Second annual message to city council of Hon. Richard J. Davant, mayor, together with the reports of the city officers of the city of Savannah, Georgia, year ending December 31, 1914

Collection:
Annual Reports of the Mayor of Savannah, Georgia, 1855-1923
Title:
Second annual message to city council of Hon. Richard J. Davant, mayor, together with the reports of the city officers of the city of Savannah, Georgia, year ending December 31, 1914
Creator:
Savannah (Ga.). Mayor
Contributor to Resource:
Davant, Richard J.
Date of Original:
1914
Subject:
Savannah (Ga.)--Politics and government--Periodicals
Savannah (Ga.). Mayor
Location:
United States, Georgia, Chatham County, Savannah, 32.08354, -81.09983
Medium:
annual reports
Type:
Text
Format:
application/pdf
Metadata URL:
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/id:dlg_zmos_1914
Digital Object URL:
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/savannahmayor/pdf/1914.pdf
Holding Institution:
University of Georgia. Libraries
Rights:
Rights Statement information

SECOND
ANNUAL MESSAGE
TO
CITY COUNCIL
or
Hon. RICHARD J. DA VANT
MAYOR
TOGETHER WITH THE
REPORTS OF THE CITY OFFICERS
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
OFFICIALS OF THE CITY FOR 1914 AND 1*15
REPORTS OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS
BUDGETS FOR 1914 AND 1915
ORDINANCES PASSED DURING 1914 AND
STATE LAWS RELATING TO SAVANNAH ENACTED 1914
4-
SAVANNAH, GA:
COMMERCIAL LITHOGRAPH * PRINTING CO.
1915
INDEX
Page
Annual Message, The Mayor's..................................... 33- 43
Act of the Georgia Legislature 1913-1914, Relative to
Savannah.................................................................... 553-575
Board of Tax Assessor's Report...................................... -450
Budget forthe Year 1914................................................ 16- 18
Budget for the Year 1915............................................ 29- 39
Building Inspectors' Report.......................................... 457-458
Bacteriologist..................................................................... 382-403
City Government, 1914................................................... 7- 18
City Government, 1915.................................................... 19- 32
City Attorney's Report.................................................... 439-448
Chief Engineer.................................................................. 235-288
City Marshal's Report...................................................... 451-454
Clerk of Market, Report................................................ 455-456
City Physicians Report of
Dr. James E. Morrison............................................ -411
Dr. L. J. Chedel........................................................ -412
. Dr. C. C. Middleton.................................................. -413
Charity Hospital.............................................................. 422-423
City Dispensary................!............................................. 424-435
Comptroller's Report..........-......... ............................... 44-109
INDEX (continued)
Page
Department of Public Health.......................................... 357-435
Electrical Inspector's Report............ ........................ ... 219-221
Electrical Examiners, Report Board of......... ............... -225
Fire Alarm Service, Report of......................................... 222-224
Fire Department, Report of....... .................................... 173-233
Fire Inspector's Report... ................................... 228-233
Food Inspector's Report. ................................... 404-410
Gamewell System, Report of.......................................... 119-124
Georgia Infirmary, Report of.......................................... 420-421
Health Department, Report of...... ................................ 357-435
Health Officer. . ........................................................... 357-367
Harbor Master. ...... ........................................................ 459H161
Index...... ........ .... ............................................................ 3-4-5
Library,Report of, White............................................... 339-355
Library,Report of, Colored ....... ................................ -356
Mayor's Annual Message ............................................... 33- 43
Marshal's Report......................... ................................. 451-454
Market Report, Clerk of.................................................. 455-456
Machinery, Superintendent, Report of.......................... 2'15-218
Moving Picture Operators Examining Board................ 226-227
Ordinances, Resolutions, Communications, and
Reports Adopted During the Year 1914............ 463-551
INDEX (continued)
Page
Police Department............................................................ 111-172
Police Matron's Report.............. ................................ 127-128
Police Surgeon................................................................. 125-126
Park and Tree Commission...................................... 303-322
Public Library, White............................................... 339-355
Public Library, Colored............................................. -356
Playgrounds...................................................................... 323-338
Park View Sanitarium...................................................... 417-419
Plumbing Inspector........................................................ 436-438
Sinking Fund, Report of................................................. -449
Savannah Hospital, Report of........................................ 414-415
St. Joseph's Hospital, Report of..................................... -416
Tax Assessor's Report...............'....................................... -450
Water Works Department, Report of............................ 289-301

CITY GOVERNMENT
FOR THE
YEAR 1914

MAYOR AND ALDERMEN FOR 1914
Mayor
R. J. DAY ANT
Chairman of Council
Alderman W. J. PIERPONT
Vice-chairman of Council
Alderman W. H. WEIGHT
Aldermen
J. W. DANIEL W. J. PIERPONT
GEO. B. ELTON W. A. PIGMAN
J. E. FOY E. A. M. SCHRODER
H. B. GRIMSHAW J. C. SLATER
H. L. KAYTON W. W. WILLIAMSON
H. H. LIVINGSTON W. H. WRIGHT
COMMISSIONS
Park and Tree
P. D. BAFFIN, Chairman, term expires January 1, 1918.
T. H. McMILLAN, term expires January 1, 1919.
R. M. BUTLER, term expires January 1, 1919.
CHARLES S. ELLIS, term expires January 1, 1916.
I. A. SOLOMONS, Secretary, term expires January 1, 1918.
Sinking Fund
GEORGE J. MILLS, Chairman
LEOPOLD ABLER JOHN F. PAULSEN
CHARLES G. BELL
(One vacancy, January 1, 1914)
Pilotage
JAMES M. BARNARB, Chairman, term expires February
13, 1920.
VAN B. AVERY, term expires February 13, 1915.
E. A. ARMANB, Secretary, term expires February 13, 1916.
GEORGE P. WALKER, term expires February 13, 1917.
J. FLORANCE MINIS, term expires February 13, 1918.
JOSEPH HULL, term expires February 13, 1919.
W. W. WILLIAMSON, term expires February 13, 1921.
Massie School
Hon. R. J. BAVANT
F. R. CASSELS H. C. SHUPTRINE
(Terms expire first meeting of Council, February, 1915)
STANDING COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL FOR 1914
Accounts
Aldermen WILLIAMSON, ELTON, LIVINGSTON
Assessments
Aldermen GRIMSHAW, SLATER, KAYTON
PIGMAN, SCHRODER
City Lots and Opening Streets
Aldermen SLATER, SCHRODER, PIGMAN
Commerce and Trade
Aldermen PIERPONT, FOY, DANIEL, KAYTON
PIGMAN
Drainage
Aldermen KAYTON, DANIEL, WRIGHT
Finance
Aldermen PIERPONT, WILLIAMSON, SLATER
FOY, DANIEL
Fire
Aldermen PIGMAN, PIERPONT, WILLIAMSON,
GRIMSHAW, FOY
Standing Committees of Council for 1914 (continued)
Harbor and Wharves
Aldermen ELTON, PIERPONT, WILLIAMSON
Health
Aldermen DANIEL, LIVINGSTON, GRIMSHAW
Market
Aldermen LIVINGSTON, DANIEL, KAYTON
Near Beer Licenses
Aldermen WEIGHT, SLATER, LIVINGSTON
Police
Aldermen SCHRODER, ELTON, WRIGHT
Streets and Lanes
Aldermen WRIGHT, FOY, PIGMAN, ELTON
SCHRODER
Water
Aldermen FOY, PIERPONT, KAYTON
Standing Committee of Council for 1914 (continued)
Sanitary Board
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Chairman
Health Officer W. F. BRUNNER, Secretary
Aldermen J. W. DANIEL, W. W. WILLIAMSON
Citizens J. M. SOLOMONS, Dr. WM. R. DANCY and
BEIRNE GORDON
CITY OFFICERS 1914
RICHARD J. DAVANT..................................................Mayor
THOMAS GAMBLE, Jr.................Secretary to the Mayor
THOMAS HALLIGAN.................................,..Clerk of Council
CHAS. V. HERNANDEZ............Assistant Clerk of Council
M. L. MELDRIM ............................................Chief of Police
B. S. BRYANT................................First Lieutenant of Police
J. F. BERNHARDT ...........Clerk of the Police Department
C. S. HARDEE....................................................City Treasurer
G. B. PRITCHARD..........................Assistant City Treasurer
JAMES FURSE........................................................Comptroller
E. R. CONANT..................................................Chief Engineer
JOHN ROURKE, Jr......................................... City Attorney
D. S. ATKINSON............................Assistant City Attorney
GEO. D. SEMKEN................................................City Marshal
J. H. PAPOT............................................Deputy City Marshal
Dr. J. E. MORRISON..................................1 White
Dr. L. J. CHEDEL........................................J City Physicians
Dr. C. C. MIDDLETON..............................1 Colored
Dr. F. S. BELCHER......................................} City Physicians
GEO. LEWIN............................................Clerk of the Market
E. B. HARTLEY ....................Assistant Clerk of the Market
THOS. H. LAIRD..............................................Harbor Master
W. F. BRUNNER...............................................Health Officer
V. H. BASSETT....................................................Bacteriologist
C. J. MELVIN....................................Chief Sanitary Inspector
D. C. GILLES........................................Chief Food Inspector
SIMON A. WEIL................................................Food Inspector
LEWIS BLISS, C. R. SHOUSE, J. T. WELLS] Inspectors
G. W. ROBINSON, NAT HARRISON, J. E.I of Naval
REGISTER, J. F. BLISS and R. B. JEWETTj Stores
JOHN R. EASON........................................Building Inspector
A. B. LaROCHE..................Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery
J. T. McCORMICK...............Keeper Bonaventure Cemetery
HENRY WILLIS (coi.)---Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery
J. D. HARMS......................................Keeper City Dispensary
City Officers 1914 (continued)
F. M. HULL............................................................Port Warden
C. W. TANNER............................................Plumbing Inspector
JOHN E. SCHWARZ....................................................Recorder
L. A. EAST..................Superintendent Scavenger Department
JOHN H. MONROE............Chief Engineer Fire Department
A. J. TOSHACH......Asst. Chief Engineer Fire Department
J. P. FIGG......... Superintendent and Engineer Waterworks
G. NOBLE JONES ............................Chairman Tax Assessors
D. T. ELLIOTT............................................................] Tax
JOSEPH M. DREYER................................................jAssessor8
J. CHRIS WERNTZ................................Custodian City Hall
BUDGET FOR THE YEAR 1914
Fixed Expenses
Interest on Bonded Debt..____-----_.._-__-$ 118,000 00
Sinking Fund__.____...._____________ 29,000 00
Sinking Fund, balance due for 1913.......---- . . 12,000 00
Total.......----....-..---......-.--------------I 159,000 00
Notes Outstanding, Due in 1914, With Interest
Asphalt Paving Blocks, contracted 1912_. -... .. .$ 33,984 40
Ardsley Park Land Corporation, contracted 1910...... _ 9,301 62
Ardsley Park Land Corporation, contracted 1911......... 18,216 25
Chatham Land & Hotel Company, contracted 1910. ------ 22,454 60
Chatham Land & Hotel Company, contracted 1912_.... 1,261 13
City Lots, contracted 1912.-..--.---......----..----.. 5,500 00
Municipal Wharf, contracted 1913---------___------- 15,900 00
Opening Streets, contracted 1906....___.___ ... 5,503 31
Opening Streets, contracted 1912..__.....____..__ 1,805 32
Waterworks, contracted 1912......-.--..--........---. 1,875 72
Interest on Notes Not Due..__.--..-_............. 2,324 12
Total.... --.-----------------. --------$ 118,126 47
Rehabilitation Cemetery Perpetuity Trust Fund
One-Third on Account Payments Made Prior to 1913_ .$ 4,000 00
Operating Expenses of Regular City Departments
Including Charities
Bacteriological Laboratory.---------__......-.---...I 7,500 00
Boardof Health...................................... 27,000 00
Bonaventure Cemetery...........______-----_.----__ 6,000 00
Laurel Grove Cemetery.............-...-..-----.-.... 6,000 00
Charity, Including Pensions to Widows and Appropriations
to Benevolent Organizations..------............... 5,000 00
Charity Disbursed from Mayor's Office...____..__ 1,000 00
Associated Charities..--..---...-.......----.-.-..-... 600 00
CityClocks I---.....------............--..--..---- 300 00
City Hall............................................ 5,000 00
City Lighting......-----......--...-...,---.--....... 46,0ft) 00
Dispensary------........................___....... 4,000 00
Drainageand Dry Culture..--.......-........--....-. 8,500 00
Fire Department and Uniforms----...-....-.-_------ 117,500 00
Harbor and Wharves.. ___.___....________... 1,750 00
Hospitals (far whites)._.............................. 9,000 00
Hospitals (Georgia Infirmary for colored) . _________.. 4,500 00
Budget for the Year 1914 (continued)
Hospital (colored).....-.......-----___.-..-..-- .. 900 00
HouseDrainage_-_---____---__---- _-..---------- 4,000 00
Incidentals.__---------_.. ... ... -- 4,000 00
Market.---...----------__-_..._-______--- 6,000 00
Parks and Squares-------.----.--..------------------ 14,000 00
DaffinPark.--...................................... 500 00
Pensions, Police and Fire Departments__.....--.-..--. 8,000 00
Police Department, Including Uniforms._._--..__--.-_ 150,000 00
PoliceReserves---.-------------.---- -------------- 3,250 00
Printing and Stationery.-._._---.___---._-..--.------_ 4,000 00
Plumbing Inspector_--.....-_....-.......------. 1,765 00
Public Library (white)................................. 10,000 00
Public Library (colored)................................ 360 00
StormSewers.__.._..___-........-_..-._... 2,000 00
Salaries-...-.---.---------__-.-..-..---.---..--.-- 56,000 00
Scavenger Department..--..----.---...:..--....------ 60,000 00
Scavenger Department, Street Railway Contract- ........ 2,000 00
Sink Department (O.E.M.)........................... 2,000 00
Streetsand Lanes...---------------__...---...-.,--. 95,000 00
Streets and Lanes, Gravel............................. 1,50000
Waterworks, Old and New............................ 68,000 00
Industrial Farm.--.............._____....... .. 3,600 00
Total....-..-....--.....--....----....--......--I 746,525 00
New Improvements, Etc., to be Made in 1914, to be
Passed on by Council Before Expenditure
Advertising or Publicity...................
Automobile, Police Department--.-.---.,-.
Automobile, Streets and Lanes Department.
Destructor Plant............._............
Fire Department Houses, Repairs to......_.
Grading Streete..-....--.-------..-..-...
Market, Improvements to City. ..._____._,
National Drainage Congress...--...---.__
New Stock at City Lot---....----........
New Stock, Police Department......_____..
Opening Streets...----..-.---.--------...
Paving Streets.- .- --._-- - -----_-.
Pest House, New Roof___...--._......
Playgrounds -._-----.- ---_-. --_-.
Tree Planting............................
Wharf, Improvements to Municipal -_- __.
....-....$ 6,00000
...----.. 2,000 00
.-----.-- 1,00000
..--.-... 60,00000
......... 15,000 00
...---.. 1,000 00
.....---- 10,00000
......... 50000
......--- 2,000 00
....----. 1,00000
.-......- 5,00000
..--.-... 25,000 00
....---.. 300 00
......... 2,50000
......... 1,00000
......... 12,00000
Total.-.--...-...--.-....................--.....* 130,800 00
Summary of Budget for Year 1914
Sinking Fund and Interest on Bonded Debt....__.....I 159,000 00
Notes Contracted Prior to 1913...__....___-___ 102,226 47
Notes Contracted 1913....................__........ 15,900 00
Budget for the Year 1914 (continued)
Rehabilitation of Cemetery Perpetuity Trust Funds Prior
to 1913, One-third on Account _____________ $4,000 00
Charity, Including Hospitals, Dispensary and Benevolent
Organizations_______________________ 25,000 00
Operating Expenses of Kegular City Departments. ....... 721,526 00
New Improvements, Etc., Subject to Council_ ___.... 130,800 00
Total Budget for 1914................-...........f 1,158,451 47
CITY GOVERNMENT
FOR THE
YEAR 1915

