
the call from the City of Atlanta, for assistance during their
conflagration on the 21st day of May.
The -fire losses during the year have been greater than
the previous year, but the values on the property involved
have been almost twice as much.
Total values were............................ $14,415,503.50
Total losses were............................. 147,636.85
The percentage of loss being 1.024 per cent, which is the
best record that has ever been attained by the department.
The percentage of loss during the past three years is as follows:
Per cent
1915........................................................................ 1.44
1916.................................................................... 1.31
1917................................................................... 1.024
The Ordinance mentioned in my last report relative to
theatres and moving picture shows was presented to Council
by the Fire Committee several months ago, but as yet has not
been passed. This, in my humble judgment is a very important matter,and I urge that it,or a similar ordinance be adopted
at an early a date as possible.
The Ordiance pertaining to the examination, and regulations govering Moving Picture Machine Operators, has
also been pending for some time and I strongly recommend
that it be adopted and thereby legalize the Examining
Board for Moving Picture Operators. *
GRASS FIRES.
The Fire Department has been called to very large number of grass fires during the year, and in many instances
valuable property was endangered, and some losses sustained
on account of these fires. I suggest that some remedy be
applied to avoid in the future so many fires from this cause.
160 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
FALSE ALARMS.
During the year there has been an unusual number of
false alarms responded to by the department, and most of
them were to the extreme city limits. The man who will
deliberately send in a false alarm is nothing short of a criminal,
and every effort should be exerted to apprehend and have them
punished to the full entent of the law.
FIRE PREVENTION DAY
On October 9th Fire Prevention Day was observed in all
the schools by having Cards with Fire Prevention Dont's put
on walls of the class rooms, and the children's attention directed to them. These cards were also distributed among the
large stores and manufacturing districts. I recommend that
Fire Prevention Day be observed in the future, as I believe
to be a very good way to educate the people, and especially
the school children the importance of fire prevention.
BUILDING CODE.
In my last report I recommended that this city adopt the
building code recommended by the National Board of Fire
Underwriters, and I am pleased to see that it has been adopted
for all future buildings.
PARKING AUTOMOBILES.

The parking of Automobiles on Broughton Street, should
be restricted between certain streets. They should only be
permitted to park on one side of the street, preferably the
South side because in case of a fire call, the street car occupying the center of the Street, it is a very difficult matter for the
Department to pass safely.
The inspectors of this department have been zealous in
the discharge of their various duties, both day and night.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 161
Their attendance every night at the theatre's and moving
picture shows, is for the protection of the people.
I have received the earnest and cordial co-operation of
all city officials and employees in my work during the
year.
J. C. TYSON, Chief Fire Inspector
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF MACHINERY
FOR THE YEAR 1917
Savannah, Ga., March, 5th, 1918.
Mr. A. PORTER McFARLAND, Fire Chief,
Savannah Fire Department
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit herein my report of operation
in my department for the year ending 1917.
At the close of the year I find the different apparatus
of the department in good condition with the exception of one
Steamer at Engine Co. No 4's Station, which needs extensive
repairs on her boiler.
In addition to my daily and weekly inspections, I have
attended to all night alarms and fires during the day. During
the year I have turned out (440) four hundred forty, different
jobs, consuming about (1,800) one thousand eight hundred
hours, besides the many calls both day and night for minor
repairs and adjustments.
I would respectfully recommend the purchase of one
large chuck for lathe, which is most too small for the work of
the department.
I would recommend also that the department purchase
a shaper for the shop which is badly needed.
With the aid of my assistant Mr. S. W. Peck, I trust I
162 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
have given satisfactory service,
In conclusion I would like to thank you as well as the
other officers of the department, for your many courtesies in
the past.
Respectfully submitted,
WALTER L. ZEALEY,
Superintendent of Machinery.
FIRE REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1917.
January..................
February................
March....................
April......................
May........................
June............... .........
July........................
August....... ..... ......
September............
October..................
November..............
December..............
Total......................
I.
481
354
553
590
650
621
549
601
552
690
703
800
7,144
in Material Inf.yards bidg and
159
134
156
177
201
132
192
205
73
330
270
390
2,419
Fire Placeswith
premises Works on
3
1
1
12
17
in Wiring Def.
Buildings
2
2
2
10
3
9
10
6
17
3
1
65
windows Bars acrosElevator Shafts a
1
1
5
1
8
1
3
20
"
and Deft.Stores
Pipes
369
257
315
201
301
272
205
270
161
153
130
53
2,687
Places Deft.Fire
Flues and
830
779
1,182
1,057
1,258
1,067
941
779
34
525
306
185
9,543
Cellars withInfl.
Mtl. andtrash
32
24
38
6
29
9
4
10
25
35
43
255
First O,K.oa
Inspection
.......... .
1,415
1,270
833
1,278
1,023
846
1,027
1,077
714
1,083
274
304
11,144
0. KSecond o
Inspection
61
443
1,205
515
941
905
780
641
798
756
1,560
1,334
9,939
0- K.Third on
Inspection
75
230
200
443
119
477
307
236
77
253
2,417
I
I
FIRE REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1917.
January............
February..........
March.. ............
April............ ......
May....... ........ ...
June.... ... ....
July...
August..............
September........
October............
November.. ....
December........
Total.. ........
O. FourthK. on
Fifth Insp. and
16
88
10
41
155
Window Broken Ordered Glasses
Repaired
5
2
10
2
4
23
Gaso Placeswith
hand line on
12
16
5
4
14
14
5
22
82
17
6
4
201
Metal Ordered
and Under Around
Stoves
50
91
35
17
30
90
12
55
15
20
22
21
458
Gasoline Tanks Under Ground
4
2
5
6
1
5
5
5
6
2
1
37
Parties Out on
First Call
192
605
327
471
342
307
494
278
189
324
94
13
3,636
Parties Out on
Second Call
577
141
548
229
661
647
372
502
422
314
499
220
5,132
Windows Doors and
in Buildings Obstructed
.____
1
2
5
1
2
2
18
5
3
39
Special Dutyand
Alms, Etc.
71
35
42
27
38
20
21
30
37
47
120
143
631
1
1,237
184
28
1
1,450
Bad Order Pols in
1
1
2
1
5
Leaks Water
Reported
12
21
5
3
11
29
81
REPORT OF FIRES FOR THE YEAR 1917.
SHOWING ACTUAL VALUES AND LOSSES SUSTAINED TOGETHER WITH THE AMOUNT
INSURANCE CARRIED AND AMOUNTS SAVED
MONTHS.
January............
February..........
March..,..
April..................
May.... ..............
July.......
August..............
September........
October............
November........
December...... .
Totals..............
Value of
Buildings
$ 639,600.00
575,040.00
539,000.00
250,550.00
1,594,950.00
200,762.50
837,875.00
88,375.00
124,780.00
3,537,975.00
473,250.00
480,430.00
$9,342,587.50
Value of
Contents
$ 417,575.00
1,076,475.00
206,475.00
139,400.00
1,040,050.00
1,042.150,00
296,900.00
45,646.00
43,460.00
393,300.00
159,730.00
211,755.00
$5,072,916.00
Total
Values
$ 1,057,175.00
1,651.515.00
745,475.00
389,950.00
2,635,000.00
1,242.912.50
1,134,775.00
134,021.00
168,240.00
3,931,275.00
632,980.00
692,185.00
$14,415,503.50
Loss on
Buildings
$ 862.00
3,606.45
2,110.75
369.00
3,434.68
527.11
183.30
1,373.45
2,415.30
11,232.35
6,085.69
7,616.40
$39,816.48
Loss on
Contents
$ 1,963.00
55,723.81
15,055.20
1,030.50
2,431.72
285.00
197.15
777.99
343.00
10,446.00
3,463.25
16,103.75
$107,820.37
Total
Loss.
$ 2,825.00
59,330.26
17,165.95
1,399.50
5,866.40
812.11
380.45
2,151.44
2,758.30
21,678.35
9,548.94
23,720.15
$147,636.85
I
GO
I
fe)
s
Percentage of Total Loss 1.024. Percentage of Insurance Loss 1.32.
REPORT OF FIRES FOR THE YEAR 1917.Continued.
MONTHS.
January ....
February ..
March........
April..........
May........ ....
June........
July............
August-
September
October.-...
November
DecemberTotals........
Insurance on
Buildings
$ 571,500.00
341,750.00
311,200.00
190,200.00
1,197,400.00
131,050.00
337,350.00
53,850.00
66,150.00
3,354,000.00
316,700.00
259,650.00
$7,130,800.00
Insurance on
Contents
$ 353,900.00
969,700,00
134,450.00
96,000.00
610,400.00
950,000.00
231,750.00
22,000.00
19,500.00
290,000.00
77,500.00
112,200.00
$3,867,400.00
Total
Insurance
$ 925,400.00
1,311,450.00
445,650.00
286,200.00
1,807,800.00
1,081,050.00
569,100.00
75,850.00
85,650.00
3,644,000.00
394,200.00
371,850.00
$10,998,200.00
Saved on
Buildings
$ 638,738.00
571,434.55
536,889.25
250,133.00
1,591,515.32
200,235.39
837,691.70
87,001.55
122,364.70
3,526,742.65
457,164.31
472,981.10
$9,292,891.52
Saved on
Contents
$ 415,612.00
1,020,761.19
191,419.80
138,417.50
1,037,618.28
1,041,865.00
296,702.85
44,868.01
43,117.00
382,854.00
151,785.25
195,811.25
$4,960,832.13
Total
Saved
$ 1,054,350.00
1,592,195.74
728,309.05
388,550.50
2,629,133.60
1,242,100.39
1,134,394.55
131,869.56
165,481.70
3,909,596.65
608,949.56
$ 668,792.35
814,253,723.65
2
I
I
1
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 167
NUMBER FEET OF HOSE LAID
January............. ........ ................. ......
February.... ........ .......................
March......... ........ .... . ........ ..... .........
April. ............. ............ .......................
May........ .............. ........... ............ ......
June. ...... ........ ........... ...... I....... .
July....-......-.-...... .... ......... .....
August............. ...... ...... ............
September.-. ....... ...... .......... .......
October.......... ... ...... ..........................
November.... ......... ........ .............
.............................. 6,400
.............................. 34,600
.............................. 10,400
...... .................. 10,950
............................. 9,250
.............................. 4,750
............................. 550
............ 5,000
.............................. 4,200
............ ........... ....... 19,000
............ ........... 19,500
Total feet.................................................. 144,950
NUMBER GALLONS CHEMICALS DISCHARGED
January..................... .......................
February....... ........... .....................
March................ ...... ......... ....... .........
April............ .......... .............................
May........ .............. ............ .................
June...... ....... ................ ............. .........
July.............. ............ ....... ......... .........
August......... ............. ........... .............
September....... .......... ........-..........
October................ ...... ............... ........
November...................... ...... .......... ...
December...... .............. ........... ......
.............................. 435
.......... .................... 1,145
.............................. 795
............ ......... 232
............................. 627
.............................. 80
............................. 115
.............................. 272
.............................. 239
............................. 999
.............................. 1,014
............................. 796
Total gallons.................................................. 6,749
168 MAYOR'S ANNAUL REPORT
HOW FIRES WERE EXTINGUISHED
January- ...'...
February..........
March._..... .....
April.......... ......
May._...............
June............ ....
July. ...............
August............
September ......
October. .........
November........
December.......
Totals.... ......
Out Dept. when
arrived
7
14
13
in
13
^?,
8
4
ft
9
1ft
17
127
Chimney foul
burned out
3
5
9:
4
1
1
3
4
23

ft
9
1
4
10
13
42
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
Buckets ofWater
8
9
4
1
9
3
?.
1
?,
4
7
9
ft9
O
e
1
1
1
?,
3
1
1
1
11

I
6
11
15
11
fi
5
?
3
5
4
8
14
16
99
Hydrant Streams
4
fi
fi
1
5
ft
3
1
6
8
10
ftft
1
o
1
?,
10
3
4
1
1
ft
ft
4
3ft
s
i
i
3
?,
3
3
fi
3
3
4
fi
10
44
J9
o i->
40
fifi
37
?,?,
41
27
?,?.
19
Ifi
41
fi7
80
478
ORIGIN OF FIRES
MONTHS
January..............................
February............................
March............... .................
April.......... .........................
May.....!....... .................. .....
June....................................
July.....................................
August...............................
September..........................
October.......... .....................
November.... ....................
December........... ........ .......
Total. .........................
Dwellings
ffi 11
21
10
7
11
7
5
5
3
6
16
17
119
EA'
en
1

PQ
2
1
3
2
1
1
5
.15
UN
sV
3 O
5
1
6
G
3
1
11
28
12
10
13
7
5
6
3
7
16
22
140
ILL'&
1
P
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
10
UMI
%

1

1
1
NAT
I+3
O
ING
tn
1

1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
11
Dwellings
S, .
11
15
12
2
7
6
4
5
2
8
25
15
112
I 1
Business oo
<->
3
8
5
4
7
5
4
3
4
7
4
6
60
:EL
1-*i
o
13
12
4
5
10
6
2
1
3
13
16
26
111
LA!

ps< 1
1
3
2
3
3
6
3
3
4
6
10
44
*EO
"3
-u

28
38
23
11
27
20
16
12
12
32
51
57
327
US
-O <n
*- 11 O
OH
40
66
37
22
41
27
22
19
16
41
67
80
478
I
I
1
o'
ALARMS FOR THE YEAR 1917.
(Manner of Receipt.)
BOX ALARMS
Jan. 25-17-217-412-147-47-513-521..
Feb. 81-29-134-117-57-323-81-51-19
59-39-48-45-216-523-143-21-6
113-138-148-17-62.....................
Mch. 116-131-216-69-34-93-17-57
82-43..........................................
April 43-8-521-57.................. ........ ....
May 51-46-26-4.12-16-112-35-13
84-52-79.....................................
June 117-23-46-127-156......................
July 214-51-19-35-45-125-75-123......
Box Alarms
I
E
7
?,3
8
4
in
4
4
(5
1
7,
1
1
4

1
8
23
10
4
11
fi
8
'Phone Alms. 1 1 Local Alarms 1 1 Total Alarms
1
?R
37
?,3
17
flfi
20
I 11
to 7s
fa
3
?,
9,
2
(0 *3
1
7
40
?,3
17
28
9ffl
13
0)

E
4
3
4
1
?,
1
"3

3
1
^ 30
3
4
1
?,
1
1

39
ftS
Sfi
TO
38
24
Ifi
$
3
fa
1
3
2
3
3
fi
3m
1
40
6fi
37
m
41
27
23
I
cc
ALARMS FOR YEAR 1917 (Continued)
August 49-521-127-129 ......
Sep. 147-128-81-513-412-147-215-94
Oct. 125-523-12-147-66-63-58-57-
128-14-6 ......................................
November 213-128-51-21-147-52-72
113-117-69-116-52-119-521-156
119-32-127-142-66-45-213
Dec. 156-522-78-168-156-12-16-78 ..
217-57-71-27-164-127-93-9-168-
16-158-161-137-129-112-156-
95-5-213-45.
Totals.........................................
?,
6
10
19
?,o
117
?,
2
1
3
8
25
4
8
11
?,?,
W
142
14
6
916
39
48
295
1
1
3
3
?,
19
15
7
?,9
49!
50
31
1
1
3
?,
22
1
1
3
9!
22
16
13
37
fil
70
434
3
3
4
fi
10
44
1Q
16
41
67
80
478
CQ
w
s
172 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
u
p
CC
(4
O
fa
(=.
CO
^K) J ^nO
^o
mox
-TO
.W
omml
WOT
Anrtpawal
,H<0
~w*a
sang
**I*W
.xocn.^p.oa
aATloajpQ
noq.?4
s^oTHunj puB
toAO^s pa^saqj >.\Q
-0,3*00,^0^,3
mor4?r,?
K
32
. CMiOCOTji>OTj<i ii ii
10 10 : f-t i ; :
OcOt C; -<t-<MCCC
*^f* '"^ co ^ ^^ 0*1 C1^ i^ !""
rHcoiN coeocococc
r-H
CMCOlt5flCOtO^ii;
*OTj-co-*>n-*coK:
i-H iH
: CM : : ; i : :
"H
ocot^oocot^cC'
r-f i-H l-H ; i-H
CO >O (M -*1 r-H i-H
CM * <N CM CO CSt 1 i-1
CMCMMlCM :i-HCM^-
: CM I-H T i
rH CM l-H T-H tt* i"1
1 t-H rH -H
J ,g ^ ^ ,_, ^,
i fc.
'>,' a
I'l-g i * 1
^&ng<|gH,H,<ia:
II|||1^11
m t- co
3 CO -i
-t (M
ft t O
Tjt CO OO
^ CO O
to co *-<
oo
222!
-^ ia
I-H i i
i ' *"*
CO * CM
l-H XQ 1O
kO OO
CM -!
CM --H id
i-( r-l ;
OO t ^
; :
October...... November December..
i-H
0
l-H
00
t00
S5
C^
CO
S
<N
i-H

3
oo
co
0
-<*<
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 173
GENERAL REMARKS
I desire to direct special attention to the fact that during the year this Department responded to 478 Fire Alarms,
(60) sixty of which were grass fires, and (44) were beyond
the City limits.
The total value of property to which we responded beyond the City limits was $3,123,900.00, loss sustained $64,755--
90, saved $3,059,144.10.
Under date of May 21st, 1917, we received a call from
Atlanta, Ga., that a conflagration was in progress and to
come at once. Under direction of Second Assistant Fire
Chief Thos. J. Fogerty, this Department responded with
Engine Company No. 7's Pumper, and Engine Company No.
1's, wagon, 2,400 feet of fire hose, and 22 firemen.
In my last report I paid reference to the necessity of the
Police Ambulance responding to all (2-2-2) and (3-3-3) Fire
Alarms. Since making the above remarks, under date of
February 7th, 1917, this Department responded to a cotton
fire at Inglesby's Warehouse, on the Central Rai'road
Terminals, and on December 8th, 1917, fire at 315-317-319
Broughton St., West, at both these fires several Firemen were
injured and had to be sent to the hospital it; was necessary
however to arrange for private conveyance to get them to the
hospital.
RECOMMENDATIONS
I would most respectfully recommend that a new fire
station be built in the Southern section of the City. At the
present time the City is building South, and I feel that a new
station is necessary.
As has been done for the past several years, I recommend that a new Headquarters Building be placed on Oglethorpe and Abercorn Streets.
I would also recommend the purchase of an Automobile
for the Second Assistant Fire Chief, as well as a tractor for
he big Aerial Truck at Fire Headquarters.
174 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
IN CONCLUSION.
In conclusion, I wish to thank His Honor The Mayor,
the Honorable City Council, the Honorable Committee on
Fire, to-gether with the heads of the different City Departments, more especially that of the Police and Chief Engineer,
for their valued co-operation during my term of office. I
wish to also extend my most sincere thanks to my Assistants
A. Jno. Toshach, and Thos. J. Fogerty, for their assistance at
To the various heads and members of the Department,
permmit me to thank you most heartily for your valued cooperation, and for your assistance rendered in my behalf
during tne year just closed.
Respectfully submitted,
A. P. McFARLAND, Fire Chief,
Savannah Fire Department.
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
POLICE DEPARTMENT
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
FOR THE YEAR
1917
B. S. BRYANT
CHIEF OF POLICE