MAYOR AND ALDERMEN FOR 1915
Mayor
R. J. DAVANT
Chairman of Council
Alderman W. J. PIERPONT
Vice-Chainnan of Council
Alderman W. H. WEIGHT
Aldermen
J. W. DANIEL
GEO. B. ELTON
J. E. FOY
H. L. KAYTON
JOSEPH A. LOGAN
H. H. LIVINGSTON
W. J. PIERPONT
W. A. PIGMAN
E. A. M. SCHRODER
J. C. SLATER
W. W. WILLIAMSON
W. H. WEIGHT
COMMISSIONS
Park and Tree
P. D. BAFFIN, Chairman, term expires January 1, 1918.
T. H. McMILLAN, term expires January 1, 1919.
R. M. BUTLER, term expires January 1, 1919.
CHARLES S. ELLIS, term expires January 1, 1916.
I. A. SOLOMONS, Secretary, term expires January 1, 1918.
Sinking Fund
GEORGE J. MILLS, Chairman
. LEOPOLD ADLER JOHN F. PAULSEN
CHARLES G. BELL
(One vacancy, January 1, 1915.)
Pilotage
JAMES M. BARNARD, Chairman, term expires February
13, 19m
VAN B. AVERY, term expires February 13, 1922.
E. A. ARMAND, Secretary, term expires February 13, 1916.
GEORGE P. WALKER, term expires February 13, 1917.
J. FLORANCE MINIS, term expires February 13, 1918.
JOSEPH HULL, term expires February 13, 1919.
W. W. WILLIAMSON, term expires February 13, 1921.
Maasie School
Hon. R. J. DAVANT
F. R. CASSELS H. C. SHUPTRINE
Commissions (continued)
Playgrounds
Mayor DAVANT
Aldermen SCHRODER, KAYTON
Mrs. W. L. WILSON, Mrs. GRACE MENDES
Miss JANE JUDGE
Messrs. GEORGE J. BALDWIN, N. B. F. CLOSE
JOHN R. DAVIS, WILLIAM J. FLOOD
MARION LUCAS, LEO MORISSEY
H. F. MYERS, G. M. OLIVER
W. G. SUTLIVE, W. J. STEWART
Rev. GEORGE SOLOMON, Rev. JOHN S. WILDER
Board for Construction New Public Library Building
Mayor DAVANT
Aldermen SCHRODER, PIGMAN
Messrs. F. G. BELL, JOHN G. BUTLER
ROBERT FECHNER, A. B. HULL, A. R. LAWTON
W. W. MACKALL, J. W. MOTTE
JOHN M. THOMAS
Board of Managers for Public Library
(Appointed by the City of Savannah)
H. W. WITCOVER, JOHN M. THOMAS
G. ARTHUR GORDON
JOHN L. TRAVIS
WILLIAM M. DAVIDSON
(Appointed by the Georgia Historical Society)
WM. W. GORDON, CHARLES ELLIS
OTIS ASHMORE, H. WILEY JOHNSON
Dr. THOS. J. CHARLTON
STANDING COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL FOR 1915
Accounts
Aldermen ELTON, LIVINGSTON, WILLIAMSON
Assessments
Aldermen LOGAN, SLATER, DANIEL,
PIGMAN, SCHRODER
City Lots and Opening Streets
Aldermen SLATER, SCHRODER, PIGMAN
Drainage
Aldermen KAYTON, FOY, LOGAN, SLATER
SCHRODER
Finance
Aldermen PIERPONT, WILLIAMSON, SLATER
FOY, KAYTON
Fire
Aldermen PIGMAN, SLATER, WILLIAMSON
LOGAN, FOY
Harbor and Wharves
Aldermen WILLIAMSON, LOGAN, ELTON
Standing Committees of Council for 1915 (continued)
Health
Aldermen DANIEL, LIVINGSTON, LOGAN
Market
Aldermen LIVINGSTON, DANIEL, KAYTON
Near Beer
Aldermen WEIGHT, SLATER, LIVINGSTON
Playgrounds
Mayor DAVANT
Aldermen SCHRODER, KAYTON
Police
Aldermen SCHRODER, ELTON, WRIGHT
Purchasing Board
Mayor DAVANT
Aldermen PIERPONT, WRIGHT
Chief Engineer CON ANT
Streets and Lanes
Aldermen WRIGHT, FOY, PIGMAN, ELTON
SCHRODER
Standing Committees of Council for 1915 (continued)
Trade and Commerce
Aldermen PIERPONT, FOY, DANIEL, WILLIAMSON
PIGMAN
Water
Aldermen FOY, PIERPONT, KAYTON
Sanitary Commissioners
Aldermen DANIEL, WILLIAMSON
Citizens Dr. W. R. DANCY, Mr. JOSEPH SOLOMON,
Col. BEIRNE GORDON
CITY OFFICERS 1915
RICHARD J. DAVANT..................................................Mayor
THOMAS GAMBLE, Jr.....................Secretary to the Mayor
THOMAS HALLIGAN.............................,...~.Clerk of Council
CHAS. V. HERNANDEZ............Assistant Clerk of Council
HARRY J. NORTON.................... Secretary Purchase Board
M. L. MELDRIM................................................Chief of Police
B. S. BRYANT..............................First Lieutenant of Police
J. F. BERNHARDT................Clerk of the Police Department
C. S. HARDEE....................................................City Treasurer
G. B. PRITCHARD..........................Assistant City Treasurer
JAMES FURSE........................................................Comptroller
E. R. CONANT..................................................Chief Engineer
W- O'D. ROCKWELL.................... Assistant Chief Engineer
JOHN ROURKE, Jr...........................................City Attorney
D. S. ATKINSON..............................Assistant City Attorney
GEO. D. SEMKEN................................................City Marshal
J. H. PAPOT............................................Deputy City Marshal
Dr. L. B. TAYLOR..........................................1 White
Dr. L. J. CHEDEL..........................................jCity Physicians
Dr. C. C. MIDDLETON..............................J Colored
Dr. F. S. BELCHER......................................../City Physicians
GEO. LEWIN....................................................Clerk of Market
E. B. HARTLEY............................ Assistant Clerk of Market
THOS. H. LAIRD................................................Harbor Master
W. F. BRUNNER................................................Health Officer
V. H. BASSETT....................................................Bacteriologist
C. J. MELVIN....................................Chief Sanitary Inspector
D. C. GILLES..........................................Chief Food Inspector
THOMAS F. FLEMING....................................Food Inspector
LEWIS BLISS, C. R. SHOUSE, J. T. WELLS,]Inspectors
G. W. ROBINSON, NAT HARRISON, J. E.|'of Naval
REGISTER, J. F. BLISS and R. B. JEWETTJ Stores
JOHN R. EASON.......................:....................Building Inspector
A. B. LaROCHE........................Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery
City Officers 1915 (continued)
J. T. McCORMICK...............Keeper Bonaventure Cemetery
HENRY WILLIS (coZ.)..........Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery
J. D. HARMS......................................Keeper City Dispensary
F. M. HULL............................................................Port Warden
C. W. TANNER..........................................PIumbing Inspector
JOHN E. SCHWARZ............................'........................Recorder
L. A. EAST....................Superintendent Scavenger Department
JOHN H. MONROE..........Chief Engineer Fire Department
A. J. TOSHACH..........Asst. Chief Engineer Fire Department
J. P. FIGG.........Superintendent and Engineer Waterworks
G. NOBLE JONES............................Chairman Tax Assessors
D. T. ELLIOTT............................................................1 Tax
JOSEPH M. DREYER................................................JAssessors
J. CHRIS WERNTZ..................................Custodian City Hall
BUDGET FOR TOE YEAR W15
Operating Expenses
General Government:
Executive and Legislative . Salaries of Aldermen and Salaries and Expenses
of Offices of Mayor and Clerk of Council,
including Publishing of Council Proceedings and of Mayor's Annual Report___$ 20,400 00
Finance and Accounts
Comptroller's Office, Salaries and Expenses_ 7,120 00
Treasurer's Office, Salaries and Expenses..__ 9,925 00
Assessment of Taxes
Tax Assessor's Office, Salaries and Expenses.. 5,187 13
Marshal's Office
Salaries and Expenses____..-.______ 6,150 00
Law Department
Salaries and Expenses___..-._____.. 5,000 00
Municipal Building
Salaries and Expenses of Custodian and Assistants, and Fuel, Lights, Elevator Operation and Other Expenses of City Hall
Building, Including Clock Expenses. .... 6,300 00
Police Court
Salaries of Recorder and of Clerk and Other
Expenses_-...____............... 3,550 00
Pensions
Police Department.._____..._____ 4,886 40
Fire Department...............__------- 3,480 00
Highway and Sanitation Departments....... 3,300 00
Widows and Orphans, Police and Fire Departments__._--------_-.-_------ 2,304 00
Miscellaneous
Salary and Expenses of Building Inspector... 1,735 00
Salary of Keeper of Powder Magazine. ._-_-- 300 00
Total General Government___-.-.._ $ 79,637 53
Police Department
Salaries and Expenses, Including New Uniforms and Military Reserve_____._ $160,00000
Fire Department
Salaries and Expenses, Including New Uniforms and Chimney Sweeping Expenses-. 125,000 00
Budget for the Year 1915 (continued)
Board of Health
Salaries and Expenses, Office of Health Officer $ 30,000 00
Salaries and Expenses, Bacteriological Laboratory___.............___.___. 7,500 00
Salaries and Expenses, Plumbing Inspector. . . 1,700 00
$ 39,200 00
Sanitation Department
Salaries and Expenses-...... .- I 135,00000
Highway Department
Street Lighting._..............-........$ 47,000 00
Ornamental Street Post Lighting............ 3,40000
Salaries and Expenses ______. ______ 40,00000
$ 90,400 00
City Stable* and Shops
Salaries and Expenses_.__.............. S 2,26000
Harbor and Wharves
Municipal Wharves, Repairs_______...S 50000
Other Salaries and Expenses..._._........ 3,40000
9 3,900 00
Board of Purchase
Office Supplies and Expenses................ $ 5000
Waterworks Department
Salaries and Expenses...................... $ 69,00000
City Market
Salaries and Expenses................... S 7,90000
Park and Tree Commission
DaffinPark..................... .........I 500 00
Other Parks and Squares__ _________ 14,250 00
Bonaventure Cemetery. ..__.....___.. 6,750 00
Laurel Grove Cemetery.-.-.-.-....-____ 6,250 00
$ 27,750 00
Playgrounds
Salaries and Expenses......__....... $ 11,50000
Industrial Farm
City's proportion as per agreement with County S 3,600 00
PiMic. Library
WhHe..........................- ...--I 10,000 00
Carnegie Public Library (colored)............ 1,20000
$ 11,200 00
Budget for the Year 1915 (continued)
Charities
Outdoor Poor Relief ____ . _ . __ --..-_-$ 715 00
Poor in Institutions. .......... ___ . ___ 1,260 00
Contributions to Associations ........... 2,640 00
Contributions to Hospitals (toAite)- ______ 9,546 66
Contributions to Hospitals (colored) - ... ..... 5,400 00
City Physicians _________________ 3,000 00
City Dispensary. _. _______ 4,500 00
Donations for Purpose of Tax Payments. .... 4,100 00
$ 31,161 66
Interest on Bonded Indebtedness
Bonds Maturing in 1959.. _ .... _ -......$ 108,135 00
Bonds Maturing in 1943- . _ ...- _ ------- 9,517 50
Drainage Bonds (serial) Dated 1914. ......... 26,824 70
Auditorium Bonds (serial) Dated 1914. . . __ 9,147 90
$ 163,625 10
Sinking Fund
Bonds Maturing in 1959..... __ .........-$ 30,000 00
Bonds Maturing in 1943.. _____ -------- 1,000 00
Drainage (serial} Bonds Maturing April 15,
1915- --..___.___.....- .- 6,600 00
Auditorium (serial) Bonds Maturing October
15, 1915 -.._..._...._--- - -- 2,000 00
$ 38,500 00
Notes Payable
Issued Prior to January 28, 1913, Maturing
in W15-. ........................... I 64,74355
Interest Accrued on Notes
Issued Prior to January 28, 1913 _ .... $ 1,13124
Rehabilitation Cemetery Trust Funds
Payments Made Prior to 1913 (one-third) .... $ 4,163 12
Total Operating Expenses, Interest and Other
Fixed Charges.. ........... ........ $1,049,722 20
New Improvements, Etc., to be Made In 1915, to be
Passed on by Council Before Expenditure
Health Department
Repairs to Smallpox Hospital _________ $ 25000
Police Department
Furniture and Fixtures, New ......... _ ...f 15000
Automobiles (Ambulance and Runabouts) .... 3,300 00
Livestock....................... ___ ... 500 00
Gamewell System (Extension and Repairs) . . . 975 00
$ 4,925 00
Budget for the Year 1915 (continued)
Highway and Sanitation Departments
Livestock..............___............I 2,000 00
Placing Street Signs ...___.._____.... 1,00000
Paving Streets (City's Proportion) __ ...... 50,000 00
Opening Streets..._--........______ 35,000 00
Steam Hoister for Excavating, etc.....-..--_ 1,300 00
$ 89,300 00
Harbor and Wharves
Repairs to Wharf foot of Abercorn Street.... 9 1,000 00
Waterworks Department
Extensions-_______................... $ 15,000 00
Artificial Stone Walks
10-Foot Diagonal Walks, Forsyth Park, Gaston
to Hall Streets___.-._....._....... $ 78000
Parks and Cemeteries
Extending and Renewing Water Mains, Bonaventure Cemetery, Artesian Wells____ 500 00
Repairs to Keeper's Residence, etc., Laurel
Grove Cemetery..___............... 300 00
Repairs to Green House, Laurel Grove Cemetery--------------------------------. 150 00
Repairs to Vaults and Tombs, Colonial Park. 300 00
Tree Planting............................. 1,000 00
S 2,250 00
Publicity
Advertising, Conventions, etc............... $ 15,000 00
Total Improvements................... $ 128,50500
Total Budget......................... $1,178,227 20
SECOND ANNUAL MESSAGE
OF
RICHARD J. DAVANT
MAYOR
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
REVIEWING OPERATIONS FOR YEAR
1914