REPORT OF POLICE DEPARTMENT
Savannah, Ga., January 1. 1918.
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit herewith the annual report of the Police
Department for the year 1917.
Tables showing the work of the department for the year,
are herewith attached. A comparison of these tables with
the previous year's work will readily show that the men of the
department have discharged their duties in a creditable
manner, for which I wish to express my appreciation.
I have used every means at my disposal to enforce the
Prohibition Law and a comparison of arrest for murders,
burglaries, drunks etc., and the number of arrests for violations of this law compared with those of last year and the
year before shows in my opinion that the work of the department along this particular line of work is very creditable.
The good results of the enforcement of the Prohibition Law
have been very marked during the past year as the year Before.
Taking in consideration the determined opposition to the
enforcement of the Prohibition Law and the persistent violations of same by a large number of our citizens, and the public
controversies relative to the legal position of the department
in enforcing said law, and the large number of new men with
which I had to work and the large number of vacancies I had
in the department for long periods, I feel that the department
has made a very commendable record in this particular work,
and the work of the department generally. It will be the
policy of this department to continue to enforce this law,
feeling it a duty we owe the people of this city.
178 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
I wish to call your attention to the increase in lost or
stolen property which is accounted for by the fact that we
added to this all stolen automobiles for the year 1917 which
werenot included in this table in 1916 or any year before. I
also call your attention to the increase in automobile accidents
over the year before which is accounted for by the increase in
number of automobiles in use and the method adopted in
1917 of recording these accidents. In previous years we only
reported accidents where cases were made in court against the
people who had the accidents, but for this year we kept a
record of all accidents of every kind whether cases were made
or not.
The department is equipped at present with 105 Winchester rifles and approximately 50,000 rounds of ammunition,
while in previous years we only had 42 Winchesters, each
member of the department is also equipped with a revolver,
and we have on hand a sufficient amount of ammunition for
these revolvers, which in my opinion places the department ina position to cope with almost any emergency. I will institute
a school of instructions for the members of the department
for 1918 which will include instructions in the use of firearms, target practice, drills, etc.
I wish to call your attention to the great need of the installation of incandescent lights in Factor's Walk, Bay Lane,
Congress Lane and Broughton Lane, as in my opinion,
especially during the conditions which now exist, it will afford
a great protection to the properties embraced in this territory,
and would be of material assistance to members of the department patroling this territory.
I wish to thank His Honor the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen and the Police Committee, and His Honor Judge Schwarz,
Recorder of Police Court, and the officers and members of the
department for the kindnesses and co-operation shown me as
head of the department during the year.
Respectfully submitted,
B. S. BRYANT,
Chief of Police.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 17!)
REPORT OF GAMEWELL SYSTEM
Savannah, Ga., Jan. 1st, 1918.
Mr. B. S. BRYANT, Chief of Police,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I submit herewith a report on the operation, maintenance
and extention of the Police Signal System, also an outline of
other work attended to for the department by myself and
assistants.
The general condition of the system is as good as when reported on in my last annual report. The necessary amount
of overhauling and rebuilding having been done to keep it in
this condition, new cables and wires have been installed, three
new boxes placed in commission and about one fourth of the
overhead line changed to twisted pair conductors. The new
boxes are No. 112 Dray ton and Liberty, Sts. No. 113 Alexander Street and Augusta Avenue, No. 114 Fifty-second and
Bull streets.
The switch board in the sergeants office has been rewired
complete with braided rubber covered wire, this was made
necessary on account of deterioration of the unbraided insultation on the wire with which the board was originally equipped; seven thousand nine hundred and twenty-five feet of
twisted pair wire and fourteen cross arms were used in the
installation of the new boxes.
Five hundred and twenty-five feet of five pair underground cables was installed on Abercorn Street from Oglethorpe
Avenue to Perry Lane, and three hundred seventy-five feet of
three pair changed to five pair in Perry Lane from Abercorn
to Lincoln street, three cables were stocked on hand and are
the joint property of the Fire and Police Departments.
180 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The service for the past year has been excellent, there
being but few interruptions, and they of minor importance
usually caused by blowing of fuses during lightning storms.
On one occasion Circuit No. 4 became crossed with primary
lines of the Savannah Lighting Company causing break down
of cable at one point and burn out of bx No. 52 service, on
this circuit was interrupted about two hours, the damage being
repaired without the loss of any equipment, in addition to
work done on the signal system. We have attended to all
duties assigned us including wiring for lights, bells etc., also
repairs to electric lights, bells, heaters, irons and telephones as
well as the electrical and mechanical equipment of Automobiles and Motorcycles of the department.
My recommendation for the year of 1918 will be made
during the year at such time as the needs of the system requires and the condition of the budget will permit of expenditure of funds, including in my next annual report such recommendation, if any, as were not approved and adopted.
My assistants Mr. E- H. Todd and J. T. Owens have
labored faithfully throughout the year to perfect and maintain a satisfactory service and I desire that they be given
credit for much of the good work that has been done.
Very respectfully,
T. P. SANDIFORD,
City Electrician.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 181
MATRON'S REPORT
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Mr B. S. BRYANT, Chief of Police,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit the following report showing the number
of white girls and white women who came under my charge
during the year, 1917, and the disposition of, the cases against
them. Very respectfully;
Mrs. L. E. FISHER, Matron,
January.................................. 2 July.................................... 8
February................................ 5 August................................ 14
March.................................... 7 September.......................... 8
April.-.................................. 5 October.............................. 4
May........................................ 10 November.......................... 7
June....................................... 6 December.......................... 8
Total................................................................................ 84
DISPOSITION OF CASES
Sentenced.................................................................................... 35
Dismissed................................................................................... 20
Released.................................... ................................................ 11
Used as Witnesses......................................_........................... 3
Sent to Hospital.......................................................................... 1
Lodgers........................................................................................ 2
Turned over to Associated Charities...................................... 1
Turned over to Parents............................................................ 2
Turned over to U. S. Authorities............................................ 2
Turned over to other Authorities............................................ 3
Turned over to Juvenile Court................................................ 2
Turned over on Lunacy warrant.............................................. 2
Total................................................................................ 84
CAUSE OF ARREST MADE DURING 1917.
Accidents, Automobiles....................
Accidents, Motorcycles...... ..............
Accidents, Street cars.............. ..........
Accidents, Other Vehicles......... .......
Adultery..............................................
Adultery and Fornication................
Arrested for Other Cities..................
Assault and Battery..........................
Assualt with Intent to Murder......
Associated Charities (Arrested for)
Attempted Burglary..........................
Attempted Itape....................... .........
Attempted Larceny of an Auto......
Attempted Larceny............ ..............
Attempting to Cheat and Swindle
Attempting to Pick a Pocket........ .
Jan.
10
1
1
12
5
2
1
Feb.
13
4
2
8
1
Mch.
5
3
8
1
Apr.|
11
11
11
1
1
May
9
1
3
2
6
2
3
2
1
June
9
2
3
14
5
4
1
1
1
July
9
3
2
10
4
5
Aug.
30
3
6
11
2
2
1
Sept
14
2
2
1
4
9
1
1
1
1
Oct.]
16
2
4
6
1
1
1
Nov.
18
1
1
2
8
1
1
Dec.
21
2
2
8
2
1
2
1
Total
165
4
4
25
4
22
111
35
20
4
5
2
1
2
2
1
Vt
I
CAUSE OF ARTEST MADEContinued.
Attempting to Stab ........................
Bastardy.. ..........................................
Beating a Board Bill........................
Bigamy................ ................................
Burglary ..........................................
Carrying Concealed Weapons........
Cheating and Swindling..................
Contempt of Court............................
Cow Stealing......................................
Cruelty to Animals............................
Cruelty to Children.... ......................
Deserters from Army and Navy...
Deserters from Foreign Vessels.....
Disorderly Conduct..........................
Disorderly Conduct Drunk..............
Driving Automobile while Drunk..
Drunk on Public Highway..............
Drunk on Railroad Train................
Disposing of Mortgaged Goods......
Escaped Convicts........... ...................
ForKerv..................... ........................
6
5
1
1
6
?,
96
48
1
1
1
1
9
3
4
4
1
9
6
74
49,
1
1
1
1
1
5
9,
?,
3
3
3
3
?,
116
,17
1
2
1
4
?
4
1
2
1
104
45
3
4
14
1
5
4
4
1
117
57
3
1
4
*
5
1
5
?:
4
4
1
163
55
1
?,
2
7
6
3
1
1
11
143
54
?
?,
4
?,
7
1
3
1
146
49
1
1
1
5
?,
4
1
4
119
48
?,
3
3
-
4
9
1
14
88
35
1
3
1
7
3
1
3
6
1
63
51
1
1
2
5
?,
1
23
78
54
1
?,
3
2
3
1
70
34
34
30
3
15
1
79
26
1,307
575
5
5
1
5
25
6
CAUSE OF ARREST MADEContinued.
Gambling House................
Gambling......................................
Gambling Device...............
Horse Stealing..............................
Involuntery Manslaughter........
Inciting Riot...... ..........................
Juvenile Court (Arrested for)....
Keeping a Lewd House..............
Larceny.......
Larceny of Automobile..............
Larceny of over Fifty Dollars..
Larceny from the House.......".....
Larceny from the Person..........
Larceny from Railroad Train....
Larceny after Trust....................
Loitering......................................
Lunacy.........................................
Malicious Mischief......................
Mayhem..............................
Manslaughter..............................
Maintaining Public Nuisance ..
34
2
25
90
8
g
2fi
2
2
1
43
24
23
5
4
6
28
14
1
36
19
7
3
33
3
6
' 8
33
18
3
19,
1
7
39
2
45
34
1
10
3
16
1
5
2fi
8
15
38
19
1
1
in
5
23
B
1
12
32
29
10
7
20
3
1
1
1
13
1
29
18
7
6
m
7
35
17
21
2fi
9
1
1
35
1
10
23
18
11
5
7
22
3
2
13
14
2
14
11
2
4
27
1
1
30
19
25
14
1
' 5
m
3
2
276
18
2
1
8
296
3
250
12
1
119
9
2
04
362
38
4
1
2
1
I**
CO
I
CAUSE OF ARREST MADEContinued.
Murder..........................................
"Pprinrv
Pointing a Pistol............ ..............
Public Nuisance . ........................
Rape................................ ...........
Receiving Stolen Goods ............
Robbery by Force ......................
Seduction......................................
Speeding with an Automobile ..
Speeding with Motorcycle ........
Stabbing........................................
Stealing Ride on Railroad Train
Suspicious Characters.. ..............
Trespassing..................................
Using Auto without Permission
U. S. Court (Arrested for)..... ...
Vagrancy......................................
Violating City Ordinance..........
Violating Dog Badge Ordinance
Violating Garbage Ordinance....
Violating Emigrant Ordinance..
1
?,
1
1
5
9
8
?,
7
48
1
75
fi
1
1
1
2
4
4
57
1
1
48
5
2
2
10
3
1
53
1
1
1
85
696
1
12
4
1
52
12
1
50
12
1
1
1
21
1
2
60
3
4
100
2
2
1
1
1
16
1
5
53
4
44
1
4
3
1
24
10
33
3
14
1
?,
1
36
1
3
47
2
3
54
1
?,
1
1
3
1
34
2
7
41
4
fi?,
3
1
1
44
?,
?,
1
33
3
3
45
1
1
1
3
?,
49
4
4
913
?,
3
60
1
21
?,
5
28
3
31
2
1
14
3
5
\?,
20
3
280
20
48
9
528
8
5
41
2
668
708
3
13
S
I
CO
>
25
12!
00J**l
CAUSE OF ARREST MADEContinued.
Violating Pure Food Ordinance....
Violating Restaurant OrdinanceViolating Traffic Ordinance..........
Violating Water Ordinance...... ......
Violating Weed Ordinance............
Violating State Prohibition Law
Wife Beating....................................
(Totals each Month).. ............
Grand Total................
7
31
45
569
16
22
478
166
19
1,359
50
31
561
3
71
52
720
1
4?,
38
611
915
34
m
42
1
699
4
54
7
6
71
667
37
45
36
653
1
71
9
43
547
43
32
487
1
66
41
542
11
6
672
41
188
472
1
7,893
2
1
co
*ra
!
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ARREST EACH MONTH
January............................. .... 569
February........ ___ ...... ....... ........ ....... .......... 478
March......--.......................,..... 1,359
April.................. .................: ............... 561
May................. ..... .................................. 720
June....-......................................-....... 611
July....................-.....-............-... 699
August-...-..---......-----...--...-... 667
September............... ........................... ........................... 653
October........ 547
November...........-.............. 487
December................................. ............... ... ... ... ..... ........ 542
TOTAL... .... :... 7,893
ARRESTS IN PREVIOUS YEARS
1911.-.............--...--..--........-....... 10,433
1912.-...-.........-........--.---... 10,303
1913................-.-.....---...-.............-- ll,356
1914--........................---....-. 10,461
1915-.--..----.-...-...----.-----......-... 11,480
1916-..-.-.......-...- ....... ............ . 8,719
FINES COLLECTED IN POLICE COURT
Fines Collected in Police Court During 1917 $24,089.00
FINES COLLECTED IN POLICE COURT EACH YEAR
FROM 1907 to 1916, INCLUSIVE.
1916.....-......-............-.--. .$14,125.00
1915.............--...........---..-....-----.-. 14,998.00
1914.............................--.........----...... 14,900.00
1913..........................-..-.......-..-----... 23,519.95
1912.......-............- ...-...... . 25,590.85
1911..-.-..-. ........... ........ 25,200.35
1910.....................-......-.................-..-... 23,562.20
1909.-......--........... ........... ... 19,332.01
1908............-.. --- ...... .......... 35,113.06
1907...-....-----.--..-.-..-.--------.-. 18, 255 . 25
CLASSFICATION OF ARRESTS MADE DURING 1917.
r
00
Jan. | Feb. | Mch.| April | May | Junej July | AugTj Sept.) Oct. | Nov. | Dec. | Total
White Men......... ..
White Women......
White Boys............
White Girls ..........
Negro Men... .........
Negro Women......
Negro Boys............
Chinamen.... ..........
Negro Girls............
TOTALS............
219
11
10
238
66
21
4
569
160
6
10
?,U
73
14
1
478
561
55
11
441
268
18
5
1.359
196
12
13
1
228
86
20
5
561
300
23
14
263
94
22
4
720
197
12
8
236
117
37
4
611
293
36
9
211
118
24
6
2
699
227
28
6
1
263
111
20
11
667
250
20
5
261
98
15
4
653
227
17
6
1
212
64
17
3
547
208
13
2
203
49
9
3
487
208
16
2
1
248
50
15
9,
542
3,046
249
96
4
3,018
1,194
232
6
48
' 7.893
I
r*
fc
DISPOSITIONS OF CASES YEAR 1917
Jan.|Feb|Mch.[Apl| May [ June | July [Aug. [Sept. [Oct. | Nov. | Dec. | Total
Sentenced........................ ........
Dismissed..................... .........
Sentence Suspended................
Turned over to Superior Ct.
Turned over to City Court ..
Turned over to Ordinary's
Court...............;....................
Turned over to Juvenile Ct.
Turned over to various
Sheriffs, etc...................... ....
Turned over to Foreign Vessel
Turned over to Army and
Navy....................................
Suspicious characters released
Turned over to U. S. Athor.
Held for U. S. Court..............
Turned over to Associated
Charities................... ...........
TOTAL............................
202
177
11
16
68
2
25
12
2
6
48
659
177
136
1
13
46
24
8
6
9
57
1
478
633
564
3
8
45
3
36
8
2
3
53
1
1,359
177
197
3
8
61
2
35
11
1
2
52
12
561
250
241
5
12
85
8
41
6
1
4
60
5
2
720
211
200
2
15
63
5
38
14
1
4
53
4
1
611
194
303
3
14
90
3
34
10
11
1
33
3
699
220
237
5
7
96
7
29
11
1
3
47
4
667
223
251
5
13
81
1
21
9
4
41
4
653
159
224
3
6
72
3
23
6
14
33
3
1
547
186
164
3
6
72
1
14
8
6
1
23
3
487
186
195
3
2
72
3
19
23
28
3
2,818
2,889
47
120
851
38
339
111
54
51
528
4
39
4
5427,893
I
CO
I
s
190 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
GAMEWELL AND PRIVATE CALLS
Wagon Calls Returns Calls
IGamewell \ Private I Gamewell) Private
Office
Report
January.......
February.....
March.........
April.............
May...
June.............
July.............
August.........
SeptemberOctober.......
NovemberDecember
TOTAL..
157
132
151
167
205
196
207
222
176
146
156
186
70
38
54
74
61
85
65
59
51
49
44
59
709
170
132
154
170
205
210
208
227
182
147
158
175
2,138
50
22
24
49
40
57
46
31
39
33
32
47
14,836-
13,652..
16,116..
17,346..
15,790..
14,985-
14,452..
16,902-
16,956..
17,263..
15,920..
18,036..
470 192,254..
AMBULANCE CALLS
White | Colored | Total
January.................................. 35
February.......................... 44
March.................................... 50
April.................................. 40
May........................................ 40
June........................................ 48
July............... 43
August..... 41
September............................. 43
October............................ 35
November.................. 25
December...... 33
TOTAL.... 477
42
45
58
58
65
53
60
69
64
43
57
40
654
77
89
108
98
105
101
103
110
107
78
82
73
1,131
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 191
CALLS RESPONDED TO BY MOTORCYCLE
CALL PATROLMAN FROM
HEADQUARTERS
January.......................... 118 July........
February......................
March..........................
........................ 215
28 August.......................... 163
124 September...................... 132
April................................ 162 October........
May................................ 173 November.-..
June.... 195 December.
142 135'
154
TOTAL......................................................................... 1,741
CALLS RESPONDED TO BY MOTORCYCLE
CALL PATROLMAN FROM
SUB-STATION No 1
January.........................
February..
March...........................
April................................ 123 October.....
May................................ 117 November
June...............................
103 July................................ 114
90 August........................... 124
120 September...................... 116
.............. 122
............... 94
144 December...................... 86
TOTAL.......................................................................... 1,353
CALLS RESPONDED TO BY MOTORCYCLE
CALL PATROLMAN FROM
SUB-STATION No. 2
January..........................
February........................ 62 August...
March............................ 86 September...
April............................... 119 October........
May................................ 82 November...
June................................ 116 December....
88 July................................ 106
............ 80
............ 62
63
49
44
TOTAL.............................-.------.....-----.- 957
REPORTS ON ACCIDENTS, LOST CHILDREN, ANIMALS
IMPOUNDED, ETC.
Jan.|Feb|Mch. |Apl| May] June | July
Animals Impounded......... .....
Attempted Suicide................
Dead Bodies Found.... ...........
Deaths by Drowning..............
Deaths reported to coroner ..
Defective Sidewalks...............
Electric Lights Out...............
Lost Children Found............ ..
Suicides.. ..................................
Stores Found Open................
Water Mains Reported Leak
ing....................... ................
Water Box Covers-Reported
TOTAL............................
12
3
3
8
10
1
15
5
2
59
7
1
2
2
2
23
1
28
180
1
247
10
6
6
1
17
1
31
5
1
78
9
4
4
28
10
55
16
1
2
1
2
3
23
28
13
2
91
2
2
4
4
9
22
7
50
2
4
4
2
4
3
12
........5
13
4
53
Aug.
7
1
1
18
9
14
6
1
57
Sept.
11
2
3
3
2
15
23
4
1
64
Oct. |Nov.
5
2
1
1
6
9
24
1
49
14
2
2
18
24
1
22
13
3
99
Dec. | Total
3
3
1
24
30
36
12
4
113
98
12
31
3
29
89
185
6
3
284
260
15
1,015
REPORTS ON ACCIDENTS, LOST CHILDREN, ETC., Continued.
ACCIDENTS
Automobiles....... ....
Motorcycles..............
Street Cars....... ...... .
Other Vehicles..........
TOTAL......... ......
2fi
9:
9,
8
38
13
1
?,
7
23
19
?:
S
11
37
2fi
?,
fi
10
43
29
5
3
Ifi
52
17
?,
7
in
3fi
?,n
4
S
in
39
23
B
7
Ifi
48
23
2
2
Ifi
43
31
2
8
in
fin
11
2
6
3
22
19
1
9
2
31
256
27
62
127
472
CO
I
i^j
8
to
w
194 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Reports made to Police Department of Automobiles
Lost or Stolen and Recovered in the City, and those
Recovered for Other Cities During Year 1917.
January. ...............................
February......... .................... ...
March... ............. ....................
April.-.. ...................................
May.... ............... .....................
June........................................
July ........................................
August..... ............................
September............................. .
October............ ............... .......
November...... .......................
December..............................
TOTAL..........................
Lost or
Stolen
1
3
2
1
3
4
3
2
1
3
3
3
29
Recovered
1
3
2
3
4
3
2
2
3
3
25
Recovered for
Other Cities
1
2
1
1
1
6
LODGERS ACCOMMODATED
January...
February...
March.......
April.__ ......
June........ ......
July..............
August.......
September....
October........
November....
December....
White
24
30
11
13
5
11
12
13
2
5
11
7
Colored
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
Total
25
32
13
13
7
12
12
13
4
6
12
8
TOTAL._. 144 13 157
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 195
SALARIES PAID MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT
1 Chief........................................................................ $2,600.00
1 First Lieutenant...................................................... 1,680.00
1 Second Lieutenant................................................. 1,580.00
1 Third Lieutenant.................................................... 1,520.00
1 Clerk, Police Department and Police Court...... 1,800.00
1 Clerk, Detective Department.............................. 900.00
1 Matron....................................................................' 600.00
1 Chief of Detectives................................................ 1,680.00
1 Sergeant of Detectives.......................................... 1,300.00
2 Detectives................................................................ 1,280.00
2 Detectives................................................................ 1,220.00
1 Detective.................................................................. 1,160.00
1 Detective................................................................. 1,100,00
1 First Sergeant.......................................................... 1,380.00
7 Sergeants.................................................................. 1,300.00
1 Sergeants.................................................................. 1,240.00
1 Sergeant.................................................................. 1,180.00
I Sergeant.................................................................. 1,120.00
II Patrolmen................................................................ 1,080.00
15 Patrolmen................................................................ 1,020.00
25 Patrolmen................................................................ 960.00
54 Patrolmen................................................................ 900.00
1 Electrician (half salary}.......................................... 900.00
1 Assistant Electrician (half salary)........................ 600.00
4 Drivers..-......-......'-.....,-...................-............ 900.00
1 Stable Keeper.-.................................................. 1,200.00
1 Assistant Stable Keeper (Night)......................... 780.00
1 Mechanic:.-............................................................ 1,200.00
1 Porter (c).............'..................................................... 360.00
MEN UNDER PENSION
1 Sergeant................................................................ 746.00
2 Sergeants.-......................................................... 560.00
2 Sergeants.............................................................. 650.00
196 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
1 Detective.....
2 Privates.......
1 Private......
1 Private..-----
640.00
540.00
510.00
300.00
CHANGES IN DEPARTMENTS DURING 1917.
APPOINTMENTS
Private B. S. Beach
Private T. F. English
Private D. Gay
Private J. W. Graham
Private M. R. Garnett
Private C. E. Hayes
Private H. B. Hamilton
Private F. C- Hamilton
Private E. M. Harris
Private D. N. Heath
Private I. D. Heery
Private G. Joiner
Private W. A. Kennedy
Private H. E- Lollis
Private C. E. Love
Private G. McElmurray
Private D. L. McLeod
Private S. L. Mattox
Private G. W. Mints .
Private H. R. Peckmann
Private J. C. Pryor
Private J. E. Robinson
Private J. E. Roughen
Private R. J. Sasser
Private T. R. Skinner
Private H. H. Simmons
Private E. D. Story
Private J. D. Thomas
Private A. L. Taylor
Private H. C. Travers
Private E. Wells
Private W. L. Wolfe
Private J. L. Willianms
Private T. J. Wilson
Private L. Z. Wetherington
Private I. G. Zahler
Driver L. B. Coats
Driver J. M. Kavanaugh
RE-APPOINTMENTS
Private F. Adkins
Private M. F. Davis
Private D. N. Heath
Private H. Hosti
Private W. W. Hewlett
Private W. C. Hendry
Private H. P. Howard
Private D. W. Jernigan
Private A. T. Jackson
Private Edw. Lutz
Private P. H. Moehrke
Private D. D. Miles
Private G. R. Seckinger
Private E. Wells
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________197
DISMISSALS
Corporal W. W. Hewlett Private C. E. Love
Private P. L. Anderson Private H. H. Price
Private R. F. Brant Private W. L. Roberts
Private H. F. Brown Private J. O. Wallace
Private M. F. Davis Private H. W. Wright
Private J. L. Floyd Private T. J. Wilson
Private P. J. Fahey Driver H. Fine
Private P. M. Hendrix
RESIGNATIONS
Lieutenant J. A. Woods Private C. F. Leech
Sergeant H. Center Private J. E. Robinson
Corporal F. Adkins Private E. J. Reeves
Detective J. P. DeLeon Private G. R. Seckinger
Private S. Berner Private L. B. Simpson
Private T. F. English Private H. H. Simmons
Private J. A. Felder Private H. C. Taylor
Private H. G. Garner Private A. L. Taylor
Private H. Goslee Private E. Wells
Private C. E. Hayes Private E. L. Williams
Private D. N. Heath Private B. L. Woods
Private H. A. Heape Private T. O. Wilson
Private H. P. Howard Driver L. B. Coats
Private G. Joiner
DEATH
Private R. A. Forehand
REPORTS MADE TO POLICE DEPARTMENT BY
PAWNBROKERS DURING YEAR 1917.
January....................................................................... 18,642
February........................................................................ 15,120
March............................................................................ 17,457
April............................................................................... 17,257
198_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
May................................................................................ 19,130
June............................................................................... 19,200
July................................................................................ 18,450
August.__....................................................................... 19,700
September...................................................................... 18,730
October......................................................................... 19,340
November.-..............................................:.................... 20,620
December...................................................................... 21,780
TOTAL.................................................................. 225,426
AMOUNTS OF PROPERTY REPORTED LOST OR
STOLEN AND AMOUNTS RECOVERED
Lost or Stloen Recovered
$ 4,086.14
3,044.45
3,834.00
1,445.25
3,685.50
5,132.00
1,681.00
2,770.00
1,484.00
2,661.00
3,556.00
4,016.45
January.........................
February. ....................
March...........................
April. ............................
May... ...........................
June...............................
July...............................
August....... .................
September.- ................
October.........................
November. ..................
December. ...................
.................$ 5,339.14
................. 3,881.99
................. 6,250.60
................. 1,868.91
................. 5,439.00
................. 7,162.50
................. 3,729.00
................. 4,463.40
................. 3,724.65
................. 4,283.00
................. 6,113.91
................. 5,890.45
TOTAL.................................. $ 58,146.55 $37,395.79
POLICE GAMEWELL TELEGRAPH BOXES
12 Bay and Habersham
13 Bay and Randolph
14 Bay and East Broad
15 Bay and Drayton
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________199
16 Grayson Park No. 2 Sub-station
17 A. C. L. Crossing and Montgomery St.
21 Bay Street and Schwarz
22 B rough ton and East Broad
23 Oglethorpe and East Broad
24 Congress and Bull
25 President and Randolph
31 York and Bull
32 Anderson Street and Waters Avenue
33 Liberty and Randolph
34 Estill and Waters Avenue
35 Park Avenue and East Broad
41 Thomas Park No." 1 Sub-station
42 Forty-second and Montgomery
43 Oglethorpe and Fahm
44 Forty-seventh and Reynolds
45 Indian and Fahm
51 Bay and West Broad
52 Estill Avenue and Bull
53 Broughton and West Broad
54 Broughton and Fahm
112 Drayton and Liberty
,113 Alexander Street and Augusta Road
114 Fifty-second and Bull
121 Oglethorpe and West Broad
122 Louisville and Schwarz Avenue
123 Gwinnett and Stiles Avenue
124 Gwinnett and Magnolia
125 Liberty and West Broad
131 Berrien and Prendergrast
132 Cohen and West Boundary
133 Charlton and Jefferson
144 Congress and Barnard
152 Gaston and West Broad
212 Gaston and Whitaker
213 Park and West Broad
214 Anderson and West Broad
2M_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
215 Liberty and East Broad
221 Gwinnett and West Broad
242 Gwinnett and East Broad
243 Jones and East Broad
312 Gaston and Lincoln
313 Hartridge and East Broad
314 Wheaton and Waters Avenue
321 Bolton and Atlantic Avenue
322 Park Avenue and Abercorn
323 Henry and Bull
331 Anderson and East Broad
341 Thirty-Eight and East Broad
412 Thirty-Sixth and Ogeechee Road
413 Thirty-Sixth and Bull
IN MEMORIAM
Patrolman R. A. Forehand
Appointed July 3rd, 1907.
Died August 21st, 1917.

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
CHIEF ENGINEER
OP THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1917
E. R. CONANT
CHIEF ENGINEER

ROSTER OF EMPLOYEES 1917.
CHIEF ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT
NAME TITLE PER YEAR 1917,
E. R. Conant...Chief Engineer and Purchasing Officer........................ $4,800.00
Monthly Rate
W. O'D. Rockwell ................Principal Assistant Engineer.......................................... $ 191,66
J. G. Hazelhurst....................Assistant Engineer (9 months)..................................^.... 125.00
Watson Walker..............Assistant Engineer................................................ 125.00
J. C. Bernhardt...Chief Clerk........................................................................ 150.00
J. R. Hayn....-..........---...^^^.......................-.-.................................-...---.. 110.00
Mrs. G. A. Lysaught..............Stenographer.............................................................. 80.00
L. A. East................................Superintendent Garbage Collection and Incinerator.. 150.00
G. W. Alien.....................Superintendent Construction.......................................... 150.00
J, H. Heery..............................Superintendent Street Cleaning.................................... 112,50
R. H. Clements......................Superintendent City Lots................................................ 125.00
Roy M. Bailey............Surveyor........................................................................... 125.00
W. F. Shellman......................Draftsman.......................................................................... 100,00
T. H. Jordan.................Record Clerk................................. .....: ........................... 100.00
O. M. Miller............................Sidewalk Inspector.......................................................... 3.00 per day
C, A. Hartlege........................Service Cut Inspector..................................................... 3.00 per day
R. F. Downing........................Foreman Garbage Collection...................................... 3.00 per day
M. F. Smith............................Superintendent Drainage Construction..................... 125.00
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT
H. J. Norton.. ............................Secretary Board of Purchase
1/2 of Salary charged to Comptroller
1/2 of Salary charged to Board of Purchase........................ $ 125.00
2
WATER DEPARTMENT |
Joseph P. Figg................................Superintendent.......................................................................... $ 150.00 "
P. F. Curry......................................Chief Clerk................................................................................ 125.00 jjj
W. P. Ridle......................................Foreman Estension.................................................................. 110.00 ej
J. H. Grady....................................Assistant Foreman Extension................................................ 75.00 b*
Geo R. Small..................................Meter Reader and Repairer.................................................... 80.00
T. J. McEllinn................................Turn Cock and Plumber..................................................... 80.00 g
Harry Alien...................................Plumber.'.................................................................................... 80.00
PLUMBIBG DEPARTMENT
C. W. Tanner.................................Plumbing Inspector................................................................. $ 120.00
C. H. Kelly.... . ..... .... .......Assistant Plumbing Inspector .................................... ...... 85.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 207
REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER
Savannah, Ga., April, 1918.
HONORABLE WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah,
Dear Sir:
I would respectfully submit this, my Fifth Annual Report,
covering the operation of various departments under my
immediate charge for the fiscal year ending December 31,1917.
Conditions existing during the year as ragards increased
cost of supplies, and wages, paid employees, has required the
strictest economy and careful management for the operation
of the various departments within the amounts allotted, and
only in one department, viz., the Water Works, did the expenditure exceed to any appreciable amount the allotment
made for same in the budget.
The increased cost of operating the Water Works was
primarily due to the increased cost of coal. The cost of fuel,
including credit for steam furnished by the Destructor Plant
$23,348.00 more in 1917 than it was in 1916, and at the same
time there was a general increase in the wages of employees
of this department during the year, which was not contemplated, nor allowed for, when the 1917 Budget was made up.
The total expenditure for 1917 for operating the Highway,
Sanitary, Harbor and Wharves, City Stables and Shops,
Plumbing Department and Board of Purchase, was in round
figures $259,400.00. This was a trifle less than was expended
in 1916, and even was less than the amount expended in 1914,
notwithstanding a larger area of pavement was required to
be kept clean, and a greater expenditure was made for lighting
the City in 1917 than the previous years.
The end of the year practically brought about the completion of the extension of Storm Water and Sanitary Sewerage
System, for which funds had been provided for from two
Bond Issues. This expenditure resulted in the accomplish
208 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ment of a system of Sanitary and Storm Water Drainage,
which thoroughly covers the necessities for the City, and to
a considerable extent a storm water drainage is provided for
outside of the corporate limits. Over 49 miles of sewers and
closed canals were constructed with the money available from
the two Bond Issues, and an allotment of $25,000.00 from
current revenue.
The operation of the water works Department during the
year brought about a much improved condition as regards the
mechanical operation of the Department, and this resulted in
an improved condition of the sanitary aspects of the situation
which previously had given considerable concern to many
people. At this time it can be said that there is no objection
as to the quality of water supplied to consumers and that it
is now meeting with the approval of the Federal Health
Department. Conservation of the water supply was started
with the installation of 421 meters, and as the result of the
installation of these few meters the pumpage per capita for the
last six months of the years was 4-1/2 per cent less than for
the corresponding months of the previous year. The installation of meters has only commenced and it is with gratification
that serious objection to the installation of meters has not
materialized. A broad and complete ordinance fixing, rates
and establishing new rules and regulations was approved by
Council.
We experienced two cold spells during the year which
caused the bursting of a large number of service pipe connections, conservatively estimated at not less than 10.000. This
brought about a tremendous wastage of water and the cost
to the City of the two freezes amounted to $10,000, and not
only was the water wasted, amounting to three hundred
million gallons, but for several days it was impossible to maintain one half the regular pressure in the distributing mains.
At the time of preparing this report ordinances are being prepared to require the necessary measures being taken whereby
repeated conditions similar to those experienced during the
year cannot occur.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 209
In 1916 the City adopted monolithic concrete type of
pavement for most of its paving construction. During 1917
we continued with this type of construction and every indication points to the success of concrete paving for Savannah,
no cracks or other deterioration is visible in the work that
was put down two years ago.
The collection and disposal of our refuse, including
garbage, was successfully carried on during the year, and
there were no interruptions, or delays, in the operation of the
Destructor Plant. The garbage portion of the refuse collected during the year was less than for previous years, as there
was a greater economy in house-hold consumption of food
products. The amount of garbage collected, was 20 per cent
less than for the previous year, if we exclude the months of
July and August when the melon sesson is at its height.
Steam furnished the Water Plant from the Destructor
Plant resulted in a saving of coal, which would have cost
$8,000.00. The work accomplished under each branch of the
various departments under my charge, together with cost of
same, and other matters pertaining to the carrying on of
same is set forth under various headings, to which your
attention is invited.
It gives me pleasure to refer to the amicable relations
which existed throughout the year between you and each
Alderman and myself, and of the co-operation and confidence
that has been extended me.
210 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
SANITARY DEPARTMENT
The total 'expenditure for operation of the Sanitary
Department for the year 1917 was $158,000.00 as against
158,300-00 for the year 1916. The work done under this
department is considered under the following headings or
items.
CLEANING STREETS AND LANES
The expenditure for cleaning paved streets and lanes for
the fiscal year was $45,524.00, which included the removal
of debris collected. Detail data concerning the cleaning of
paved streets and lanes is given in the following tabulation:
CLASS OF
PAVEMENT
Sheet Asphalt....
Asphalt Block.
Granite Block....
Vitrified Brick ..
Concrete ............
Cobble Stone ...
Area In
Sq. Yds
140,818
342,190
122,108
384,849
55,932
68,224
Total............!, 114. 121
1
100
6.12
Percentage of
Area Cleaned
Times per Week
.
2
58
100
71
100
58.38
3
25
9
10.51
4
9
2.79
Length
In Miles
6
100
8
20
22.20
5.03
13.52
6.10
16.49
2.97
3.74
47.85
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 211
Cost of Cleaning
Per Year Including
Removal of Debris
8,295.00
11,885.00
6,843.00
15,913.00
1,725.00
863.00
$ 45..524.00
Cost Per Mile
Per Year
$ 1,632.65
861.14
1,121.81
960.03
580.50
220.63
Cost of Cleaning
Per 1,000 Sq. Yd.
Per Year
$ 60.74
34.49
55.74
41.09
30.24
12.64
Cost Per 1,000 Sq.
Yd. Per Cleaning
Cu. Yd Debris
Removed
Cost Per Cu. Yd.
Debris Removed
$ 198
251
560
283
302
632
5,441
4,612
3,000
6,507
810
424
20,794
$ 1,528 .
2,579
2.281
2,430
2,128
2,034
It will be noted from the above tabulation that the cost
of cleaning streets is proportional to the smoothness of the
paved surface, and to a small degree on other features. It is
noted that the cost of cleaning vitrified brick per thousand
square yards for cleaning is a trifle less than concrete, yet we
know the concrete surface is generally smoother than brick,
but in this City the average width of brick streets exceeds the
width of concrete paved, and the wider the streets is the
lower the cost permit for cleaning same.
212 MAYOR'S AJfXUAL REPORT
The greater portion of street sweepings are delivered to
a local concern, who pays the City a nominal amouunt of
$250.00 per year for same. All of our machine broom sweeping is done at night, so that the cleaning gangs can start at
7:00 o'clock in the morning to collect debris from the streets.
REFUSE COLLECTIONS
The amount expended for refuse collection during the
fiscal year was $58,913.00. The amount of garbage
collected was 23,000 tons, of ashes practically 400 tons and
the number of dead carcasses, consisting of cows, horses,
sheep and hogs was 444. The cost per ton for collecting the
above was 82.50. This cost includes all labor employed,
care of live stock, renewal of live stock and up keep of equipment. The dead carcasses are delivered to a Rendering Plant
outside of the City Limits and there is a small revenue of
$150.00 per year obtained for same. Street sweepings from
the City Lots amounting to approximately 1200 tons, are
sold at the lots for $325.00 per year.
REFUSE DISPOSAL
The Destructor Plant was operated without interruption
during the year and the total amount of material destroyed
was 23,400 tons- The total cost of operating the plant was,
for operation $18,518.00, for clinker disposal $1,502.00, for
weighing refuse and delivering same to hoppers $1,538-00 and
for maintenance of plant $3,246.00, making a total outlay of
$24,804.00. Steam furnished the Water Works, resulted in
a saving of fuel amounting to $8,379.00, making the net cost
for refuse disposal $16,425.00 or a net cost per ton of 70 cents.
Previous Annual Reports for 1914, 1915 and 1916 gives detail
description of the plant and other data concerning the operation of same. The Plant has now been in operation for three
years and nine months and has been continuously operated
without interuption from the time it was put in operation in
March 1914.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 213
The average monthly amount of garbage, rubbish and
other refuse destroyed at the Destructor Plant for 1914 was
2,128 tons, 1915 2,305 tons, 1916 2,203 tons and 1917 1,950
tons. It will be seen that the amount of refuse now being
collected is much less than it was for either of the previous
years noted and if July and August were excluded, when the
water melon season is at its hight, the average amount consumed in 1917 for ten months, was 20 per cent less than it was
for corresponding months in 1915 and 1916. This is concrete
proof of household economy as regards saving food stuff.
The capacity of the Destructor Plant is 3,900 tons per
month, the saving in steam increases with amount of refuse
destroyed up to the full capacity of the plant, so that if the
plant was operated at its full capacity much greater saving
would result in coal consumption at the pumping station by
the increased amount of steam furnished from the Destructor
Plant.
It may be of interest to know the total expenditure for
destroying refuse at the plant since March 1914, or for the
period of three years and nine months. The expenditure
during this period was as follows:
OPERATION
Labor..............................._.........................$61,506.00
Material.................................................... 6,101.00
214 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
MAINTENANCE
Labor...-.-....-...-........$ 1,200.00
Material and repairs, including labor
and material......................................... 7,967.00 9,167.00
Outlays.............................................. $2,596.00
Clinker Disposal.................................... 5,091.00
Weighing of refuse....................._......... 3,199.00
Handling cinders for fuel during July
and August each year.......................... 1,900.00
Fuel purchased................._............... 500.00
13,286.00
Grand total.................-.......$89,970.00
SUMMARY OF CREDIT
Steam..-......-...-......-...-........__.-..-.............$25,524.00
Clinker.......................................................................... 4,963.00
Outlays that should be distributed over several
years...................................................................... 2,596.00
Material on hand.......................................................... 3,000.00
Total....-....-...-..-..-....-...............$36,083.00
The total amount destroyed for three years and nine
months was 98,717 tons, equivalent to 72.6 tons per day.
The net cost per ton was 54.6 cents, the guaranteed net cost
of operation, assuming that the plant is worked to its full
capacity of 130 tons per day, is 40.4 cents, and if the plant was
worked to its full capacity, the net cost per ton would be less
than the guaranteed cost. The cost above, however, does
not include interest on investment or depreciation. An
account of the operation of the Incinerator Plant from the
commencement of operation, is contained in "Municipal
Engineering" for February 1918.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 215
MAINTENANCE OF SANITARY AND STORM WATER
SEWERS
The amount expended for maintenance of storm water
sewers for the fiscal year was $4,196.00 and for maintenance
of sanitary sewers $3,039.00. This included, however,
2,664 lineal feet of extension of circular sewtrs from 6-inches
to 12-inches in diameter, the cost of which was $2,132.00.
While we were fortunate in not having any extensive
sewer breaks during the year, naturally we had quite a large
number of small breaks and a large number of stoppage in
sewers to clean out.
DRY CULTURE
While the term Dry Culture is used, what is really meant
is the surface drainage of lands on the outskirts of the City
through open ditches and canals, and the work consists of
keeping these ditches and canals clean and to proper grade.
The amount expended for this work in 1917 was $4,086.00.
SPRINKLING STREETS
The Auditor's statement shows an expenditure for
sprinkling streets $3,365.00. This amount, however, should
appear in items for cleaning streets and has been so considered
in deriving at cost of cleaning paved streets and lanes.
SWEEPING CROSSINGS
At the end of the fiscal year there were 362 foot crossings
constructed across unpaved streets to connect with sidewalks.
The amount expended for cleaning crossings was $1,184.00,
which entialed an expenditure of $3.27 per crossing per year.
216 MAYOR'S ANNUAL RETORT
CLEANING UNPAVED STREETS AND LANES
The amount expended for this work for the year was
$6,071.00. The work done consisted in part of cleaning up
the debris consisting of rubbish and other refuse, and to a
considerable extent the removal of ashes that had been dumped
in the lanes by housholders, and to some extent of the grading
of lanes. The cflbic yards of debris removed was 3,279.
OILING CATCH BASINS
Between April and November, during the mosquito breeding season, a force makes regular weekly inspections of all
catch basins and the catch basins are treated with a low grade
of kerosene or crude oil. This treatment eliminates to a very
large extent the mosquito nuisance. The amount expended
during the fiscal year for this purpose was $1,615.00. The
number of oilings made was 54,000, making the cost for oiling
approximately 3 cents. The number of catch basins was
1.774 or the cost per catch basin for the period when it was
treated was a little less than $1.00 per catch basin, which must
be considered a most economical expenditure for the results
attained.
CLEANING CATCH BASINS
The cost of cleaning catch basins including the removal
of debris taken from same, for the fiscal year was $6,759.00,
the approximated yardage removed from the catch basins was
3,540 and the cost per cubic yard was $1,90. The number of
cleanings made during the year was 21,698. the cost per
each catch basin cleaned was 31 cents. The number of catch
basins existing at the end of the year was 1,774.
CUTTING WEEDS
The amount expended for weed cutting was $1,645.00.
The cutting of weeds was done in City's streets and lanes and
other area owned by the City. This work was done part with
horse drawn mowing machine and in part by hand.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 217
CITY STABLES AND SHOPS DEPARTMENT
The operation of this department, includes the care and
feeding of all live stock, the maintenance of and up keep of all
vehicles and rolling stock. All wagons are built new, purchases
being only made for wheels, axles and minor castings, used in
the construction of same. All harnesses used in the various
departments are repaired at the lots and all cart and wagon
harnesses are made in the harness shop. All painting required for the rolling stock and vehicles is done in the paint
shop, and to a considerable extent outside work is done at the
market, maintaining bridges, etc., by the employees of this
department. Besides the above, horseshoeing of all stock of
departments under the public works office is also done without loss of time that would ensue if the work was done by outside parties.
During the year 1917 the average number of stock on
hand was 160 head. Only five head of stock died and five were
sold. 18 head of stock were purchased during the fiscal year,
28,000 bushels of oats, 560 tons of hay and one ton of mixed
feed was purchased. The cost of feed for the year, including
drayage to the lots was $38,000.00, of this amount $8,000.00
worth was distributed to the Police and other departments.
At the end of the year there was feed on hand valued at
$2,000.00, so that the cost per animal for feeding during the
year was $14.50 per month.
The number of two horse wagons built during the year
was eight, the average cost of which .was $156.00. The
number of new carts built was ten, the average cost of which
was $47.00, and the number of machine brooms refilled, 134,
the cost of which was $6,47 each, the number of paper boxes
built for use in lanes, was 46, at an average cost of $8.00 each.
In addition to the routine work done at the shops, the regular
force made certain improvements at the City Market, consisting of building 13 chicken coops 13 tables, closing opening
to prevent birds entering the building, plastering and white
washing several vaults, putting in window frames and glasses,
218 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
supervising the painting of the Market and other miscellaneous work.
A small amount of work was done by the City's forces in
repairing bridges and City's docks and wharves.
The amount of pay roll for City Stables and Shops
amounted to for the year $9,344.00. With the exception of
$1,695.00, for maintenance of buildings and office force, this
amount is distributed to various departments for which work
was done.
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
STREET LIGHTING
The amount expended for street lighting for the fiscal year
was as follows:
For post and pendant lighting $48,226.50, for ornamental
street post lighting $1,862.32. At the end of the year there
were 802 lights, 4-ampere magnitite arc lamps in use, 20
having been installed, one taken over by the City and one
cancelled during the year 1917. The present rate for
street lighting and current for power is as follows:
For 4-ampere magnitite arc lamps, $60.00 per year
Ornamental lighting 3c per kilowatt.
For power 1.8 cents per kilowatt.
For lighting all municipal buildings 2-1/4 cents per K. W.
SIDEWALKS
On account of high cost of meterial and increase in labor
cost, as well as the desire of the real estate men to retrench
as regards improvement work, the amount of sidewalks put
in for 1917 was very much less than for the previous year.
The yardage of new pavement put down was less than 2,000;
518 notices were served upon the owners of property to repair
sidewalks. Due to the general suspension of sidewalk work,
there are at this time a large number of localities where
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 219
sidewalks should be constructed, and it is anticipated that
this work can be resumed in the near future.
There was expended for maintenance of sidewalks and
for repairs to sidewalks, where roots of trees upheaved same
$1,071.00.
REPAIRING PAVED STREETS AND LANES
The following area of paved streets were taken up and
either new material put down or old material turned and relaid:
SheetAsphalt......................................... 1,051 Square yards
Block Asphalt..........................._............... 6,944 Square yards
Granite Block............................................ 7,439 Square yards
Vitrified Brick.......................................... 12,938 Square yards
Concrete.................................................... .......... Square yards
Cobble ...................................................... 3,144 Square yards
The total expenditure for this work amounted to $8,390.00
The amount expended during the year 1917 for maintenance of unpaved streets and lanes of the City amounted to
$13,417.00, of this amount $2,500.00 was expended in re-surfacing or re-grading streets and lanes that were badly
washed by torrential rains that occurred in July and August.
The amount of rain that fell during a heavy rain fall amounted
to over 4-inches in one hour. As it is impracticable to surface
unpaved streets and lanes, which generally have a sand loam
surface, on account of there being no suitable clay or gravel
pits within a reasonable distance of Savannah, therefore, until
paving is carried on more extensively in the City than it has
been done in the past, we face a heavy annual expenditure for
keeping up our unpaved streets and lanes, and the demands
for this work is growing on account of the use of automobile
trucks which require streets to be in better condition than when
lighter vehicular traffic passed over same. The City now has
from 70 to 75 miles of unpaved streets and lanes, over which
there is more or less traffic and perhaps for 20 miles of these
streets and lanes the traffic is considerable.
220 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The City expended for re-surfacing streets with gravel
during the year $476.00. We have about 15 miles of streets
surfaced with gravel, cinders, shells and pyrites, which have
had to be repeatedly repaired in order to keep them in a safe
condition for traffic and a considerable amount of the money
expended noted above for repairing unpaved streets and lanes
was expended for keeping the streets that were at one time
surfaced with gravel or other material which is now worn out.
MAINTENANCE OF BRIDGES
The amount expended for maintenance of bridges was
$374.00. The report for 1914 contains description of bridges
owned and maintained by the City, and the report of 1915
shows .the bridges which have been eliminated due to the
filling in of certain canals and ditches.
CONSTRUCTION OF NEW CATCH BASINS
During the year 1917, 72 new catch basins were constructed at a cost of $3,818.00, of this number 53 was of the large
type and 19 of the smaller type, known as monkey catch
basins. The average cost per catch basin was $53.00, this
included the connecting to catch basin with sewer, the average
length of which is 20 feet.
NEW STREET CROSSINGS
During the year 20 new street crossings were added to
those existing making the total number existing at the end of
the year 1,200. The amount expended for constructing these
crossings was $611.00. The great number of crossings are
required on account of the City having a large mileage of unpaved streets and lanes.
OPENING STREETS
Under this heading there was expended for 1917, $19,-
387.00. This expenditure acquired 79,615.9 square feet of land
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 221
for opening streets at a cost of $9,000.00. There was also
acquired sewer right of ways through various property, for
which there was only expended in cash $969.50, which was
paid for from money allotted for sewer extension. There
was also acquired a lot upon which was bored an artesian
well, having an area of 2,325.58 square feet at a cost of
$427.50 and this amount was paid for from the allotment
for Water Works. The tabulation below gives the land
acquired by the City during the year:
LOCATION Deed Square Feet Cost
Atlantic St., part of lots 170
and 167 Glatigny Ward.... 793 2702.44 $ 750.00
Forty-first St., part of lot 13
Brownville Ward.............. 795 1725 500.00
Fortieth St., lot 43, Brownville Ward...................... 803 5000 1,125.00
Fifty-fourth Lane, (in exchange)
no deed 27000 ................
Harmon St., part of lot 251
Harmon Ward................ 805 2430.66 825.00
Montgomery St., lot 48 Norwood Ward.......................... 798 3600 3,400.00
Montgomery St., 81 Norwood
Ward.................................... 797 3600 1,600.00
Park Ave., (Springfield)...,...... 806 30750 ' Water main etc.
Park Ave., North part of lots
34and36Gallie Ward...... 799 307.8 100.00
Thirty-fourth St., lot 108
(Millen 11) Schwarz Ward 802 500 700.00
79615.9 $9,000.00
Sewer right of way (Kayton
Canal)...........................-.... No deed 969.50
For new artesian well lot 169
Bacon-Cann Subdivision 8043225.58 427.50
82841.48 $10,397.00
222 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The remainder of the amount expended under heading of
opening streets was for grading, curbing and other work
incidental to the carrying out of agreement which the City
made in obtaining streets and lanes noted in the above tabulation outside of cash consideration.
NEW PAVING
The paving progress for 1917 was interrupted on account
of the rapid raise in prices for material and scarcity of labor.
The total yardage put in during the year was' 26,281 square
yards. It will be noted from the tabulation given below that
the greater proportion of the paving done was of the monolithic concrete type. This pavement was adopted in the
early part of 1916 and some of it has now been in use two
years, and there is no sign of deterioration or of any cracks in
the oldest pavement that was laid. It is the writer's opinion
that this type of pavemnet properly put down with proper
material is the most satisfactory pavement considering
cost of construction, durability and ease of cleaning,
that can be adopted for this section. The following
tabulation shows the paving done during 1917 for which
assessments have been made against the. property owners for
the cost of same:
Old Street Paved
Oct. 11-16 Stiles
Avenue
Feb. 28-17 Wheaton Street
Feb. 28-17 Wheaton Street
Mch. 28-17 Waters
Avenue
From
Louisville
Road
E.Broad St.
Track "J"
Anderson St.
To
Ogeechee
Canal
Randolph St.
Waters AveEstill Avenue
Material
used
Granite
Block
Concrete
Concrete
Concrete
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 223
Squares
Yards
1,851.75
3,538.55
7,994.96
12,895.98
26,281.24
Front
Feet
" 84.89
1,766.25
4,800.22
7,552.25
14,960.61
Lineal
Feet
420.94
883.12
2,400.11
3,776.13
7,480.31
Total
Cost
4,758.20
5.080.66
11,479.19
24,526.00
45,844.05
City's
Proportion
1,586.07
1,482.98
3,606.43
5,832.99
12,508.47
Cost
Per
Square
Yard
$ 2.57
1.43
1.43
1.90
Intersecting Streets and Lanes chargeable to City...5,243.35
17,751.82
Work done outside of ordinances-....................... 1,071.65
18,823.47
Cost Property Owners.....................................$17,582.94
Cost Railroads....................................................... 9,437.64
$27,020.58
Including Curbing.
Cost City.............. ........................................................$18,823.47
Total Cost.__.............................................................$45,844.05
At the end of the year a considerable amount of material
has been collected for paving of Montgomery Street, between
40th and 45th Streets. The total expenditure for the year
1917 for street paving was $56,286.29, of this amount the
City's proportion charged in assessment rolls was $18,823.47.
The amount assessed against property owners was $27,020.58.
The remainder of the amount expended for paving is $10,-
442.24, accounted for by the value of material on hand as
follows:
224 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Crushed Stone......................................................... $3,300.00
CobbleStone...........................-....-...-......... 3,000.00
Granite Block............................................................ 1,000.00
Stone Curbing................-....................................- 1,000.00
Cement.......................................................................... 2,142.24
The granite block pavement laid on Stiles Avenue was
laid in a somewhat different manner than similar pavement
had been laid in the past in that the stone block was laid on
dry mortar bed placed over the surface of the ground which
had been carefully rolled and shaped or screeded to a true
surface. The cost per square yard for this mortar cushion
1 ^-inches thick was 20 cents per square yard, cost of pitch
joints was 33 cents per square yard, cost of stone was $1.50
and the total cost for laying this pavement per square yard
was $2.44 excluding curbing, the total cost per square yard
including curbing was $2.57, and this pavement has been down
a little over a year and has every indication that the extra
expense of laying block on mortar cushion was warranted as
no depressions or cracking of jointshave occurred.
My report for 1916 contains itemized cost of laying concrete paving. The same data was prepared for the laying of
paving in 1917. The paving down on Wheaton Street amounted to 11,534 yards costing $1.44 per square yard, which is
only 6 cents per square yard more than work done in 1916.
This work was done, however, before there was any greatly
increase cost in material. The paving of Waters Avenue consisted of 12,896 yards entailed a considerable additional
expenditure. In the first place heavy grading was required,
in some places the removal of nearly 2 feet of material, again
the railroad track was located in the center of the street and
naturally would require some additional cost of laying the
pavement and again the cost of material was much greater for
this work than for previous work, so that the total cost of this
portion of pavement done during 1917 was $1.90 per square
yard including curbing. The paving done during the year
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 225
increased the mileage so that there was at the end of the year
the following yardage and mileage of various classes of pavement.
Material
Vitrified Brick... ...........
Asphalt Block................
Cobble............................
Sheet Asphalt................
Concrete.... ... ..............
Granite Block................
Length
Feet
98,682.64
71,412.7
20,485.00
26,577.49
15,570.23
33,068.84
256,796.90
Length
Miles
16.98
15.52
3.9
5.03
2.9
A q
51.5
Square
Yards
392,844.51
342,190.17
71,763.00
140,817.64
55,932.55
122,108.20
1,125,656.07
The 1916 Anual Report gives a statement of all street
paving done in the City from 1858 to December 31st, 1916.
HARBOR AND WHARVES
The existing project for improvement of Savannah
Harbor by the Government contemplates a channel 30 feet
deep at mean low water, from deep sea to Quarantine Station
a distance of ten miles, then a depth of 26 feet at mean low
water, from Quarantine Station to the City Water Works a
distance of sixteen miles, then a depth of 21 feet at mean low
water to the foot of King's Island, a distance of \y-t
miles, making the total length of improvement 28 miles.
The project also includes broadening the channel opposite the
foot of West Broad and Barnard Streets, creating a turning
basin, of constructing mooring dolphins for an anchorage
station opposite Fort Oglethorpe, for maintenance of closing
dams, training walls and for closing the south channel and
providing for a cut from the main river above the south
channel to Habersham Creek, so .that the south channel can
be closed. The mean tidal range is 6 >-feet at the bar and
6-feet in the upper part of the harbor.
228 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The average depth from deep sea to the old water works
is 27 feet at mean low water, but there are four or five
localities of short lengths where there is a depth less than 26-
feet at mean low water. The 21-feet project from the old
water works to the foot of King's Island is one-half completed,
a channel 150-feet wide with the project depth being so far
attained, funds, however, are available for the completion of
this channel with a width of 300 feet.
At the suggestion of Col. John Millis, District Engineer,
a Savannah Harbor Commission, composed of fourteen
members, was formed during the year. This Commission
considers matters pertinent to the improvement of Savannah
Harbor and co-operates with the United States Engineer District Officer in furthering the harbor benefits. Since the
formation of this Commission a number of meetings have
been held, the results of which have been beneficial to the
interest of the City and port, and the organization of the
Commission is highly desirable.
During the calendar year 1918, the City expended for
Harbor and Wharves Departments $3,366.20. Practically
all of this was expended in the maintenance of the Harbor
Master's Office.
The Municipal Dock that was constructed in 1914, is in
use practically the entire time. While the current revenue
derived from the use of the wharf is nominal, being $485.00
for 1917, yet the City makes good use of the wharf in accomodating various Federal Departments by allowing a landing
place for Government boats. At the present time a portion
of the wharf is used by the Harbor Patrol Fleet, also by the
Engineering Department of the United States Army, and the
construction and ownership of this wharf is a direct and
decided benefit to the City.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 227
EXTENSION OF STORM WATER AND SANITARY
SEWERAGE SYSTEM
My reports for 1914, 1915 and 1916 gives the history of
the issuance of two Bond Issues for $600,000.00 and $400,-
000.00 for the extension of storm water sanitary sewers. The
reports referred to above also gives varied information concerning the work up to the end of 1916. During the year
1917 contracts with the Gadsden Contracting Company for
Division "B", and with Obenshain Brothers for Division "A"
of the work was completed during the year. The contract
with the Beasley Contracting Company for the construction
of the Fell Street Sewer, a contract for which was made in
1916, was also completed during the fiscal year 1917. A contract was entered into with the Carolina Construction Company for the construction of the closed portion of the Kayton
Canal Sewer, and this work was virtually completed in 1917.
On account of the contractors not performing the work in
accordance with the specifications, the City took over the
work on August 16th, 1917, and has carried same to completion.
The following tabulation gives the location of all work
from the commencement of the storm water and sanitary
sewerage system to. the end of the fiscal year 1917, size and
length of the various sewers constructed and total cost.
The drainage money was insufficient to complete the
Kayton Canal project and Council appropriated in 1917
budget $25,000.00 from current revenue to assist in carrying
out this project.
SAVANNAH SEWERAGE EXTENSION
8
1914-1915.
BOND ISSUE $600,000,00 PROCEEDS 8604,707.00.
SECTION No 1A. and No. 2 SIZE No. of Feet Total Length COST
fa*
(Main Trunk Sewer (substituting Bilbo Canal) from
"A" Savannah River to Gwinnett Street, and branch
extending west on Perry Lane), and extending south
"B" on Paulsen Street, from Gwinnett Street to 61st St.
lane, thence west to Bull Street, thence north to
Notes Roswell Street.
CONTRACTORS
"A" A. T. Twiggs & Sons, River to Wheaton Street and
Perry Lane
"A" Gadsden Contracting Company& Guild & Company
Wheaton Street to Gwinnett Street.
"B" Gadsden Contracting Company and Guild & Company.
SECTION No. 3.
Main Trunk Sewer (Sanitary) West side of City
"C" (Known as Brow Ditch Sewer) extending from
Savannah River to 61st St. Lane.
7 ft.xlS ft.
7 ft.xll ft. 6
4 ft.x6 ft.
48 inches
42 inches
36 inches
24 inches
15 inches
10 inches
8 inches
36 inches
30 inches
24 inches
20 inches
18 inches
12 inches
..... ^
2848,9 ^
3936.7 O
1458.0 *S
3032.1 *
1730.0 &
1809.0 3
1717,0 ^
fc
2659.89 g
3175.1 3
9
428.55 22795.24 $274,074.82 ^
6905.6
7329.99
613.0
582.0
858.0
68.0 16356.59 $85,031.66
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 229
s s
CO O5
o S
00 O
00 OS
e eo
r- o>
S c5
S CO i-t
ui
fe
8
5?
o
00
ro

S"
00
ICO
0
1-H
eT
^4

.
00
S
9
0
1
00
"E
?3 CO i-H M iH *-<
5 00 t* <O C3 00 M CO
1010000
CO 00 O
^9!^5P??^^^ ^ ^ TO
4JCjQJQJQ3oCJQ OvQj
*OOOOOOOO O Q O
.S.g.g.g.g.g.g.g _c..
C30O5 tC^lO C
CO *O C
* *^ 1!
'I'CO CO IM -< 1-1 -t
eo
O
.-t CD
CQ n co so a;
d) O o3 4) QJ
IIIIIIIIH o-oo;
O
e
13
5=2
* o
co -O

sal
U-g-3
*!! 25 C3
Sffii.S
b
I.
I
'S ''.S
8g<s
co ?J
I |S
J5 |
2 feS
8 -31 w ^g|
.s:
*
o
o
xi
o
c
I
1
"8
230 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
S
II

52^^
1111
5x2c
$H
SI?4
3
jj5
1C X
.

^ c<
cco1Scgg
o5> C1
1
1
"
5
1-1 *H
Sa:
S
^W >.
^ MO H
S
i^-S 2s
Or" __..!-> 5
c
^~ 5 o 5.s
- M > S^ *A
|^g= o
ll&l 1 ss*5 a
SS = ^ g
2 25 S .
$ 2 S JS >>
^ S = 5
a
x:^ ,5 s K5CP5P5 O a.
OH:
en15S
cc1
td
gjj
?
63X1
S?1
*
5 7S
g