SECOND ANNUAL MESSAGE
/
OP
RICHARD J. DAVANT, Mayor
OF SAVANNAH
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915-
The Board of Aldermen, City:
Gentlemen:
Although the European war that clouded the last half
of the year greatly interfered with the commercial life of the
city for five months, bringing almost a complete cessation of
foreign trade and seriously hampering operations in certain
lines of activity that have been large employers of labor and
important elements in the general prosperity of the community, Savannah, it is a satisfaction to know and assert, has
on the whole suffered less from the unsettlement of business
than many of its sister cities of the South. Its business men
speedily adjusted themselves to the new conditions as far
as was possible, and the problem of unemployed labor did
not take on in Savannah the magnitude that seems to have
marked it in many cities.
Fortunately the municipality had available the proceeds
of its $600,000 drainage bond issue and the legal questions
involved having been disposed of and its right to proceed
with the work sustained, contracts were made and work was
begun on November 1st. By ordinance the council enacted
that on all city contracts preference must be given to Savannah labor, a similar provision was inserted in the contracts,
and as a result several hundred men who might otherwise
36 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
be idle have been employed and will remain in service throughout 1915. Excellent progress is being made on the work and
by the close of the current year the sewerage and drainage
conditions over a large additional territory will be sanitary
in every respect.
As is generally known; the amount of the bonds voted
was not adequate to give Savannah a complete sanitary
system and the matter of a further issue must be presented
to the voters if it is deemed advisable to complete the system
at this time. While the contractors have their trained forces
and machinery in hand, it is not unreasonable to believe
that they could give the city the benefit of lower bids than
if required to reassemble them at some later period. This
matter of submitting another drainage and sewerage bond
issue to the people is one that the council might well take
under consideration in sufficient time before the close of the
present contracts to guarantee a continuation of the work
without cessation if the voters so approve. It is impossible
to over-magnify the importance of a sanitary drainage and
sewerage system covering the entire city. Magnificent
though our reports are, showing Savannah to be probably
the healthiest city in the South and one that does not suffer
by comparison with any city elsewhere, there is always room
for improvement, and a further lessening of disease and
death will amply repay any expenditures in the direction
indicated.
Other precautionary and protective steps are constantly
being taken to promote the public health. During the year
the food inspection ordinances were strengthened and a trained
chief food inspector engaged. Conditions at the city market
were improved as far as the plant as it now stands will permit.
Experience has amply demonstrated that the deficiencies are
inherent in the building itself and that even though large
additional expenditures are made the market will never be
entirely satisfactory. At the same time it is incumbent on
the city to do the best it can with the property and as soon
as funds are available the suggested refrigerating plant should
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________37
be put in and the conditions surrounding the sale of food be
otherwise bettered. In these and other matters the authorities will continue to endeavor to advance the city's standing
from the most vital of all points, that of the public health.
Drainage conditions west of the city, one of the most
serious problems of this nature owing to the extensive low
lands and the danger of inundation, from heavy rains, will
be greatly improved by a contract entered into between the
city and the Ocean Steamship Company, under which the
Ogeechee Canal, from the Savannah river to its western
limit at the Ogeechee river, has been transferred to the city.
The corporation referred to has paid to the city $25,000 for
deepening the Canal from its intersection with the Musgrove
Creek to the river, $12,000 for flood gates, and $2,000 for a
bridge over the Louisville road, a total of $39,000. The
improvement of the canal is now well under way and affords
employment to a considerable number who might otherwise
be dependent upon public aid. As a result of this contract
the construction of the new docks of the Ocean Steamship
Company has been facilitated. These and those completed
for the Merchants and Miners' Transportation Company
mark another decided advance in the facilities at this port,
already ranking so high among American shipping centers as
to the vast extent and superior equipment of its terminals.
The ownership of the right-of-wdy of the canal now
being vested in the city puts it in a position where the Ogeechee river can be tapped to supplement its artesian supply
if the necessity should arise with the growth of the city. This
was a prime factor in the negotiations and may some day"
be the means of avoiding a great outlay to reach an unpolluted source of water to meet the requirements of a city of
the size we all hope and believe Savannah will ultimately
become. In this connection it may be stated that the extension of water mains will require large expenditures during
the next few years, as the city is expanding over large new
areas in all directions and its growth promises to be more
rapid in the future than in the past. During the year under
38__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
review over 600 dwellings were built, considerable land was
laid out for residence sections by developers, and approximately five-and-a-half miles of mains laid, 528 feet of 12-inch,
3,376 feet of 8-inch, 24,894 feet of 6-inch, and 1,319 feet of
1$4 and 2-inch. Provision has been made for greater improvements of this character during 1915 to meet what promise to be urgent needs.
The completion of the destructor plant can also be hailed
as a decided step toward equipping Savannah with the most
complete sanitary arrangements known to modern science.
Costing $125,000, fully paid for, this plant is today in a number of respects the most notable in the United States, possessing features that are new and which are drawing ty> it
the attention of the officials of other cities. All of the city's
garbage and other household waste is now completely
destroyed. That this is an immeasurable forward step, amply
justifying the expenditure, is acknowledged by all. The
capacity of the plant is considerably in excess of the present
needs of the city, and it will be years before its ability to
consume all of the waste will be taxed to the full limit. The
elimination of the old county dump removed a source of persistent danger and the daily destruction of all the garbage,
etc., will be a potent factor in lessening the fly evil and in
preventing the spread of disease. The plant supplies a portion of the steam used by the waterworks, the value of this
product going a long ways towards meeting the operating
expenses of the destructor.
While on the subject of public health the successful
installation of a system of playgrounds can be referred to.
The creation of sound bodies in the growing generation,
and the cultivation of a love of clean, out-of-door sports
and recreation, building up the boys and girls physically and
increasing their powers of resistance to disease, is one of
those preventive measures that are far preferable to remedies
after disease has taken root. It is a pleasure to record that
the public sympathy has been with the playground movement from its inception and that the approval has been
__________. MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________39
practically unstinted. Five playgrounds are now working
successfully and a corps of competent assistant directors has
been built up. from home material within the few months
that the system has been in vogue. Additional playgrounds
will, of necessity, be established to meet the public demand.
The city has had the unselfish Services of an unremunerated
commission that has given much time and thought to the
work entrusted to it, and it is entitled to the commendation
of all for the success it has achieved. This is, as far as known,
the first governmental body here on which women have served,
and accepting the work done by them on the Playground
Commission as a criterion, it can be said that Savannah will
be the loser if it does not further avail itself of the talents
of its women in those public affairs for which they are peculiarly adapted.
Paving and the opening of new tracts for homes, while
not generally discussed from the health standpoint, also undoubtedly play their part in promoting that phase of the
public welfare by the prevention of congestion in residence
sections and the proper cleaning of thoroughfares which only
becomes possible after their improvement. Both of these
classes of betterments received attention during 1914. Several streets were extended, new ones opened and considerable
areas thereby added to the rapidly developing home districts.
In all, 51,197 lineal feet, embracing 2,124,081 square feet of
land, was acquired for new highways, the extension of old
highways whose blocking has been a barrier to the city's progress, or the removal of encroachments on thoroughfares
that were irregular in their layout. These purchases added
nine miles to the streets and lanes owned by the municipality.
They were made at very satisfactory cash prices when in
the built-up section, and in outlying districts were acquired
by the city opening and grading the highways. Despite
this large addition to the public domain, the total outlay
chargeable to opening streets was but $13,335.
With the great stretches of suitable land available for
residence there is no reason why Savannah should become
40__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
more congested than it is and the disposition of citizens to
build further and further from the business district is to be
commended and encouraged. In paving, 40,496 square yards
were laid during 1914, of which 17,545 were of asphalt blocks,
15,444 of granite blocks and 7,507 of vitrified bricks, the
streets of which sections were improved being Wheaton, Gwinnett, River, Duffy, Montgomery, Taylor, Habersham, Louisville Road and Perry, Bay, York, Congress, Hull, and
Broughton Lanes. The legislation referred to in a special
message to council relative to the better protection of the
growth of the city along regular lines, has been secured from
the general assembly, together with laws that enable the
municipality to prevent the tearing up of newly-paved highways, and otherwise strengthening its hands in administering
the public affairs satisfactorily. The city now has jurisdiction for two miles beyond its limits so far as the laying out
of streets and lanes is concerned, and the haphazard methods
of the past have come to an end. A considerable portion
of the city has also had new street signs placed in position,
a minor, but much needed improvement.
Outside of the destructor plant, the most costly, most
important and probably the most far-reaching improvement
of the year as indicative of a new policy that must be pursued
by Savannah and other ports hereafter with regard to their
river terminal facilities, was the purchase of a wharf
frontage of 320 feet, in the very heart of the river-front of
the city, and the construction of a municipal wharf that
does not suffer by comparison with any other on the river.
The expenditures aggregated $67,000 and gave the city a
permanent asset that could even today be sold at a substantial advance. The free use of this municipal wharf has been
tendered to the United States government vessels, and private yacht owners from the North will be encouraged to
visit Savannah and use this advantageously located facility.
Commercial vessels are charged for the use of the wharf and
make it a revenue producer.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________41
No progress beyond that previously reported has been
made in the matter of a turning basin, but hopes are entertained that the next congress may be induced to see the
advisability of this progressive step. While it may be some
years hence, there is hardly a doubt that eventually the city
will have very valuable municipal wharves on Fig Island
and to the west of the present developed river frontage.
With the probability of our foreign trade being more and
more carried on under the American flag, and with two large
Savannah-owned steamships already sailing from this port
in foreign trade, it is not unreasonable to believe that Savannah will become the home port of a large fleet of freight
carriers and that whatever accommodations the city may
provide will be in demand by independent lines. In this
connection the matter of river front protection is assuming
greater magnitude with the expansion of the various terminals
and the enormous values of the property jeopardized by fire.
Conferences held this year with representatives of the transportation interests were fruitless of immediate results, but
will be persevered in with the hope that some satisfactory
arrangement can be made between them and the city for the
purchase and maintenance of a fire tug.
Preliminary steps toward the erection of two important
public buildings were taken during the year and 1915 will
find one of them, the library building, probably completed,
and the other, the auditorium, well under way. A site that
will eventually be in the very center of the residential section,
so rapidly is the city expanding to the south, was purchased
at Bull and Thirty-sixth Streets, for $15,000, and on this a
building that, in its conveniences and adaptability to library
purposes will be a model, will be erected. The commission
in charge has given much thought to its work and faithfully
sought to promote the public interest. No site for the auditorium has yet been selected. The bonds have been printed
and offered for sale and there is good reason to believe that
a satisfactory bid will be had for them.
42__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
By early summer it is hoped to have the construction
of this building begun. As with the library building, those
in charge will undoubtedly proceed with the determination
to avoid the mistakes that have been made elsewhere in the
building of auditoriums, to profit by the experience of other
cities, and with the realization that it is not so much a matter
of speedy building as of a perfect building that is to be sought.
Ready for conventions and other public gatherings in
1916, this building should prove an important factor in advertising Savannah and in its development as a tourist and
trade center. One large convention has been booked for
1915, that of the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Association,
which will draw to this city prominent men from along the
entire Atlantic coast. The city will unquestionably on the
completion of the auditorium, become a favorite convention
point. Its ability in catering to such bodies is too well known
to need comment, and with the projected expansion of its
hotel facilities it will be in position to satisfactorily take care
of large bodies.
The various departments were maintained during 1914
in an efficient condition, buildings and apparatus being under
constant supervision, and the personnel of the several forces
kept at a satisfactory pitch. A spirit of earnest co-operation
was manifest among the aldermen and the department
officials. The aldermen in their various committee capacities
gave unstintedly to the municipality the benefit of their intelligence and time and by their zealous efforts to promote its
interests contributed individually to the successful planning
and execution of the year's work. The new system of accounting has.worked smoothly from its installation, but modifications will be introduced to perfect it wherever necessary.
The full value of the system will only become apparent this
year when accurate comparisons can be instituted as to expenses and results. At the earliest possible time a complete
detailed report of the financial operations for 1914 and the
two years of this administration will be presented.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________43
During the year the municipality co-operated in various
ways with the business organizations of the city in movements designed to benefit Savannah. A pleasing feature of
the situation as it now exists is the unity of sentiment among
our people, the evident desire to keep down internal strife,
and to harmoniously co-operate for the good of the community. Working in this direction, the terms of the mayor
and aldermen were changed by legislative enactment to four
years, lessening the disorganizing effect that persistent politics
has heretofore had. Freed from this pernicious influence, all
can now strike hands for the consideration and promotion of
plans that seek to make Savannah a greater city. Along
this line is the suggestion made in the mayor's last annual
report, and now repeated, recommending a city commercial
agent, free from all outside influences, and working singly
for the protection of Savannah's trade interests, studying
freight tariffs, transportation facilities, business currents, analyzing conditions and complaints, acting as the friend and
ally of every legitimate business interest of the city.
This administration, since its induction into office two
years ago, has earnestly sought to redeem the pledges it made
to the people prior to and after its inauguration. It believes
that it has done so. For the four years term upon which it
will soon enter it will simply renew its pledges of an honest
conduct of municipal affairs, seeking solely the betterment of
local conditions along all lines, and promise a hearty cooperation with all of the citizens of Savannah in movements
that have for their purpose the upbuilding of the city. Realizing that it has the good will of the community, and the
assurance of its support in all forward steps, it will be the
purpose of the administration, by its governmental policy
and methods of administration, to justify a continuance of
the confidence and esteem of the people who have so generously entrusted it with a new lease of authority and responsibility.
R. J. DAVANT,
Mayor.

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
COMPTROLLER
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
JAMES PURSE
COMPTROLLER

REPORT OF COMPTROLLER
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor, City of Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I herewith submit the Report of the Accounting Department of the City for the year ended
December 31, 1914.
The financial condition of the city in condensed form is as follows:
Financial Condition
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Assets
Current Assets.... .................................... ... ....
Deferred Assets.................................. .............
Capital Account Cash Proceeds from Sale of
Bonds of April 15, 1914.............. ..................
Land, Buildings, Permanent Improvements
and Equipment...................... .................... ......
Total.................................. ...........
$ 237,487.84
23,649.99
571,203.90
10,471,052.57
$11,303,394.30
$ 241,984.58
1,379.32
10,278,976.68
$10,522,340.58
$
22,270.67
571,203.90
192,075.89
$781,053.72
$ 4,496.74