ig |
Q X .
$400 BONDS ISSUE
^^8S
308
/ carried g
over 1915...
.
CiQ O ^H oo
oc Q oo o r*
osO occ <o
t^ ia IN cf> o
5)* 55
** ***
i i
i
2
tfc'j;
* J^-H
3 C i-*
; 1916..... available i by Co appropriated
, 1916 foravailable a
; out1916 forpaid
Balance _ ....
C C C
G
i i
|_s es
|> |8&
TP <O O N <O
fe co' CO * P 1O
^H fH -l CO "V f^
o o t~ *< o> *f
. 1-4 CM i-f -- Z
S g S
S
.., o o o o
W e c a e c
ccs
COeo
00
00
<r I1
-i oo i ci >A ah " rt "~"-
o e
Ig5
OQzi
-
wIf^
C*cs
*2 ^^
S
igo
CO
i <
O
>g.
*b
(.4
DIVISION "A" Storm Sewers South East Section
"D" of City East of Bull Street.
DIVISION "B" Sanitary and Combined sewers,
"C" West of Bull Street. .
"C" DIVISION "B" Storm Sewers West of Bull Street
12-inches
15-inches
18-inches
24-inches.
30-inches
36-inches
48-inches
8-inches
10-inches
12-inches
15-inches
18-inches
36-inches
42-inches
48-inches
54-inches
60-inches
12-inches
15-inches
18-inches
20-inehes
1 24-inches
30-inches
36-inches
42-inches
5 ft x6 ft.box
895.85
2089.7
2714.9
3822.4
1351.6
1997.8
590.0 13462.25 5 39,853.09
$ 140,211.81
55012.85
2913.00
3328.9
831.5
797.6
2003.1
1367.7
903.7
509.36
1249.34 68917.05 $ 104, 692; 03
3257.35
3774.85
4357 .6
1517.3
2071.6
286.6
857.0
21.7
432.6 16576.6 $ 29,935.41
8 134,627.44
2
^
o
CO
C
y
d
>c*
H
S
F0
H
g
Fell Street Outfall Sewer from Savnnnnh River to
"V" Extended 7 ft.x5 ft. (i-inehes 1699
S ft. 6 in.xfi in. 1096
10 ft.xO ft. (> in. 1269
Cnsey Canal Storm Wa-
"K" ter Sewer through Hill- 7 ft.xO in. 6 in.
crest Cemetery and cross 7 ft.xfi ft.
Henry Srtrect.
1322
4G64
1355.
NOTE
Drainage work done by City not contract Miscellaneous expenses, rights of way, Kng. Inspection, ete.
CONTRACTORS
186587.7
35.34 Miles
"D" Obenshain Brothers, sublet to Gadsden Contracting
Co. and Guild & Company.
"C" Gadsden Contracting'Company and Guild and Company.
"F" Beasley Contracting Company.
"E" Carolina Construction Company.
$ 68,860.04
S 38,157.53
$381,856.82
I 26,541.58
24,905.81
S 433,304.21
sI
VTM 3
SAVANNAH SEWERAGE EXTENSION 1916-1917
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Bond issue $400,000.00. Proceeds $416,451.00 $416,415.00
Balance carried over from 1915.......... _.-..-. ------ -.-.--. ..-...-.---.... .... 1,529.49
Amountavailablel916-.... $417,980.49
Appropriated by Council 1917_________... ..... 25.000.00 g
Amount available during 1916-1917-. -__... $442,980.49
Amount paid out during 1916-1917__ _ $433,304.21
BALANCE......- $ 9,676.28
DISBURSEMENTS 1916 1917 TOTAL
Obenshain Brothers (Contractors)................................ $ 79,124.82 $ 61,086.99 $ 140,211.81
Gadsden & Guild (Contractors).._... 98,647.55 35,979.89 134,627.44 -,
Beasley Contracting Company._...___...._.___._ 8,685.21 60,174.83 68,860.04 g
Drainage work done by City not under contract... _....... ___. 16,031.55 10,510.03 26,541.58 p
Miscellaneous Expenses, Rights of way, Engineering, Inspectors, etc. 20,360.41 4,545.40 24,905.81
Carolina Construction Company (Kayton Canal)___________ 18,452.02 18,452.02
By City (Kayton Canal)......-................................___________19,705.51_______19,705.51
$ 222,849.54 $ 210,454.67 $433,304.21
RECAPITULATION
Amount available Jan. 1st, 1916.___.....__....._.......________.__.._.... .... $417,980.49
Amount paid out during 1916._...__....._. .. . _. __.. 222.849.54
$195,130.95
Amount appropriated by Council 1917....._____..._____.____.__..._____.____ 25,000.00
$ 220,130.95
Amountpaidoutl917-.. ... -.. 210,454.67
BALANCE..................................... .......................... $ 9,676.28
234 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The mileage of rectangular reinforced concrete type of
sewers constructed was 3 miles of circular reinforced concrete
pipe 10.2 miles and of circular terracotta pipe 36.1 miles,
making a total of 49.3 miles . The total mileage of sewers
previously constructed amounted to 39.5 miles, so that at
this time the City has a total of 88.8 miles of closed sewers,
costing in total $1,860,000.00.
The accomplishment of the work carried out under the
several projects for the extension of storm water drainage has
brought about a most favorable condition as regards not only
surface drainage of the City but to a considerable extent, a
considerable area of land lying outside of the corporate
limits. There is also afforded a complete sanitary system of
severs, and as undeveloped sections are built up there will
simply be required the laying of laterals to give service for
same.
Unfortunately property owners in certain sections have
not taken advantage of the new lateral sewers for sanitary use,
but this is due to a large extent to their inability to obtain
plumbers at this time, also to the fact of the cost of this work
being so excessive at the present time. It is anticipated that
the full benefit of the improvement can be taaken advantage
of in the near future. Since the completion of the work, a
great many of the vaults and dry closets have been eliminated,
and certain localities where previously there were a large
number of open ditches into which sewerage was run, have now
been obliterated and filled in. Special reference is made to
that section between Habersham Street and Waters Road,
south of Anderson Street.
When the project for constructiong Kayton Canal was
considered, the County was asked to co-operate with the City
in this work, for the reason that this Canal would mutually be
of benefit to the County and the City. The County offered
to do a portion of the open excavation with convict labor, and
40,000 cubic yards of material was excavated between Decem-
ber llth, 1916'and April 14th, 1917 with convict labor. The
City assisted in pumping water and purchasing rubber boots
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 235
for the men and incurred other incidental expenses amounting to about $1,800.00, and as a result of the assistance rendered by the County, the work done by the County amounted
to approximately $15,600.00.
The original project for taking care of storm water overflow for certain parts of the City contemplated the installation of pumps. There is every indication that trunk sewers
as designed with automatic flood gates is going to give satisfactory drainage without the expensive installation and
operation of pumps. The grades of the sewers that have been
constructed have been established with great care and the
capacity of the sewers were tested last August with a rainfall
of 4-inches during the period of one hour, and yet the trunk
sewers behaved admirably. There are several places in the
older part of the City where the storm water sewers are inadequate in capacity to carry off instanta surface water from
torrential rains such as occurred last August and to overcome
this condition would require a very heavy expenditure. It is
not customary in designing a system to contemplate such abnormal and excessive rain falls, it being expected that such
would only occur rarely and the cost of a system to take
charge of such an abnormal flow would not be warranted.
WORK DONE UNDER THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF
ASSISTANT ENGINEER MR. W. O'D. ROCKWELL
All surveying establishment of grades and street lines,
making up of assesment rolls for paving and sidewalks and
other miscellaneous engineering work, is directly under the
supervision of Mr. Rockwell, Principal Assistant Engineer.
The City of Savannah, unlike most municipalities,
requires all surveying of lots and street lines, as well as lots
in cemeteries, to be established and suveyed by the City, and
a moderate fixed charge established by Council is made for
this work. This method has worked out admirably and the
property owners havenever complained of the system employed
and the method resulted in not only a direct saving for the
property owners as regards the expense for survey work, but it
236 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
also insures a greater degree of accuracy . No error of any
consequence has been made for years by Mr. Rockwell's department in the establishment of street or lot lines. Plates
of all surveys of lots for private parties are made of uniform
scale properly indexed and filed and are in such shape as to
be filed with deeds.
The following tabulation gives the routine work done in
the office for the fiscal year 1917.
Survey of lots for private parties.........----..-...--............ 169
Plats made of the above lots for private parties............ 93
Measurements of street pavements for assessment rolls 3
Survey of lots in Bonaventure Cemetery..................... 12
Survey of lots in Laural Grove Cemetery........................ 12
Miscellaneous measurements and surveys........................ 102
Grades and lines for curbing, grading, etc........................ 110
Levels taken for miscellaneous purposes.......................... 9
Profiles for street grades, etc............................................. 7
Profiles for sewers................................................................ 123
Street lines given during the year._............................... 136
Grades and lines given for sidewalks................................ 33
Estimates prepared for street paving, grading, etc..... .. 17
Maps and plats of lots........................................................ 9
Maps and plats miscellaneous............................................ 8
Maps and plats of streets.................................................... ' 4
Tracing of lots...................................................................... 18
Tracing sewer profiles and plans..................................... 133
Tracing miscellaneous.......................................................... 36
Blueprints.................................................................... 560
Miscellaneous reports.......................................................... 13
The revenue derived for making surveys for private
parties was $455.00. This revenue does not any where meet
the cost of the work. The rate for making surveys should be
increased so that the revenue would be sufficient to meet the
cost of actual work entailed in making and plating surveys.
This office has had a great deal of extra work during the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 237
period of sewer construction and has made complete records
of work accomplished, making separate plans and profiles of
every sewer laid for future reference. I wish to commend the
work done by Mr. Rockwell and his assistants.
The Plumbing Inspection for the year 1917, was under
Mr. C. W.Tanner, and for a portion of the year he had an
assistant. The expenditure for maintaining the office of the
office of the Plumbing Inspector for the fiscal year was $3,-
626.00. The number of fixtures inspected during the year was
1,963, and the amount of fees collected was $981.50. It is
observed that the cost of operating the department was three
times the amount of revenue received. This department
should be practicablly self sustaining and fees for inspections
should be adjusted to pay the inspections. It is, of course,
understood that on account of the war there has been a
general depression of building construction and extensive repairs to buildings. Besides the inspection of fixtures, 425
connections made to sanitary and storm water sewers were
nspected, for which a revenue of $442.00 was received. An
inspection of 202 water main taps and water supply to premises were made for plumbers, 40 water taps connecting city
flush tanks, also at the request of tenants and property owners
the Plumbing Department inspected 110 cases of faulty
plumbing, and for the Health Officer 45 inspections.
A new Plumbing Ordinance prepared by the Plumbing
Inspector was approved by Council, and this ordinance extends the supervision of all plumbing work outside of the
corporate limits of the City wherever water or sewerage is
provided for property owners.
BOARD OF PURCHASE
The Board of Purchase was created four years ago and
the establishment of same' has been a great benefit to the City,
not only has supplies been bought more economically than before the Board was established, but the method of purchase
238 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
permits of wider competition as regards purchasing of supplies. All dealers are invited to submit proposals for purchases required. During the past year we have bought materials in greater quantities than was done heretofore. Coal
was purchased for a year's supply, material for paving operation were bought in such quantities as to obtain lowest prices
possible. The Board of Purchase has not been established in
one respect as originally intended, in that no warehouse has
been provided whereby small supplies could be bought in
large quantities for all departments and then charged out to
each department as required. A good deal of money could be
saved if this was put in operation. The method of checking
accounts now in use by the Purchasing Department eliminates
almost entirely errors in accounts that are rendered against
the City and errors are frequently found ranging from small
up to considerable amounts which are detected by the method
followed. During the fiscal year 40 meetings were held by
the Board of Purchase and the Secretary issued in requisition
blanks for various departments for over 5000, orders, and the
Secretary checks all bills against these orders and personally
investigates any irregularities that was brought to his attention. The records of the office are always open for inspection
of the public and the Board gives business interest a square
deal. I wish to commend the work done by the Secretary of
the Board, Mr. Harry J. Norton.
WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT
An election was held on October 9th, 1917 to determine
whether the City would providea bond issue for the purpose
of providing funds for the general rehabilitation of our water
works system. The people voted against the issuance of
bonds, so that the project for the rehabilitation of our water
works system as submitted by me had to be called off.
The Annual Reports for 1915 contains a number of reports upon the condition of water supply at Savannah with
project for improvement. The annual report for 1916 contains a revised project for the rehabilitation of the water
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 239
works system and reference can be had to these reports. No
special mention is made of same at this time of the proposed
plan for the improvement heretofore considered and printed
in full in previous reports. Although the bond issue failed,
a considerable expenditure was made during the fiscal year
1917 in bettering the condition of our water works system and
increasing its supply.
Three artesian wells were bored, two of 12-inch diameter
with a depth of 600 feet and one of 10-inch diameter at the
bottom with a depth of 1,230 feet. At the end of the fiscal
year only one of these wells had been connected into system.
All three of the wells were successfully bored and test of flow
showed the capacity of each well to be over a million gallon
capacity per day, in fact by using sufficient air the capacity
noted can be considerably exceeded.
The City appropriated $10,000.00 for meters, all of which
amount was expended during the fiscal year. As stated in
previous report the per capita consumption of water for the
City is abnormally high. There is a great waste of water due
in part to inferior plumbing and in part to carelessness on the
part of users. The city's water supply must be conserved. The
public has had presented to them a strong argument for cooperation and acceptance of the meter system, and it is highly
gratifying to observe the favorable interest shown by the
property owners as regards the installation of meters and it is
earnestly recommended that the City proceed with entire
meterage as rapidly as funds will permit. At the end of the
fiscal year 773 meters had been installed of which 421 meters
were installed during the year 1917. These meters were
installed in accordance with ordinance which provides that
all manufacturers, laundries, hotels, restaurants, livery stables,
etc., be equipped with meters during the year, also all consumers located outside of the corporate limits of the City.
The installation of this small number of meters resulted
in an appreciable reduction of water per capita of 4 per cent.
It is very interesting to note the meter cards. In many
nstances after a meter had been installed, the consumption of
240 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
water as indicated by the meter was enormous, investigation
made generally shown a great wastage due to faulty plumbing
and after this is corrected the consumption would be reduced
to from one third to one sixth of the quantity registered by
the meter before leaks were stopped.
During the fiscal year a complete new set of rules and
regulations governing the Water Department were prepared
and adopted by Council, and the water rates were revised also.
These rules and regulations, with the revised water rates were
printed in pamphlet form and can be had upon application to
the Chief Engineer's office.
During the fiscal year 1917 two abnormal spells of freezing weather occurred, one in January and the other in December. During these two periods of the cold weather when the
temperature was at 14 degrees above Zero, the breakage of a
very great number of water pipes occurred and a conservative
estimate of the number of pipes broken, due to both freezes,
is 10,000- As a result there was a tremendous wastage of
water following each freeze and the plumbers were unable to
make repairs promptly, in fact after each freeze the City put
on every available man to stop wastage by disconnecting
broken pipes from the water supply. This year the cost of
this special work alone was approximately $2,000.00 to the
City. The extra amount of water pumped due to these two
freezes, was three hundred million gallons. The cost of coal
alone for this extra pumpage cost the City $6,000. It will be
seen that it is necessary to take vigorous measures whereby
repeated experience can be avoided, and it is urgently recommended that such ordinances be passed as will require the
proper installation of stop and waste cocks, so that water can
be shut off by the occupant or owner of a building, when a
freeze comes, and such laws passed as will provide a penalty
for not taking necessary precaution during period of freeze,
either as regards protecting exposed water pipes, or by shutting off the supply and draining the pipes when a freeze
comes, which as we all know only last but a brief period.
The work proposed for the fiscal year 1918 is to make
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 241
repairs to pumping engine to eliminate slippage, to connect
the new wells with the system, to install one electrically driven
individual pump at Springfield Well, to continue the installation of meters as far as funds will permit, with the exception
that the above work will permit of the pumping at the River
Station being eliminated. If this is done there will be marked
saving in the cost of operation of our water works system.
OPERATING EXPENSES
GENERAL EXPENSES:
Superintendent.................................................... $ 4,113.87
Salaries of Office Clerks.......................................... 1,500.00
Inspection salaries.................................................... 3,300.00
Office expenses and supplies.................................... 219.79
Printing and stationery...................................... 218.73
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph..................:..... 268.44
Insurance............................................................ 262.36
Surity bond premium........................................ 5.92
Total---...................... $ 9,889.11
OPERATING GWINNETT STREET PUMPING
STATION
Fuel..................................................................... $ 25,522.36
Fuel handling........................................................ 810.16
Lubricants and waste............................... 1,005.63
Wages............................................................ 14,208.00
Other expenses.................................................. 322.04
Steam furnished by Incinerator....................... 8,379.20
Total.............,...,.....,I.............. $ 50,247.39
242 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
OPERATION RIVER PUMPING STATION
Fuel............................................................................ 13,544.28
Lubricants and waste ............................................ 223.08
Wages........................................................................ 9,055.75
Other expenses.......................................................... 256.18
Total.......................................................... $ 23,079.29
MAINTENANCE GWINNETT STREET PUMPING
STATION
Material.................................................................... $ 3,778.47
MAINTENANCE RIVER PUMPING STATION
Material.......................................... ................... $ 191.12
MAINTENANCE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
Wages........................................................................ $ 4,001.65
Material.................................................................... 811.42
Tools, repairs and replacements............................ 167.59
Care of live stock...................................................... 319.59
Total.......................................................... $ 5,300.25
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES
Traveling.................................................................. $ 139.94
Connection service expenses.................................. 214.54
Meter service expenses............................................ 4,395.01
Maintenance of vehicle equipment........................ 84.59
Plumbing and turn cock expenses...................... 1,914.18
Furniture and fixturesrepair and replacements 130.54
Miscellaneous items.-....................-....................... 2,892.64
Motor vehiclesoperation...................................... 135.00
Motor vehicleMaintenance........... 107.82
Soldiers' encampment................ 588.52
Total.......................................................... $ 10,631.78
Grand Total......... $103,117.41
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 243
OUTLAYS
Liquid chlorine apparatus................................... $ 774.20
Total.......................................................... $ 774.20
EXTENSION DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
Extension Distribution System.............................. 8,828.92
Meters........................................................................ 10,402.24
Improvement to plant............................................ 14,372.72
Total.......................................................... $ 33,603.90
APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS
Amount appropriated for:
Operating expenses-............................................. $ 9,888.00
Operating Gwinnett Street Pumping Station...... 38,675.00
Operating River Pumping Station........................ 17,500.00
Maintenance Gwinnett Street Pumping Station 2,025.00
Maintenance River Pumping Station.................... 250.00
Maintenance Distribution system.................. 9,035.00
Outlays..................................................................... 54,300:00
Total.......................................................... $131,673.00
DISBURSEMENTS
Amount disbursed for:
Operating expenses.................................................. $103,117.41
Chlorine apparatus.................................................. 774.20
Extension of Mains.......................-...........- 8,828.92
Meters...................................................................... $10,402.24
Improvement to plant................................'.......... 14,372.74
Total...................................................... $137,495.51
244 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES
Total receipts for the year 1917............................ $179,297.34
Total expenditures.........................__................... 137,495.51
Net revenue.............................................................. f 41,801.83
TOTAL PUMPAGE FOR GWINNETT STREET STATION AND RIVER PUMPING STATION IS AS
FOLLOWS:
GALLONS
Gwinnett Street Station..................................... 3,265,890,050
Daily average....................................................... 8,947,644
River Station........................................................ 591,289,468
Daily average.................................................... 3,857,179,518
Total Gwinnett Street and River Station........ 3,857,179,518
Total daily average both stations..................... 10,567,615
COAL CONSUMPTION
TONS
Gwinnett Street Station...................................... 3,971.9
Daily average.................................................... 10.88
River Station........................................................ 2,061.0
Daily average.................................................... 5.64
Total consumption both stations...................... 6,032.9
Daily consumption both stations...................... 16.5
At the end of the fiscal year 1917 the City had installed
the following lengths of various sizes mains and laterals.
EXTENSIONS OF MAINS
LOCATION Length in Feet Size Inches
44th. Street from East of Habersham Street to
East of Battey Street .................................... 565 6
Augusta Avenue from Millen to Jenks............ 1,232 6
Various Connections to hydrants...................... 582 6
Total laid during year._............................. 2,379 6
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 245
Total feet of cast iron mains in City 473,210 or 89.62
miles.
FIRE HYDRANTS PLACED
North side of 49th Street east of Habersham Street.
Northeast corner of 49th and Battey Streets.
North side of Augusta Avenue east of Fell Street.
Northeast corner of Augusta Avenue and Jenks Street.
Making a total of 858.
NEW VALVES PLACED
LOCATION Size in Inches
Augusta Ave., and Millen St., West side of Millen St....... 6
Augusta Ave. and Fell St., West side of Fell St............... 6
Making a total of.................................................................... 590
AIR LINE
Stiles Ave. Air Line to Wells No. 14, 15 and 16, 1,600 feet
2 1/2-Inches diameter.
FIRE HYDRANTS REPLACED
Hull and Barnard Streets.
Southeast corner of Gordon and Barnard Streets.
Northeast corner of 41st and Dray ton Streets.
Northwest corner of Gaston and Barnard Streets.
Southeast corner of Wheaton and Sixth Streets.
Northeast corner of Wheaton and Fifth Street.
Wheaton Street at Gulf Oil Company.
Wheaton Street at McDonough's Mill.
Wheaton Street at Aimar's Mill.
Northeast corner of Paulsen and Gwinnett Streets.
Charlton and Barnard Streets.
Northwest corner of 38th and Habersham Streets.
Southeast corner of Taylor and Jefferson Streets.
246 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
FIRE CONNECTIONS PLACED
Hull and Barnard put in 6-inches connection for Auditorium.
Hull^ Street near Jefferson put in 4-inch connection for Auditorium.
Harris and Drayton Streets put in 4-inch connection for
DeSoto Hotel.
River Street east of Farm Street put in 3-inch connection for
M. & M. T. Co.
WATER METERS PLACED
421 New Meters have been placed during the year making a
total in service 793.
MISCELLANEOUS
Broken mains repaired.................................................... 8
New Valve Boxes placed................................................ 80
Water shut off for leaks.............................................. 1,125
Water meters repaired............................................... 10
Leaks in mains caulked.................................................. 58
New taps placed.............................................................. 225
Valves packed.................................................................. 86
Water shut off for City Taxes.................................... 10
Water turned on ............................................................. 6
New Nozzles in fire hydrants ........................................ 15
Water services transferred.......................................... 30
Valves replaced................................................................ 2
New Valves in fire hydrants.......................................... 10
Lathrop Avenue moved 6-inch meter Hilton Dodge Co.
Lowered 569 feet 8-inch water main (Waters Avenue)
Taps placed for house drainage flush tanks.
MISCELLANEOUS
At the end of the fiscal year very careful inventory was'
made of all property for various departments and following
is result of same:
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 247
WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT
Buildings.............................................................. $ 80,000.00
Wells...................................................................... 50,000.00
Machinery.............................................................. 100,000.00
Mains.................................................................. 400,000.00
Reservoir, conduits and connections................ 40,000.00
Hydrants, valves, etc., set in system...... 30,000.00
Miscellaneous trestle, etc................................... 10,000.00
Meters installed.................................................... 10,000.00
Land........-.................................................. 90,000.00
Meters on hand not set...................................... 5,000.00
Cast iron pipe, valves, etc., on hand.... 8,000.00
Chlorine Apparatus.............-....................... 600.00
Auto, truck wagon, etc...................... 1,000.00
Meter testing machine........................................ 350.00
Tools, valves, packing, etc................... 2,000.00
Total...................................................... $ 826,950.00
Incinerator:
Building, machinery and miscellaneous equipment.-.........-..................................... $ 107,000.00
Engineering equipment, transite, levels, rods,
miscellaneous drawing instruments, stationery
and books...... $ 1,100.00
Building City Lot................................................ $ 15,000.00
Furniture City Lot........................... 40.00
Automobiles.............................-. $ 1,300.00
Livestock..................... 20,000.00
Equipment, (wagons, sprinkler, rollers, concrete mixers, etc.) ..................................... 15,000-00
Harnesses and leather stuff..................... 1,200.00
Small tools ..................................................:........ 2,100.00
Total.................... $ 60,740.00
248 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
MATERIAL ON HAND
Feed (City Lots.................................................... $ 2,000.00
Lumber.................................................................. 280.00
Sewer pipe.__..................................................... 300.00
Crushed stone._..................................................... 3,300.00
Cobblestone......................................................... 3,000.00
Granite block........................................................ 1,800.00
Stone curbing........................................................ 1,200.00
Vitrified brick........................._......................... 300.00
Asphalt block........................................................ 150.00
Cement.................................................................. 2,250.00
Total...................................................... $14,580.00
Grand Total.................................. $1,009,270.00
A complement statement of water meters installed and
on hand is contained in the following tabulation
WATER METERS INSTALLED TO JANUARY 1st, 1918.
MAKE
Lambert.. ..............
Keystone................
Empire...................
Trident.... ..............
Worthington._.......
Hersey....................
Thomson ..............
Bates......................
Watch Dog............
National................
Pittsburgh... .........
Union. _ ...............
Neptune.............
Eureka............. ......
Nash..-. .......
Gem...... .... ........
King........ .......
TOTAL..............
5/8..
30?,
8?,
5
10
78
7
?,
1
?,
1
1
ft
496
X
m
si
4
?
14
?,
106
1
I?,
40
7
11
1
1
72
IX
9,
16
1
19
IX
9
14
9
1
fl
28
IK 2
9,
4
ft
1
1
1
1
S
1
19
3
1
4
B
1
3
10
4
1
6
9,
8
5 6
10
10
7 8
1
1
2
9- 10
S
S
To'l
353
9107
34
11
80
48
3
9,
1
1
1
?,
3
13
4
3
7
773
I
da
I
I
Five of these Meters are Discontinued
METERS ON HAND January 1st, 1918.
Keystone................
Lambert ............ ....
Empire...................
Worthington..........
Buffalo....................
TOTAL..............
?,04
fifi
99
191
389
Wt
22
?,0
20
M4
27
?,?,?
11^
99
191
458 I
COI
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 251
In connection with the purchase of meters a modern type
of meter tester was purchased in 1917 and all new meters
received are tested before being installed.
Other miscellaneous work done during the year was
preparing a chart showing the water main pressure at various
points in the City, a report upon same being filed in this office.
The Bureau of Standards of Federal Government sent
representatives to the City to make a preliminary examination of the electrolysis problem and their report is on file in
this office. The result of this preliminary investigation indicates that our water mains are not effected apparently by
electrolysis action.
MISCELLANEOUS
A careful record is kept of all permits issued from my
office for connection in house drainage system, for setting
poles, gasoline tanks, etc.
During 1917 the following permits were issued:
386 Permits were issued for connection to house drainage
468 Permits for connecting to our water supply.
704 Permits were issued for cleaning sanitary sewers
68 Permits issued for cleaning storm water sewers
24 Permits were issued for laying cement sidewalks
114 Permits were issued for street space where new
buildings were constructed or old buildings repaired.
38 Permits were issued for electric signs
24 Permits were issued for the installation of gasoline
tanks.
The Savannah Electric Company, Savannah Lighting
Company and Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company received permits for setting 449 poles, resetting and
replacing 442 poles and removing 51 poles.
On account of so much work being done by the Savannah
Gas Company, one inspector is detailed to look after the
trench work done by this Company, and see that cuts made in
streets are properly back filled, and for this inspection the
252 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Savannah Gas Company reimburses the City for the time
employed by the inspector.
Regular inspection was made of city wharves and docks
to see that they are maintained in a safe condition. Inspections are frequently made to determine whether encroachments existing in the streets and sidewalks where permits
have not been issued for same. Monthly meter readings are
taken of electric meters registering quantity of current used
for ornamental lighting of the City and other miscellaneous
detail work.
In concluding my report it is my pleasure to refer to the
co-operation and hearty interest taken by my assistants.
A position similar to the one which I hold with as many
ramifications, can be made pleasant and agreeable if there is
co-operation and good feeling by those who are called upon to
perform the various branches of the work assigned them. It
is expected with municipal work to receive criticisms as there
are so many persons effected by municipal operation, and in
nearly every instance where criticism or exceptions have been
taken to work or deeds performed during the past year it has
been my pleasure to make explanations to the complainant,
and again it gives me pleasure to feel that your Honor and each
and every Alderman has shown confidence in the operation
of my departments, and from their action have assisted in the
maintenance of the office where every attempt has been made
to carry on the work with efficiency, economy and business
methods without any hampering of same by political action.
Many of the men under me have served for a long period,
changes are accordingly infrequent, therefore, the men responsible for the carrying out of the work under the various
departments becomes experienced and acquainted with their
work, thereby increasing the value of their service and promoting efficiency.
Respectfully,
E. R. CONANT
Chief Engineer.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 253
REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY.
HON. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit this, my report as City
Attorney for the year 1917.
The following cases were pending on January 1st, 1917:
1. W. W. Williamson, et al, as executors of the estate of
James M. Schley vs. City. This was a suit for $20,000.00
damages said to have been caused by the raising of the grade
of Waldburg Street and Park Avenue incident to the elevation
of the tracks of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway Co. The
case was non-suited upon trial in the City Court, appealed to
the Court of Appeals, the judgment in favor of the City is
published in 19 Ga. Appeals, 784. Recently the case has been
reinstituted in the Superior Court and is now again pending.
2. C. E. Bennettvs. City. Suit for $10,000.00 damages for
personal injuries. The case was tried and non-suited on
motion of the City and appealed to the Court of Appeals and
the judgment affirmed, but not yet published.
3. Frank Simmons vs. City. Suit for $1,000.00 for
personal injuries. This case was dismissed by the Court on
April 11, 1917, the date set for the trial, and has not been
reinstituted.
4. Thomas Wilson vs. City. Suit for $500.00 for personal injuries. This case was dismissed by the Court on
March 27, 1917, and has not been reinstituted.
5. James L. Rankin vs. City. This was an action for
salary, there being a dispute as to the amount to be paid.
Mr. Rankin was eventually paid $100.00 by direction of the
Finance Committee, being less than the amount of the suit6. Harvey Granger, et al, vs. City. This was an injunction case contesting the validity of the Act affecting
automobiles and like vehicles and the ordinances of the City
requiring such vehicles to be registered. The Superior Court
254 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
decided against the City. This judgment was appealed to
the Supreme Court and was reversed in 145 Ga. 578, and the
entire case finally dismissed January 2nd, 1917.
7. J. S. Balmer, et al, vs. City. This suit was similar
to the above, affecting motor-cycles, however. It had the
same course as the foregoing case. The decision in favor of
the City is reported in 145 Ga. 580- The case was finally
dismissed January 2, 1917.
8. Hagar Barnes vs. City. This was an injunction case
brought in 1915 against the City concerning a small lot
claimed by the City as a part of a street. A verdict was rendered against the City by the Superior Court and the case is
now pending on Appeal in the Supreme Court.
9. C- P. Brannen, et al, vs. City. This was an injunction contesting the validity of the Act establishing the Municipal Court. The judgment of the Trial Court sustained the
Act and the case was dismissed by plaintiffs without appeal.
10. City vs. W. H. Wade- This is an affidavit of illegality to the levy of an execution for a paving assessment.
The judgment of the Superior Court was against the City on
demurrer and from this judgment there is now an appeal
pending in the Supreme Court.
11. L. M. Bishop vs. City. This is an action for $20,-
000.00 for personal injuries. The demurrer of the City was
sustained by the City Court, but this decision was reversed in
19 Ga. Appeals, 196. The opinion of the Court of Appeals
however, in substance sustains the position of the City, and
while the case is still pending the planitiff has not asked for
a trial.
12. City vs. Savannah & Northwestern Railway. This
is an action brought to recover a valuable tract immediately
east of the waterworks conveyed with the expressed convenant
and condition that the property should revert to the City if
the Railway Terminals were not constructed thereon. The
demurrer of the Railway Company was overruled, but by
direction of the committee of the whole the further prosecution of the case has been suspended. On Nov. 16, 1917, an
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 265
order was taken placing this case upon the docket of suspended
causes and the City was given the right at any time within
the next ten (10) years upon ex parte motion to have the same
reinstituted and placed upon trial.
13. Henry Harmon vs. City. This was an action for
$1,000.00 for personal injuries. . A verdict was rendered in
in 1916 for $36.00. The City made a motion for a new trial
which was overruled. The City appealed to the Court of
Appeals which set aside the verdict. The case is still pending.
14. J. H. Tennant vs. City. This is an action for
$5,000.00 for personal injuries. The case has been twice
tried, the first time resulting in a dismissal and the second
time in a mistrial. It is still pending.
15. City vs. Mrs. Jessie Dixon. This is an affidavit of
illegality to an execution for a paving assessment. The
affidavit of illegality was dismissed upon demurrer of the
City. The Court of Appeals affiirmed the judgment of the
Trial Court and defendant then sought by certiorari to appeal
from the Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court, but the
Supreme Court declined to allow the writ. The case has since
been settled.
16. Georgia E. Saunders vs. City. This was a suit for
$5,000.00 for personal injuries. The case was tried upon its
merits and a verdict for the City rendered from which there
has been no appeal.
17. John H. Monroe vs. City. This is a certiorari
from a decision by the Mayor and Aldermen convicting
Monroe as Chief of the Fire Department upon certain charges.
Motion was made by the City to dismiss the certiorari which
was granted on April 12, 1917. Judge Meldrim directed,
however, that the dismissal should not prejudice Monroe's suit
for salary. This portion of his judgment has been appealed
to the Court of Appeals and is there now pending.
18. A. L. Thompson vs. Mayor, Chief of Police and
certain other police officers. This is an action for $10,000.00
for damages growing out of an alleged raid in connection with
enforcing of the prohibition law. The suit is still pending.
256 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
19. J. H. Meyer vs. same officials. This was also a
damage suit of the same character as the preceding which was
brought in 1916 and is still pending.
20. Arthur Young vs. City. This is a suit for $1,000.00
for personal injuries. The demurrer of the City was sustained on January 13, 1917, and there has been no appeal.
21. Mrs. J. S. Davis, et al, vs. City. This is an injunction suit seeking to restrain the City from enforcing the
ordinance concerning cows. Upon a trial, the injunction was
dissolved. The plaintiffs have appealed to the Supreme
Court and the case has not yet been determined.
22. T. J. Sheftall vs. City. This suit was brought on
Dec. 18, 1916, complaining of an alleged illegal discharge from
the employment of the City. The demurrer of the City was
sustained on Feb. 14, 1917. An appeal was had by the
plaintiff to the Court of Appeals, but the appeal was dismissed on July 7,1917.
23. Robert T. Russell vs. City. This suit was similiar
to the above. The demurrer of the City was sustained on
Feb. 14. 1917, and there has been no appeal.
24. George R. Patterson vs. City. This was a suit for
$10,000.00 for personal injuries. The jury found a verdict
in favor of the City on May 31, 1917. Motion for new
trial has been finally dismissed and there has been no appeal.
THE FOLLOWING ARE CERTIORATES IN LIQUOR
CASES
25. I. Raskin vs. City. Overruled Jan. 11, 1917.
26. O- D. Jones vs. City. Overruled Jan. 9, 1917.
27. Henry Wood vs. City. Sustained Jan, 12, 1917.
28. C. H. Levan vs. City. Dismissed upon motion.
29. Abe Raskin vs. City. Sentence modified Jan. 11,
1917.
30. Peter Mastapoulas vs. City. Dismissed Jan. 11,
1917-
31. Peter Mastapoulas vs. City. Certiorari in another
case sustained Jan. 12, 1917.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 257
32. T. F. Daniel vs. City. Sustained Jan. 9, 1917.
33. Henry Suiter vs. City. Overruled Jan. 11, 1917.
34. Joe Greenburg vs. City. Sustained Jan. 11, 1917.
35. Martin Roentch vs. City. Overruled Jan. 11, 1917
36. Mrs. J. Friedman vs. City. Sustained Jan. 12, 1917
37. J. Baker Bryan vs. City. Dismissed Jan. 11, 1917.
38. Willie Mazon vs. City. This is a certiorari complaining of a conviction for disorderly conduct dismissed on
motion of the City.
39. Wesley Snipe vs. M. W. Dixon, Sheriff. This was
a habeas corpus contesting the validity of the prohibition
ordinances of the City. The Supreme Court held the ordinances invalid since the enactment of the "Bone Dry" Law.
40. Louisa Snipe vs. same. This case was consolidated
with the foregoing and came to the same determination.
41. H. A. Quante vs. same. This was also a hebeas
corpus but brought in the City Court. The ordinance was here
upheld and there was no appeal in view of a decision of the
Court of Appeals.
NEW CASES
42. Bessie R. Hargrove vs. B. S- Bryant, Chief of Police
et al. This was a suit for $10,000.00 damages for illegal arrest.
The case was dismissed Nov. 22, 1917.
43. Lionel Hargrove vs. same. A similar action for
$10,000.00 and was dismissed Nov. 22, 1917.
44. City vs. Midland Railway. This was a suit for
$322.45 for material. A verdict in favor of the City was
rendered September 10, 1917, and the judgment has been paid.
45. City vs. Midland Railway. This was a similar
action to the above for $100.00 for a strip of land. A verdict
was rendered for the City on September 10, 1917, and the
judgment has been paid.
46. Katie Rivers vs. City. This is a damage suit for
personal injuries brought Oct. 22, 1917. Property owners
were vouched into Court and required to settle the case.
47. H. B. Jones vs. City. This is a damage suit for
personal injuries filed in the Superior Court. The demurrers
258 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
of the City having been overruled; the case is now pending
on Appeal.
48. John H. Monroe vs. City. This is a suit for salary
alleging and illegal removal from office. The case is now
pending upon appeal from the decision on the demurrer.
49- C. M. Page vs. City. This is and injunction to
prevent the collection of a tax execution and is now pending
in the Superior Court.
50. Nick Pahno vs. City. This was an injunction seeking to restrain the making of prohibition raids. The case was
tried, the injunction denied and the case dismissed upon
demurrer.
51. City vs. Gustave Werm. Condemnation. The
Condemnation proceedings were completed April 18, 1917.
52. Gustave Werm, et al, vs. City. This was an injunction seeking to restrain the above condemnation. The
injunction was refused, condemnation concluded and the injunction case dismissed.
53- City vs. J. W. Smith. This was an affidavit of
illegality to an execution for curbing. It has not yet been
tried.
THE FOLLOWING ARE LIQUOR CERTIORARIES:
54. Fred Ford vs. City. Overruled April 25, 1917.
55. A Weitz vs. City. Overruled April 25, 1917.
56. L. Sable vs. City. Dismissed.
57. J. T. Byrnes vs. City. Overruled April 25, 1917.
58. J. G. Barbuor vs. City. Overruled April 24, 1917.
59. H. Kravitch vs. City. Overruled June 12. 1917.
60. Herman Grefe vs. City. Sustained June 12, 1917.
61. Ida Apolinski vs. City. Sustained June 12, 1917.
62. H. Kravitch vs. City. Sustained June 25, 1917.
63. Robert Baker vs. City. Overruled July 25, 1917.
64. Abe Raskin vs. City. Overruled June 12, 1917.
65. M. R. Klienberg vs. City. Overruled June 12,
1917.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 259
66. Monroe Page vs. City. This certiorari involved the
validity of the municipal ordance as to employment agencies.
The certiorari has been overruled.
67. Charles Davis vs. City. Same as preeeeding certiorari. Was overruled.
68. F. Ellair vs. City. This certiorari involves the tax
ordinance and is still pending, being the only certiorari case
now remaining upon the docket undisposed of.
69- Savannah Lighting Co. vs. Savannah Electric Co.
et al. This was a case brought before the Railroad Commission
of Georgia complaining of the electric light and power rates
and practices in Savannah. The City was made a party.
The final order of the Railroad Commission fixed rates for the
local companies. The present contract rates for municipal
lighting and power were established as the maximum rates
for this class of public service and discrimination as to rates
for light and power was prohibited.
The volume of litigation concluded by the law department of the City has wonderfully increased in the past two
years. In the number of cases tried there has been an increase
for the years 1916 and 1917 of 400% over the average for the
preeeeding five years.
At the beginning of the year there were forty-one (41)
cases pending and twenty-eight (28) new cases have been
brought during the year. Of these sixty-nine (69) litigated
matters there are only eighteen (18) which have not been
finally disposed of during the year. Much of this litigation
has been due to the enforcement of the prohibition laws, but
it should be remembered that the City has during this time
practically completed the extension of the House Drainage
and Storm Sewerage System with an expenditure of over a
Million Dollars and has completed the New Municipal Auditorium and the new Municipal Library in addition to carrying
on its usual activities which have naturally been more extended owing to the increased population of the City. In
connection with its civic development, it has established
and maintains a Recreation Commission and a Municipal
260 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Traffic Bureau in addition to the commissions heretofore in
existence.
Notwithstanding the amount of litigation, however, the
City has been lucky in the matter of results. In the yeafr 1916
only one jury found a money verdict against the City. This
was in a personal injury case and was for the small sum of
$36.00. Upon apppeal, however, this verdict has been set
aside in 1917. During the year 1917, no money verdict has
been rendered against the City in any case, nor has any suit
or claim for personal injures been settled by me in or out of
Court. The results should be gratifying.
In the procuring of extensive rights of ways through
private and corporate property, while the assistance of this
department hasb een given, it cannot justly claim credit for
the really remarkable results obtained by the Committee on
Drainage under the leadership of Alderman H. L. Kayton.
Miles of right of way have been procured by him without a
penny,of expense to the City. During the entire year condemnation proceedings have been resorted to in one instance
only. If condemnation had been required to any great extent
in cases where these rights of way have been obtained the
drainage system which has just been concluded and which puts
the City of Savannah in the very fore front of American
Cities in the matter of public drainage would have been
seriously imperiled for lack of funds. As a result, no doubt,
of the improvement due to the extension of the House Drainage System, I am informed that the health record of Savannah
is the best since vital statistics have been preserved.
There has been unusual activity in municipal legislation.
Among the most important and progressive ordinances
drawn by this department have been those governing weights
and measures and the establishing of public scales and providing for inspections, and the ordinance establishing a modern
building code and housing law for the City, as well as a number
of other ordinances intended for the good of the public.
Another important matter arose in connection with the
proposal to require the Atlantic Coast Line Railway to elevate
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 261
its tracks within the City limits. I advised the Mayor and
Aldermen that this could be required to be done at the expense
of the Railway Company. The ordinance was enacted on
April 11, 1917, and at the instance of the Railway Company
an extension of twelve (12) months after the declaration of
peace between the United States and Germany was granted.
The usual service of the Law Department in rendering
opinions, drawing resolutions, deeds and contracts has been
rendered.
Let me take occasion to say, that in my contact with the
Mayor and Board of Aldermen, it has been particularly pleasing to me to find without exception that not one of them has
shown the slightest disposition, in the performance of his
municipal duties, to do other than cheerfully and strictly
comply with the law applicable when so advised. It is a
pleasure to advise a Board that maintains such an attitude
towards public service.
The Assistant City Attorney, Honorable David S. Atkinson, has been faithful, intelligent, courteous and efficient.
I have the honor to be,
ROBERT J. TRAVIS, City Attorney.
December 31, 1917.
282 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF THE HARBOR MASTER
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1918.
HON. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor
City of Savannah,
Sir:
I hand you herewith statements showing the number of
vessels arriving at this port during the year 1917, giving the
net tonnage of same, also amount collected for laoor fees.
The inland steamers and small craft plying local waters, of
which there are quite a number, are not included in the statement.
Respectfully Submitted,
THOMAS H. LAIRD,
Harbor Master.
Coastwise vessels handling solid cargoes in and out of
the port of Savannah during the year 1917.
Inward Cargoes
33 Lighters....................... 23,000 Tons.............. Soft Coal
29 Vessels.............................. 18,784 Tons._....... Soft Coal
8 Vessels.............................. 11,072 Tons..............Hard Coal
2 Vessels.............................. 1,473 Tons....................Cement
11 Vessels.............................. 7,570 Tons ..............Fertilizer
3 Vessels.............................. 1,636 Tons....Phosphate Rock
86 Vessels............................ 63,535 Tons._.
Outward Cargoes
4 Lighters....................... 1,850 Tons.................Soft Coal
5 Lighters.................... 3,139 Tons................ Hard Coal
9 Lighters.................... 4,989 Tons............................ Coal
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 263
1 Vessel 368 Piling........................251,130 feet lumber
2 Vessels 16,247 Ties............................724,384 feet lumber
8 Vessels....................................................3,968,637 feet lumber
11 Vessels....................................................4,944,151 feet lumber
8?
VESSELS ARRIVING AT SAVANNAH, YEAR 1917
1917
Month
January... _
February- ..
March ..
April. ......
May.......
June. ------
July........
August.-...
September..
October ... .
November. .
December . .
Total..
Am
No.
57
51
58
47
45
45
33
36
40
40
43
40
535
Steamer
Net
Tons
166,031
128,324
148,397
127,209
121,778
129,446
86,469
94,251
98,759
95,458
103,557
103,489
1,393,168
Am. Sail
No.
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
10
Net
Tons
314
2,966
1,879
485
342
235
243
683
7,147
For. Steamer
No.
9
10
8
7
5
7
10
9
7
15
7
9
103
Net
Tons
15,715
18,719
17,773
14,449
13,152
13,549
20,807
14,653
18, 195
29,491
15,656
21,238
213,397
For. Sail
No.
12
7
6
3
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
41
Net
Tons
13,824
7,265
4,979
4,106
469
3,500
2,467
1,425
4,313
7%
1,993
607
45,744
Tugs
No.
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
9
Net
Tons
163
269
269
538
269
538
269
2,315
Barges
No.
1
5
5
6
3
5
6
8
3
4
3
3
52
Net
Tons
922
2,514
2,127
2,680
1,749
2,018
3,916
3,983
1,810
2,364
2,766
1,749
28,598
Harbor
Fees
327.00
303.00
314.64
219.24
217.00
211,64
252.00
268.00
250.72
364.00
234.00
329.66
3,290.90
s
I

OB
I
Recapitulation: 638 Steamers, 1,606,565 tons; 51 Sail Vessels 52,891 tons; 9 tugs 2,315 tons; 52 Barges 28,598 tons
making a grand total of 750 vessels with 1,690,369 net tons. Included in the American steamers there were 17 steamers with
46,234 net tons in foreign trade.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 265
Foreign Vessels by Nationality
Steamers Tons.
British.................................................:...... 42 117,838
Danish....................................................... 18 22,344
Dutch........................................................ 1 2,327
Greek.......................................................... 1 1,988
Italian........................................................ 1 2,659
Japan.......................................................... 1 2,287
Norwegian.................................................. 17 27,600
Russian...................................................... 1 3,398
Spanish...................................................... 13 22,450
Swedish...................................................... 8 10,506
Total..................................................l03 213,397
Sail Vessels
Tons.
Brazilian Bark .......................................... 1 232
Danish Ships.............'.............................. 3 5,656
Danish Barks............................................ 7 5,589
Danish Schooner...................................... 1 154
Norwegian Ship........................................ 1 1,993
Norwegian Barks...................................... 19 24,653
Potuguese Barks...................................... 2 938
Portugese Brig ._................................. 1 210
Portuguese Schooner................................ 1 258
Spanish Barks........................................ 3 3,564
Swedish Barks.......................................... 2 2,497
Total.................................................. 41 . 45,744
266 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF BOARD OF TAX ASSESSORS
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1918.
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
The assessed valuation of all property in the City of
Savannah, for taxation in the year 1917, shows a net increase
over the corresponding valuation in 1916, amounting to
$1.044,830.00, and this without any extension of the city's
limits and in spite of the slump in the tax returns of the city's
banking institutions and the restricted building operations
attributable to the country's being at war.
Following are the relative valuations:
1916 1917
RealEstate............:...............$40,957,901.00 $41,381,878.00
Personalty.............................. 17,960,051.00 18,582,423.00
Franchises of Corporations 1,308,300.00 1,306,781.00
Totals..............................$60,226,252.00 $61,271,082.00
The following items of personal property showed decreases in amounts returned for taxation: Stock in trade,
merchandise on consignment, books, pictures and statuary,
live stock, horse-drawn vehicles, money and solvent accounts,
vessels and banks.
These items showed increases: Furniture, Jewelry and
silverware, musical instruments, automobiles, stocks and
bonds, promissory notes, mortgages on land, mortgages on
personalty, bonds for title, machinery and the personal
property returned by public service corporations.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 267
Buildings completed during 1917, were assessed as follows:
First. Quarter............................................... $215,675.00
Second Quarter................................................ 43,250.00
Third Quarter..............................'.................. 77,895.00
Fourth Quarter....................................... 95,250.00
Total.................-..............-....-.....- $432,070.00
Respectfully Submitted,
G. NOBLE JONES, Chairman,
HENRY M. WARD,
J. J. HORRIGAN.
268 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
The "Sinking Fund Commissioners" submit their thirtyseventh annual report.
During the year we have purchased sixty three thousand
bonds of the issue of 1909, as under:
$25,000 at 105 and interest................................................
13,000 at 104f and interest................................................
25,000 at 105J and interest amounting to $67,489.50
31st of December 1916, balance on hand issue
of 1909.................... ........ .... .... ..........................$33,000.00
Add for appropriation of 1917........................ 32,000.00
$65,000.00
31st December 1916 issue of 1913.................
appropriation for 1917 .............................................. 2,000.00
$67,000.00
Bonds redeemed 1917 issue of 1909..................$63,000.00
Bonds redeemed 1917 issue of 1913.................... None
Balance to credit of Sinking Fund issue of 1909 $2,000.00
Balance to credit of Sinking Fund issue of 1913 2,000.00
$ 4,000.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 269
Debt of 1919 ................. $2,267,000.00
Debt of 1913......-..... 210,500.00
Total debt of these issues $2,467,500.00
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. J. MILLS, Chairman,
CHARLES G. BELL,
JOHN F. PAULSEN,
LEOPOLD ADLER.
270 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah
Dear Sir:
I am enclosing herewith my annual report for the year
1917, showing a decrease of 285 in number of Building Permits issued, amounting to $755,720.
In view of the extremely high cost of all building material
and the scarcity of labor, caused by war conditions, I do not
consider this decrease abnormal.
It might be well to mention the fact that during the past
year several large manufacturing and two ship-building plants
have been built just outside of the City Limits, at a cost of
at least $3,000,000. Practically all of this work has been done
by Savannah labor, and this addition to the industries of
Savannah has already been of great benefit to our City.
Very respectfully,
JOHN R. EASON Building Inspector.
Number of Permits issued in 1917............334
Number of Buildings Completed..........289
Number of Buildings Unfinished.............. 29
Number of Buildings not Built................ 16
Municipal Auditorium, completed..................... $200,000.00
Remodeling DeSoto Hotel.................................. 200,000.00
63 Two-Story Frame Buildings............................ 164,300.00
52 One-Story Frame Buildings.......................... 70,700.00
5 Two-Story Brick Veneer Buildings......-.. 34,000.00
3 Two-Story Brick Buildings.............................. 14,000.00
5 Three-Story Brick Buildings...-...................... 66,000.00
47 Two-Story Frame Buildings Remodeled........ 20,675.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 271
3 One-Story Brick Buildings................................ 14,000.00
22 New Porches...........,......................................... 3,920.00
24 One-Story Frame Buildings Remodeled.......... 12,125.00
11 Three-Story Brick Buildings Remodeled........ 14,650.00
20 Two-Story Brick Buildings Remodeled.......... 29,550.00
8 One-Story Brick Buildings Remodeled .......... 12,200.00
70 One-Story Frame Garages................................ 11,070.00
24 One-Story Frame Stables.................................. 5,470.00
5 Frame Buildings Removed from one lot to
another.............................................................. 1,000.00
1 Brick Church...................................................... 40,000.00
1 Frame Church.................................................... 2,000.00
1 One-Story Open Steel Shed.............................. 2,500.00
Total..............................................................$ 918,160.00
29 Unfinished Buildings, about.............. $300,000.00
Very respectfully,
JOHN R. EASON,
Building Inspector.
272 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF CITY MARSHAL'S OFFICE
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Hon. W. J. PIERPOXT, Mayor,
City of Savannah,
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit herewith my annual report,
for the year 1917, same being my fifth report.
The collections from all sources amount to $67,643.86,
as per itemized statement attached, an increase of $6,034.94
over the previous year.
GROUND RENTS:All lots reported to this office by
the City Treasurer have been ro-entered for arrears of rent, as
required by ordinance.
REAL ESTATE:This item shows a total collection of
$24,898.46, an increase of $6,807.14, same being the largest
amount collected from any specific item during the year.
During the year we bought at public sale three vacant
lots against which we held executions for seven years or more,
and deeds have been made to the City.
PERSONAL PROPERTY:Receipts from this source
amount to $6,269-41, an increase of $1,272.67. This is the
largest amount that has ever been collected through the
Marshal's Office for this item.
SPECIFIC TAX:From this source we collected
$12,564.00, and in this connection would respectfully suggest
that the City Treasurer issue Executions and turn same over
to the City Marshal for collection as soon as possible after Jan.
31st, instead of waiting until March 1st, as at present.
PAVING ASSESSMENTS:From this source was collected $13,122.58, showing an increase over 1916 of $398.98.
SIDEWALK CHARGES:From this source was collected $4,648.34, showing a decrease of $1,033.47.
MARKET RENTS:From this source was collected
$4,203.95, showing and increase over 1916 of $82.17-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 273
CITY PROPERTY RENTS:This item shows a collection of $205.00
During the past year we placed about 20 parties on the
Police Docket for doing business without paying Specific
License, and with only two exceptions, all of these parties were
found guilty and fined by the Recorder.
In conclusion, I desire to express my sincere thanks
and appreciation, to His Honor, the Mayor, the Police Department and the Recorder, for their assistance and co-oepration during the year.
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. D. SEMKEN,
City Marshal.
274 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CITY MARSHAL'S OFFICE
Itemized Statement of Collections, Year Ending
December 31st, 1916
Real Estate
1909..............................$ 8.13
1910.............................. 28.79
1911............................ 35.40
1912.............................. 17.62
1913.......................... 329 65
1914.......................... 1,067'63
1915.......................... 2,445*79
1916.......................... 20,859'50
1917.......................... 105,195$24,898.46 *u
Personal Property:
1912............................. 35.36
1913.............................. 236.30
1915............................... 130.08
1916.............................. 1,427.66
1917.............................. 4,440.01$ 6,269.41
Specific Tax:
1915..............................$ 5.00
1916.............................. 715.29
1917..........:................... 11,843:71$12,564.00
Paving Assessments:
1906..............................$ 14.00
1909.............................. 36.83
1910.............................. 95.60
1912.............................. 30.00
1913.............................. 1,290.58
1914.............................. 515.41
1915.............................. 1,259.64
1916.............................. 7,024.52
1917.............................. 2,856.00$13,122.58
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 275
Sidewalk Charges:
1913....................... 76.26
1914...........-:.-........... 17.43
1915......-..... 1,035.60
1916..... 3,070.08
1917................ 448.97$ 4,648.34
Sink Cleaning Fees:
1911-.$ 4.00
1912............ 4.00
1913- 4.00
1914.......... 9.50
1916.... 43.10
1917....................... 212.15$ 276.75
Market Rents:
1916-.$ 273.76
1917............... 3,930.19$ 4,203.95
City Property Rent:
1916..-..$ 15.00
1917.............................. 190.00$ 205.00
Execution Fees:
1909___...$ 6.00
1910. 5.00
1911.. 7.00
1912.............................. 7.00
1913. 19.00
1914.............................. 39.00
1915-- 102.00
1916...... 463.00
1917.___............ 443.00$ 1,091.00
Miscellaneous: 1.04
Interest.....-.....-.$ 298.84
Overbid at sales..........
Advertising....... 65.49$ 364.37
Total.... ............ $ $67,643.86

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PUBLIC LIBRARY
OP THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
SAVANNAH, GA.
1918
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1917

To the Board of Managers of the Savannah Public Library:
Ladies and Gentlemen:
In reporting on the work of the reorganized Public Library
in 1917 I wish to emphasize the fact that the library has still
barely entered the field which it ought to covera field of
such service to the people of Savannah in all intellectual life,
in civic improvement, and in wholesome recreation, as will
cause the library to be considered, not as an expense to the
city but as a most valuable asset. The year 1916, as recorded
in my last report, was a transitional period, in which the separation from the Georgia Historical Society and the preparations for opening the new building necessitated the postponement of many plans for more important work. And, as I
stated last year, "Our efforts must first be given to enlarging
the resources and perfecting the administration " of the library,
before we can undertake any new enterprises. Much has been
accomplished in the last twelve months, and many gratifying
expressions of appreciation have come to us from people to
whom the library has been of service. But it would be foolish
to blind ourselves to the fact that what we have accomplished
and what we are now in a position to accomplish, is but a
small part of that which we must work for.
In this connection I wish to express my appreciation both
of the sympathetic interest and help which I have received
from the Board and from the staff, and of the encouraging
attitude of the public, which has been tolerant of our present
short-comings, grateful for every improvement in the service,
and keenly desirous of continued improvement. It is surely
a field which deserves our best.
280 ' MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
THE BOOK COLLECTION
The use of the library, both for circulation and for reference purposes, has been most gratifying, considering the
insufficiency of our book collection. A vast increase in serious
reading; a total circulation of more than 118,000 volumes; and
a steadily increasing use of the reference department of the
library for serious work, attest at once the importance of the
service now being given the public, and urgent need of the
strengthening our resources as rapidly as possible.
It will be remembered that only 3,003 volumes of adult
books other than fiction were transferred to us from the Historical Society. The entire class of literature, exclusive of
fiction but including all of poetry, drama, and essays, contained only 612 volumes; of history, travel, and biography we
had only 431 volumes; in the entire field of sociology, including not only social work but political economy, government,
law, and education, there were but 419 volumes. The collection of reference books was practically negligible. Standard fiction was very poorly represented. The children's
collection was strong in the titles it contained, but extremely
weak in the physical condition of the books. It was evident
that with the money available for buying books several years
must elapse before the entire collection could be made at all
adequate to serve the public properly.
Approximately four thousand volumes have been added
to the collection during the year. About one thousand of these
were purchased by the librarian late in the year in New York,
when it was possible for him to visit the stores of the leading
booksellers and examine their stock carefully, selecting desired books which were offered at prices far lower than could
be obtained in any other way. Every possible effort was
made at all times to buy to the best advantage. By the
occasional purchase of second-hand copies of important books
infrequently called for, and by careful ordering from lists of
remainders and of review copies, one dollar may often be made
to do the work of two. When the books recently bought have
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 281
all been cataloged, we shall have the necessary foundation on
which to build up a good collection of books.
The purchases of the year amounted to $4,329.59. Of
this amount $796.24 was spent for children's books, in addition
to an order amounting to over $600, payable in 1918- The
collection in this department^ is now in much better condition,
for the new purchases have made it possible to discard many
of the outworn books. Much further improvement, however,
is desirable. We cannot open any of the new branches so
seriously needed, and we cannot do justice to the two smal
branches we are now maintaining, until we greatly enlarge
the children's collection; and we are not doing justice to the
children who now use the library when we offer them books
that are badly soiled or dilapidated. Experience has proved
that the danger of contagion from library books is negligible
when, as in this library, all possible precautions are taken to
safeguard the borrowers. But the moral effect on the children of shabby, mutilated, and soiled books, is bad.
SELECTION OF BOOKS
In the last few months of the year somewhat greater
liberality in the purchase of new fiction was possible than was
considered advisable at first when other departments were so
weak. It is desirable that we should buy as much as possible,
without slighting other classes of reading, of the best of the
current fiction. I wish to renew my recommendation, however, that we be reasonably conservative in our decision as to
what is the best, and that we keep our standards of literary
merit reasonably high. On this point I quote the following
extracts from a book by A. R. Spofford, for many years librarian of Congress.
"The great demand for this class of reading renders it
all the more important to make a wise and improving selection
of that which forms the minds of multitudes, and especially
of the young.....To buy indiscriminately the new novels of the
day, good, bad, and indifferent (the last named greatly pre-
282 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
dominating) would be a very poor discharge of the duty devolving upon those who are the responsible choosers of the
reading of any community. Conceding, as we must, the vast
influence and untold value of fiction as a vehicle of entertainment and instruction, the question ariseswhere can the line
be drawn between the good .and improving novels, and novels
which are neither good nor improving? This involves something more than the moral tone and influence of the fictions:
it involves their merits and demerits as literature also. I hold
it to be the bounden duty of those who select the reading of a
community to maintain a standard of good taste, as well as of
good morals. They have no business to fill the library with
wretched models of writing, when there are thousands of good
models ready, in numbers far greater than they have money
to purchase." This advice of Mr. Spofford will not result in
a deficiency of reading sufficiently "light" and entertaining to
meet the needs of those who read only for relaxation or amusement. Some of the mediocre we must have; but while we
cannot possibly buy all of the best, let us not buy too much of
the mediocre.
CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT
Particular attention should be given, not only in our selection of books for the library, but in seeking to extend our
influence over the buyers of books, to the subject of
children's reading. Soon after the opening of the schools in
the fall the children in some of the schools were requested to
give their teachers a list of the books they had read in the last
month. The lists were sent to the library and examination of
them showed that a very large number of mediocre and even
trashy books are being read by the children; to quote again
from Mr. Spofford, the "weak and flabby and silly books"
which "tend to make weak and flabby and silly brains." These
books are not borrowed from the library, but come from other
sources. Persistent effort is needed to raise the standard of
reading among the young people, and in this effort we need
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 283
the active co-operation of the parents and of the schools.
The library has always sought to exert an influence in
behalf of wise selection on the part of all individuals who buy
books for children. Our recent experience shows the importance of still further effort. In nearly every case the
purchase of inferior books results from ignorance of the better
class. To give greater publicity to the better books an
exhibition of books suitable for children was arranged, with
the co-operation of the Connor Book Store, similar to the exhibition held in 1916 but on a much larger scale. The exhibition was open for two weeks before Christmas. Some
member of the staff was always in attendance, lists of good
books were distributed, and publicity was given the fact that
the children's librarian is always glad to advise concerning the
purchase of books. The exhibit was attended by 382 people,
all of whom were greatly interested. Similar displays will be
held from time to time in the future and the books, many of
which are low-priced editions suited to people of moderate
means, will form a permanent "model collection" for examination by anyone at any time.
The story hour has for several years been an important
educational feature of our work with children, as a means of
interesting them in good reading. The subjects of the stories
told are taken from folklore, history, and the classics. Stories
are told at the main library every Friday afternoon to two
separate groups of children, the younger children and those
above ten years. At the East Side Branch stories are told
every Thursday afternoon. During the spring term of school
the library conducted a story hour once a week at the Barnard
Street School. The total attendance at story hours during
the year was 5,780.
An important work has been undertaken by Miss Dodgen,
the children's librarian, in teaching children how to use the
resources of the library. Miss Dodgen has spoken to the
classes in many of the schools on the use of the library, and
has also given instruction in the use of the catalog and of
some of the simpler reference books, to children who have
come to the library for that purpose. It was regretted that
284 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
this could not this year be done on a much larger scale, and I
trust the time will soon come when instruction in the use of the
library may be given, as a part of the curriculum, in every
grade in all the schools of the city, including the high school.
CIRCULATION
Statistics are appended to this report showing in detail
the number of books issued to borrowers. The total number is
118, 891. Of these, 4,908 were issued at the two small branches.
The circulation at the main library was 113,983, of
which 65,687 were adult books and 48,296 were juvenile.'
This is a decrease of 10,650 volumes from the adult circulation
in the last twelve months at the old library, and an increase of
1,965 volumes from the juvenile. It must be remembered
that the removal of the library into a new neighborhood
necessitated, especially in the children's department, the
building up of a new clientele in a less thickly populated section. The adult circulation has been strongly affected by the
deficiencies in the book collection; yet the decrease was solely
in the class of fiction. Of adult books other than fiction
7,759 more volumes were circulated than in the old library's
last full year.
It is always interesting to note the percentage of fiction
in the entire circulation. Anything above 70 per cent is considered high; about 60 or 65 per cent constitutes what is usually
considered a satisfactory, normal percentage. Of our adult
circulation last year 76.9 per cent was fiction, and of the juvenile circulation slightly over 77 per cent. This, however, seems
a very satisfactory record when we remember that at the old
library the yearly percentage of adult fiction was always 90
per cent or higher. An improvement was seen immediately
after the opening of the new building, where the public are
given unlimited freedom of access to the books. Notwithstanding the pitifully small collection of non-fiction with which
we opened, the first two months, compared with the same
months of theprevious year, recorded an increase of 60 per
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 285
cent in the circulation of books other than fiction. In the
year 1917 the increase was more than 205 per cent over the
last year in the old building.
It is therefore evident that the use of the library, as shown
by the circulation of books for home use, has been very satisfactory. The use of the library on Sundays, though less than
we might wish, presents many encouraging features. The
adult departments only are open every Sunday from 4 to 7
p. m. The average circulation was 67 volumes; the highest on
any Sunday was 136 volumes. On most Sundays the reference
room is filled nearly to its full capacity, and although the reading is confined largely to the magazines and papers, there is
sometimes considerable use of the reference collection for
more serious purposes.
At the beginning of the year we commenced the practically unlimited circulation of back numbers of all periodicals,
in addition to subscribing for extra copies of a few magazines
to permit the circulation of current numbers. Experience has
shown it to be desirable to restrict, to some extent, the circulation of back numbers, but with reasonable limitations this
is an important feature of our work, both supplementing the
recreational reading offered by the books, and supplying important material on subjects not fully covered by any of the
books.
The number of borrowers registered at the main library at
the end of the year was 4,942 adult and 2,451 juvenile.
BRANCHES AND EXTENSION WORK
At present the work of the main library is supplemented
by only two outside agencies. These are the East Side
Branch on Habersham Street near Broughton Street, and a
small branch at the Waters Avenue School.
The East Side Branch was opened in January, 1915, and
until early in the present year was conducted, under the supervision of the children's librarian, by Miss Stella Breckenridge.
Since Miss Breckenridge found it necessary to give up the
286 MAYOR'S ANNUM, REPORT
work early in 1917 the branch has been cared for mainly by
Miss Annie S. Porter of the library staff, with assistance
given by the members of the training class. Excellent work
is being done among the children of the neighborhood, and the
branch should as soon as possible Tae placed in more attractive
and more commodious quarters. It should be open every
afternoon and evening instead of from 3 to 6.30 p. m. one day
a week, as at present. Instead of depending on such books as
can be temporarily spared from the children's room of the
main library, exchanged from time to time for others, there
should be a permanent collection of some of the best books,
supplemented by temporary deposits from the main library.
The permanent collection should include adult books as well
as juvenile, in order that we may begin to reach the grown
people. The people living in this section of the city are far
removed from the main library, and as soon as our resources
will permit we should give them the privileges of a well stocked
branch.
The same needs exist in the Waters Avenue section, where
the people feel most keenly the inaccessibility of the main
library, and where a branch would be an unqualified success
from the start. In response to a request of long standing, a
small collection of children's books was deposited in the
Waters Avenue School early in November, and since November 8 the library, under the care of Miss Amelia Shumate, of
the Waters Avenue School, has been open every Thursday
when school is in session from 3 to 6 p. m. On the first six
open days 730 books were given out. Some arrangements
must be made for keeping the library open during the summer
vacation, and a way must be found soon to provide more
adequate facilities for the adults of the community and for
the children. Our thanks are due to Miss Shumate for the
very important services she has contributed to the library
in the interests of the Waters Avenue section of the city.
Even if it were more centrally located, the main library
could not satisfactorily reach all parts of the city. In addition to placing our two existing branches in a position to do
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 287
more and better work, we should have at least one other well
equipped branch located in the vicinity of the old library, to
serve the western section of the city. We should supplement
these branches by smaller stations in drug stores, schools, or
other suitable places. Some of these might be "delivery
stations" only, where books could be delivered from the main
library on request, or they might combine such delivery
service with a small deposit of books left there permanently
or exchanged at intervals. And there should be a business
man's branch, situated as near as possible to Bull and Broughton Streets and open during all regular business hours. Such
a branch, in the heart of the shopping district and of the business section, could supply miscellaneous reading in all classes
as well as meeting the needs of the business men for practical
information needed by them in their work. It is a safe prediction that within a year the use of such a branch would exceed the present use of the adult departments of the main
library.
Such a program may seem so ambitious that in view of
existing conditions it is not worth considering. It would require probably an additional annual appropriation of $7,000,
which is manifestly impossible under present circumstances.
But let us remember that by this increase of less than 50 per
cent of our present appropriation we could increase the usefulness of the library by several hundred per cent; that we
could place adequate library facilities within easy reach of
every inhabitant of the city, that we could immeasurably extend and strengthen the library's influence. We ought not to
rely a day longer than necessary on the main library alone,
but should keep the ultimate goal ever in mind, and should
endeavor to get at least a little closer to it each year.
COUNTY EXTENSION
As soon as possible, too, the library should extend into
the county, and if the necessary legislation can be secured at
the 1918 session of the legislature, we should endeavor to get
288 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
from the county commissioners an annual appropriation toward the maintenance of the library. There are many residents of the county who could be reached, in various ways,
who now have access to no books at all. The new school at
Montgomery, with the plans for developing there a neighborhood center, offers an excellent opportunity, but a request
which has already come for such service there had to be denied. The rapidly growing, important industrial community
at Port Wentworth, so closely linked with the people and the
interests of Savannah, imposes on us the duty of placing a
branch library there at as early a date as possible, and from
the superintendent of the sugar refinery has already come a
request for books. Yet we are unable to make even a beginning of such service. Here again it may seem that there are
so many urgent needs in the city still unsupplied that we ought
not to attempt to do anything for the county. But the
people of the county are so nearly a part of Savannah's own
population that we ought so to consider them, and the city
might well meet half of the additional cost of serving the
county. An annual appropriation of $1,000 from the county
with a like amount from the city, would enable us to give the
residents of the county, and the men employed at Port Wentworth, the library facilities which they need for their recreation and for their instruction.
REFERENCE USE
Statistics can give only a partial indication of the actual
usefulness of even the circulation department of a library, for
the number of books taken home does not measure accurately
the good accomplished. Of the reference department's work,
very often more important than the issuance of books for
home use, still less can be learned from statistics. No record
is kept of the number of visitors to the department, for such
ja record is, if not misleading, at least insignificant. But a
record is carefully kept of all questions asked of the attendant
which require any research, and from this record it is plain
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 289
that there are a constantly increasing number of people who
recognize the value of the library as a source of specific information. By school students, by club women, by business men,
and by casual inquirers of all classes, the reference department
is now used to a very much greater extent than a year ago.
This is a branch of our work which requires careful attention, for on the formation of a good collection of reference
books and the painstaking efforts of the staff to satisfy every
request for information depends much of the usefulness of the
library. Little money has been spent on the reference collection since the purchase of a considerable number of the most
important works of reference in the summer of 1916, and the
collection ought to be strengthened in the coming year by the
purchase of many other important books. As soon as possible
some of the periodicals should be bound, to make them more
available for use in reference work.
CATALOGING
The library has been hampered in its work by the incompleteness of the catalog. Under prevailing conditions it has
been impossible to do much more than the work of classifying,
cataloging, and preparing for circulation the new books acquired, and since early in the year no headway has been made
on the re-cataloging of the old collection. Late in the year
an effort was made to employ temporarily a cataloger from
some other city, in order to complete the work as rapidly as
possible. We did not succeed in finding anyone who cared
for this temporary position, and shall have to rely on our own
staff alone. Fortunately conditions are now such that the next
yearpossibly the next six or eight monthsought to see
the work finished.
STAFF AND TRAINING CLASS
On June 1, the staff was increased by the appointment,
from the graduates of the training class, of two new assistants.
This gave us for the first time the minimum of eight assistants
290 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
required to maintain all departments properly with a reasonable schedule of working hours. It is not yet possible to open
the Periodical Room, on account of difficulty in having an
attendant on duty there at meal hours and during the vacation
season.
The library suffered an irreparable loss in the death of
Miss Helen C. Brewer, the assistant librarian. Miss Brewer
came to us as an assistant in October, 1916, a graduate of the
Carnegie Library of Atlanta Training School, and for two
years librarian of the Cordele Public Library. On May 1 she
was appointed assistant librarian, and had she lived she would
have rendered most valuable service in developing the library's
work. But soon after her appointment she was attacked by
typhoid, and died on June 7. By her personality Miss Brewer
had won the friendship of all who knew her, and by her professional ability, not only in technical knowledge but even more
notably on the more important human side, she was unusually
well qualified for the work she loved. I cannot forego this
opportunity of testifying to the fine character and high ability
of one in whom the best ideals of the library profession were
exemplified.
The vacancy in the position of assistant librarian was
filled by the appointment, taking effect September 1, of Miss
Julia A. Schilling, a graduate of the Atlanta Training School
and a member of the staff of the Atlanta Library.
In December Miss Selina Heyward, who had been an assistant at the old library for several years prior to the reorganization, was given a year's leave of absence to accept a position
in the Government service in Washington. Her position was
filled by one of last year's training class.
The first training class conducted by the library completed
its six months' course on May 10. There were five in the class,
four of whom are already holding positions on the staff. A
new class, of four, was organized November 1 for a course of
seven months, and it is probable that we shall find it necessary
to conduct a class every year in order always to have trained
people eligible for such vacancies as may arise and for new
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 291
positions which may be created. Miss Dodgen, the children's
librarian, is also director of the training class, for which important work she is well qualified.
The instruction which we are giving our training classes
compares very favorably with similar courses conducted by
much larger libraries, and I know of no other library approximating ours in size where as careful instruction is given.
Nevertheless, our course should still be improved. Aside
from the desirability of employing local people so far as possible, it is a distinct advantage for the library to have always an
eligible list of people with the necessary training, for temporary
employment as substitutes or for permanent appointments,
instead of having in all such cases to send to the library schools
for candidates. But if we are to depend mainly on our own
people for recruiting the staff, the interests of the library demand that we give them the best possible training and instruction. As soon as it can be done, I recommend that the course
be lengthened to nine months instead of seven, and that a
small compensation for service be given the students in the last
two months.
Weekly staff meetings are held, partly for the discussion
of routine matters of administration, but mainly for the discussion of books, the members of the staff presenting brief
reviews of new books or other books of special interest. Plans
are now being made for other meetings, to be held bi-weekly,
for the discussion of various phases of library work with which
the staff do not ordinarily come in contact in the course of
their work. Much good should result from all such meetings,
which will furnish a mean? of supplementing the more formal
instruction given in the training class.
WAR SERVICE WORK
t
The library has co-operated to the extent of its present
ability with the American Library Association's war service
work. The Association at its annual conference in June laid
extensive plans for placing well selected libraries, which
292 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
should be administered by trained librarians, in every cantonment and training camp. The difficult conditions under which
we were working here during the summer made it impossible
for us to do as much as we should have done in soliciting donations of books and magazines, in sorting them, and forwarding
to the camps. About 5,000 books, however, and several hundred magazines were sent to Camp Hancock, in Augusta, and
to the station of Marines at Paris Island, S. C.
The library took part in the national campaign to raise
$1,000,000 for the purpose of buying books for the camp
libraries to supplement the gifts. The librarian served as a
member of the State committee and visited Atlanta, Augusta
and Macon in the course of the campaign. With the co-operation of the Savannah Federation of Women's Clubs, the United
Daughters of the Confederacy, the Council of National Defense,
the Board of Trade, the Rotary Club, the Greater Savannah
Commercial Club, the Jewish Educational Alliance, and many
individuals, an active campaign was conducted in Savannah,
which brought in $1,397.50. Proportionately to the population, this was far in excess of the amount raised in any other
city of the State, and I wish to express my sincere thanks to all
those who helped make the campaign in Savannah so successful.
LIBRARY HOURS
In December it was decided to close the library daily at
9 p. m. instead of at 10 p. m., as the use of the library after 9
o'clock was not sufficient to justify the expense of lighting.
At present the libraryc ontinues to open at 10 a.m., and more
time is gained for the work of cataloging and routine work.
As soon as the demands of such work become less pressing, we
should open at 9.30 or possibly as early as 9 o'clock in the
morning.
FUTURE NEEDS
Enough has already been said to indicate the most urgent
needs of the library in the immediate future. I feel that no
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 293
apology need be offered for the work thus far accomplished.
But the coming year will see a continued perfecting of the
administration of the library, the further strengthening of the
book collection, and redoubled efforts to extend the library's
service and the library's influence for good in every possible
way. The library should become in reality a "university of
the people," a continuation school for those who have lacked
full educational advantages, and the center of the city's intellectual life. May the year 1919 find us much further advanced
toward this goal than we are at present.
*
Respectfully submitted,
C. SEYMORE THOMPSON,
Librarian.
January 21, 1918.
294 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
STATISTICS
(In accordance with form approved by American Library
Association)
ANNUAL REPORT FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER
31, 1917
Name of Library: Savannah Public Library:
City or town: Savannah, Ga.
Population served: 45,000 (estimate)
Terms of use: Free for lending
Free for reference
Total number of agencies: Three
Consisting of: Central library
Two stations
Number of days open during year (Central library) :........................................................................ 358
Hours open each week for lending (Central library) 75
Hours open each week for reading (Central library) 75
-~ i Number of volumes at beginning of year:._......... 19,602
(Number of volumes added during year:.................. 4,000
5 i Number of volumes lost or withdrawn during year 900
^ 'Total number of volumes at end of year.L._...... 22,702
JuvenNumber of volumes of fiction lent for Adult ile Total
home use........................................ 50,543 41,061 91,604
Total number of volumes lent for
home use........................................ 65,687 53,204 118,891
Number of borrowers registered during year.............................-.-........ 2,463 1,462 3,925
Total number of registered borrowers 4,942 2,451 7,393
Registration period: 3 years.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 295
Number of newspapers and periodicals currently received:
Newspapers 5
Periodicals 115
Receipts From:
City appropriation.................................................. $ 14,000.00
Fines.......................................................................... 627.36
Duplicate pay collection....................._............... 289.29
Other sources............................................................ 50.99
Total.................................................. $ 14,967.64
Payments for:
Maintenance
Books.........................__......................................... $ 4,329.59
Periodicals.__................................................. 430.85
Binding.................................................................. 9.00
Salaries, library service........._.................... 7,245.26
Salaries, janitor service.._................................. 845.00
Heat..................._....................................................... 313.00
Light.......................................................................... 343.66
Other maintenance............................................... 1,451.28
Grand total._.....................!................... $ 14,967.64
296 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
BOARD OF MANAGERS
(4>J. Randolph Anderson, Chairman
<3>H. W. Witcover, Vice-Chairman.
<i)John L. Travis, Secretary.
(5)Mrs. B. F. Bullard (6)W. F. McCauley
(2>Thomas Gamble (3>Mrs. P. W. Meldrim
d)J. W. Griffeth (4>Miss Hortense Orcutt
<5>E. M. Lokey (2>Mrs. J. G. Smith
(6) John M. Thomas
(1) Term expires 1918
(2) Term expires 1919
(3) Term expires 1920
(4) Term expires 1921
(5) Term expires 1922
(6) Term expires 1923
LIBRARY STAFF
Librarian
C. SEYMOUR THOMPSON
Assistant Librarian Children's Librarian
Julia A. Schilling Lily M. Dodgen
Assistants
Mary C. McCants Margaret Silva
Pamela Hyrne ' Margaret Brooks
Annie S. Porter Agnes Jones
Substitute Stenographer
May Inglesby Frances A. Pottinger
Training Class
Marie S. Carolan Janey W. Davant
Eva W. Martin
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 297
REPORT OF THE
CARNEGIE COLORED PUBLIC LIBRARY
Savannah, Ga., Jan. 1,1918.
Hon. WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor
City of Savannah
Dear Sir:
*
I herewith submit report of the Carnegie Colored Public
Library for the year ending December 31, 1918.
In submitting this report, I respectfully desire to direct
attention to the constant increase in the number of borrowers
which demonstrates the constant and continued growth of
the Library in the estimation of the public and the continued
expansion of its influence.
The greater the number of borrowers, and the more
general becomes the use of the library, the greater becomes
the demand upon its resources, and the need of better facilities.
These facts also demonstrate the great usefulness of the
library to those whom it serves, and makes clear the great need
of increased resources and better facilities.
I, therefore, respectfully ask and recommend that the appropriation for the maintenance of the library be increased so
as to make possible the purchasing of books which the library
so much needs. This would make it possible for it to accomplish much good, and to better fulfill the purpose of its
establishment.
Respectfully submitted,
A. L. TUCKER, Chairman.
298 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
To The Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Colored Public
Library:
Gentlemen:
I herewith submit report of the operation of the Carnegie
Colored Public Library for the year ending December 31, 1918.
In submitting this report I desire to call your attention
to the constantly increasing number of borrowers, and to say
that the increase in the number of borrowers has been much
greater in proportion than the facilities of the library would
warrant. This increase in the number of borrowers, has
greatly increased the need of better facilities.
In order to supply the demands of the public as to kind
of books applied for, it is necessary that the collection in each
class be enlarged. There is especially a great and pressing
need of juvenile books, and books of reference. To supply
these needs would greatly foster the growing list of borrowers
and enhance the work of the library to the public. The
circulating statistics are as follows:
Books in Library January 1, 1917............................ 3,308
Books added by gift.................................................... 170
Books added by purchase.......................................... 11
TOTAL................................................................. 3,489
Books worn out and discarded.................................. 14
Books in Library Jan 1, 1918.................................... 3,475
Number of Borrowers cards issued................. .......... 118
Number of books issued.............................................. 2,616
Number of visitors...................................................... 2,950
Number of Children.................................................... 2,344
Respectfully submitted,
P. A. DENEGALL, Librarian.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 299
Treasurer's Report of the Carnegie Colored Library
for period December 31st, 1916 to Dec 31st, 1917.
RECEIPTS
Appropriation of $112.50 per month for year 1917 $1,350.00
Collected from fees and fines................................ 13.04
Balance brought forward from 1916.......-.....-... 30.73
TOTAL...................... ...-..$ 1,393.77
DISBURSEMENTS
Salary to Librian....... $ 480.00
Salary to Janitor.......................................................... 240.00
Lights........--.----..-----......---.. 75.03
Fuel...........................................'..................................... 96.00
Miscellaneous Repairing._......................... 51.00
Magazines............................................................. 48.00
Books ordered.............................................................. 205.27
Incidentals............... 35.00
Interest and payments on option of two lots contiguous to Library................................................ 102.74
Cash to balance..........................................!-......... 60.73
TOTAL._..-...................$ 1,393.77
Respectfully submitted,
S. A. GRANT, Treasurer.