GO
55
3
Financial Condition (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Liabilities
Current Liabilities....... .............................
Deferred Liabilities........... ... .................. .. ..
Trust Funds for Perpetual Care of Lots .
Funded Debt, Less Sinking Fund.................
Total Liabilities........ .......... ............. .. ...
Excess of Assets Over Liabilities...... .........
Total.............................. .......................... ...
$ 435,344.16
54,492.87
12,163.12
3,159,500.00
$ 3,661,500.15
% 7,641,894.15
$11,303,394.30
$ 382,374.11
51,861.12
12,163.12
2,600,500.00
$ 3,046,898.35
$ 7,475,442.23
$10,522,340.58
$ 52,970.05
2,631.75
559,000.00
$614,601.80
$166,451.92
$781,053.72
I
The Increases and Decreases above are shown in detail on the General Balance Sheet.
The Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the year are shown in the following Condensed Statement:
CASH STATEMENT
Capital Sinking Trust Current
Funds Funds Funds Funds Total
Balance, January 1, 1914....................
Receipts During Year from All Sources
Revenues................ ...... ..........................
Revenues Receivable....... ....................
Sales of Land, Etc............. ....... .............
Operating Expenses and Outlays........
Miscellaneous Items.............................
Accounts Receivable.......... ...............
Central of Georgia Railway Company
for Ogeechee Canal..........................
Borrowed Money..................... ...........
Sinking Fund, 1913 Balance...... .........
Sinking Fund for 1914.... ......................
Proceeds from Sale of Bonds of April
15, 1914................................................
Interest on Deposits and Collected at
Sale of Bonds....................................
Bonaventure Cemetery Trust FundTotal Receipts... ...........................
Total......................... ......................
$ 2,250.00
$
604,797.00
14,891.14
$619,688.14
8621,938.14
$14,000.00
$
12,000.00
29,000.00
$41,000.00
$55,000.00
$1,825.00
$
2,650.00
$2,650.00
$4,475.00
$ 18,186.21
$ 929,917.31
186,628.86
15,763.80
2,736.91
553.74
86,514.86
10,000.00
203,000.00
$1,435,115.48
$1,453,301.69
$ 36,261.21
$ 929,917.31
186,628.86
15,763.80
2,736.91
553.74
86,514.86
10,000.00
203,000.00
12,000.00
29,000.00
604,797.00
14,891.14
2,650.00
$2,098,453.62
$2,134,714.83
a
s?06
SS
I
SJ
s
s
(continued)
Gash Statement (continued)
Disbursements
i/ f\\ \ /* n A1"9
Pay Checks.... . .... . ....
Coupons on Bonds... ....... ........
Sinking Fund Cash Requirements ......
Redemption of Bonds of 1883.... .
Total....... ....:........... ...... . ......
Balance December 31, 1914. .... ... . .
Capital
Funds
$ 48,484.24
1,750.00
$ 50,234.24
$571,703.90
Sinking
Funds
$55,000.00
Trust
Funds
$4,475.00
Current
Funds
$ 692,645.56
594,809.56
131,529.37
41,000.00
$1,459,984.49
$ *6,682.80
Total
$ 741,129.80
594,809.56
131,529.37
41,000.00
1,750.00
$1,510,218.73
$ 624,496.10
2
I
CO
g
*Overdraft
This Statement does not include proceeds received from sale of Bonds of February 1, 1914,
which were refunded and the Bonds cancelled.
The net overdraft of $6,682.80 in current funds consists of overdraft in Exchange Bank of
Savannah of $9,840.52, less cash with Treasurer and in other banks, $3,157.72.
The Income Account for 1914 as compared with the previous year is stated in condensed form aa
follows:
INCOME STATEMENT
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Operating Revenues...... ........ .............. ... ....
Additions to Income..... ................................ . .
Total........ ...................... ..........................
Operating Expenses..... ...................... ...............
Deductions from Income.............. ............ ........
Total..................................................... .......
Net Operating Income........ ........................
Additions to Property, Including Payments
of Notes Issued for Outlays Under Prior
Administrations.............. .........................
Deficit................. .............. .... .................
$ 1,120,463.28
5,842.57
$ 1,126,305.85
$ 828,585.84
160,268.09
$ 988,853.93
$ 137,451.92
$ 298,173.63
$ 160,721.71
$ 1,107,504.46
9,359.70
$ 1,116,864.16
$ 797,692.26
152,670.37
$ 950,362.63
$ 166,501.53
$ 248,265.18
$ 81,763.65
$ 12,958.82
$ 9,441.69
$ 30,893.58
7,597.72
$ 38,491.30
$ 49,908.45
$ 78,958.06
$
3,517.13
$ 29,049.61
*?
o5
I
(continued)
Income Statement (continued)
The increases in Operating Revenues and Operating Expenses are shown in detail in the statements thereof in this Report.
The decrease in Additions to Income and the increase in Deductions from Income are shown
in detail in the Income Statement.
%
The Additions to Property Through Income are shown in detail in the Income Statement in this
report.
The payments of Notes inherited from prior adminstrations amounted during 1913 to $153,-
663.46, and during 1914 to $95,883.71, a total of $249,547.17, a figure which exceeds the total deficit
for the two years.

The deficit from operations for 1914 amounts to $160,721.71, as shown. However, the accumulated deficit to December 31, 1914, in the revenues and miscellaneous receipts required to meet
expenditures under budget authorizations, including the $12,163.12 due to Trust Funds, is $156,-
420.61; see Current Account Balance Sheet.
The General Balance Sheet of the City as of December 31, 1914, compared with the previous
year, should be sub-divided under the following captions:
Capital Account Balance Sheet
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Assets
Cash.............................................. ....................
Land, Buildings, Permanent Improvements
and Equipment.. ............................... .............
Total...................... ...............................
$ 571,703.90
10,471,052.57
$11,042,756.47
$ 2,250.00
10,278,976.68
$10,281,226.68
$569,453.90
192,075.89
$761,529.79
2
I
CO
(continued)
Capital Account Balance Sheet (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Liabilities
Notes Payable..... ...*.......................................
Deferred Liabilities, Interest on Deposits
Collected......... ... ........................... ......
Funded Debt.....
Total Liabilities.. .. . ................... ............
Excess of Assets Over Liabilities......... ...
Total....... ...............................................
$ 83,248.84
1,192.87
3,215,000.00
$ 3,299,441.71
$ 7,743,314.76
$11,042,756.47
$ 224,132.55
2,616,750.00
S 2,840,882.55
$ 7,440,344.13
$10,281,226.68
$
1,192.87
598,250.00
$458,559.16
$302,970.63
$761,529.79
$140,883.71
2
I
CO
5!
I
Sinking Fund Balance Sheet
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Assets
Cash on Deposit for Redemption of Bonds
of 1909............................................... .............
Sinking Fund Cash Requirements...... .. ....... ..
Total......... ..................................................
Liabilities and Reserves
Sinking Fund Reserves.... ....... ...... .... .....
$ 55,000.00
$ 55,000.00
$ 55,000.00
$ 14,000.00
. 12,000.00
$ 26,000.00
$ 26,000.00
$ 41,000.00
$ 29,000.00
$ 29,000.00
$
12,000.00
I
00
ej

uv
3
Trust Fund Balance Sheet
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Assets
Cash on Deposit for Perpetual Care of
Lots in Bonaventure Cemetery...... .... .....
Cash on Deposit for Perpetual Care of
Lots in Laurel Grove Cemetery.... ... . .......
Due from Current Funds.... ........ . ......... .. ....
Total... ....................................... ........
Liabilitits and Reserves
Bonaventure Cemetery Perpetuity Fund
Account.................... .......................................
Laurel Grove Cemetery Perpetuity Fund
Account................ ...... ....................................
Total..................... .......................................
$ 3,350.00
1,125.00
12,163.12
S 16,638.12
$ 15,113.12
1,525.00
$ 16,638.12
$ 700.00
1,125.00
12,163.12
$ 13,988.12
$ 12,463.12
1,525.00
$ 13,988.12
$ 2,650.00
$ 2,650.00
$ 2,650.00
S 2,650.00
I
to
M
3
Current Account Balance Sheet
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Assets
Current Assets........ ......... ................. ......... .........
Deferred Assets.... ........ ........... ............... ............
Total Assets....... ....... ...... ............ ............. ...
Deficit of Assets Over Liabilities........ .... ........
Total...... ................. ................................
Liabilities
Current Liabilities............... ...............................
Deferred Liabilities...... ............................. .........
Trust Funds for Perpetual Care of Lots ........
Total Liabilities..........................................
Excess of Assets Over Liabilities ....................
Total ..................... .......... ........................
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
237,487.84
23,649.99
261,137.83
156,420.61
417,558.44
352,095.32
53,300.00
12,163.12
417,558.44
417,558.44
$ 241,984.58
1,379.32
$ 243,363.90
$ 243,363.90
$ 158,241.56
51,861.12
12,163.12
$ 222,265.80
$ 21,098.10
$ 243,363.90
$
22,270.67
$ 17,773.93
$156,420.61
$174,194.54
$193,853.76
1,438.88
$195,292.64
$174,194.54
$ 4 4Qfi 74
$ 21,098.10
ICD
I
The Revenues and Expenses of the Municipal Industries Are As Follows:
Years Ending December 31
1914 1918 Increase Decrease
Waterworks Department
Revenues................... ........ ................ ............
Expenses...... ............ ......... ... .... ........................
Net Revenue....................... ....................
Bonaventure Cemetery
Revenues.................... .................................. ........
Expenses.......................... ..................................
Net Loss...................................... ... .... .......
$ 144,874.96
68,471.38
$ 76,403.58
$ 6,350.96
6,904.86
$ 553.90
$ 140,645.79
68,508.61
$ 72,137.18
$ 6,110.69
8,226.00
$ 2,115.31
$ 4,229.17
S 4,266.40
$ 240.27
$
37.23
$ 1.321.14
$ 1,561.41
g
05
5S
I
H
3
(continued)
Revenues and Expenses of Municipal Industries (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Laurel Grove Cemetery
Revenues.............. ........ ........... ...... ....................
Expenses........... .................................... ............
Net Loss..... .................................................
City Market
Revenues.............................. ................................
Expenses...... ........................ ....... .....................
Net Revenue....................... ....................
*
$
*
$
1,811.50
6,191.01
4,379.51
20,620.02
8,457.98
12,162.04
$
$
S
$
1,806.45
6,145.20
4,338.75
19,948.13
8,768.36
11,179.77
S
$
S
$
5.05
45.81
40.76
671.89
982.27
$
-
310.38
2
I