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PARK AND TREE
COMMISSION
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1917
SAVANNAH, GA.
1918

MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 303
PARK AND TREE COMMISSION.
PHILIP D. DAFFIN................Term Expires January 1, 1918
ISAIH A. SOLOMONS............Term Expires January 1, 1918
THOMAS H. McMILLAN......Term Expires January 1, 1920
ROBERT M. BUTLER.__...Term Expires January 1, 1920
CHARLES S. ELLIS................Term Expires January 1, 1922
Chairman
PHILIP D. DAFFIN
Vice-Chairman
CHARLES S. ELLIS
Secretary
ISAIAH A. SOLOMONS
Superintendent
WILLIAM H. ROBERTSON
Foreman
WILLIAM J. LOVE
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery (White Portion)
A. B. LaROCHE
304 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Keeper Bonaventure Cemetery (White)
J. T. McCORMICK
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery (Colored Portion)
HENRY WILLIS
REPORT OF THE PARK AND TREE COMMISSION
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1918.
Hon. W. J. PIERPOXT, Mayor,
City of Savannah
Sir: In accordance with Section 6 of an Act of the Legislature of the State of Georgia, Approved November 30, 1895, to
create and organize a Park and Tree Commission for the City
of Savannah, the Commissioners have the honor to submit
this report of their doings for the past year:
Due to a request for conservation of paper and printing,
this report will be made as short as possible.
OUR PUBLIC GROUNDS.
Acres.
ForsythPark........,....:....................,............................. 10.
Forsyth Extension.................................................... 21.
Colonial Park._.....:....................................................... 6.6
Twenty-five Squares.................................................... 21.8
Oglethorpe Green...............................:................. 3.44
Liberty Street Green.__............................................... 2.18
Dasher Park.................................................................. . 16
Thomas Park................................................................ 2.
Wells Square..............................._............................. 1.4
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 305
Emmet Park..._......................-........................... 4.75
Myers Park...__......................-........................... 1.56
Cann Park.................................................................... 2.18
Dixon Park.................................................................... 1.29
Grayson Park....................-...................................... 1.75
Baffin Park..................................................... 80.40
Park in Southville Ward (not named)...................... . 17
Tiedeman Park.................................,.,............... 2.75
McCauley Park.................................................... 1.2
Solomons Park........................................................... 1.2
Theus Park.................................................................... 1.2
Baldwin Park..........:....................................-.-.......... 1.2
Guckenheimer Park...................................................... 1.2
Entleman Park............................................................. 1.
Kavanugh Park.......................................................... . 1.
Vetsburg Park.............................................................. 1.
Lattimore Park............................................................ 1.
Gaudry Park............................................................ 1.
Adams Park.................................................................. 1.
Total...................................................................... 175.43
Total area of Parks and Squares................................ 175.43
Laurel Grove Cemetery (White)......................... 57.1
Laurel Grove Cemetery (Colored).............................. 60.8
Bonaventure Cemetery................................................ 99.69
Total area of our Public Grounds.............. 393.02
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Parks and Squares.
There was appropriated.......................................... $15,000.00
There was expended................................................ 15,000.00
306 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Tree Planting
There was appropriated...................................... $ 1,000.00
There was expended................................................ 1,000.00
Bonaventure Cemetery
There was appropriated.......................................... $ 8,000.00
There was expended............................................... 8,000.00
Laurel Grove Cemetery
There was appropriated.......................................... $ 6,500.00
There was expended............................................ 6,500.00
Baffin Park
There was appropriated.......................................... $ 2,500.00
There was expended ............................................... 2,500.00
Special Appropriation Bonaventure Cemetery
For Construction of New Stables.
There was appropriated.......................................... $ 300.00
There was expended................................................ 300.00
This appropriation was first made for the repair of keeper's residence but to have used the money for that purpose
would have been wasting it, therefore the commission requested City Council to allow it to be used for the construction of new stables and barns, as same were badly needed.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 307
Special Appropriation Laurel Grove Cemetery
For Paving Roadways
There was appropriated.......................................... $ 400.00
There was expended................................................ 399.96
Balance unexpended............................. .04
Special Appropriation Bonaventure CemeteryFor Paving Roadways.
There was an appropriation of $400.00 included in the
Budget for the year 1918 to pave roadways in Bonaventure
Cemetery but the request of the commission to have the said
appropriation made available was never granted, consequently
no work on the roadways was possible, there being no funds in
hand for that purpose.
Special Appropriation Bonaventure Cemetery
For Extending and Renewing Water Mains
An appropriation of $400.00 for the above work was provided for in the Budget for the year 1918 but the request of
the commission to have same made available was never
granted, therefore no work of that character was performed.
Special Appropriation Parks and Squares For
Purchase of English Rye Grass.
There was appropriated..............!........................... $ 330.00
There was expended................................................ 328.50
Balance unexpended.............................. $ 1.50
308 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
BONAVENTURE CEMETERY
Receipts
Received from sale of lots.................................. $ 1.928.96
Received from burial fees....................................- 736.00
Received from care of lots................................... 2,500.24
Received from water rents.... 733.74
Received from miscellaneous work. 1,098.83
Received from fees for deeds to lot and exchange 37.15
Total amount paid to City Treasurer..... $ 7,034.92
LAUREL GROVE CEMETERY
Receipts
Received from sale of lots, white..................... $ 205.80
Received from fees for deeds to lots..... 9.00
Received from burial fees, white... 1,289.50
Received from sale of lots, colored ............... 439.65
Received from fees for deeds to lots..... 30.00
Total amount paid to City Treasurer.......... $ 1,973.95
FORSYTH PARK
The general routine work was carried on in this park as
usual.
The mutilation and destruction of benches in this park
continues and it does seem a great pity that we have to spend
so much each year in replacement of benches, when the same
money could be used to increase the number and thereby
afford greater resting facilities for the public and we continue
to hope that some determined effort will be made to break up
this destructive practice.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 309
Last fall this park was planted in English Rye Grass
and same gave excellent results.
The Azalea beds which we planted in 1916 gave promise
of thousands of flowers and but for the destructive freez in
February the same would have been magnificient. The freeze
was so severe that many of the plants were very seriously
injured and 245 were killed outright. -
BULL STREET SQUARES
These squares have received general care and were planted
in English Rye Grass.
THOMAS PARK, WELLS SQUARE
AND DASHER PARK
The usual routine care was given to these parks.
The destruction and mutilation of benches in Thomas
Park has become so serious that it is almost impossible to keep
any benches in this park and those that are not torn up or
mutilated are very few and far between. It does seem that
persons using this park would at least have cnsideration for
the nurses and children who frequent this recreation center
and help protect the benches for them. No protection is
afforded the benches and it is necessary for us to be continually
repairing and replacing them. May we not hope in vain for
a greater co-operation on the part of the public in their protection during the coming year.
At the request of the Southwestern Tax Payer's Association, we placed 20 benches in Wells Square and it is with regret we have to report that there are but three benches left of
the original 20.
310 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
PARK AT ESTILL AVENUE AND BULL STREET
This park has been kept in good condition and the
shrubbery is growing nicely, so that in a very short time it will
have reached a finished state.
SQUARES EAST AND WEST OF BULL STREET AND
NORTH OF GASTON STREET
These squares have received only the regular routine care.
THE STRAND
The Strand received excellent care during the past year
and it is with regret that we lost the valuable services of MrG. W. Harvey its caretaker but hope to replace him with
another who will give the ground under his charge the same
painstaking care that he gave it.
COTTON EXCHANGE CIRCLE.
This Circle was planted in cotton as has been the custom
for a great many years past and is still of interest to our
visitors.
MYERS AND CANN PARKS
We beg to express our appreciation of the fact that Cann
Park has been curbed and we are now in position to improve
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 311
same as it no longer appears as a part and parcel of the streets
around it. \We hope to take up its improvement during the
coming year.
Myers Park has not yet been curbed and we earnestly
hope that the matter will receive early consideration, as it is
in a rapidly growing section and demands more attenion paid
to it. As soon as the curbing is laid we will be in position to
make further improvements.
GRAYSON PARK
This park received only general care during the year.
DIXON PARK
The usual routine care was given this park.
We placed a Christmas tree in this park for the use of the
Colored Cristmas Tree Festival Association.
GRASS PLATS
We were unable to do very much in the way of filling in
low grass plats but tried to keep all of them in as good condition as possible with the small force at our command.
TREES
We planted trees to the number of 124, and the following
list will show the number and variety of each.
312 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Live Oak._......................................................................... 80
Sweet Gum.-................................................................... 19
Palmetto............................................................................ 9
Crepe Myrtle.................................................................... 9
Sugarberry....................................................................... 7
Total.................................................................. 124
REPLACING OF TREES
We replaced trees to the number of 289, and the following
list will show the variety and number of each.
Live Oak........................................................................ 165
Sweet Gum.................................................................... 118
Crepe Myrtle................................................................ 4
Palmetto........................................................................ 2
Total............................................................ 289
TRIMMING OF TREES
While this branch of our work has received considerable
attention, beg to report that it has been impossible for us to
give same the attention it required due to the shortage of
climbers and we were without a climber for a quite a long
while, and in consequence much of the work was delayed.
SPRAYING OF TREES
We have given as much attention to this work in the past
year as our limited funds and labor would permit and believe
MAYOR'S ANNAUL REPORT 313
that we took care of all cases that were urgent. To give this
branch of our work proper care would require a force of not
less than two men who would have to keep at it day in and
day out. We are very fortunate in not having as many destructive insect agencies and fungus troubles as they do in
the north but we have enough to demand constant attention
which unfortunately, we are not in position to give them.
REMOVAL OF TREES
We removed 62 trees during the year and the following
will show the variety and number of each.
Chinaberry........................................................................ 12
Water Oak........................................................................ 11
Sycamore............................................................................ 9
Elm ................................................................................... 7
Sugarberry............................. .............._.......:..........._...... 3
Mulberry...........,.....,..,.............................................. 3
Sweet Gum............................................................... 3
Dogwood............................................................................ 3
Poplar............................................................;................... 2
Copal................................................................................. 2
Live Oak............................................................................ 1
Red Bud............................................................................ 1
White Oak...................................................................... 1
Hickory.............................................................................. 1
Haven................................................................................ 1
Crepe Myrtle................................................................. 1
Magnolia..............-........................................................... 1
Total.................................................................. 62
314 MAYOR'S AXXUAL REPORT
EMMET PARK
This park received only the general care.
We placed 20 new benches in this park and regret to report that of that number but three now remain. The benches
are not only mutilated and destroyed in this park but persons
have actually taken them from the park and carried them to
other parts of the city for their personal use.
PARKS IN ARDSLEY PARK
Such care as these parks received last year was given
them by The Ardsley Park Land Corporation with one exception and that was when the Park and Tree Commission gave
them a general cleaning up, this work having been performed
although there were no funds appropriated to cover the cost
of the work. The commission requested an appropriation to
care for the parks in this sub-division but no appropriation was
made. We trust that provision will be made in the budget for
1918 to care for these parks.
PARKS IN CHATHAM CRESENT
These parks were taken care of by The Chatham Land and
Hotel Company, no funds having been given the commission
to perform the work.
COLONIAL PARK
This park received very good care during the past year
much having been done to clean out all useless trees and
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 315
shrubs, this adding much to the general appearance of the
park.
The destruction of trees, shrubs, flowers and benches continues and this gives us much concern but we seem unable to
get the assistance necessary to stop these practices.
Even though we have cleaned up much of the low growth,
the park is still dark and is in need of additional lights.
DAFFIN PARK
We tried to keep nearly all of this park under cultivation
during the past year and this not only enabled us to keep
down the growth of weeds but went a long way towards cutting
down our feed bill, otherwise with the increased cost of food
stuffs our appropriation would have been more than sorely
taxed.
We planted Amoor River Hedges on the north and south
sides of the central Mall for a distance of about 1,800 feet and
also along the walk on Waters Avenue side, this hedge being
about 1,100 feet long.
We completed the filling in and grading of sidewalk and
grass plat area on Dale Avenue from Waters Avenue to Bee
Road, a distance of 2,700 feet with a width of about 20 feet.
We also filled in some of the low area lying near Dale
Avenue and towards the western end of the park.
We put down over 600 yards of concrete sidewalk, part
of the work being on 47th Street, and the other being a
diagonal walk leading from 47th Street and Waters Avenue
towards the Central Mall.
We fertilized all trees within the park area and they took
on a healthy color and made splendid growth.
The drainage of the park is much better now and we have
less trouble in getting our trees to live and grow. The use of
dynamite worked wonders.
316 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
MISCELLANEOUS
We delivered a number of loads of wood to the worthy
poor of the city.
The Public Library Commission furnished the English
Rye Grass seed and we furnished the labor planting the Library Lawn.
We procured and erected a large Christmas Tree in the
Park Extension for the Christmas Tree Festival Association.
Superintendent Robertson again allowed the use of his
farm for the making of a hay crop for the commission and we
raised approximately 12 tons of splendid hay, this land being
used without cost to the commission.
The Ford Express Truck which we purchased in August
1916 is still going and has really been a tremendous help in
our work.
The Cadillac automobile purchased on February 1st, 1913
for use of the department is still giving excellent service and
this with very little upkeep cost. Although nearly five year
old and with a monthly average of 1,000 miles of travel, then
engine has never had to be torn down and still runs very
smoothly, this being attributed largely to the excellent care
which the car has had.
Our stables and barn and also our workshop were in such
condition as to be almost in a state of collapse and as we
were occupying ground that did not belong to the city, deemed
it inadvisable to erect anything of a permanent nature or to
repair the present structures but instead to place our stables,
barn and other buildings on property owned by the city, so
there was a piece of the colored portion of Laurel Grove
Cemetery, situated in the north east corner, that was unfit for
burial purposes but by filling same in with cinders it could
be made usable for the structures stated, therefore we started
the work last January and by degrees hope to have a lot that
will be substantial and efficient in every way. When the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 317
work is completed we will have room to house our stock and
a barn to take care of such feed stuffs as we can grow and also
sheds to properly protect our equipment from the elements
and thereby prolong its life and cut down its maintenance
cost. We will also provide for the proper care of tools, lawn
mowers, oils, greases, etc.
We discontinued our shop the latter part of the year and
made a very satisfactory arrangement whereby we have been
able to cut down considerably on that part of our maintenance cost.
Our laborers had been working for us at the rate of
$1.50 per day, this being a lesser rate than that paid by other
departments which was $1.75 per day, so towards the latter
part of the year we increased our labor to that figure without
asking for any additional appropriation, this being possible by
the elimination of our shop as stated above.
Due to the unusual conditions existing in regard to
labor it will be necessary for us to make a further increase and
in this we hope for the assistance of City Council by the
granting of an increased appropriation, otherwise we fear that
we will not be able to hold our labor.
BONAVENTURE CEMETERY
The care of this cemetery has been very good during the
past year and while we have had some difficulty with labor,
conditions generally have been satisfactory.
The grass plats on the avenues were planted in English
Rye Grass and made the cemetery attractive during the winter
and spring months.
A portion of Section E was grubbed and cleaned up.
318 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The eastern portion of Section N was planted in Bermuda
Grass,
We planted 25 Live Oaks, 23 Magnolias, 15 Palmettos,
70 Crepe Myrtle, 40 Altheas and 150 Hydrangeas during
the year.
We cared for 427 lots under annual agreement.
Also cared for 5 lotsunder monthly agreement.
Furnished water to 431 lots.
We also cared for 82 lots in perpetuity, for which the City
of Savannah has received the sum of $22,195.00 in trust to
provide for their care and maintenance.
Installed water on 30 lots.
The pumping plant is in very good condition and giving
efficient serviceBesides taking care of funerals, we have performed a
large amount of miscellaneous work.
We purchased 34,000 brick with the appropriation allowed for the building of new stables and barn.
An appropriation of $4,000.00 was allowed for the construction of a keeper's residence and office at Bonaventure
Cemetery, this being in the budget for the year 1918 and with
this money we expect to build not only a residence and office
for the keeper, but also waiting rooms and toilets for both men
and women. The building will be both attractive and substantial and in thorough keeping with a cemetery of the
prominence of Bonaventure.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 319
LAUREL GROVE CEMETERY
This cemetery has been kept in good condition during the
year and we have had little cause to complain.
Planted Italian Rye Grass in the Circle and on the main
grass plats and it presented a beautiful appearance.
The flower beds were planted in attractive designs as usual.
The burial lots in the Ravine Section have nearly all been
filled in and are now ready for sale, in fact a large proportion
of them have already been purchased and improved.
We care for 19 lots in perpetuity, for which the City of
Savannah has received the sum of $4,700.00 in trust for their
care and maintenance.
We beg to call especial attention to the fact we have
cared for the Mary E. Williams lot as per agreement entered
into with the Mayor and Aldermen.
Beg to report that with the $400.00 allowed for the paving of roadways, we paved 450 feet of 12 foot roadway in the
southern section of the cemetery, same connecting the eastern
shell road with the first gravelled avenue to the west and in
addition did much in the way of patching roadways that were
badly worn.
It was a matter of gratification to us that the roadway
leading from the Ogeechee Road to the entrance of the cemetery was put in a more presentable condition as per our request
of August 16th, 1915, this work having been done during the
latter part of the year 1917 and we immediately made the
necessary fill in the plats and planted grass and the improvement has simply been wonderful. The laying out of the
center and side plats and curbing them was just what this
avenue needed to make an attractive entrance. We also
planted four large Live Oak trees on the north side to match
those already on the south. We hope that some day the
320 MAYOR'S ANNUAL RETORT
city will see its way clear to pave the roadways with concrete.
We built an attractive rain shelter with provisions for a
drinking fountain and wash basins, this structure being very
substantial and covered with a slate roof. Has a concrete
floor and is otherwise sanitary.
We also built a new greenhouse foundation and walls on
which we hope to erect a modern greenhouse built of materials
that are more lasting than those formerly used.
Attached to and forming a part of the greenhouse is a
complete set of cold frames built of hard brick and plastered
with cement mortar so that they will to a large extent be
moisture and cold proof.
We have also constructed a toilet for men and hope to
install the necessary fixtures during the coming year.
The brick structure directly across from the keeper's
residence which has been used for many years as a tool room
for the working force of the cemetery, has been cleaned out,
new plaster put upon the inside walls and a tile floor put down,
the said building being converted into a waiting room for
women. We have built an addition to this building in which
will be a wash room and other conveniences.
Under the main building of the women's waiting room we
have constructed a lot owner's tool room, same being made
attractive with plastered walls and concrete floor. This room
affords the opportunity for lot owner's to leave their tools,
garden hose, watering pots, etc., at the cemetery.
We have a stock of 5,000 plants of many varieties in, our
greenhouse which will be used in planting the coming spring.
We have removed for cause the following trees; Chinaberry 39, Water Oaks 6, Cedar 4, Catalpa 21, Cherry 12, Elm
2, Mulberry 1, Wild Olive 5, Sassafras 1, Locust 1, Sycamore
2, Laurel 1. Haven 2 and Sweet Gum 1, making in all a total
of 98.
There is need for a new waiting station at the street car
line and this we hope to put in some time in the very near
future.
There are many roadways that are badly in need of pav-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 321
ing and we trust that City Council will see its way clear to
grant additional funds for this purpose.
In addition to the roadways that need paving, there are
others that were paved many years ago and are now so badly
worn that considerable patching is necessary.
LAUREL GROVE CEMETERY
Colored Portion
The Cemetery in general was kept in very good condition
the past year and we feel that with the limited amount of
labor employed that a very remarkable showing was made.
We furnished cinders to the keeper of the cemetery and
with these he paved the main roadway which did much to ease
the complaint in regard to the bad condition of that roadway.
We hope from time to time to do additional paving with
cinders which have been very generously given to us by the
Savannah Electric Company in the past.
I attached to this report the mortuary statistics of the
keepers of the cemeteries.
Yours respectfully,
P. D. BAFFIN, Chairman,
MORTUARY REPORT OF LAUREL GROVE CEMETERY (White)
January 1. 1917. to December 31, 1917.
White
January......................................
February....................................
March.............. ......................
April............................................
May................................... ........
June............................................
July............................................
August...................... ..................
September..................................
October......................................
November..................................
December..................................
Total..................................
inDied Savannah
11
18
13
15
18
13
12
20
14
17
27
20
198
Died ofout Savannah
4
2
6
5
4
1
6
1
1
7
3
2
42
Stillborn
and Prema Births ture
2
5
4
4
2
2
0
1
3
10
2
3
38
1
17
25
23
24
24
16
18
22
18
34
23
25
278
ii ta <3
2
3
1
7
7
2
3
4
5
6
2
42
Colored
Died inSavannah
57
62
60
64
58
50
53
44
45
61
55
54
663
Died ofoutSavannah
8
5 .
3
7
8
7
6
5
4
6
2
2
63
Stillborn
and Prema births ture
13
9
11
14
9
5
3
11
7
9
13
6
110
3
sS
78
76
74
85
75
62
62
60
56
76
70
62
836
a
Ub *
18
7
13
13
19
4
11
7
11
13
7
10
133
Total Interin mentsboth
Cemeteries
95
101
97
109
99
78
80
82
74
110
102
87
1,114
GO
d
t
VTJ
3
Removals in cemetery, adults 2, llemovuls out of cemetery, adults 4, infants 2.
Respectfully, A. B. LaROCHE, Keeper.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 323
jo jdinoan
01 rM^u atxo
inojj
O *3
D
I*
.o
H g

PQ
O S
w Sfi
Is'
3
mojj
msmuqo
pan
jo
n; paid
(N
iI iI i(di-HiIt-ItIr-lN
CO
1 J i =
g 03 S fl
1-g 1 I
o
O
I
O
CO
CO
V
tn
a
<u
o
O
*^>
a
oo
00