cc
CJ$
3
The Accounts for 1913 not having been recorded on the same basis as in 1914, it has not been
practicable during the year to compare the Monthly Expenditures with the previous year. During
1915 we hope to prepare Monthly Comparative Statements of Operating Expenses for the guidance
of the several executive officers.
The Operating Expenses of the several Departments for the year have exceeded the estimated
Budget Authorizations therefor by $64,886.68, as follows:
Actual Budget
Expenses Authorizations Overdraft Underdraft
8
General Government, Including Pensions......
Police Department............................................
Fire Department.. .............................. ...............
Health Department......... ............... ........ ......
Bacteriological Laboratory........ ....................
Department of Chief Engineer, Consisting
of Sanitation, Highways, City Stables and
Shops, Harbor and Wharves and Board
of Purchase .............. ....... ....... ................ ..
Charities.................................... ............. ...........
Industrial Farm.................. ............................
Publicity or Advertising...... .............................
Libraries...... .......................................................
$ 78,707.41
154,015.63
128,187.33
30,742.74
7,642.61
264,902.78
31,212.72
3,600.00
6,258.09
10,360.00
S 76,837.00
153,678.50
117,500.00
27,765.00
7,500.00
229,716.00
26,242.66
3,600.00
6,500.00
10,360.00
S 1,870.41
337.13
10,687.33
2,977.74
142.61
35,186.78
4,970.06
$
241.91
2
I
(continutd)
Operating Expenses in Excess of Budget Authorizations (continued)
Actual
Expenses
Budget
Authorizations Overdraft Underdraft
Playgrounds........................................................
Waterworks Department.................. ..............
City Market........... .... ......... ........
Daffin Park.............................. ............................
Other Parks and Squares...... ............................
Tree Planting............-.....-............. ........
Bonaventure Cemetery....................................
Laurel Grove Cemetery...... ..............................
Total. .................................. ........ ........
$ 6,624.50
68,471.38
8,457.98
500.00
14,806.82
999.98
6,904.86
6,191.01
$ 828,585.84
$ 2,500.00
68,000.00
6,000.00
500.00
14,000.00
1,000.00
6,000.00
6,000.00
$ 763,699.16
$ 4,124.50
471.38
2,457.98
806.82
904.86
191.01
$ 64,886.68
$
.02
X
I
09
25
I
3
The total Authorized Expenditures for the year amount to $1,287,027.56, as follows:
Operating Expenses..........................................................$ 828,585.84
Interest..................................................................................... 127,523.90
Sinking Fund................................................................................... 29,000.00
Miscellaneous Items................................................................. 3,744.19
Notes Payable, Issued Under Prior Administrations................ 95,883.71
Additions to Property................................................................... 202,289.92
Total............................................... $1,287,027.56
This figure exceeds by $128,576.09 the estimated Budget of December 26,1913, of $1,158,451.47.
Operating Expenses
The comparative Operating Expenses may be summarized as follows:
Years Ending Decembr 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
General Government Including Pensions......
Police Department........................ .............
Fire Department... ............................................
Health Department............ .................. ........
Bacteriological Laboratory..............................
Department of Chief Engineer, Consisting of
Sanitation, Highways, City Stables and
Shops, Harbors and Wharves and Board
of Purchase........... ........................................
Charities................. ...................................... .....
Industrial Farm........ ............ .............. ...........
Publicity or Advertising....... ............................
Libraries.............................. ............................
Playgrounds.................... ..................... .......
Waterworks Department.... ....... ....... ...........
City Market....... .................. .........................
S 78,707.41
154,015.63
128,187.33
30,742.74
7,642.61
264,902.78
31,212.72
3,600.00
6,258.09
10,360.00
6,624.50
68,471.38
8,457.98
S 78,517.85
138,880.35
122,487.54
30,810.42
7,401.78
268,186.40
* 26,464.56
3,562.00
1,600.00
10,359.96
68,508.61
8,768.36
S 189.56
15,135,28
5,699.79
240.83
4,748.16
38.00
4,658.09
04
6,624.50
1
67.68
3,283.62
37.23
310.38
S.
ICO
(continued)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Baffin Park..........-.-............-........ .....
Other Parks and Squares..................................
Tree Planting.............. .....................................
Bonaventure Cemetery.................................... ..
Laurel Grove Cemetery........... .....................
Total........... .................................................
$ 500.00)
14,806.82J
999.98
6,904.86
6,191.01
$ 828,585.84
$
17,773.23
8,226.00
6,145.20
$ 797,692.26
$
999.98
45.81
$ 30,893.58
S
2,466.41
1,321.14 I
CO
I
*Donations for purpose of Tax Payments, amounting in 1914 to $4,192.06, were not accounted
for in 1913.
The Property within the City of Savannah assessed for the purpose of Taxation, as shown on
the books, as of December 31, 1914, is as follows:
Real Estate..................................................................................$38,207,647.00
Personal Property..............-...........-................................ 18,033,216.00
Franchise Assessments of Public Service Corporations............ 910,977.00
Total........... ........................................................... ...$57,151,840.00
PROCEEDS FROM SALE OF DRAINAGE BONDS
The $600,000.00 Drainage Bonds Issued Under Date of April 15, 1914,
Were Sold for................................................ .... ....................................
There have been Expended to December 31, 1914, the following:
Salaries of Office Employees........................................................................... $ 1,554.96
Salaries of Inspectors.................... ................................................................ 1,548.54
Printing and Stationery................................................................................ 315.40
Postage............................................................................................................... .24
Telephone and Telegrams...................................................................... ....... 82.73
Office Supplies and Expenses.......................................................................... 18.30
Advertising for Bids, Etc........................................................................ ...... 636.83
Printing, Signing and Validating Bonds.................................................... 1,229.00
Express Charges............................................................................................. 159.03
Traveling Expenses of City Attorney in re Bonds ........................................ 250.00
Law Expenses................................................................................................ . 31.15
Premium on Surety Bonds.............................................................................. 37.50
Rights of Way................................................ ................................................... 8,654.80
Testing Machine............................ ........... ..................................................... 625.00
Engineering Instruments.................................................................................. 449.00
Payments to Pittsburg Testing Laboratory................................................ ... 335.11
$ 604,797.00
I
00
55
I
irv
s
(eonttntud)
Proceeds From Sale of Drainage Bonds (continued)
Sewers Constructed by City............ ..................................................................
Supervision Expenses............... ...............:..........................................................
Payments Under Contract to Gadsden Contracting Co. and Guild & Co.
Payments Under Contract to A. J. Twiggs & Sons........ ...............................
Payments to Jaudon Engineering Co. Under Contract......... .......................
Payments to Jaudon Engineering Co. for Field Force..................................
Engineering Services to Drainage Commission..............................................
Interest Collected and Received on Deposits.............................. $14,746.14
In Excess of Coupons Paid............................................................ 13,500.00
Leaving an Unexpended Balance at December 31, 1914, of........................
Which is Represented by Cash on Deposit........................ ..............................
Less Advances by Current Fund Refunded Subsequent to December 31
$ 2,288.83
172.00
14,448.42
567.16
3,000.00
1,252.73
2,367.50
l)trx\j*L^ 1 94ft 14
$ 571,203.90
5,184.99
$
qo tfo AQ
$566,018.91
2
I
co
SS55
e;
s
Your attention is respectfully invited to the accompanying Statements, viz.:
General Balance Sheet
Income Account
Operating Revenues
Operating Expenses
^"
Because of the pressure of detail work in the Comptroller's office and because of the large space j|
in your Annual Report which such statements would occupy, no detail schedules have been prepared g
of the property owned by the city or of the Accounts Receivable and Revenues Receivable, all of P
which are shown on the city's books.
8
Respectfully submitted,
JAMES FURSE,
Comptroller,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
General Balance Sheet December 31,1914
Assets 1914
Companion Companion
With With
PreviouB Month Previous Year
Increase 'Increase
t Decrease
Current Assets
Cash on Deposit and with Treasurer. . .
Accounts Receivable
Delinquent and Executions IssuedRevenues Receivable
Less Reserve for Discount and
Total Current Assets _ .........
Deferred Assets
Expenditures for Sidewalks in
Suspense. - .......................
Expenditures for Street Pavements in
Total Deferred Assets. ...........
Capital Account Cash Proceeds from
Sale of Bonds of April 15, 1914,
Land, Buildings, Permanent
Improvements and Equipment
Construction in Progress Storm and
Sanitary Drainage ..............
Total Land, Building, Etc. .......
Total..........................
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
S 1
5
3
$10
$11
3,157.72
9,477.78
16,441.82
196,438.00
20,368.82
212,806.82
26,456.90
186,349.92
22,060.60
237,487.84
1,494.91
25.45
90.00
974.29
21,065.34
23,649.99
571,203.90
,376,693.13
,331,087.11
,728,486.36
34,785.97
,471,052.57
,303,394.30
S t31,111.67
$ 16,261.23
*4,808.46
$*186,584.68
9,607.87
$196,192.55
25,313.53
$170,879.02
$ *3,068.21
$141,382.79
$ *581.52
f71 .67
974.29
21,065.34
$ '22,549.48
$ t 14, 984. 38
$ *21,215.61
143,476.44
42,236.98
15,591.88
fl26,563.68
$ *95,957.23
$244,905.12
$ H5.028.49
$ 13,659.68
1,452.18
$ *6,367.11
13,876.27
$ *20,243.38
$ '10,856.90
$ *9, 386.48
$ *3,352.77
$ t*, 496.74
$ '115.59
25.45
90.00
974.29
21,065.34
$ *22,270.67
$571,203.90
$ *16,598.69
142,255.91
42,236.98
34,785.97
143,801.66
$192,075.89
$781,053.72
(conttnwd)
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
General Balance Sheet December 31,1914 (continued)
Liabilities- 1914
Comparison Companion
With WitL
Previous Month Pnvioui Yew
*Increu *Incne
Current Liabilities
Overdraft, Exchange Bank of Savannah
Notes Payable, Demand .............
Notes Payable Time. ................
Audited Pay Rolls Payable ...........
Unclaimed Wages. ..................
Deferred Liabilities
Interest on Notes Payable, Accrued .
Not Due. .............. __ ......
Interest on Funded Debt, Accrued
Not Due -...-.--.-.-.-----.--.--.
Premium on Bonds of April 15, 1914...
Total Deferred Liabilities _____
TrustFundsfar Perpetual Care of Lots
Bonaventure Cemetery. ....... .......
Less Cash Deposited in Special
Total Trust Funds ...............
Funded Debt Bonds Outstanding
Series of 1879, Maturing in 1909. .....
Series of 1883, Maturing in 1913. .....
Series of 1909, Maturing in 1959.
Series of 1913, Maturing in 1943- .....
Series of April 15, 1914 Maturing
Serially. .........................
Less......... ................
Sinking Fund and Cash With Treasurer
Applicable to Redemption of Bonds .
TotalFunded Debt..............
Total Liabilities.. ...............
Surplus of Assets Over Liabilities
Sinking Fund Reserve ............
Additions to Property Through
Income 1914. ..__ I................!
Deficit for Year 1914.. ..............'
Total Surplus. -....-...--...... '
$ 9,840.52
284,000.00
83,248.84
43,573.66
8,221.62
307.02
6,152.50
$ 435,344.16
$ 4,117.50
46,249.12
4,126.25
$ 54,492.87
$ 15,113.12
1,525.00
$ 16,638.12
4,475.00
$ 12,163.12
$ 400.00
100.00
2,403,000.00
211,500.00
600,000.00
$ 3,125,000.00
55,500.00
S 3,159,500.00
$ 3,661,500.15
S 7,449,442.23
55,000.00
298,173.63
o 160, 721. 71
$ 7,641,894.15
Total.. ........................ $11, 303, 394. 30
$ *9,840.52
*29, 000.00
fl,261.13
16,676.16
11,939.89
3,323.61
* *55,639.27
158.62
5,653.12
1,998.78
t4,797.00
$ 3,013.52
9 *400.00
$ *400.00
400.00
$
29,000.00
$ 129,000.00
$ *29,652.79
$215,252.33
$244,905.12
$ *9,840.52
203,000.00
tl40,883.71
125,950.89
8,221.62
307.02
tl,564.51
$ *52,970.05
$ t2,687.37
1,192.87
4,126.25
$ *2,631.75
$ 2,650.00
$ *2, 650.00
2,650.00
$
11,750.00
600,000.00
$'598,250.00
39,250.00
$559,000.00
$614,601.80
$166,451.92
$781,053.72
, Deduction
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
Income Statement
Years Ending December 31 Increase *
1914 1913 Decrease f
Total Operating Revenues..........................................................
Additions to Income
Interest on Daily Balances........ ..................................................
Interest on Delinquent Accounts. ..............................................
Ground Rent Interest...... ............................................................
Miscellaneous Items......................................................................
Profit from Sale of North Part of Lot No. 148 Schwarz Ward
Total Additions to Income................................ .................
Total Revenues and Additions to Income....... .........................
Operating Expenses..............................................................
$1,120,463.28
$ 1,353.48
48.51
4,393.61
46.97
$ 5,842.57
$1,126,305.85
$ 828,585.84
$1,107,504.46
$ 2,572.41
495.24
4,184.82
2,107.23
$ 9,359.70
$1,116.864,16
$ 797,692.26
$12,958.82
t$ 1,218.93
t 446.73
* 208.79
t 2,107.23
* 46.97
t$ 3,517.13
*$ 9,441.69
*$30,893.58
I
CO
S
3
Income Statement (continued)
Years Ending December 31 Increase *
1914 1913 Decrease f
Deductions from Income
Sinking Fund Provision for Redemption of Bonds
Maturing in 1959...................................................................
Interest on Funded Debt........... .................................................
Interest on Notes Payable, Demand........................ ..................
Interest on Notes Payable, Time........... ...... ...... .......................
Miscellaneous Interest................ ............. ...... .... ................ .......
Discount on Ground Rent Lots Sold ........................................
Loss from Sale of Lot "C" Southville Ward........... ...... ...........
Miscellaneous Items Accrued in Previous Year Net.......... ....
Total Deductions from Income.................. ........................
Total Operating Expenses and Deductions from Income......
Net Ooeratine Income for Year.................. ........................
$ 29,000.00
117,241.41
7,480.55}
2,786.75}
15.19
131.52
100.00
3,512.67
$ 160,268.09
S 988,853.93
S 137.451.92
$ 28,000.00
118,218.75
6,451.62
S 152,670.37
$ 950,362.63
S 166.501.53
*$ 1,000.00
t 977.34
3,815.68
15.19
131.52
100.00
3,512.67
*f 7,597.72
*$38,491.30
tS29.049.61
I
(ctntintud)
Income Statement (continued)
Years Ending December 31 Increase *
1914____ 1913 Decrease f
Additions to Property Through Income
Furniture and Fixtures Office of City Treasurer.................. $ 182.20
Furniture and Fixtures Police Department............................ 163.55
Automobiles Police Department.............................................. 1,650.00
Motorcycles Police Department.............................................. 350.00
New Live Stock Police Department..................................... 1,575.00
Emergency Motorcycle Station Thomas Park ...................... 539.60
Incinerator Plant Expenditures for Year................................ 82,762.02
Cost of New Streets and Opening and Grading Thereof...... 17,335.30
Construction of New Sidewalks on City's Property ........... 1,426.89
City's Proportion of Cost of Paving Streets.......................... 22,802.72
New Street Signs........................................................................ 672.07
Automobiles, Highway and Sanitation Departments .......... 987.00
New Live Stock Highway and Sanitation Departments .... 3,804.50
Extensions of Distribution System Waterworks Department 11,790.50
Municipal Wharf, Between Bull and Drayton Streets ........ 55,000.00
Improvements to Municipal Wharf ........................................ 9,556.61
Carnegie Library Site................................................................ 15,192.53
Strip of Land on Barnard St. Between44th and Barrington 112.50
Strip of Land at Burroughs and 35th Streets........................ 100.00
Notes Payable for Outlays, Issued Under Prior Administrations ................................................................................ 95,883.71
Total..................................................................................... * 321,886.70
g
iGO
3
(continued)
Income Statement (continued)
Years Ending December 31 Increase *
1914 1913 Decrease f
Less
Sales of Bonaventure Cemetery Lots................................. ......
Sales of Laurel Grove Cemetery Lots.................. ......................
Sales of Ground Rents Lot..........................................................
Sales of Other Land and Equipment.... ....................................
Recovered from Standard Fuel Supply Company Account
of Purchase of Wharf in 1913..................................................
Inventory Adjustments of Value of Live Stock and
Equipment ................................................................................
Total . . .. ...... .. . ...
Net Additions to Property for Year.......................................
Deficit for Year.... ................................................................
$ 2,112.57
1,302.55
1,315.20
1,433.03
10,000.00
7,549.72
1 23,713.07
S 298,173.63
S 160,721.71
1
I 248,265.18
$ 81,763.65
S
$*49,908.45
$*78,958.06
\
Income Statement (continued}
The Accounts for 1913 were not kept in such detail as to render a Comparative Statement of
Value. The items may be summarized as follows:
Municipal Wharf....-............-...-..-.-..-......-..................................... $ 10,000.00
Cost of New Streets, Opening and Grading................................................................ 3,542.58
New Bridges.......................-..--.-............................................................... 2,251.94
City's Proportion of Cost of Paving Streets................................................................ 20,148.97
Incinerator Plant Expenditure for Year...................................................................... 43,801.66
Miscellaneous Live Stock, Motor Cars and Other Equipment..................... 14,856.57
Notes Payable for Outlays, Issued Under Prior Administrations........................... 153,663.46
TotaL....-.........--...-.--.....................-..........-...-................ $248,265.18
CITY OF SAVANNAH GEORGIA
Operating Revenues
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Real Estate Taxes.............................................. I 526,079.49
Less Discount............................................... 51,381.37
S 474,698.12
Personal Property Taxes.................................. $ 244,731.34
Less Discount.................................................. 23,684.52
$ 221,046.82
Franchise Taxes................................................. $ 12,662.58
Less Discount................................................ 1,264.75
11,397.83 $ 689,040.57 $ 18,102.20
so
(continued)
Operating Revenues (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Specific Taxes................................. ...................
Less Discount............ ......................................
Near Beer Licenses.............. ..............................
Less Discount.................... ..........................
Badges............................. ....................................
Less Discount.................... ..............................
Chimney Sweeping Fees........................ ...........
Electric Inspection Fees............................. .......
Execution Fees............................ .......................
Less Relieved.............. ....................................
*
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
141,689.50
11,493.05
130,196.45
64,350.00
6,315.00
58,035.00
16,852.50
1,044.60
15,807.90
329.00
1,680.25
2,902.00
1,140.00
1,762.00
$ 127,775.25
$ 66,340.00
$ 15,500.20
132.10
$ 1,678.55
S 1,330.00
$ 2,421.20
$ 307.70
S 196.90
1.70
$ 432.00
$ 8,305.00
s:
I
CO
W7W
I
(continued)
Operating Revenues (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Gas Meter Inspection Fees.. ...........................
Harbor Fees........................................... ....... ....
Jail Fees..............................................................
Plumbing Inspection Fees................................
Pound Fees..........................................................
Sink Cleaning Fees............................................
Less Discount..................................................
Surveying Fees....................................................
Wharfage Fees....................................................
Water Meter Inspection Fees..........................
Ball Permits.......................................................
Moving Furniture Permits...................... ......
Police Court Fines................... ...........................
Police Department Services........... ..............
Rents, Miscellaneous City Property..............
Rents, Municipal Wharves........... ...................
$ 6.00
6,075.76
234.00
1,527.50
398.10
2,644.90
179.04
$ 2,465.86
$ 1,295.00
285.00
1.00
1,350.00
15.50
14,899.80
1,910.00
273.25
110.00
$ 3.00
6,531.71
327.88
1,829.90
326.05
$ 2,414.39
$ 1,276.00
1,442.00
22,871.55
49.00
$ 3.00
72.05
$ 51.47
S 19.00
285.00
1.00
15.50
1,910.00
224.25
110.00
$
455.95
93.88
302.40
$
92.00
7,971.75
SS
I
GO
(continual]
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 77
i
0)
BD
25 1
Pi
bO
-l CO
06 *
J2
O O
oT r-T
1
,.
^
w

1
s
5
is
1
g
-l q
OO
11
<D
ui
o>
*< <O
Oi !> l>-
co oo ^it^
l^ ^t* CO
*& CO CO
t>T oo~ of
T-< CO t-t
<4J

8
^
s I
a
O
la.