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF SANITARY
COMMISSIONERS
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1917
SAVANNAH, GA
1918
326 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
BOARD OF SANITARY COMMISSIONERS
Savannah, Ga., January 1st, 1918.
Hon. WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
The following is the report of that part of the health
work assigned to the Health Officer is submitted with the
report of Dr. V. H. Bassett, Director of the Bacteriological
Laboratory and that of Dr. D. C. Gilles, Chief Food Inspector.
MORTALITY
The following comparative statement of deaths for ten
years from natural causes will give a fair idea as to what improvement has occurred within the last decade. It should be
taken into consideration that, in the ten years ending 1917,
there was an increase of about 30 per cent, of the population.
Year
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
White
467
462
571-
568
543
442
449
440
409
446
Colored
939
878
1,070
1,234
1,107
1,038
1,074
1,133
1,038
1,022
Total
1,406
1,340
1,641
1,842
1,650
1,480
1,523
1,573
1,447
1,468
POPULATION
It is estimated that, in the year 1917, there were about
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 327
81,000 people, of which number 40,000 were white and
41,000 colored.
PRINCIPAL CAUSE OF DEATH
Disease
Tuberculosis
Brights' Disease
Heart Disease
Pneumonias
Pellagra
Malarial Fever
Typhoid Fever
White
29
58
35
26
6
2
7
Colored
143
98
96
100
32
16
14
Total
172
156
131
126
38
18
21
TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES
DIPHTHERIA
There were 121 cases, with five deaths, four whites and one
colored. '
SCARLET FEVER
There were 16 cases and no deaths.
MEASLES
Measles swept the entire South Atlantic and Gulf coasts
during this year. Until March this was not a reportable
disease, therefore, we are unable to state the total number of
cases during the year, but there were about 1,200 cases, of
which 7 resulted fatally. It is beyond the knowledge of
health officers to stop the progress of this disease, which occurs
every second or third year, and within a period of two years
or less attacks all persons who never had the disease before,
eats up the supply of non-immunes and disappears for two
or three years before again returning. The quarantine of
328 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
measles does not arrest the progress of an epidemic for two
reasons: first, the mildness of the disease precludes about
fifty per cent that physicians never see and quite a half of
those seen have passed the transmissible stage before coming
under medical observation. 1917 was a measles year. There
probably will be a little measles during the year 1918 and there
will be no serious out-break in the following year.
WHOOPING COUGH
An epidemic of this disease accompanied measles this
year and there were two deaths.
SMALLPOX
There were three cases, all of which were found outside
of the corporate limits, but were considered as being within
the City and were cared for at the smallpox hospital. During the latter part of the year when smallpox prevailed to
some extent, particularly in the military cantonment zones,
there will be quite an outbreak during the coming year.
Smallpox rarely occurs among the residents of this city. To
exemplify, for nearly 20 years there has been no record of a
local person having contracted the disease who had been admitted to the public schools of this county, where a successful
mark of vaccination against smallpox is a requisite for admittance to such schools.
BIRTHS
There were 900 white births and 817 colored births recorded during the year, which means that somewhat less than
10 of the births which occurred among whites were not report
ed, while not 80 per cent of the colored births were recorded.
In this part of the United States vital statistics cuts but
little figure, the value of birth registration being recognized
by few municipalities and in actual fact, not by the State of
Georgia. It should be stated that it is in evidence that there
is a law enacted by the State Legislature to the effect that
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 329
vital statistics shall be kept. It is a debatable question as to
whether it will be put in force this year.
FOOD PRODUCTS
This work has been under the supervision of Dr. Gilles,
Chief Food Inspector, and the Abattoir, owned by private
parties is under construction and almost finished which, when
finished, will be under the regulations of the municipalty and
should be aa effective and protective measure against the sale
of unsound meats.
BUILDING LAWS
The time has long passed when the City should enact I
building laws in keeping with modern civilization. Often,
your Health Officer has tried to show in many of his reports
the necessity of enacting laws which would control and prevent the congestion of houses and the people which live in
them. This City has been liberal in its endeavors to promote
the health of its inhabitants in throwing safeguards around
them to protect their health. Our municipal charity has been
freely spent to care for those when sick who are not able to
care for themselves, but, so far, the prevention of disease
which comes from improper housing has never been legislated
upon. The modern city protects its population by seeing
that particularly the poorer classes are properly housed and
there can be no great improvement in the housing conditions
of any City unless the City provides laws which prevent the
congestion of houses and the people that live within them.
For nearly 20 years, your Health Officer has advocated that a
commission of intelligent men and women be given authority
to make a survey of the housing conditions of this City and
inquire into the sanitary and moral conditions which unquestionably retard good health and good morals.
WATER
Your attention is called to that part of Dr. Bassett's
report which touches on the water situation. It is clear that
330 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
the sooner the River Station be abandoned the nearer we will
be from the constant danger of pollution of our water supply
or at least that part of that supply which goes to a portion of
the City: I refer to the Northern section near the water front.
Dr. Bassett made many examinations of the water from the
river pumping station which showed frequent contamination
of the water supplied to the Northern section of the city
above referred to.
SANITARY INSPECTION
In June the inspection forces of the Health and Water
Departments were consolidated and placed under the control
of the Health Department, and while under the present
arrangement it will never attain the highest degree of efficiency
it is easier to show the few errors committed than to see the
good work performed by the inspection force. These facts
are recorded in the Health Department and prove the good
work performed by these men.
Your Health Officer would recommend the employment
of two female nurses (one white, one colored) to perform a
mcst valuable work of the Health Department. The work
of these nurses would have two principal functions: To aid
in the prevention of infantile mortality and in the fight
'against tuberculosis. Already, every organized modern
Board of Health has this bureau in operation.
Yours respectfully,
W. F. BRUNNER, M. D-,
Health Officer.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 331
Savannah, Ga., 1st, 1918-
Dr. W. F. BRUNNER, M. D.
Health Officer, City.
Dear Sir:
I herewith submit a report of the work performed, resultr
accomplished, etc., by the food inspection division for the yeas
ending December 31st, 1917.
GENERAL STATEMENT
In general the work has progressed very favorably, in
spite of the conditions brought on by the war. The shortage
of labor, high cost of material, relative narrow margin of
profits, etc. have caused the dealers in food products to go
slow in making many extensive improvements in their places
of business voluntarily, and it has been the policy of this
division not to force extensive improvements where they
could be dispensed with, consistent with proper sanitation.
It is with regret that I have to report the postponement
of the opening of the Savannah Abattoir & Packing Co., and
consequently the postponement of the centralization of the
slaughtering of animals supplying meat to Savannah. It is
hoped, however, and seems altogether probable that this plant
will commence operation very soon.
MEAT INSPECTIONS
The same methods of inspecting meats at the cold storage
plants and green groceries, with no attempt to centralize.the
inspection of country meats, has been followed as in the past.
This appears to be the only logical method with the present
force, it has given better results especially during the latter
part of the year, due to the high price of meat, which has
resulted in a decrease in consumption.
During the year the Savannah Abattoir & Packing Co.,
have been building a plant, which is completed except for the
332 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
installation of machinery. This plant when completed, will
be known as the Authorized Municipal Abattoir, and the City
of Savannah will have control not only of the sanitary conditions and inspection, but also of the prices to be charged for
slaughtering and storage. All the local butchers will be compelled by the meat inspection ordinance to do their slaughtering at this plant, and the meats from the country, while not
excluded from the city, will be shipped under restrictions as
to wrapping, and will be brought to a central point for inspection.
This new system of inspection will result in a great improvement in the quality of the meat supply, a guarantee of
its freedom from disease, and contamination, from dirty
slaughter pens, and rough handling during transportation.
GREEN GROCERIES
There has been some improvement in the sanitary condition of the green groceries, the increasing price of meat, and
the resulting decrease in consumption has naturally led to less
meat being sold by most dealers, and while this has rendered
the work of cleaning these places less hard, the profits made
have been less, and the dealers hesitate in buying new fixtures
and equipment, These have not been insisted on unless particularly needed to maintain in proper sanitation and storage.
FISH HOUSES
There has been a scarcity of fish during a part of the past
year, and some of these places have been closed temporarily.
The sanitary conditions have been good, and the fish have as a
rule been better than ever in the past, due to the smaller
quantities kept, and an increase in the consumption.
RESTAURANTS
Taken as a whole, the restaurants, including cook shops,
and lunch rooms have shown a marked improvement during
the year, in spite of the fact that only one or two have made
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 333
any great structural improvements. A considerable number of the smaller places have closed, and about the same
number have made applications for permits, several of which
have been refused.
The score card has again been revised during the year,
giving fewer points on the dining rooms, and more points on
the kitchens which has forced these places to take more of
their kitchens, in order to get the same score as previously.
BAKERIES
There has been some improvement in the sanitary condition of the bakeries, the majority of these having been kept
in a good sanitary condition. The number is the same as last
year, no bakeries having closed, and no new applications for
permits have been made.
TUBERCULIN TESTING OF DAIRY HERDS
This work has progressed favorably during most of the
year when the weather has been cool enough for this work.
The following table gives the extent and result of the work
done during the year.
BOARD OF SANITARY COMMISSIONERS
TUBERCULIN TESTS 1917.
No.
1.
a,
8.
4
5.
6.
7.
q
10.
11
12.
13.
14,
15
16.
Dairy
Vale Royal............ ..............
Powell, W. S......................
Demosthenes & Co......... . McLester, W. 0.................
Tucker, Mrs. K. A...........
Oliver & Keller..................
Mood, E. W.......................
Kent, M. U.......................
Prior, Mrs. H. H...............
Harms, J. W. ......................
Paulitch, J. F....................
Sullivan, D. E...................
Clark Bros.........................
Ga. State Ind. Col............
Kyals Estate.....................
Wansley, J. S....................
Date
1/2/3
1/9/1Q
1/15/16
1/22/23
1/26/27
2/26/27
2/15/16
2/12/13
3/6/7
3/8/9
3/14/15
3/14/15
3/26/27
3/29/30
5/2/3
5/14/15
Test
3rd
2nd
3rd
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
1st
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
2nd
Healthy
47
3
47
13
12
40
30
15
14
14
3
7
43
14
60
73
Reacted
17
2
4
0
0
1
13
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
9
Susp.
4
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
2
4
Total
68
5
51
13
12
50
46
15
14
14
3
9
45
14
62
86
Per cent
Keacters
25
40
7.8
0
0
2
28.2
0
0
0
0
11.1
0
0
0
10.4
#
COfc
X
t^j
S
TUBERCULIN TESTSContinued
17,
18
10
20.
91
22.
O'Lea'ry, Col. M. J...........
Polychronides & Co... ......
Oliver & Keller..................
Vale Royal..........................
Demosthenes & Co...........
Mood, E. W.......................
5/17/18
11/30/12/1
12/4/5/6/7
12/11/12
12/13/14
12/28/29
1st
3rd
3rd
4th
4th
3rd
28
49
87
34
46
22
710
0
1
8
0
0
6
62
1
0
0
2
0
3
22
29
50
95
36
46
31
794
0
2
8.4
0
0
19.3
7.8
GO
I
3
S
CO
CO
CJi
336 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The per cent of reacters in this table appears rather high,
but 55 per cent of these tests were made on dairies known to
contain tuberculous animals as a result of previous tests.
There are in addition to those listed eighteen (18) dairies containing about 500 animals, which have been found to be free
of tuberculosis on previous tests. As a whole, the result of
the year's work has been encouraging.
This work will be continued in 1918, and judging by past
improvements, there should be comparatively few tuberculous
animals found, except in two or three herds which have
shown a high percentage of reacters on previous tests.
The reacters from the herds tested during the year have
been slaughtered as soon as possible after tests have been
made, and a careful postmortem examination has been made.
About 50 per cent of these have been condemned for food.
RECOMMENDATIONS
With the opening of the new Abattoir, which will take
place soon, it will be necessary to procure a new inspector for
the inspection work at this plant, as it will take up all of man's
time for this. This man should be a veterinarian, Who is a
graduate of a "recognized" veterinary college, and one who
has had experience as a veterinary inspector.
I would also recommend that the green groceries be required to obtain a permit from the Health Officer before conducting business. This would have little effect on those doing
business at the present time, as most of these would qualify
immediately, but it would be a great help in getting new
places properly equipped from the start, and would prevent
the opening of many places which sell meat for a few weeks in
winter, which never became really properly equipped for the
sale of meat.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 337
Inspection was made during the year as follows:
Green Groceries 10,186, restaurants 6,108; bakeries, 1,032;
fish houses 822, cold storage and packers 380; City Market
229; special, 58; slaughter pens, 22; police court, 17; dairies,
16; tuberculin tests, 794; post mortem examinations, 56.
grand total, 19,720.
Condemnations during the year was as follows:
Beef 9,914 Ibs., pork 2,647 Ibs., fish 30,425 Ibs- mutton
and goat 24 Ibs., veal 460 Ibs., sausage 257 Ibs., salt meat 175
Ibs., liver 592 Ibs., smoked meats 78 Ibs., poultry 7 Ibs.,
miscellaneous meat products 200 Ibs., cheese 50 Ibs., total
44,829 Ibs.
In closing this report, I wish to thank you for your support
and encouragement in my work during the year, and also give
due credit to Mr. C. S. Parks, Restaurant and Bakery Inspector, and to Mr. Thomas Fleming, Meat Inspector, for
their interest and work during the year, without which the
work of this division could not have been properly performed.
Very respectfully,
D. C. GILLES, D. V. M.
Chief Food Inspector.
338 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIANS
Northern District
January 1, 1918.
Hon. WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit herewith my Annual Report as Acting
City Physician for the Northern District for the year 1917:
Total number of patients............................................ 1,734
Total number of house visits................................... 1,634
Total number of office calls.......:................................ 1,247
Total number sent to Savannah Hospital.......... 44
Total number sent to St. Joseph's Hospital............ 51
Total number sent to Park View Sanitarium.......... 52
Total number sent to Georgia Infirmary................. 9
Total number sent to Charity Hospital.................. 1
Yours respectfully,
JAMES E. MORRISON, M. D.,
Acting City Physician, Northern District.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 339
/
Southern District
January 1, 1918.
Hon. WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah,
Dear Sir:
I respectfully submit my report as City Physician for the
white Southern District for the City of Savannah from January
21,1917, the day of my appointment, to December 31, 1917,
inclusive, as follows:
Number of patients treated......................................... 2,435
Number of office calls...................................................... 1,154
Number of House Visits.................................................. 1,969
Sent to the Savannah Hospital...................................... 56
Sent to the St. Jos. Infirmary...............,............ 65
Sent to the Park View Sanitarium................................ 51
Sent to the Georgia Infirmary........................................ 7
Number of Firemen treated..................................... 86
Number of Policemen treated........................................ 31
Number cases treated at Police Barracks.... 23
Number of Firemen examined for department............ 11
Number of Policemen examined for department........ 15
Firemen sent to the Hospital._................................... 3
Examined for the Government Child welfare work.... 11
Number of cases of small pox sent to the pest house 2
Respectfully submitted,
HOWARD T. EXLEY,
City Physician, White Southern District.
340 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Western District
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1918.
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
Savannah Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit this, my report as City Physician, Western
District, (Colored) for year ending Dec. 31, 1917.
1917
Januarv.... ......
February. .......
March............
April................
Mav...... ..........
June... . ............
Julv................
August. ...........
September.-...
October .........
November......
December......
Totals.. ......
No.
Treated
731
554
602
616
552
462
436
412
527
369
197
273
5,727
Office
Calls
241
188
214
231
179
173
155
128
294
136
92
95
2,126
House
Visits
518
293
416
426
381
321
289
310
243
246
208
183
3,834
Sent to
Ga.Inf.
17
7
12
16
27
16
17
27
18
14
10
1
182
Sent to
Charity
Hospital
7
6
4
2
5
3
9
4
5
4
2
2
53
Respectfully submitted,
T. B. BELCHER, M. D.
City Physician, Western District.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 341
REPORT OF CITY DISPENSARY
January, 1, 1918
Hon. WALLACE J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
I herewith beg to submit the report for the City Dispensary for the year ending Dec- 31, 1917. Number of prescriptions filled is as follows:
January.. ............................. ...
February.......... ......................
March....................................
April.................. ... ...................
May... .....................................
June.... ....................................
July.......................................
August....................................
September........................ ......
October............................ ......
November..............................
December.. ............................
Totals.... ........................
WHITE
475
568
765
702
727
556
665
598
533
581
593
576
7.339
COLORED
1,221
1,003
1,020
1,013
912
739
733
715
757
760
676
599
10,148
Total
1,696
1,571
1,785
1,715
1,639
1,295
1,398
1,313
1,290
1,341
1,269
1,175
17,487
Besides supplies for the various charitable institutions,
viz:District Nurses, Tuberculosis Nurse, Day Nursery,
Free Clinic, Fresh Air Home, Home for Aged, Abrahams
Home, Police Barracks, Pest House, and City Physicians.
The Number of Prescriptions Filled as per Physicians is as Follows: w
fe
Belcher..................
Exley...........'...........
Morrison.... ............
Middleton..............
Collier....................
Waring, A. J.........
Stothart, J. A.......
Iseman....................
Daniels, B. W. ......
Martin, R. V.........
Bray........................
Pinckney................
Tyson......................
Heriot....................
Lee, L.....................
Wilson....................
Reid........................
Stothart. W. J.......
Jan,
654
111
86
250
2
41
38
48
21
25
913
41
26
81
26
18
10
3fi
Feb.
508
265
105
251
37
37
23
225
15
15
22
24
17
32
14
10
17
Mch.
587
265
296
223
48
42
28
114
12
18
17
10
12
17
15
20
8
April
537
282
228
249
29
31
15
17
25
18
18
18
23
13
8
13
26
May
474
325
200
180
38
24
34
14
17
10
28
23
23
25
12
21
16
June
407
210
181
167
37
30
20
20
19
26
10
23
20
14
15
8
4
July
306
290
214
155
78
34
6
13
16
18
12
17
20
42
14
12
21
Aug.
345
322
oq
16
174
11
17
10
24
49
19
25
13
24
10
20
21
5
Sept.
320
249
179
229
7
26
22
23
7
14
17
18
10
18
9
14
14
Oct.
320
225
174
246
35
25
21
34
16
33
3
14
6
26
26
3
3
Nov.
254
168
243
237
42
19
21
22
34
37
24
27
8
12
13
17
10
Dec.
262
226
200
206
30
4
18
29
19
28
16
12
7
11
14
10
2
Total
4 974
2,938
2,197
1,501
1,172
389
299
273
259
256
253
238
228
223
218
176
168
141
s
5
03
as
3
Number of Prescriptions Filled(Continued)
ChedeL..................
Corson....................
Lang................ ......
Olmstead...... ..........
Farmer........!...........
Wahl...... .......
Harris, W. A.........
Thomas..................
Brunner........... ......
Redmond................
Causey.. . .....
Winders..................
Lapat................. ....
Baker......................
Myers. ...................
Brazier...... .............
Carter....................
Lee, W. W.............
Norton, G. M.......
Williams, L. W. ....
DeCarAdeuc.. ........
457
1379
in4
1?,5
1141
?,
?, 355
3
1339
11
ft
?, 2
16
Ifi1711494
2
14
.78
207
1042
11
9121233
128
?, 6775757
157521R17
ft12
13
109
1477
4fi5722
ft
9,13863
2479141412233
5
1579236
ft
ft
?, 55755
?, 32
159
ft
?, 5
ft
ft723534
ft3
fi
ft
fi
158
127
ft32
1425
ft
fi
687
214163438
11743
91
3
?,
1174
?,1
ft1
ft5271
3
7
139426211134
112
112
92
81
73
71
61
53
51
50
47
45
43
41
40
39
35
30
29
29
29
#
oo
Number of Prescriptions Filled(Continued)
w
Blake......................
Usher, C................
Jones......................
Smith, E. J. ....... ...
Johnson..................
Righton.... ..............
Stothart, E. J.......
Orear........... ...........
Crawford................
Rogers....................
Norton, W. A.......
Edwards................
Brannen..................
Maxwell..................
Harmon..................
Owens....................
Usher, J. A...........
Taylor....................
Tompkins.. ............
Dudley....................
Clavborne ............
612
917416441
?,
3
?, 4
?, 431 .
?, 21
?,
115
?, 121121
?,I
5
?, 13114213111
?,
?, 1134
?, 1
?, 16
2233
?, 313
?,11172
33
?!444233124
11131146
?, 211
6421
?,
?, 12?
35
?, 33411
44
?, 3131
?,
14o2522412
28
24
oo
oo
23
22
20
18
18
18
17
15
14
11
10
10
109876 i
CO
Number of Prescriptions Filled(Continued)
Leftwich..... ...........
Chisholm................
Corbin.... ................
Clay........................
Hesse......................
Jackson..................
Fischer... .................
Boyde... .................
Williams................
Jackson, R. L.......
Bishop....................
Meldrim.. ..............
Hiers......................
McGee............ ...... ..
Total..............
1
1
1
?,
1
?,
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1 2
9,
1
?, 1
1
5
5
4
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
17,487
en
55
I
3
Respectfully Yours,
JNO. H. HARMS,
Keeper City Dispensary
346 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORTS OF HOSPITALS
St. Joseph Hospital
Savannah, Ga., Jan. 1, 1918-
Xumberof Patients Remaining Dec-31, 1916 .......... 38
Number Received during year 1917.............................. 1,390
Number of Patients Discharged.................................... 1,393
Number of Deaths during year...................................... 45
Number Remaining Dec. 31, 1917................................ 35
Number of Births during year........................................ 93
Number Surgical Operations.......................................... 595
Total Number treated............................................ 1,428
PARK VIEW SANITARIUM
Savannah, Ga., Jan. 21, 1918-
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah.
Sir:
The Directors of the Park View Sanitarium have the
honor to submit to the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah this their annual report for the year ending December 31, 1917.
The care of the Sanitarium includes: Treatment, lodging,
nourishment, medicines, surgical appliances, surgical operations and the care of obstetrical cases.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 347
The Sanitarium receives without limitation, all patients
sent in by physicians of Savannah, the Police Department,
in fact, all deserving patients living in Savannah, excepting
only contagious diseases.
The following table shows the record of City patients; the
appended the total work done byt he Sanitarium for the year:
Year 1917
January......
February....
March. .......
April............
May............
June............
July............
August........
September
October......
November..
December
Total
Hospital
Days
205
309
254
298
297
244
370
440
347
347
362
396
3,869
Admitted
31
28
30
34
40
35
34
39
51
26
29
30
407
Female
23
24
23
22
25
. 15
26
29
33
18
18
17
273
Male
8
4
7
12
15
20
8
10
18
8
11
13
134
Births
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
6
Deaths
0
0
0
1
2
1
3
0
2
2
0
1
12
Total number of patients admitted during the year.. 1,818
Total number of hospital days...................................... 15,446
The number of deaths......................-.......................... 44
Total number of surgical operations......... 843
Patients moribund when admitted................. 15
Mortality................................................................. 0242.%
Mortality, less moribund..-. 0159.%
Total cost, per patient, per day................... $ 2.30
Respectfully submitted,
L. C. SAVILLE, R. N., Superintendent.
348 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CHARITY HOSPITAL
Hon. W. J. PIERPONT, Mayor,
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit to you this, the annual report of Charity
Hospital, for the year ending December 31st, 1917.
Patients left in Hospital Jan. 1st, 1917 Total
(City 14, Pay 10)...................................................... 24
Patients cared for during 1917
(City 313, Pay 497).__............................................. 810
Hospital Days
(City 3,201, Pay 4,445)..................................... 7,646
Surgical Cases
(City 114, Pay 380)._........................................... 494
Surgical Operations
(City 45, Pay 240).................................................... 285
Births
(City 15, Pay 9)....................................................... 24
Deaths
(City 39, Pay 36).................................................... 75
Moribund
(City 12, Pay 13)...................................................... 25
Left in Hospital December 31, 1917-
(City 11, Pay 12)...................................................... 23
Respectfully submitted,
J. D. WILLIAMS, M. D., Treas.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 349
GEORGIA INFIRMARY (Colored)
Savannah, Ga., Jan. 1st, 1918-
STATISTICAL
Number of Patients remaining in Infirmary Jan. 1. 52
Number of Patients admitted during 1917.................. 1,196
Number of Patients cared for during 1917.................. 1,248
Number of Patients discharged during 1917............. 999
Number of Patients..died during 1917.......................... 190
Number of Patients remaining January 1, 1918....... 59
Number of Births in infirmary during 1917................ 36
Moribund Patients admitted during 1917.................... 41
Mortality.......................................................................... 15
Corrected Mortality........................................................ 11
Tubercular admissions, 1917.......................................... 48
Operations during 1917.................................................... 374
Surgical Deaths during 1917.......................................... 42
Medical Deaths during 1917.......................................... 148
Number of Hospital Days all Patients, 1917 ._.......:. 26,131
Number of Hospital Days City Patients, 1917 .......... 22,972
Number of Hospital Days other Patients, 1917 ........ 3,159
Daily Average Number of Patients, 1917 ............._. 71
Largest Number Patients any one day, 191/7 .........__. 89
Smallest Number Patients any one day, 1917 ._......... 50
Attendants, Including White Nurses............................ . 23
Number of White Nurses................................................ 2
Daily Average Cost per Patient.................................... 50
Appropriation from City of Savannah averages for
City Patients per day.................................................. 21
Expenses for year 1917................................................$13,236.59
Cost of City Patients for year 1917, there being
22,972 Hospital Days of Patients.. 1 .......................ll,636.41
Cost of Other Patients, there being 3,159 Hospital Days............................................................. 1,600.18
350 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
RECEIPTS
City of Savannah............................._....................... $5,500.00
Chatham County.......................................................... 3,500.00
Pay Patients._.._........................................................... 3,713.75
From Interest on Investments................................... 738.66
From Student Nurses ................................................ 22.00
Savannah Benevolent Association............................ 1,250.00
DISBURSEMENTS.
Salaries..............................................* 4,559.00
Provisions.......................................... 4,868.55
Drugs, & Surgical Supplies............ 1,718.63
Repairs, Plumbing, Etc. ................ 359.55
Household Supplies.......................... 406.66
Electric Lights and Gas.................. 289.98
Coal and Wood................................ 627.00
Undertakers Account...................... 179.00
Telephone........................................ 40.46
Insurance.......................................... 65.34
Interest and Collection Charges ... 122.42
$13,236.59
Deficit 1916...................................... 651.71
Balance in Bank.............................. 836.11
$14,724.41
$14,724.41 $14,724.41
Attest:
MARCUS S. BAKER,
Secretary and Treasurer.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 351
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BACTERIOLOGIST FOR
THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917.
Savannah, Ga., Dec. 31, 1917.
DR. W. F. BRUNNER, Health Officer and Secretary,
Board of Sanitary Commissioners"
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
I transmit herewith the annual report of this department for the year 1917.
The work of the year has progressed about as usual: The
total number of examinations made was ten thousand, six
hundred and eight (10,608), of which two thousand, one
hundred, seventy-eight (2,178) were clinical, and the remainder examinations of milk, water, food, etc.
The number of clinical examinations was about the same
as in year 1916. The number of such examinations depends
in part on the number of cases of suspicious communicable
diseases coming under observation, this number varying from
year to year. While the service offered by this department
for the diagnosis of communicable diseases is freely used, it
could be much increased without additional cost, if the following suggestions were followed. The number of examinations
for diptheria quarantine should be increased by requiring two
negative cultures for release of quarantine. Contacts should
also be examined for the location of carriers. The number of
examinations for tuberculosis should be increased by more
frequent examination of specimens from all suspects, and by
routine examination of all infected persons for prophylaxis
and control of treatment. Examinations for the diagnosis
of typhoid fever and malaria should be increased by making
both examinations in all suspected cases. All cases of malaria
should be examined if possible before quinine is given. Examinations of persons living in contact with known cases of mala-
352 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ria would result in finding many chronic cases which are
carriers of the infection. Specimens of feces should be more
generally examined, since it is certain that there are many
undiscovered cases of hookworm infection, as well as of other
parasitic diseases. All cases of infected eyes should be examined, by smears and by cultures. This last service, now
offered by the department, is not used to the extent that
health conditions require.
Examinations for the negro population are insufficient in
number, when it is considered that the negro population
exceeds the white population in number, and furthermore
has a much greater incidence of morbidity and mortality, and
if the facilities of the department were used to a proper extent for the negro population, the number of yearly examinations would be doubled.
Examinations for the venereal infections, both syphilis
and gonorrhoea, should be included in the routine work. This
recommendation has been made for several years and is now
being urged by the United States Government. These
diseases should be made reportable by law, and some sensible
prophylactic measures instituted. The additional expense
for this service would be small, and the advantage, from a
health standpoint, considerable.
The regulations for the routine laboratory work, as adopted
by the Board of Sanitary Commissioners, have been printed
frequently in the annual reports of this department and are
issued to physicians in the form of a printed card of information. By order of the Board, all cases must be reported to the
Health Department before examinations are made in the
laboratory. The work of the department for the past year is
shown in detail in Table No. 1.
TABLE No. I.
SHOWING NUMBER AND CHARACTER OF LABORATORY EXAMINATIONS MADE IN 1917, BY MONTHS.
CHARACTER OF EXAMINATIONS
Examinations of Sputum and Other Material for Tuberculosis, Positive. _-_..____--__------..--_._---_--.---._
Examinations of Sputum and Other Material for Tuberculosis, Negative. ..._. __________.___.._..___..__--_.-
Diphtheria Cultures for Diagnosis, Positive. ____._.._----_
Diphtheria Cultures for Release of Quarantine, Positive ...
Diphtheria Cultures for Release of Quarantine, Negative- ._
Typhoid Fever, Widal Test, Positive... ....._-.-....---..
Typhoid Fever, Widal, Test, Negative ....... _ .... __ .
Typhoid Fever, Widal Test, Suggestive . . _ ............
Typhoid Fever, Other Tests ..... _____ _ ........ ...
Malarial Fever, Blood Examinations, Positive __ -.......-
Animal Parasites (Other than Malarial), Positive. .........
Animal Parasites (Other than Malarial), Negative .........
Meningitis, Positive ...................................
Meningitis, Negative.. ..---......---... ... -----------
Ophthalmia, Positive.. .. _ ...-.-_ __ ---------------
Ophthalmia, Negative ..................... ._...--
Bacteriological Examinations, Milk, Cream, Food, Water,
etc -. -._-_-.. ----- . . ... ..-.:.
Chemical Examinations, Milk, Cream, Food, Water, etc ....
Total Examinations __ ...........................
Jan
9
39
4
34
3
7
6
14
4
1
1
13
4
18
0
1
0
0
5
444
372
979
Feb
5
47
6
37
0
4
4
11
1
0
1
14
13
12
0
0
1
0
6
335
287
784
Mch
3
43
7
33
5
3
4
11
1
0
1
23
11
26
0
0
0
0
7
437
354
969
Apr
10
33
0
22
1
6
4
17
4
0
1
21
10
24
0
1
0
0
6
405
332
897
May
6
37
0
22
0
0
4
21
3
0
0
25
12
33
0
0
0
1
3
456
354
977
Jun
11
'31
1
12
1
0
14
28
6
0
0
26
13
33
0
1
0
1
4
408
318
908
July
4
22
3
6
0
3
1
39
5
3
5
28
16
21
0
0
0
1
10
392
306
865
Aug
2
24
6
14
0
3
19
23
4
0
3
42
4
23
0
0
0
0
3
399
331
900
Sept
4
40
28
9
13
15
11
20
3
0
17
32
9
16
0
1
0
0
7
352
285
862
Oct
3
21
18
43
22
29
5
20
6
0
4
33
10
29
0
0
0
0
5
358
284
890
Nov
5
22
26
36
13
20
1
11
0
0
1
21
9
30
0
0
0
0
5
364
273
837
Dec
5
40
2
41
10
19
1
5
1
0
0
6
3
18
0
0
0
0
5
325
259
740
Total
67
399
101
309
68
109
74
220
38
4
34
284
114
283
0
4
1
3
66
4,675
3,755
Grand Total,. .............. ... 10,608
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT3
354 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Laboratory Examination for Communicable Diseases
Tuberculosis
Four hundred sixty-six (466) specimens, mainly sputa, were
examined for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Tubercle bacilli
were found in sixty-seven (67) specimens. The direct method
of examination was used as the routine procedure, two smears
being examined, and an average time of twenty-two (22)
minutes was spent in the search for bacilli in each negative
specimen. Selected cases were examined by the concentration method.
Malarial Fever
Three hundred eighteen (318) blood specimens were examined for the diagnosis of malarial fever, and parasites were
found in thirty-four (34) specimens. Of these, nineteen (19)
were tertian parasites, single brood; three (3) tertian parasites, double brood; and twelve (12) were aestivo-autumnal.
The routine procedure was to examine thin smears, but the
thick-smear method was used for selected cases. An average
time of twenty-one (21) minutes was spent on each negative
slide.
Typhoid Fever
The Widal test was made on three hundred twelve (312)
specimens of blood from suspected cases of typhoid fever. In
seventy-four (74) instances, the results were positive; in two
hundred twenty (220), negative; in thirty-eight (38) instances*
the results were inconclusive, and a re-examination requested.
One specimen of feces and three specimens of blood were
examined for typhoid bacilli, with negative results. Three
immunity tests were made after the use of anti-typhoid
vaccine.
Animal Parasites
Three hundred ninety-seven (397) specimens of feces were
examined for animal parasites or ova thereof, and parasites
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 355
were found in one hundred fourteen (114) specimens (with two
double infections). The parasites found are indicated in
Table No. II.
Table No. II
Specimens
Hookworm .... .................................................................. 100
Cercomonas intestinalis.... .... ........................................ 2
Taenia saginata................................................................ * 1
Oxyuris vermicularis .... .... ............................................ 1
Ascaris lumbricoides........................................................ 9
Tricocephalus dispar....................................................... 1
Meningitis
Four specimens of spinal fluid were examined for the
diagnosis of meningeal infections. The examinations were
all negative as to results. No case of cerebro-spinal fever
came under observation during the entire year.
Ophthalmia
Four specimens of exudate from infected eyes were
examined with one positive result.
Diphtheria
Four hundred ten (410) specimens were examined for the
diagnosis of diphtheria. Diphtheria bacilli were found in
one hundred one (101) cultures and were not found in three
hundred nine (309).
One hundred seventy-seven (177) cultures were examined
for the control of quarantine. Sixty-eight (68) cultures were
positive and one hundred nine (109) negative.
In one hundred (100) instances, swabs from the throat
were examined for the immediate diagnosis of diphtheria, and
in fifty-seven (57) cases, a positive result was secured.
Of the cases examined, ninety-three (93) were pharyngeal;
five (5) laryngeal; and three (3) nasal infections.
356 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The average duration of quarantine for diphtheria was
sixteen (16) days.
Rabies
Nineteen (19) animals were examined for the diagnosis of
rabies. Of fifteen (15) dogs, twelve (12) were found to be
rabid. Of three (3) cats, two (2) were found rabid. One squirrel was examined with negative results.
One case of hydrophobia in a human being was observed
during the year. A young man living in a neighboring eountjr
was bitten by a rabid dog. The pasteur treatment was not
given and after an incubation period of five months, the
disease developed in a typical form. The patient was removed
to Savannah and died in a local hospital. A post mortem
examination was made to determine the exact cause of death.
Negri bodies, now generally recognized as the parasites of
hydrophobia, were found in the brain, localized in Ammon's
horn.
This disease is not a large factor in the mortality of human
beings, though on account of its prevalance, thirty to forty
people each year in this city are compelled to take the pasteur
treatment, which is tedious, painful and expensive. The
disease is a considerable factor in the mortality of dogs and it
would seem that consideration for our dumb friends would
demand that something be done to prevent its spread.
It may well be questioned whether those well-meaning
but ignorant people who oppose measures for the control of
stray dogs are the best and truest friends of the dog.
Special Examinations
Sixty-six (66) examinations of varying character were
performed. Six (6) samples of coal were examined for the
Chief Engineer. One (1) sample of ice was examined.
Thirty-eight (38) samples of beverage were examined to determine the alcohol content.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 357
Examination of Milk
Three thousand, three hundred seventy-two(3,372) samples of milk were examined during the year. The high
standard of the past few years has been maintained. The
results are shown in tables No. Ill, IV, V, VI and VII.
Bacterial counts were made on one per cent acid agar
after incubation'three days at 20 degrees C- Seventy-six and
seven-tenths per cent (76.7%) of the samples contained less
than 100,000 bacteria per CC. Fifteen and six-tenths per
cent (15.6%) of samples contained excessive numbers of bacteria.
Four and two-tenths per cent (4.2%) of samples examined
contained less than the legal amount of butter fat. Only one
per cent (1.0%) of samples contained less than the legal
amount of solids. Seven-tenths of one per cent (0.7%) of
samples were deficient in solids other than fat. Forty-two
(42) samples deficient in solids not fat were examined with the
Immersion Refractometer, and of these, thirty-three (33)
samples were found to contain added water.
Table No. Ill
Table showing the results of the examination of three
thousand, three hundred, seventy-two (3,372) samples of milk
for total solids.
The standard requires not less than twelve per cent
(12%) of total solids.
Samples with 13% of total solids, or more
Samples with from 12.5% to 12.9% of
total solids............ .......... ......................
Samples with from 12% to 12.4% of
total solids................... ......... ......:......
Samples with less than 12% of total solids
No. of
Samples
2,914
300
123
35
Per
Centage
86.4
8.9
3.7
1.0
Total...................................................... 3,372 100.0
358 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Table No. IV
Showing the results of the examination of three thousand,
three hundred, seventy-two (3,372) samples of milk for solid,
not fat.
The standard requires not less than 8.5% of solids not fat.
Samples with 9% of solids not fat, or more
Samples with from 8.5% to 8.9% of solids
not fat......................................................
Samples with from 8% to 8.4% of solids
not fat.......................... ..... .............
Samples with less than 8% of solid,
not fat................................... ...........
No. of
Samples
3,104
245
20
3
Per
Centage
92.0
7.3
0.6
0.1
Total...................................................... | 3,372 | 100.0
Table No. V
Showing the results of the examination of three thousand,
three hundred, seventy-two (3,372) samples of milk for butter
fat.
The standard requires not less than 3-5% of butter fat.
Samples with 4% of butter fat, or moreSamples with from 3.5% to 3.9% of
butter fat. ..................................._..
Samples with from 3% to 3.4% of butter
fat...............................__.........................
Samples with less than 3% of butter fat
No. of
Samples
2,748
481
116
27
Per
Centage
81.5
14.3
3.4
0.8
Total......................................................] 3,372 | 100.0
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 359
Table No. VI
Showing the results of the examination of three thousand,
three hundred, sixty-five (3,365) samples of milk with regard
to the number of bacteria.
The standard requires that milk shall contain not more
than 100,000 bacteria per CC. for the period from November
1st to April 1st; and not more than 300,000 bacteria per CC.
for the period from April 1st to November 1st. On the 24th
of September, 1917, the standard for the period from April 1st
to November 1st was changed to 150,000 per CC.
Bacteria per CC.
Samples with less than 50,000 ..................
Samples with more than 50,000 and less
than 100,000..........;. ......................
Samples with more than 100,000 and less
than 300,000..........................................
Samples with more than 300,000 and less
than 1,000,000................................
Samples with more than 1,000,000............
No. of
Samples
2,257
325
372
281
. 130
Per
Centage
67.0
9,7
11.0
8.4
3.9
Total. 3,365 |100.0
Five hundred twenty-six (526) samples contained more
than the number of bacteria allowed by the standard as
noted above; thus fifteen and six-tenths per cent (15.6%) of
samples contained excessive numbers of bacteria.
TABLE No. VII
Showing Comparative Number of Illegal Samples of Milk with Percentages,
For the years 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917.
Fat (standard
3.8%) ......
Total solids
(stand'd 12%
Solids not fat
(standard 8.5%
Bacteris per
CO. within
limits of the
standard (see
table VI.)
Total No. of Samples Exam.
1910
3544
3443
3443
3443
1911
3288
3286
3286
3279
1912
2663
2661
2661
2657
1913
2232
2232
2232
2228
1914
2520
2519
2519
2519
1915
2741
2814
2822
2525
1916
3278
3446
3458
3020
1917
3372
3372
3372
3365
Number of Illegal Samples
1910
212
486
1092
741
1911
106
94
229
567
1912
93
48
58
453
1913
55
26
39
303
1914
64
15
8
410
1915
96
23
15
310
1910
188
28
16
456
1917
142
35
23
526
Percentage of Illegal Samples
1910
6.0
14.1
31.4
22.9
1911
3.2
2.9
7.2
17.3
1912
3.6
1.8
2,2
17.0
1913
2.5
1.1
1.8
13.6
1914
2.5
t-
0.3
16.3
1915
3.4
0.8
0.6
10.9
1916
5.4
0.8
0.5
13.1
1917
4.2
1.0
0.7
15.6
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 361
EXAMINATION OF CREAM
The chemical standard for cream is that it shall contain
not less than eighteen per cent (18.0%) of butter fat- Of one
hundred ninety-seven (197) samples examined in 1917, only
five (5) samples, or two and one-half per cent (2.5%) contained
less than the required amount of butter fat.
The bacterial standard for cream is that it shall not contain more than 500,000 bacteria per CC. during the period
from November 1st to April 1st; and not more than 1,000,000
bacteria per CC. during the period from April 1st to November 1st. Of one hundred ninety-seven (197) samples examined
during the year, twenty-four (24) samples, or twelve and
two-tenths per cent (12.2%) contained excessive numbers of
bacteria.
EXAMINATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS
A number of samples of foods and drugs were examined on
order of the Health Officer and Food Inspector.
EXAMINATION OF WATER
The examination of samples of the city water supply,
taken both at its source and from taps in the City, has continued during the year. Despite the fact that some sources of
contamination have been eliminated, and some new wells,
yielding a large amount of uncontaminated water have been
added, the situation remains about the same and it is still
necessary to treat the water with chlorine gas to meet the
standard of the United States Public Health Service. There
has been some improvement and it is the purpose of this
report to note this improvement and to set forth, so far as
possible, the character of the supplies at the two stations and
as delivered at the taps. .
362 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of Specimens Examined
One thousand fifty-nine (1,059) specimens of water were
examined during the year, from the following sources:
Source
River Station Reservoir.......... .................................
River Station tap at pump......................................
Gwinnett Station Reservoir at Tunnel.. ................
Gwinnett Station Reservoir at Pump. ...................
Taps in City, north of Liberty St. (River Station)
Taps in City south of Liberty St.(GwinnettSta-)
Special samples.... ........................................................
Total SamDles.... ............... ....................................
Number of
Samples
320
39
307
66
207
86
34
1.059
Method of Analysis
The methods approved by the American Public Health
Association were used in making the analysis. Bacterial
counts were made on one per cent (1.0%) acid agar, after
incubation for two days at 37 degrees C. Fermentation tests
were made in lactose bouillon. Subcultures of cultures
forming gas in lactose media were made on Endo medium, and
the colon organisms identified by the character of the growth
on the special medium. A number of the organisms were
isolated and studied in detail for the purpose of more complete identification.
Standards of Allowable Impurity
No natural water supply is entirely free from impurity.
All that can be demanded is that the impurities be so small in
amount that the use of water for drinking purposes will not
result in harm. For the purpose, of detenning whether a
water is of good sanitary quality, standards of allowable
impurity have been made, from a comparative study of
waters from various sources.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 363
The standard of allowable impurity set by the United
States Public Health service for water used by interstate
carriers is such a standard; and water not meeting the requirements of such a standard cannot be used on railroad
trains or passenger boats engaged in interstate traffic. The
Public Health Standard requires that waters so used shall
contain not more than 100 bacteria per CO.;that fermenting
organisms of the colon type shall not be present in more than
one ten CC. culture made from a sample; and that the water
shall be entirely free from disease-producing organisms.
While this is a rather severe standard, it is not a severe
standard for water of artesian source.
The study of our water supply at its source, from wells
known to be uncontaminated, indicates that such water contains less than 50 bacteria per CO.; that no gas forming
organisms of any kind are present; and that harmful bacteria
are never present.
Results of Examination
The results of the examination of samples from both
sources and from taps in the city are shown in detail in Table
No. VIII.
TABLE VIII
Source and Character
of
Specimens
River Station Tap at Pump Treated with
Gwinnett Station Reservoir at Tunnel
Untreated ...........................
Gwinnett Station Reservoir at Pump
Tup Water in City North of Liherty St.,
River Station Supply Treated Except as
Noted** . .....................
g 3,
a
Ui
o
h
4J
1
y,
320
w
307
00
208
6
jjO
&
x.3
ss
\\ <;
7260*
04 53*
3219*
11
8340*
*
o
SK
w+
Ij
jjj
1
0
2
0
0
|8
a s
S B.
i*
1