II
so
o>
OJ
c^
1
o>s1
us
J.
o it;
CO ON
o^ o oo
i-T t-T
OO
C4
O O C4
O
O) o o co oo
CO O t> r-5 O
rH O OO CO OS
O O 1-1 O I-H
8 rt"^
"S 8 -
w)
S
j* 6
^
fe i^ "**
O g QQ
S Is T3
a a> ,* .g
O J ^
O
3"! .3
I
i-H
06
f-^
CO
(O
t5-
N
O
oo e>
o oi
eT eo~
i-H
' 1V
OJ
Operating Revenues (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Bonaventure Cemetery
Care of Lots........... ............................... ........
Burial Fees......... .......... ........ .. ............... .....
Water Rents....... ..... ...... . ..............................
Miscellaneous....................................:.................
Laurel Grove Cemetery
Burial Fees................. ........................................
Miscellaneous.. ....................... .................. ... ....
Miscellaneous Other Revenues... ........ .............
Total Revenues.... ....................................
$ 3,438.74
643.50
950.08
1,318.64
1,745.50
66.00
1,005.70
$ 1,120,463.28
$ 4,257.03
593.00
666.67
593.99
1,806.45
125.25
$ 1,107,504.46
S
50.50
283.41
724.65
66.00
880.45
$ 12,958.82
$ 818.29
60.95
I
GO
I
i
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
Operating Expenses
General Government
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Executive and Legislative
Salary of Mayor...... ..........................................
Salary of Mayor's Secretary......... ...................
Salaries of Aldermen......................... .........
Salaries of Clerk of Council and Assistant-
Salary and Uniform of Porter................. .........
Office Expenses and Supplies.....:..... .................
Printing and Stationery.......... ..........................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph... ............
Surety Bond Premiums............. ..................
Auditing................................................ .............
Publishing Mayor's Annual Report...... ..........
Publishing Council Proceedings, Etc. ............
Badges............ ......................................................
Miscellaneous Items.... ................. .....................
Salaries of Clerk Commissioners of PilotageTotal.................. .........................................
$ 3,600.00
2,100.00
3,120.00
5,077.50
496.25
260.57
227.75
230.51
31.62
1,623.80
2,106.50
80.50
75.00
$ 19,030.00
$ 3,614.56
2,102.90
3,120.00
4,809.65
510.50
290.78
644.58
355.29
3,497.99
1,355.80
2,116.00
65.35
$ 22,483.40
$
267.85
31.62
268.00
80.50
75.00
$ 14.56
2.90
14.25
30.21
416.83
124.78
3,497.99
9.50
65.35
$ 3,453.40
s
15
(continued)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Finance and Accounts
Year Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Comptroller's Office
Salary of Comptroller...... ... ........................
Salaries of Office Clerks... ...... . .. ....................
Office Expenses and Supplies...... ......... . .......
Printing and Stationery....... ...........................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph.. ...........
Surety Bond Premiums...... ... . ... . ... ..
Total..................................................... ...
$ 3,500.00
1,800.88
15.22
550.35
2.00
19.63
$ 5,888.08
$ 495.82
$ 495.82
$ 3,004.18
1,800.88
15.22
550.35
2.00
19.63
$ 5,392.26
I
CO
55
55
W
s
s
Operating Expenses (continued)
Year Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Treasurer's Office
Salary of Treasurer.......... ..................................
Salaries of Office Clerks...................... ..........
Salaries and Uniform of Porter................. ......
Office Expenses and Supplies........... .............
Printing and Stationery................... ....... ..........
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph..................
Surety Bond Premiums............................. ...
Furniture Repairs and Replacements..........
Badges............................. .. .. .... ................ .
Bond Issue, Advertising, Printing, Etc.. ......
Commission on Coupons.... ...................... .......
Total.................. ........................................
$ 2,500.00
6,236.05
733.75
76.78
822.15
277.68
150.39
10.45
167.04
$ 10,974.29
$ 2,499.85
7,399.90
616.50
158.00
499.58
139.54
223.25
641.95
51.71
$ 12,230.28
$ .15
117.25
322.57
138.14
10.45
167.04
$
1,163.85
81.22
72.86
641.95
51.71
$ 1,255.99
S
I
CO
55
Ik *
3
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Assessment of Taxes
Salaries of Assessors............. ...........................
Salaries of Office Clerks........... ....................
Office Expenses and Supplies........ ...................
Printing and Stationery.............. ...................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph. ................
Surety Bond Premiums............................... ....
Furniture Repairs and Replacements ............
Total....................................... ................
$ 3,785.34
1,102.37
25.40
294.59
172.00
22.22
2.50
$ 5,404.42
$ 4,099.85
700.00
34.90
159.10
50.04
19.25
$ 5,063.14
$
402.37
135.49
121.96
2.97
2.50
$ 341.28
$ 314.51
9.50
I
GO
cj t
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Marshal's Office
Salary of City Marshal ....................................
Salaries of Deputy and Office Clerks...... .......
Office Expenses and Supplies.............. ............. .
Printing and Stationery................................. ...
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph.................
Surety Bond Premiums................................
Stable Expenses.................. ...............................
Maintenance of Equipment........................ ....
Total............................................................
$ 1,800.00
3,948.00
35.95
261.05
100.00
47.53
146.63
35.50
$ 6,374.66
$ 1,807.28
3,788.39
24.89
196.65
140.02
85.50
212.88
$ 6,255.61
$
159.61
11.06
64.40
35.50
$ 119.05
$ 7.28
40.02
37.97
66.25
3ya
00
I
3
8
(confirmed)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Law Department
Salaries of City Attorney and Assistant.... ...
Salary of Special Agent............. ............ .......
Litigation Expense. .......................................
Miscellaneous Items........ .................................
Damage Settlements and Judgments.............
Total...........................................................
Registrations and Elections
Salaries in Re-Registration ............................
Salaries in Re-EIections... ................. ................
Printing and Stationery....................................
Swearing-in Fees.................................... ...........
Total.................. ........................................
$ 3,600.00
40.00
152.65
68.50
1,222.50
$ 5,083.65
$ 3,614.39
520.00
486.30
75.00
2,328.01
$ 7,023.70
$ 203.50
1,115.50
481.17
57.00
S 1,857.17
$ 14.39
480.00
333.65
6.50
1,105.51
$ 1,940.05
$ 203.50
1,115.50
481.17
57.00
f 1,857.17
I
(eonh'nwrf)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Municipal Building
Salary of Custodian.. ........................................
Salary of Engineer..... ... ...................... ..............
Fuel and Lights................. ................ .................
Ice................................ .......................................
Insurance.................. ..........................................
Elevator Operation............. .............. .................
Elevator Maintenance......................................
Building Maintenance.................... ........... .......
Furniture and Fixtures, Repairs and
Replacements................................. ........
City Clock Expense........-........... ...................
Cleaning Expense........................ ......................
Towel Service......................................................
Surety Bond Premiums............. .......................
Salary and Uniform of Porter..........................
Miscellaneous Items...... ............. ...... ........ .........
Total........................ ...................................
S 1,200.00
840.00
821.55}
121.50J
487.31
891.10)
65.87
81.53 1
43.57
300.00
638.77
130.00
5.62
493.75
25.00
$ 6,145.57
$ 1,200.00
898.00
1,109.40
495.00
1,552.75
251.14
308.33
1,436.38
$ 7,251.00
$
58.00
166.35
7.69
595.78
126.04
8.33
143.24
$ 1,105.43
2
I
55
I
(continued)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Courts
Salary of Recorder............. ....... ............
Salary of Clerk... ................. .........................
Printing and Stationery.... ....... ........................
Maintenance of Court Building......... ............
Total.... ......... .......................................
Pensions and Gratuities
Tax Assessors............... .................. .................
Police Department....... ...............................
Fire Department................... ............................
Sanitation and Highways Departments..........
Widows and Orphans, Police and Fire
Departments... ... .. ......................................
Total..........................................................
S 2,500.00
900.00
137.88
82.40
$ 3,620.28
$ 876.67
4,406.41
3,245.00
3,327.72
2,294.00
$ 14,149.80
S 2,499.85
900.00
382.50
52.55
S 3,834.90
$
3,913.03
1,956.25
1,880.03
2,304.00
$ 10,053.31
$ .15
29.85
$ 876.67
493.38
1,288.75
1,447.69
S 4,096.49
$
244.62
$ 214.62
$
10.00
i
GO
(coniinutd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Miscellaneous
Salary of Building Inspector......... ................
Other Building Inspection Expense..... .........
Care of Powder Magazine.................... ...........
total...................... ......................................
Total General Government.... ................
$
$
f
1,500.00
236.66
300.00
2,036.66
78,707.41
$ 1,506.01
163.51
300.00
$ 1,969.52
$ 78,517.85
$
73.15
$ 67.14
$ 189.56
$ 6.01
2
I
GO
I
(continued}
Operating Expenses (continued)
Public Safety
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Police Department
Salary of Chief of Police..... ......... ....................
Salaries of Subordinate Commanding Officers
Salaries of Patrolmen.. .............. ...................
Salaries of Detectives.. .............................
Salaries of Office Clerks........... .....................
Other Salaries............ ... ...............................
Office Expenses and Supplies.... .... .................
Printing and Stationery...................... ... .........
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph.. .... ......
Light and Fuel.... .. ..... . ... ...... . ....... ..... .......
Insurance.... ......... ... .... ....................... .... ...
Surety Bond Premiums... ..............................
Telephone System Maintenance........ .............
$ 2,600.00
16,982.99
93,390.30
9,471.71
1,786.70
4,490.00
87.31
389.12
654.27
897.70
142.64
31.89
1,109.78
$ 2,593.48
15,567.59
84,042.80
6,996.22
900.00
6,672.97
303.76
550.87
298.83
751.21
707.14.
S 6.52
1,415.40
9,347.50
2,475.49
886.70
355 .44
146.49
142.64
31.89
402.64
S
2,182.97
216.45
170.75
00
R 3
(cmtinutd)
Operating Expenses (continued}
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Police Department (continued) ~
Motor Vehicles, Operation......... ......................
Motor Vehicles, Maintenance..........................
Maintenance of Other Vehicles............ ............
Maintenance of Buildings........ .......................
Care of Live Stock............................................
Replacement of Live Stock..... .........................
Care of Uniform Equipment.......... ..................
Replacement of Uniform Equipment..............
Jail Operation............... ...................................
Dog Impounding Expense....... .........................
Police Military Reserve......... ...........................
Traveling Expenses............................................
Equipment and Maintenance Thereof ..........
Furniture Repairs and Replacements ............
Miscellaneous Items.........................................
Total..........................................................
S 878.00
2,630.73
197.90
523.16
6,651.07
345.00
99.85
2,962.61
2,205.80
1,112.83
3,000.00
170.90
754.44
170.75
278.18
$ 164,015.63
$
4,261.56
1,741.95
3,590.13
4,167.28
1,906.44
616.80
2,750.00
452.32
$ 138,880.35
$
197.90
3,060.94
345.00
99.85
299.36
496.03
250.00
170.90
754.44
170.75
$ 15,135.28
$
752.83
1,218.79
1,204.67
174.14