+*
4,000
45C
***
SOU
100
***
3, SOL
HIM!
05
##*
7,800
1,200
>
O M
u
^
19
V.
44
9
ft
0
23
_^
Ja
w ^

13 8
23 1
2 0
0 0
U.I
$a
Ip8
o
t
Jifl
3
^
14fi
19
19
1
35
S3
iS
45 ft
48 7
ft 2
1 S
10.4
||i!|cj
o" 41 a 4>LjO Jlu~
JS
3
z
134
4
09
14
19
ft**
41 9
10 3
22 S
21 2
9.1
5 u a |
1 || sl"
cNft
S
3
^
89
1
34
3
9
a1. fn*
&
27 8
2 0
11 1
4 5
4.3
-111
S| B I|J
Ial35
13
fc
10ft
3
41
9
15
S-j
^ t2 &
33 1
7 7
13 4
13 ft
7.2
JlsfJjS
Is ft
k. fl
X
6ft
1
14
2
7
WtS

20 ft
2 ft
4 0
3 0
3.4
TABLE VIIIContinued
Tap Water in City South of Liberty St.,
Uwinnett Station Supply Treated Except
As Noted**-.--. ....................
Tap Water in City All Treated Specimens. -.
Tap Water in City, All Untreated
Specimens. --......--..--.-.-----.-.--.
Sfi
245
49
44
65 41*
89
n
0
4
450
***
7,800
1,200
800
8
18
13
9 3
7.9
26.5
13
29
19
15 1
11.8
39.8
19
26
12
m 1
10.7
24.5
IS
14
8
15 1
5.7
16.3
11
17
9
n s
7.5
18.4
R
8
5
ft, 9
3.3
10.2
*'Single Abnormally High Count 'Excluding a Single Abnormally High Count **For Treatment see Text.
366 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
River Station Supply
A study of the detailed analysis shows that the supply at
River Station is contaminated by the entrance of surface
water. Thirteen and eight-tenths per cent (13.8%) of samples
contained bacteria in excess of 100 per CC. Twenty and sixtenths per cent (20.6%) of the samples contained colon
bacilli in excessive numbers. These organisms are not
present in the uncontaminated water and therefore enter it
through defects in the equipment. It has been shown in the
studies of the supply for the past three years that these defects are mainly in the well casings. A source of contamination from drainage from a defective pipe was discovered
during the jrear and remedied, but the water still contains
excessive numbers of bacteria at times; also colon organisms.
The following comparative statement of the condition of the
supply for the past two years is given:
Year
1916
1917
Average number
of Bacteria per CC.
122
50
Per cent
exceeding
100
35.7%
13.8%
Per cent with
colon bacilli
in excess.
9-8%
20.6%
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 367
Gwinnett Station Supply
This supply, is quite free from impurity, except in times
of hard rains. The figures for the past two years are almost
identical. At the time of this writing, the efficient Superintendent of the Waterworks Department; Mr. L. A. East, has
discovered and repaired a defect which has allowed contamination, in times of heavy rainfall, and it is believed that this
change will do much to improve the supply at this station.
The following comparative statement of the supply for the
past two years is given:
Year
1916
1917
Average number
of Bacteria per CC.
23
19
Per cent
exceeding
100.
2.0%
2.0%
Per cent with
colon
bacilli in excess
4.3%
4-6%
Tap Water in the City
The tap water in the city has much improved, mainly due
to the substitution of chlorine for hypochlorite in treatment at
both stations. The improvement is shown in the following
tabulation:
Year
1916
1917
Average number of
Bacteria
Per CC.
157
70
Per cent exceeding 100.
48.9%
10.5%
Per cent with
colon
Bacilli in
excess
8.1%
4.5%
The results in 1917 would have been even better had it
not been for the fact that chlorination was interrupted for a
short time, on account of the difficulty in getting a supply of
368 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
the chemical. During this period which was fortunately
short, the bacterial content of the tap water was as high as
eight hundred (800) bacteria per CC., and colon bacilli were
constantly present in excess.
It has been definitely determined that the tap water is at
times contaminated by the entry of water from outside
sources. On the 31st of July, water taken from taps near the
City hall was observed to have a dirty green color, and found
to contain bacteria in great excess (7,800 per CC); also green
plants and flagellate organisms. Since these are not present
in the water as it comes from the ground, and also are not
present in the water at the reservoirs, they must have entered
from some outside source. This would be impossible if the
water pressure was maintained. The maintenance of pressure, the repair of leaks, and economy in the use of water are
therefore matters of great sanitary importance.
Chlorination of the Supplies
Liquid chlorine is added to the supplies to render them
safe for use. While chlorine is a powerful chemical, it is
used in extremely small amounts and is entirely decomposed
in the process of purification. It can do no harm, and is now
generally used in the purification of water supplies.
Chlorine was used at River Station except for the period
from January 5th to March 9th; and except for the period
from May 23 to May 28. Chlorine was used at Gwinnett
Station except for the period from May 23rd to May 28th;
and except for the period from Nov. 5th to Dec. 5th. The
amount used was from 0.2 to 0.5 parts chlorine per
million parts water.
Conclusion
It ought not to be necessary to chlorinate a supply of
artesian origin for any considerable length of time. Treatment of the city supplies has now continued for over three
years. The completion of the rehabilitation of the Water-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 369
works system, as recommended by Drs. Stevenson and Dole,
and by Professor Whipple, is urgent from both economic and
sanitary standpoints
Special Water Samples
Thirty-four (34) special samples of water were examined
from various sources. Samples of water taken from the new
artesian wells sunk by the City during the year were examined,
the results showing that the deep water is of good sanitary
quality. Some special samples were examined in an attempt
to determine sources of leakage. Samples of water were
also examined from private artesian wellsall samples of
good quality.
Baby Welfare Exhibit
In the first week in May, 1917, under the general auspices of the Federation of Women's Club of Savannah, a Baby
Welfare Exhibit was held in the De Soto Hotel. The department exhibit covered the subjects of vital statistics, birth
statistics, infant welfare, condition of city milk supply, garbage
disposal, parasitic diseases, and other health subjects. Demonstrations were made of the methods of combatting hookworm disease, of the pasteurization of milk, and of milk inspection. While the attendance was small, much interest was
taken in the low infant mortality of the white population.
During the following week, the exhibit was shown to the
colored people of the City at the Cuyler School, with the cooperation of the Negro Business Men's League. Special
attention was given to the subject of the high mortality
among negro children. The attendance was good, and
much interest was aroused.
Respectfully reported,
V. H. BASSETT, M. D.,
City Bacteriologist.
Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes in the City of Savannah, Ga., for 1917.
CAUSE OF
DEATH
Ahseess ....................
Abscess of Brain. ...---.-
Acidosis.. ...............
Anaemia ................
Angina Peetoris ..........
ATwinlpw
Appendicitis. . -......-,..
Arteri Sclerosis. ----------
Asthma ....-.-----.....-
Asthenia. -.--------...--
Brain, Congestion of .....
Brain, Embolism .........
Brain, Hemorrhage of --
Brights Disease-----.....
Bronchitis.. ------------
Bronchitis Capillary. -----
Brain, Tumor of
Cancer .. - ----------
Cancer of Bladder. . . .
Cancer of Breast--.......
Cancer of Liver.. .....
Cancer of Intestines . .
Cancer of Rectum. . .-.-..
Ja
W~
1
5
1
1
1
n
5~
1
1
4
4
2
1
1
Fob
W
1
4
1
8
1
1
C
1
2
1
"?,
1
fl
8
M
VT
1
l
2
9
fir
C~~
1
1
1
2
3
?,
Apr
W
1
1
1
5
C
1
1
?,
12
?,
1
May
W
2
1
6
1
1
1
1
C
1
2
1
2
12
Juno
W
1
1
1
?,
"&
2
C
?,
1
6
1
July
W
1
2
"2
1
1
?,
C
9
2
1
2
1
10
2
AUR
w
i
2
2
1
2
3
1
1
C
2
2
6
3
1
1
So
W~
-.-
3
1
1
1
2
pt
C"
1
f.
1
1
7
Got
W
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
?,
C
1
1 1
2
1
8
1
2
N
W"
1
?:
f,
"2
3
...
5
2
1
ov
C~
1
1
1
...
1
10
1
D
W~
1
1
"3
2
7
1
BO
C~
1
1
1
1
...
2
12
2
2
Total
W
4
3
1
9
9
2
11
2
9
2
58
6
12
?:
5
1
1
1
6
C
3
4
3
11
8
10
2
6
19
98
10
6
1
4
1
3
Brifid
TOM
WIG
7
3
5
3
9
20
10
21
4
15
21
156
16
18
2
6
5
2
1
9
Annual Report of DeathsContinued
Cancer of Stomach ........
Cancer of Uterus. --------
Child Birth.... ..........
Convulsions pueperal.
Cystitis ..----.---....--.
Cord Strangulated -.-..-
Cholycistitis .----...
Diabetes ................
Diphtheria .............
Dropsy.. -_-..._._----
Dysentery.--.-.-.......
Empyemia--....--...----
Endecerditis- - --.-.._.-.-
Enteritis..-..-.. __ ...
Entero Colitis.-..-. ......
Epilepsy... ....
Erysipelas. -----.....-...
Fever,Malarial. ..........
Gastro Enteritis . ._..-..
Heart Disease ........
Hernia.. -.---_-.--.-----
Hydrocephlus.. ----------
Insanity ...--.--.
.
Ileo Colitis..--.. __ ....
Indigestion, Acute. -------
1
rj1
?.
?,1411134
?,
't.12
f,
?,
....
1?1113414
11113
11111114?153
11
?. 111
111131
9,
fi8318
f,
1111
fi7141
1
f.3
fi11671
?1
?,
?,
?,
7:
1131
1111S5 11?1311
1373
<>5
103
131
311
fi
?, 14S11
11?2517
111f111412
f,
1011 111314
113148111
11111
?, 111
f,\ 11f1
fi11
fi1
?,
1
?,
?, 13 1111211
fi
?, 2
1(1
fi1474
108R
1Q761
30
fi12
tttO1151
fi
10
?,
20a
Hfi
Ifi
14
267
81
Ifi1
118
11
14
ft3
129213
fi
1255
202
?
27
18
21
26
13
1.
Illm2ii8
13
Annual Report of Deaths Continued
Influenza. ..........
.
Intestines, Hemorrhage of .
Intestines, Obstruction of -
Intestinal, Toxaemia _ --_
Jaundice... ..
.
Lefkoin. ....... .....
Lungs, Oedema of.. __
.
Marasmus. . .............
Meningitis...........
Meningitis. Cerebro Spinal
Meningitis, Tubercular . .
.
Morphinism...... .......
Measles.............. ..
Neuritis. . ...............
Old Age......... .......
Osophagus, Stricture of ....
Pyaemia................
Paralysis................
Patent Poramin Ovale. ...
Pericarditis. .............
Peritonitis, Puerperal .....
Pellagra.......:?........
Pneumonia ......
Penumonia, Broncho __ ..
Polio, Myelitis.. ____ ..
Pyosolpinx _ . _ _ ....
Septecaemia, Puerperal ...
1121131
1 1
121113
2
2 11
11
...
1 14
...1
---11
11
5>11
1 252
15 411
11111
...13
,51
6 11131
2
?,
6 51
...1
1
?,111
...21
2
6 111123
7
7.\1
11331122
...
?1
3 134
3
2 11
1211
...12
...
3
5 135
1 12
...11121
...
153162
21
...121
?, 31
141112
...11
...11
14131
2 11
4 11
...1
13
9, 33341
2111124
2412112
101
...1131
4 3
2
4 112
3 1
17 14
4
2 11
3
2
12 3
3
1
5
3
?,
17 12
1256
20 6
6 2
1381
4
1
47 63
4 47
1
274
32
4
82
18
2
1
1
13 3
17
10
1
1
I
7
3
59 9
6
1
9
7
2
24
1
3
399
38
4
102
24
2
1
1
19 5
Annual Report of DeathsContinued
Spina Bifida. .........
Stomatitis ............
Syphilis ..............
Tetanus. _ ...... __ ..
Trismus Nascentium.. .
Tuberculosis. . _ ...
Ulcer....... .. ...
Undefined....... ...
Uraemia __ .........
Uterus, Hemorrhage of.
Whooping Cough ...
Totals..
3
30
3
13
9.
1
76
3
39
9,
9,
15
S
1
97
3
32
5
12
4
1
88
1
2
1
29
3
9
11
6
1
107
1
"i
2
53
9
9:
13
2
1
1
88
1
...
32
9,
2
3
10
3
80
4
1
30
1
1
12
4
9
92
1
...
34
1
8
1
1
63
1
4
...
36
"?,
14
2
73
1
2
2
1
34
4
1
15
2
83
...
3
4
1
53
4
11
6
1
82
...
2
3
44
3
2
9
2
93
3
2
29
10
1
2
1
446
1
2
30
11
4
143
39
7
1
1
1
1022
2
33
11
6
172
49
S
3
2
1
146S
AGE SUMMARY
January.. .
February. .
March ....
April ..
May......
June......
July......
September
October _
November.
December
Total. .
i
i
W
3
1
fi
10
8
7
1
7
8
5
6
61
9
*
8_>
c
8
14
10
20
17
18
18
14
8
9
14
12
162
a
8
2
w
1
1
2
4
1
1
2
7
23
i
5

c
2
5
1
6
5
9
5
4
4
2
1
44
e
S it
W
1
1
3
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
19
i
s
1
c
3
1
4
3
4
4
fi
3
1
1
32
a
|
1
W
1
1
2
2
6
*
t
o
8
w
C
1
1
2
3
2
3
1
2
1
16
a
i
i
w
1
1
1
11
2
2
2
1
12
8
1
S
C
5
11
6
2
8
3
3
9
5
3
9
66
o
1
a
W
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
3
4
2
21
w
8
1
C
11
14
19
15
10
9
16
9
11
19
14
Ifi
163
1
1
W
3
3
6
4
4
3
2
4
ft
2
37
g
I
S

C
17
18
12
16
14
11
10
5
11
17
14
20
165
a
*
1
W
1
5
1
2
7
4
4
4
5
4
ft
4
47
e

8
8
o
C
8
20
19
15
14
9
17
11
14
13
14
12
166
a
|
&
W
9
3
3
1
6
4
2
5
5
5
9
3
55
i
t
8
1
s;
c
13
8
6
20
10
8
10
8
7
10
11
10
121
fl
*
S
W
4
9
5
fi
10
4
1
3
4
3
9
9
67
fi
I
8
s

C
7
4
5
4
4
4
4
5
5
4
7
6
59
C
$

w
3
11
5
3
10
5
4
4
1
2
8
9
65
*
t
S
1
8
C
1
3
2
2
1
1
4
4
20
a
*
&
W
2
5
4
1
2
3
3
3
1
3
1
30
ft
1
i
1
i
C
1
1
1
1
1
5
a
I
&
w
1
1
1
3
e

1
S
C
11
1
3
?
W
fi
8
*
1
5
c
__
t
w
30
39
32
29
53
32
30
34
36
34
53
446
3
-1
C
76
97
88
108
88
80
92
63
73
83
82
93
1022
|
H
e
O
wc
106
136
120
137
141
112
97
109
117
135
137
1468
DEATHS FROM VIOLENCE, STILL BIRTHS, PREMATURE BIRTHS, ETC.
CAUSE OF
DEATH
Accidents
Asphyxiation. .........
Drowning...... ___ .
Fracture of Femur.. _ .
Fracture of 'Legs. ....:.
Fracture of Ribs ....,..-
Fracture of Skull .......
Fracture of Thigh ......
Total.. _ ........
> i
i
iW
1
1
*
i
i
C
1
1
1
3
i
!
&
W
1
?:
3
>1
I
)
4
C
3
?,
5
j
k
W
1
1
i
u
a
C
1
1
<
W
...
5
3.
C
1
1
!
1
^
^
W
_. -
>>
c
1
1
3
5
H
W
--_
15
C
1
1
>
W
1
1
2
|
C
1
1
1
1
?,
6
.

W
1
1
1
3
j
Q
0
3
C
1
11
1
4
,
.
C
W

3
I
1
c
<
w
?,
1
3
S
a
S
y
c
i
1
2
w
...
fe>
>
o
z;
C
1
1
2
(.
W
2
1
3
S
a
a
!
c
?,
. 1
3
W
1
4
1
fi
3
2
16
3
S
c
8
?,
1
1
1
1
fi
1
2
10
33
3
0 ca
ll
WJC
1
12
2
1
1
1
1
1
11
1
5
n
49
DEATHS FROM VIOLENCE, STILL BIRTHS, PREMATURE BIRTHS, ETC.Continued
HOMICIDES
Fracture of Neck -----
Fracture of Skull. ...-.-
Gunshot Wound ......--
Incised Wound
Total- ------ ------
Suicides
Gunshot Wound -----
Hanging.. _...-.-.--
Poison, Carbolic Acid...
Total. -.------.---
Still Births.. ----------
Premature Births . . .
Deaths under 10 years. .
Death without
Physician..-.- .
W
2
1
5
C
1
9,
1
4
21
3
14
10
W
1
1
4
1
1
1
C
16
1
21
11
W
1
1
5
"5
2
C
1
1
2
25
1
17
14
W
1
2
9
C
9,
9,
23
1
33
18
W
2
"14
1
C

18
2
28
14
W
3
3
11
1
C
1
1
17
1
34
8
W
...
10
C
1
1
16
30
11
W
1
7
2
C
1
1
17
1
21
11
W
3
1
11
1
C
1
1
17 "is
n
W
10
3
13
1
C
1
1
19
1
20
12
W
1
1
2
1
8
2
C

16
1
15
15
W

4
"Is
1
C
1
1
14
1
15
17
W
1
1
1
4
37
12
109
12
C
1
1
7
3
12
1
1
1
219
13
263
152
WIO
1
1
7
3
12
2
1
1
1
5
256
25
372
164
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 377
WHITEMALES
LONGEVITY
Age WHITEFEMALES Age
Blumenfeld, Abram.._____ 93
Cook, Frederick....____. 93
ScholJ, August.._.____.. 91
Barnwell, A. S............... 84
.Ensinger, Charles M..-_-___.. 84
Cameron, John._........... 83
Cook, J.B................... 83
Jackson, James..----.--...-.- 83
Palmer, Herbert A.__..__ 83
Blake, George................ 82
Buttimer, Patrick ... ___. - . 82
O. Driscoll, Dennis....__- 82
Rogers, Cornelius D._........ 82
Twiggs, Hansford D. D..~__ 81
Cohen, Isaac G.-.-__-.....- 80
Cornell, Joseph C-____.. _ 80
*McDonough, James._...... 79
Calais, W. J............... 78
Nisbet, John...........__. 78
O'Brien, Robert.............. 78
Tanant, Richard..______ 78
Walker, John W.............. 78
Weatherhorn, Solomon-.....-. 78
Meyer, Andrew.............. 77
Burns, James.-.._........-.- 75
Cunningham, Henry C........ 75
Ferren, Thomas B._.......... 75
Gansaky, F.. ________- 75
Graves, John H._............. 75
Huhn, John C................ 75
McDonough, J. N.-..-_._ 75
Pope, Pano.......__-.....- 75
Winkler, Van. R.............. 75
Healey, Thomas F............ 74
Stiles, Montgomery P..-.....- 74
Campbell, William......... 73
Coloniss, Alexander R._....... 73
Du Bose, Edwin R._...__. 73
Renken, George......_..... 73
Broad, James E...... ..... 72
Curtis, Hugh................ 72
Dwyer, Laurence J._........ 72
Englerth, Joseph A._____.. 72
Waher, Edward......--..-.-- 72
Pine, Charles H.............. 71
Flaherty, Timothy____ __ 70
Sloat, George M..._..__.. 70
Winchester, George W...... 70
Wittachen, Y. H........ 79
Brady, Julia A., Mrs, ____ 87
Daniels, Emma, Mrs........ 87
Blumenthal, Sophia, Mrs. ... 85
Dotson, Lavinia H.,Mrs.-... 85
Klein, Hildon, Mrs. __..... 85
Lindsay, Donora J., Mrs._. 85
Walsh, Chaterine L-, Mrs.... 84
Ward, Sarah, Mrs......_.. 84
Lange, Marie M., Mrs.___ 83
Gordon, Ellen K-, Mrs. ..... 81
Hinely, Ellen, Mrs. ___.... 81
Wilson, Bridget, Mrs........ 81
Ash, Sarah J., Mrs. ........ 80
Donovan, Mary, Mrs........ 80
McMahon, Margaret, Miss. 80
Sehultz, Sarah, Mrs._____ 80
Sutker, Hannah, Mrs....... 80
Wiggins, Martha A., Mrs.... 79
LeeTHarriet iE., Mrs........ 78
Clohoesy, El zabeth, Mrs.... 77
Patrick, SistTr M.______ 77
Stults, Amel'a A., Mrs....... 77
Wells, Sarah, Mrs.......... 77
McDonald, Martha, Mrs. ... 76
Flannigan, Catherine, Mrs. . 75
Grimm, Margaret M., Mrs... 75
Hartman, Catherine, Mrs.... 75
Garmany Emma C., Mrs. -.. 74
Green, Charlotte, Mrs...... 74
Norton, Martha J., Mrs..... 74
O'Donnell, Catherine A., Mrs. 74
Strous, Margaret J., Mrs. ..- 74
Waite, Emma N., Mrs. __ 74
Corbett, Catherine ,Mrs..... 73
Gayoon, Louise M., Mrs... 73
Herman, May C., Mrs..._. 73
McConnell, Emma C-, Mrs. . 73
Pack, Mary, Mrs....__... 73
Schroader, Meta, Mrs. ...... 73
Simmons, Adelia, Mrs...--.. 73
Douglass, Frances A., Mrs... 72
Kessler, Elizabeth, Mrs. ... 72
Smith, Josephine, Mrs. . . ... 72
Weigared, Margaret, Miss..- 72
Blitch, Elizabeth, Mrs.___ 71
Creamer, Mary W., Mrs. ... 71
Krenson, Catherine, Mrs. ..- 70
Redmond, Elizabeth, Mrs. .. 70
Tucker, Florence A., Mrs.... 70
NATIVITY
Georgia, other than
Savannah ........
South Carolina -.-.-.
North Carolina ..-.
New York.............
Virginia
Alabama, .............
Florida ....... ......
Pennsylvania ..........
New Jersy .-..-.....
Texas.................
Minnesota... . .........
Ohio.. -
Tennessee. .........
Colorada... ......
Delaware ...........
Illinois. ....... ....
Mississippi --.---.-....
Miaarklifl
Oklahoma...-- --------
West Virginia... ....
Wisconsin.-...--- -.--
January
W
7
13
1
1
?,
1
1
1
C
4
47
23
1
February
W
4
12
5
1
1
2
1
C
8
63
24
1
1".
W
3
9
4
1
1
1
C
7
58
18
1
1
1
1
1
!
w
3
13
4
1
1
1
1
C
11
73
17
3
1
5?
W
9
22
9
2
?,
1
1
1
C
10
60
18
8>
1
W
7
14
4
1
1
1
1
C
14
46
15
1
2
1
,>>
a-
W
4
13
1
"i
i
2
1
C
10
58
21
1
1
*a
3
w
5
12
3
1
1
C
5
44
10
1
September
W
6
16
4
1
1
1
1
C
9
41
17
1
1
October
W
3
18
4
3
1
C
6
57
14
2
1
1
1
November
W
7
16
6
1

2
1
1
C
7
49
21
3
1
December
W
7
23
2
1
1
1
1
1
C
7
55
27
1
...
1
3
S
w
65
182
47
11
10
2
6
6
fi
3
1
1
2
?,
?,
1
1
1
1
1
C
98
651
225
13
8
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1l (
we
163
833
272
24
10
10
8
8
5
3
3
2
2
2
2
NATIVITYContinued
United States.. ...-..-
England ------- ...
Russia-------------

Norway and Sweden.. _.
West Indies .---...
Austria -----_.-..-
Holland. --------
Canada-------- ....
China . -------------
Hayti.. --------
Italy...

Scotland..--.-. ....
Switzerland .
Unknown .........
Total. ___ ------
2!1
30
1
76
V, 3
fi111
39
1
97
143
?, ?, I
32 88
1111
29
11
107
2111
63 88
111
32
1
80
31111
30
1
23411
92l 34
1
?:
?,112
63! 36
11
?,
73
11111
34
1
83
345
?,111
53
1
82
9!1112
44
2
93
9
?5
9!39
ftS
fl
?:
?, 11114
446
13
1
1 1
10
1022
10
25
23
9
6
5
5
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
14
146$
380 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
LONGEVITY
COLORED MALES
Age Wall, Pompey--........... 97
Jones, Sidney__- ---------- 81
Filer, Ira.__._-_--.--- 80
Holmes, Aaron...--.-.....-.. 80
Mitchell, Thomton... __.... 78
Seabrook, James.------------ 76
Hunter, Sandy...-_-------- 75
Reynolds, Jackson..---------- 75
Singleton, Pinex........... 75
Green, Joseph__......------ 74
Robinson, Cyrus.----..----.. 74
Alien, James--------------- 73
Wilson, Peter..-..... ..... 70
COLORED FEMALES
Age
Brown, Alice.----.--'---.-. 92
Burroughs, Jare Ann... . _ 90
Jones, Jane P...._____ 88
Morgan, Lizzie.....-......- 80
Robinson, Viola... ___ _ 79
Brown, Elizabeth_______ 75
Singleton, Sibbie. -.-.---... 75
Habersham, Sophia.---.-.-- 74
Doyie, Sarah A.______. 74
Taylor, Eu^aa-. ___. _. 74
Weber, Leonora............ 74
Lee, Nancy ___ ____ _ 73
Charlton, Sarah_______ 72
Bacon, Amelia............. 70
Carsberry, Pollie.......---. 70
Dias, Betty ______. _. 70
Mclntosh, Mattie __.-... 70

Locations