I
CD
f
Operating Expenses (continued)
Public Safety (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Deciease
Fire Department
Salaries of Chief and Assistant... ....................
Salaries of Captains and Lieutenants..... . ......
Salaries of Engineers and Stokers.. ..... ..........
Salaries of Chauffeurs and Drivers ... ............
Salaries of Inspectors...... .............. .. .........
Salaries of Office Clerks...... ............. ..............
Other Salaries.......................... ........................
Office Expenses and Supplies...... ...... ............
Printing and Stationery................ ...................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph... ...........
Light and Fuel................ ........ .........................
Insurance.......... ..................... .......................
Surety Bond Premiums....... ......................
Fire Alarm Expenses.......... ........ ....... .............
$ 5,280.00
20,563.89
9,712.53
2,788.36]
5,898.00
1,498.26
57,796.56.
117.00
280.15
215.66
1,391.63
1.57
21.40
1,034.95
$ 5,278.33
23,549.35
8,317.36
64,129.45
589.51
405.55
142.34
1,138.03
483.26
S 1.67
1,395.17
3,851.73
73.32
253.60
1.57
21.40
551.69
$
2,985.46
472.51
125.40
3
(cmtinutd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Fire Department (continued
Motor-Drawn Apparatus, Operation ............
Motor-Drawn Apparatus, Maintenance ........
Horse-Drawn Apparatus, Maintenance ........
Care of Live Stock................ ................ .........
Replacement of Uniform Equipment..............
Maintenance of Building.. ................................
Furniture Repairs and Replacements............
Medical Attention................ .......... ......... ........
Replacement of Hose... .....................................
Electric Inspection. ...........................................
Chemical Supplies....................................... .......
Chimney Sweeping ............................................
Traveling Expenses............................................
Miscellaneous Items...... ................. ................
Total............................................................
$ 1,072.94]
5,841. 20 [
303.84J
1,504.49
3,882.26
2,214.38
743.75
82.50
2,409.25
1,509.90
177.82
901.18
150.00
793.86.
$ 128,187.33
$
7,084.86
2,541.31
4,655.19
1,265.45
814.10
173.55
750.00
192.77
592.33
384.80
$ 122,487.54
S
133. 12
948.93
743.75
2,235.70
759.90
308.85
150.00
409.06
S 5,699.79
$
1,036.82
772.93
731.60
14.95
i
09
(ctnttnuctO
Operating Expenses (continued) 8
Public Safety (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Board of Health
Salary of Health Officer.. . ... .. ... ...................
Salaries of Office Clerks........ ................
Salary and Uniform of Porter...................... ...
Office Expenses and Supplies............................
Printing and Stationery...... ..............................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph.......... ...... ..
Insurance.. ..........................................................
Sanitary Inspection............................................
Milk Inspection........ . ......................................
Food Inspection.......... ......... ............................
Plumbing Inspection...... . ... .............................
Sink Inspection........................... ....................
Sink Cleaning.......... ............. ..........................
Isolation Cottage Expense.... ......... ...............
$ 3,600,00
2,845.16
493.75
56.36
184.75
173.82
55.01
7,743.79
900.00
3,682.97
1,674.62
899.20
2,429.00
$ 3,600.00
2,700.00
376.50
94.66
361.93
176.27
8,919.53
3,117.75
1,847.97
1,341.00
2,588.64
280.00
$
145.16
117.25
55.01
1,465.22
S
38.30
177.18
2.45
1,175.74
173.35
441.80
159.64
280.00
*
2
I
GQ
(continutd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Board of Health (continued)
Small Pox Hospital, Operation.......... ..............
Small Pox Hospital, Maintenance............. ....
Care of Live Stock............................................
Motor Vehicles, Operation................................
Motor Vehicles, Maintenance........... ..............
Other Vehicles, Maintenance............. ...............
Traveling Expenses....... .....................................
Vaccination Service............................................
Disinfection Service ..........................................
Burial Expense...... ............ .................................
Diphtheria Antitoxin. .......................... .............
Tetanus and Meningitis Serums......... ............
Furniture and Fixtures, Repairs and
Replacements.......... ......................................
Miscellaneous Items.. .....................................
Total.................. ........................................
$ 1.259.981
210.70J
487.36
490.12}
482.87J
112.75
141.70
68.25
2,358.90
136.25
117.50
21.73
55.75
60.55
$ 30,742.74
$
1,485.32
354.25
1,474.83
1,719.08
142.75
229.94
$ 30,810.42
$
133.11
112.75
141.70
68.25
639.82
117.50
21.73
55.75
f
14.74
501.84
6.50
169.39
$ 67.68
S
I
GO
> 2!
2!
3
S
(cmtinutd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Public Safety (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Bacteriological Laboratory
Salaries....... .........................................................
Chemicals...... .....................................................
Library ................................................................
Exhibit at Jacksonville, Fla...... ....... ................
Other Expenses....................... .........................
Total.............. ..............................................
Total Public Safety........................... .......
$ 5,340.00
687.57
480.41
310.86
823.77
7,642.61
$ 38,385.35
$ 320,588.31
$ 5,340.00
240.07
509.01
1,312.70
7,401.78
$ 38,212.20
$ 299,580.09
$
447.50
310.86
240.83
$ 173.15
$ 21,008.22
S
28.80
488.93
058
(eonttntMd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Sanitation
Salary of Chief Engineer, Proportion.............. $ 1,800.00
Other General Salaries...................................... 6,177.50
Cleaning Sheet Asphalt Streets........................ 8,575.03
Cleaning Other Paved Streets........................ 24,335.25
Cleaning Unpaved Streets and Lanes............ 8,242.64
Garbage Collection........................................... 36,757.90
Garbage Disposal.............................................. 2,282.23
Incinerator Operation........................................ 13,040.96
Incinerator Maintenance.............................. 1,213.75
Clinker Disposal................................................ 1,099.06
Weighing Refuse and Delivery to Hoppers.. 1,066.75
Steam Furnished Waterworks Credit............ *4,403.00
Maintenance of Equipment.......-............ 9,493.41
Maintenance of Storm Sewers......................... 2,330.09
Care of Live Stock....................................... 18,734.19
Replacement of Live Stock.......-............. 3,839.16
2
I
CO
fc
s
Deduction (continutd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Sanitation (continued)
Dry Culture Expense...................................... $ 7,824.60
Sprinkling Streets............................................. 1,008.77
Sweeping Crossings........................................... 2,229.25
Oiling Catch Basins.......................................... 1,180.25
Cleaning Catch Basins...................................... 5,845.02
Garbage Disinfection........................................ 69.60
Maintenance of Sanitary Sewers.................... 4,943.20
Cutting Weeds................................................... 1,519.70
Insurance........................................................... 508.92
Miscellaneous Items......................................... 29.00
Total.........-..................................................! 159,743.23
K
I
01
(eonKmurf)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Departments Under Supervision
of Chief Engineer (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Highways
Salary of Chief Engineer, Proportion.............. $ 2,400.00
Engineering and Surveying, Salaries.............. 7,042.75
Engineering and Surveying, Supplies.............. 185.39
Other General Salaries...................................... 4,837.50
Printing and Stationery................................... 377.45
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph.................. 190.07
Office Supplies and Expenses........................... 112.75
Insurance............................................................ 135.10
Surety Bond Premiums.................................... 23.78
Street Lighting.................................................... 45,049.84
Ornamental Street Post Lighting.................... 1,973.14
Maintenance of Streets and Lanes.................. 9,378.38
Resurfacing Unpaved Streets and Lanes...... 8,042.50
Maintenance of Bridges................................... 598.67
Maintenance of Equipment ............................; 3,383.46
Motor Vehicles, Operation................................ 69.73
Motor Vehicles, Maintenance.......................... 159.65
Care of Live Stock............................................ 8,439.01
Replacement of Live Stock.............................. 1,741.34
Traveling Expenses............................................ 75.00
2
I
*?
CO
55
cj
lf
3
(cmtinutd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Highways (continued)
Furniture and Fixtures, Repairs and
Replacements................ .........$ 42.50
Placing Catch Basins........... .................. 112.05
Construction of Crossings.... ...................... 987.97
Grading Streets with GravelCity's
Proportion .................................................... 2,898.37
Salary and Uniform of Porter........................ 493.75
Miscellaneous Items....................................... 564.05
Total... .........................................................^ 99,314.20
City Stables and Shops
Salary of Chief Engineer, Proportion.............. $ 600.00
Other General Salaries...................................... 1,205.00
Stables, Operation and Maintenance ............
Shops, Operation and Maintenance................
Maintenance of Buildings.............................. 106.44
Insurance............................................................ 160.48
Miscellaneous Items....................................... 5.36
Total............................................................! 2,077.28
3
f?
en
ira
I
Operating Expenses (continued)
Departments Under Supervision
of Chief Engineer (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Harbor and Wharves
Salaries of Harbor Master and Clerk........ ......
Office Expenses and Supplies...................... ......
Boat Expenses and Supplies.... .......................
Municipal Wharves, Repairs...... ............. .........
Total............................................................
Board of Purchase
Stationery and Printing, Postage and Other
Office Supplies............. ...................................
Total Chief Engineer's Departments......
$
*
$
$
2,700.00
235.09
506.42
279.63
3,721.14
46.93
264,902.78 $ *268,186.40 S 3,283.62
S
IGO
55
I
The expenwi for -1914 having been recorded on a different bans from 1913, it is not practicable
to make a companion, that would be of value, except of the total.
(continued)
Operating Expenses (continued)
8
Charities and Corrections
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Charities
Outdoor Poor Relief ....................................
Poor in Institutions......... .......................... .
Contributions to Associations.......... ... ........ .
Contributions to Hospitals, White......... ....
Contributions to Hospitals, Colored.... .........
City Physician Salaries.....................................
Donations for Purpose of Tax Payments......
Total............................................................
$ 678.95
1,260.00
2,640.00
9,546.66
5,400.00
3,000.00
4,192.06
$ 26,717.67
$ 642.90
935.00
3,225.00
9,000.00
5,400.00
3,003.03
$ 22,205.93
$ 36.05
325.00
546.66
4,192.06
$ 4,511.74
$
585.00
3.03
(continued)
2
I
GO
Operating Expenses (continued)
Charities and Corrections (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Dispensary
Salaries..... ......;. ........ .......... ............. .......
Rent..................... ...... ..........................................
Medicines............ ...............................................
Other Expenses......... ........ .................................
Total..... ............... .....-........................-
Corrections
Industrial Farm.......... ......... ..............................
Total Charities and Corrections... ...........
$
S
$
$
$
1,920.00
480.00
1,953.09
141.96
4,495.05
31,212.72
3,600.00
34,812.72
$ 4,258.63
$ 26,464.56
$ 3,562.00
$ 30,026.56
S 236.42
$ 4,748.16
$ 38.00
$ 4,786.16
g
I
GO
3
(continued)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Recreation and Education
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Parks
Daffin Park................................. .........................
Other Parks and Squares.... ..............................
Tree Planting......................................................
Total...........................................................
Education
Public Library, White......................................
Public Library, Colored.... ................................
Total................................................... .......
Playgrounds
Salary of Director............................... ...............
Other Salaries and Labor..................................
Expenses and Supplies......................................
Total............................................................
Total Recreation and Education............
1
I
$
$
$
$
$
500.00
14,806.82
999.98
16,306.80
10,000.00
360.00
10,360.00
2,049.96
4,050.03
524.51
6,624.50
33,291.30
S 17,773.23
S 9,999.96
360.00
$ 10,359.96
S 28,133.19
t .04
t 04
$ 6,624.50
$ 5,158.11
$ 1,466.43
S
Operating Expenses (continued)
Publicity and Advertising
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
National Drainage Congress............................
National Association of Commission
Merchants.............................................. ........
United States Chamber of Commerce............
Georgia State Industrial College......................
Entertainment Government Engineer............
Entertainment Shriners and Publicity...........
Annual Convention United Daughters of
Confederacy............................... ..................
Establishment in Savannah of Regional
T^pRPTVf "R fin Ic
Establishment in Savannah of District
Lighthouse..... ......... .................... .......... ..........
Total Publicity and Avertising....... .........
$ 989.07
92,00
176.65
300.00
245.28
2,103.74
1,000.00
750.00
601.35
$ 6,258.09 $ *1,600.00 $ 4,658.09
2
I
i.j
3
SS
*See 1013 Heport {or corresponding details. (continued)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Municipal Industries
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Waterworks Department
Salary of Superintendent....... .......................
Salaries of Office Clerks .................................
Inspection Salaries....................................... ...
Office Expenses and Stationery.....................
Printing and Supplies....... .................................
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph........... .......
Insurance............................................................
Surety Bond Premiums.... ...............................
OperationGwinnettSt. Pumping Station
Fuel......................................................................
Fuel Handling.. ..................................................
Lubricants and Waste..... .................................
Wages.........................................-....................
Other Expenses... ...............................................
Steam Furnished by Incinerator.............. ........
$ 2,000.00
2,625.00
7,561.79
98.76
296.20
295.00
201.87
12.27
13,875.85)
284.20
852.09
13,787.75
72.89
4,403.00
$ 2,000.00
1,500.00
7,205.53
246.20
279.25
130.02
$
1,125.00
356.26
16.95
164.98
201.87
12.27
$
147.44 I
(tontinutd)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Waterworks Department (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Operating River Pumping Station
Fuel.................:.. ................................................
Lubricants and Waste......................................
Wages............................. ....................................
Other Expenses........ ................................. .........
Maintenance Gwinnett St. Pumping Station
Wages................ .................................................
Material......... ............................. ........................
Maintenance River Pumping Station
W&ges... ..............................................................
Material..............................................................
S 4,406.16
123.05
8,674.05
141.50
1,700.53]
8.55
304.68J
$
46,245.72 374.82
$
IGO
(ronh'nuW)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Waterworks Department (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Maintenance Distribution System I
Wages.................................................... ........... $ 3,675.78
Material......................A...... .............................! 162.22 i
Tools, Repairs and Replacements .................. 30.08
Care of Live Stock......... .............................. 515.20
Traveling Expenses........................................... 100.00
Meter Service Expenses................................... 1,045.25
Maintenance of Vehicle Equipment.............. 55.13
Plumbing and Turn Cock Expenses................ 1,095.00
7,817.86
479.84
944.44
1,467.00
35.36
100.00
100.81
55.13
1,936.02
372.00
Z
i
50
CO
(continued)
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Waterworks Department (continued)
Furniture nd Fixtures, Repairs and
Replacements ................................................
Miscellaneous Items................. .........................
Total Waterworks Department.. . ...........
Bonaventure Cemetery......................................
Laurel Grove Cemetery.. .................................
$
$
$
$
$
46.50
21.03
68,471.38
6,904.86
6,191.01
$
$
$
S
192.75
68,508.61
8,226.00
6,145.20
$ 46.50
$ 45.81
$ 171.72
$ 37.23
$ 1,321.14
s
I
CO
25d
&
(continued)
Municipal Industries
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
City Market
Salaries of Superintendent and Assistant... .
Printing, Stationery and Office Supplies .....
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph. ..........
Insurance............................. ...........................
Surety Bond Premiums ..................................
Light and Water ..............................................
Maintenance of Buildings........ ....................
Repairs to Roof..................................... ...........
Maintenaifce of Equipment..............................
Cleaning Expenses......... .... .. ............................
Miscellaneous Items. .....................................
Total...................... . ................. .............
Total Municipal Industries......................
$ 2,865,00
150.17
40.00
8.04
1,577.12
145.451
825.00]
35.55
2,811.05
.60
$ 8,457.98
$ 90,025.23
$ 2,633.96
110.75
40.02
1,534.75
858.53
3,401.10
189.25
$ 8,768.36
$ 91,648.17
$ 231.04
39.42
8.04
42.37
111.92
35.55
$
.02
590.05
188.65
$ 310.38
% 1,622.94
I
Operating Expenses (continued)
Years Ending December 31
1914 1913 Increase Decrease
Recapitulation
General Government.......... ................................
Public Safety.. ................................................
Departments Under Supervision of Chief
Engineer............................................. .............
Charities and Corrections...... ..........................
Recreation and Education.............. ............ ......
Publicity and Advertising....... ... .. ..................
Municipal Industries......... ................... ..............
Total Operating Expenses.... ..................
$ 78,707.41
320,588.31
264,902.78
34,812.72
33,291.30
6,258.09
90,025.23
$ 828,585.84
$ 78,517.85
299,580.09
268,186.40
30,026.56
28,133.19
1.600,00
91,648.17
$ 797,692.26
$ 189.56
21,008.22
4,786.16
5,158.11
4,658.09
$ 30,893.58
$
3,283.62
1,622.94
s
CO
s

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
POLICE DEPARTMENT
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
FOR THE YEAR
1914
M. L. MELDRIM
CHIEF OF POLICE

HEADQUARTERS POLICE DEPARTMENT
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor, and
The Board of Aldermen of the City of Savannah.
Gentlemen:
I have the honor to transmit to you my second Annual
Report for the Savannah Police Department for the year
1914, including tabulated statistics showing the routine work
of the department.
The total number of arrests last year was 10,461. Of
these 202 were sentenced and the sentence suspended, 4,012
were sentenced, and 3,838 were dismissed. The others were
turned over to higher courts or otherwise disposed of.
The number of arrests in 1913 was 11,363. The difference is almost entirely due to the smaller number of cases
made for violations of the traffic ordinance, the traffic conditions being improved to a marked degree.
A considerable proportion of cases shown as arrests were
docket cases where no arrests were made, though they were
classed as arrests, and being for minor violations of the city
ordinances, the offenders were not arrested but were summoned to police court by subpoena. These docket cases
were often made against reputable citizens and the disposition
of these had a large bearing on the proportion of cases dismissed as against those sentenced.
114_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
This proportion of cases dismissed is not peculiar to last
year, but a discussion of the situation is warranted by the
fact that some criticism, which grew out of a misunderstanding
of the situation, has been expressed in the belief that arrests,
or cases classed as arrests, were frivolously made.
Apart from the docket cases, or cases made by subpoena,
it is true that a considerable number of arrests are followed
by the offender being dismissed after a hearing in police
court. I believe this is not any more true of Savannah than
other cities. That it is also not peculiar to the petty cases
disposed of in police court, but extends to the more grave
violations of the law tried in the higher courts all over the
land, I am convinced by the periodic expressions of the press
condemning this lack of convictions.
With these, police departments have nothing to do. The
scope of the police department is limited to the making of
docket cases where proper cause is shown for a hearing of a
case for a violation of a city ordinance, and the making of an
arrest where it appears a law has been violated. I refer, of
course, now, only to the making of cases for trial and not to
the general duties of the department. The police officer
cannot try a case. That is left for the judiciary. Circumstances of justification, or other things, even if brought to
the attention of the officer, will not permit him to ignore the
case. The docket case or arrest must be made and the justice
of the cause left to the court which passes upon it.
As in cases of the kind most commonly tried in police
courts the Recorder has a wide discretion. The exercise of
this varies as widely as the personalities of those who sit on
the bench. Varying reasons that grow out of humanity or
well directed leniency properly cause to be released without
punishment many who have violated the law or the ordinances.
No well-thinking citizen can therefore even remotely condemn
a police department for frivolous arrests with only the figures
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________115
showing a comparison of discharges with the number of
arrests before him.
While the progress of the department has been satisfactory, and I find much to commend in the work of the men
during the year, I feel that with an eye to the future the needs
of the department in a physical way should in a measure be
again laid before you.
For the first time in many years the estimate from this
department in December, for the following year's expenditures
to be appropriated in the budget, failed to contain a request
for a new station house. This was not because the need was
any less felt, but it was understood the money would not be
available. The station house where the prisoners are kept is
by far less commodious and comfortable than should be. A
new, modern and sanitary one should be provided as soon as
council can see its way clear to do so. The same state of
affairs exists as regards the building used as a stable. A
heating plant and the remodeling of the main building, known
as "The Barracks," is desirable, the first from a standpoint
of economy, and the second in order that the needs of the
early future may be met.
The department is also in need of the establishment of
a Bertillon finger print and photograph outfit, and a man to
operate it. Independently of this is needed a small printing
outfit for the getting out of circulars which it is very often
necessary to send out on short notice.
I feel it my duty to strongly urge the changing of the
age limit at which men are appointed to the department.
Some five years ago this was changed from 35 years to 40
years. I believe it should be changed back to 35 years.
I find that the men who are appointed near the 40-year
mark are not so able to adapt themselves to the conditions
110_____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
which are met in police work, nor are they at that stage of
life able to be shaped into as competent and efficient policemen as younger men.
Again, a man appointed a policeman at 40 years, as a rule,
becomes unfit for the work after a period of about ten years,
but a man who is appointed at 35 or younger can efficiently
perform the work at an age where the man who came on the
department too late in life is useless for police duty. It is
obvious that the changing of the regulation placing the age
line at 35 years rather than at 40 will be an advantage to the
city from a standpoint of efficiency and financially as well.
With the great number of applications that are made for
places on the department there will be no trouble in getting
acceptable men at the younger age, and no more men will be
disappointed in not getting places on this force. Police work,
I take it, is no work for cast-offs who have failed in other
vocations, or men who, desiring to do work of this sort, have
put off the time until their usefulness is lessened. Along
with my recommendation for a lower age limit goes that
for more strict physical requirements, and a more rigid enforcement of them.
On the other hand, a man who enters the police department as a vocation, as he would any other work, should be
protected in his position until grounds of incompetency or
neglect of duty warrant his dismissal. For this reason, I am
an advocate of the Civil Service for police departments and
will welcome the day when it is inaugurated in Savannah.
Throughout the year the loyalty of the men to their
duty and to the department has been a source of satisfaction
to me and has resulted in an increased efficiency for public
service. I desire to render this acknowledgment to both
officers and men who have performed their duties well and
diligently. Some have been deserving of notice for meritorious
service which has been given them throughout the year.
______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 117
Among the noticable improvements in department work
during the year was the establishment of the Motorcycle
Emergency Sub-Station in Thomas Park. Men on duty
there at all hours of the day and night have answered emergency calls from the southern section, while motorcycle men
on duty at headquarters have performed similar service for
the northern section of the city. This branch of the work of
the department has received what I believe to be well merited
compliments from many of our citizens who have been served.
As soon as funds are available another sub-station should be
established in the east side or Collinsville section. Other
cities are following our lead in this method of police protection with the knowledge that it is an important adjunct in
giving quick service to citizens threatened or in distress.
There has been a noticable betterment of the Gamewell
System during the year, due to the improvements which have
been made by Mr. T. P. Sandiford, Superintendent of Fire
Alarm and Telegraph, assisted by Mr. E. H. Todd, who was
appointed Assistant during the year. These improvements are
specified by Mr. Sandiford in his report which is attached.
I desire to commend Mr. Sandiford for his competent work
and unfailing diligence.
The figures setting out the work of the detective department show a very high percentage of lost and stolen property
recovered, as well as other efficient work. During the last
year two men were added to this department, and to the
increased number of men I believe is part due the better
showing made. I regret that the force could not be increased
somewhat this year as there is still need for more men in
this department. Commendation is due Chief Detective
J. J. Murphy for the efficient handling of this department,
and to the men under him.
I desire to extend my acknowledgments for the kindness,
consideration and assistance rendered me during the year
118 ___ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
by His Honor, The Mayor, the members of City Council and
the Police Committee, and to His Honor, Judge John E.
Scnwarz, Recorder of Police Court.
It is with regret that I have to chronicle the death of
Patrolman C. A. Smoak during the year. A page of this
report is set aside in his memory. No injuries of importance
occurred to the members of the department during the year.
The stock was also remarkably free from injuries, these being
confined to minor things like the picking up of nails, etc.,
which were treated successfully and no losses resulted.
Very respectfully,
M. L. MELDRIM,
Chief of Police.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 119
REPORT ON GAMEWELL SYSTEM
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. M. L. MELDRIM, Chief of Police,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to make the following report:
The condition of the Police Signal System is practically
the same as shown in my 1913 report.
The addition of Box 41, which has been added in the
Motorcycle Emergency Sub-Station in Thomas Park, and the
moving of box 44 from River and Water Streets to Reynolds
and Forty-seventh Streets has necessitated the use of 5,400
feet of overhead wire, 12 cross arms with pins and glasses
and other minor fittings.
On September 1st, the position of Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Telegraph was created, and Mr. E.
H. Todd appointed to fill the place. Since his appointment,
Mr. Todd has shown both capability and a conscientious
attention to duty.
During the year the overhead equipment has been considerably improved by restringing wires, changing boxes and
routes where trees and high voltage conductors interfered
with or endangered the service. As a result there have been
fewer interruptions than previously experienced. There is
yet, however, need for further improvement on this line and
120 ________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
the same needs as shown in previous reports prevail in connection with the underground cables.
A new tape register is one of the urgent needs, as the
entire system is dependent on this one piece of apparatus,
which is frequently in need of repairs.
Extensions of the system, including additional boxes for
the outlying districts, are much needed. These can be installed during the coming year without additional help if
funds for the necessary purchases are available.
Respectfully,
T. P. SANDIFORD,
Superintendent Fire Alarm and Telegraph.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 121
POLICE GAMEWELL TELEGRAPH BOXES
First Circuit
12 Bay and Habersham
13 Bay and Randolph
14 Bay and East Broad
15 Bay and Drayton
22 Broughton and East Broad
24 Congress and Bull
25 President and Randolph
31 York and Bull
45 Indian and Fahm
51 Bay and West Broad
53 Broughton and West Broad
144 City Market
Second Circuit
21 Bay and Schwarz Avenue
23 Oglethorpe Avenue and East Broad
32 Anderson and Waters Road
33 Liberty and Randolph
43 Oglethorpe Avenue and Fahm
54 Broughton and Fahm
121 Oglethorpe Avenue and West Broad
122 Louisville Road and Dooley Avenue
125 Liberty and West Broad
133 Charlton and Jefferson
215 Liberty and East Broad
314 Wheaton and Waters Road
122_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Third Circuit
123 Gwinnett and Stiles Avenue
124 Gwinnett and Magnolia
131 Union Station
132 Cohen and West Boundary
152 Gaston and West Broad
212 Gaston and Whitaker
221 Gwinnett and West Broad
242 Gwinnett and East Broad
243 Jones and East Broad
312 Gaston and Lincoln
313 Hartridge and East Broad
321 Bolton and Atlantic Avenue
Fourth Circuit
34 Estill Avenue and Waters Road
35 Park Avenue and East Broad
42 Forty-second and Montgomery
52 Estill Avenue and Bull
213 Park Avenue and West Broad
214 Anderson and West Broad
322 Park Avenue and Abercorn
323 Henry and Bull
331 Anderson and East Broad
341 Thirty-eighth and East Broad
412 Thirty-sixth and Ogeechee Road
413 Thirty-sixth and Bull
44 Reynolds and Forty-seventh
41 Motorcycle Sub-station, Thomas Park
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 123
AMBULANCE CALLS
1914
January..............................................
February............................................
March................................................
April..................................................
May.............................. ................. .....
June....................................................
July....................................................
August................ .............................. ..
September....... ...................................
October..............................................
November.................. ........................
December..................... .....................
Total..........................................
WHITE
32
38
51
37
38
35
46
51
32
37
34
37
468
COLORED
46
59
52
48
43
66
58
64
46
49
64
72
667
TOTAL
78
97
103
85
81
101
104
115
78
86
98
109
1,135
124 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
GAMEWELL CALLS AND PRIVATE
TELEPHONE CALLS
1914
January.................
February................
March..... ...........
April.......... ....... .......
May.......... .............
June......... ...... .........
July............ ...........
August. .................
September..............
October..................
November....... .......
December..............
Total..............
WAGON
Gmewell
Box
290
262
297
293
284
184
346
363
299
285
318
358
3,579
CALLS
Private
Phone
82
90
84
114
94
91
100
123
101
113
113
113
1,218
RETURN
Gamewell
Box
285
281
304
278
105
292
371
369
316
293
311
366
3,571
r CALLS
Private
Phone
60
44
35
75
46
48
57
91
60
95
107
83
801
REPORTS
18,560
18,121
19,567
17,933
16,241
17,030
17,493
17,402
19,293
24,781
18,501
19,509
225,431
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 125
REPORT OF POLICE SURGEON
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. M. L. MELDRIM, Chief of Police,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to advise you herewith of the number of visits
made to prisoners at the Police Station-house, and the members of the Police Department, during the year 1914.
Visits to Patrolmen......................... 142
Visits to Prisoners............................ 156
Very respectfully,
JAMES E. MORRISON,
City Physician and Acting Police Surgeon.
126 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Report of Police Surgeon (continued)
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. M. L. MELDRIM, Chief of Police,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to advise you herewith of the number of visits
made to prisoners at the Police Station-house, and to members of the Police Department during the year 1914.
Visits to Patrolmen.......................... 184
Visits to Prisoners................... 206
t
Very respectfully,
L. J. CHEDEL,
City Physician and Acting Police Surgeon.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 127
MATRON'S REPORT
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. M. L. MELDRIM, Chief of Police,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit the following report showing the number
of white girls and women who came under my charge during
the year 1914, and the disposition of the cases.
Very respectfully,
Mrs. L. E. FISHER,
Matron.
January.................... 10 July............................ 5
February.................. 7 August....................... 9
March...................... 14 September.................. 22
April.......................... 9 October...................... 9
May.......................... 8 November.................. 15
June.......................... 6 December.................. 17
Total.................................................................. 131
Disposition of Above Gases
Dismissed.................................................................. 28
Sentenced.................................................................. 45
Sentenced and Sentence Suspended............. 2
Released............................................................. 28
(Continued on following pa#)
128_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
Matron's Report (continued)
Deported by U. S. Authorities................................ 1
Remanded to City Court........................................ 5
Remanded to Superior Court................................ 2
Turned over to U. S. Authorities.......................... 2
Turned over to Other Authorities.......................... 1
Turned over to Probation Officer.......................... 5
Turned over to Parents.......................................... 2
Turned over to Husband........................................ 1
Sent Home................................................................ 1
Sent out of City...................................................... 3
Provided with a Home............................................ 1
Sent to the Crittenden Home................................ 1
Used as a Witness.................................................... 3
Total................................................................. 131
MAYOR'S ANNUAL HEPORT 120
DOG CATCHER'S REPORT
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. M. L. MELDRIM, Chief of Police,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I respectfully beg to render the following report as to
the number of dogs caught, killed and released, and the
amount of cash collected during the year 1914.
Very respectfully,
W. W. THOMSON,
Dog Catcher.
January........................Ill
February...................... 78
March............................ 64
April.............................. 63
May.............................. 75
June.............................. 75
July................................ 68
August.......................... 37
September.................... 69
October.......................... 79
November.................... 68
December...................... 60
Totals._.................847 410 341 $293.00
Dogs on hand January 1, 1915............13
is Dogs Dogs
jht Killed Released
L 48
$ 31
t 26
! 32
i 52
> 51
$ 35
' 24
) 38
) 26
\ 22
) 25
47
37
19
18
15
17
27
13
26
49
46
27
Cash
Received
$ 43.00
31.00
17.00
18.00
15.00
15.00
27.00
13.00
23.00
36.00
34.00
21.00
130 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
INVENTORY POLICE DEPARTMENT PROPERTY
JANUARY 1, 1915
Buildings......................................... $50,000.00 $50,000.00
Land............................................. 25,000.00 25,000.00
Gamewell System
Operated jointly by Police and Fire Departments; value
of Police Department's portion only shown.
Batteries, Racks, extra parts............ $ 670.00
Charging Board, Operating Board
Inter-Connections, extra parts...... 1,800.00
50 Street Boxes, extra parts.............. 7,600.00
4 Desk Telephone Sets, 1 Gong Indicator, Inter-Connections ............ 230.00
89,900 feet Overhead Wire........ 899.00
24 Street Manholes ............................ 600.00
8,375 feet Undergorund Conduits.. 2,093.75
60 Iron Posts with Box Attachments 750.00
2,700 feet 15 pairs Underground
Cable................................................ 540.00
2,700 feet 10 pairs Underground
Cable................................................ 455.00
2,700 feet 6 pairs Undergorund Cable 229.50
15,400 feet 5 pairs Underground
Cable ................................... 1,078.00
33,400 feet 3 pairs Underground
Cable................................................ 1,670.00
100 Iron Posts Top Fixtures ............ 100.00
362 Cross Arm Outfits, complete .... 181.00
___ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________ 131
Inventory (continued)
Outlet Boxes, Pipes and Fittings...... 250.00
Extra Material on Hand.................... 100.00
Tools and Appliances ........................ 50.00 $19,296.25
Live Stock
30 Horses, at $150.00 each................ $4,500.00 $ 4,500.00
Material and Supplies
2 Tons Coal.......................................... 12.00
70 Bales of Hay.................................. 70.00
Stationery.............................................. 15.00
12 Buckets............................................ 4.00
10 Brooms ............................................ 5.00
4 Cans Stove Polish............................ .40
1 Case Soap........................................ 3.50
^ Case Washing Powders.................. 1.00
| Case Bon Ami.................................. 1.00
Potash.................................................. .75
1 Box Starch........................................ 1.50
2 Bottles Blueing.................................. .10
2 Brushes.............................................. .25
Clothes Pins.......................................... .10
24 Face Towels.................................... 6.00
36 Bath Towels.................................... 7.00
36 Sheets, Patrolmen's Beds.............. 8.00
32 Sheets, Prisoner's Beds.................. 6.00
35 Yards of Sheeting.......................... 3.50
20 Yards Bunting................................ 1.00
1 Box Tape Register Paper................ 10.00
6 Extra Automobile Tires.................. 275.00
20 Gallons Automobile Oil.................. 8.40
25 Gallons Motorcycle Oil........... 10.00
Dope Grease for Automobiles 100 Ibs 8.00
20 Gallons Disinfectants.................... 10.00 $ 361.50
132_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Inventory (continued)
Furniture and Fixtures
4 Roll Top Desks................................ $ 100.00
5 Small Flat Top Desks...................... 25.00
1 Flat Top Desk Standing.................. 7,00
1 Wood Filing Cabinet._................. 10.00
2 Small Wood Filing Cabinets.......... 5.00
1 Remington Typewriter.................... 50.00
1 Smith Typewriter............................ 90.00
2 Prisoner's Property Cabinets.Wood 30.00
105 Clothes Lockers............................ 262.00
3 Large Tables-.-...-.-..-.-......-..-.. 50.00
6 Small Tables.-............................. 15.00
8 Revolving Desk Chairs........ 40.00
90 Chairs.......................................... 90.00
2 Kerosene Oil Heaters-. 12.00
2 Electric Heaters.................. 20.00
7 Heating Stoves. 35.00
1 Cook Stove and Utensils........ 5.00
3 Clocks............-.. 15.00
2 Wooden Cabinets.. 10.00
I Medicine Cabinet and Contents.... 5.00
6 Electric Fans....... 50.00
2 Art Squares....... 25-00
II Rugs--.-... 25.00
20 Cuspidors for Offices.. 5.00
30 Wooden Cuspidors for Prisoners.. 5.00
2 Book Cases........... 12.00
2 Metal Filing Cases.____.............. 40-00
1 Combination Metal Filing Case.... 100.00
5 Desk Portable Lights.... 10.00
1 Metal Clothes Locker.. 20.00
1 Warrant Case-..... 2.00
4 Water Coolers-....... 15.00
1 Mimeograph Machine....... 5.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 133
Inventory (continued)
20 Window Shades......-....-.....-....-.- 5-00
Floor Coverings, Linoleum................ 20.00
2 Pairs Handcuffs................................ 5.00
15 Blankets, Officers' Beds................ 15.00
40 Blankets, Prisoners' Beds............ 30.00
7 Beds, 7 Mattresses, 16 Pairs Pillows, Officers' Beds........................ 25.00
29 Mattresses, 11 Iron Cots, 17
Pillows, Prisoners'.......................... 50.00 $ 691.00
Rolling Stock
1 Automobile Patrol Wagon (White) $2,300.00
1 Automobile Ambulance (White).... 2,500.00
1 Automobile Touring Car (Hudson) 1,500.00
7 Motorcycles.................................. 1,000.00
2 Horse-Drawn Patrol Wagons.......... 65.00
1 Horse-Drawn Ambulance............ 75.00
1 Dog Catchers' Wagon .................... 20.00
1 Buckboard.................................... 100.00
1 Supply Wagon.................................. 25.00
2 Bicycles.............................................. 15.00 $ 7,600.00
Equipment
5 Sets Single Harness.......................... 35.00
2 Sets Double Harness........................ 30.00
35 Saddles:............................................. 200.00
35 Bridles.............................................. 75.00
32 Saddle Blankets and Covers........ 225.00
42 Stall Halters.................................... 25.00
5 Shovels._......................................... 3.00
1 Platform Scale.................................. 5.00
134_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Inventory (continued)
1 Bowser Gas Tank............................ 200.00
3 Oil Tanks..._................................... 20.00
2 Wheelbarrows.................................... 5.00 $ 823.00
Uniform Equipment
Collars and Gloves on Hand.............. $ 95.00
50 Webb Cartridge Belts.................... 15.00
133 Helmet Wreathes......................... 66.00
144 Badges............................................ 72.00
94 Club Sockets................................ 23.50
115 Clubs.............................................. 57.50
118 Whistles............................... 25.00
115 Uniforms.................................... 575.00
120 Uniforms........................................ 1,440.00
126 Overcoats...................-........ 1,260.00
107 Black Hats................................ 100.00
107 Helmets.................................... 80.00
23 Caps................................. 15.00
133 Pistol Holsters.............................. 33.25
97 Belts._.........-.............-. 50.00
23 Pairs Spurs...................................... 10.00
30 Pairs Puttees.................................. 30.00
62 Springfield Rifles and Bayonets .. 124.00
42 Winchesters (38 Caliber)._........... 336.00
125 Revolvers.................................. 1,250.00
30 Sabers...................................... 15.00
Ammunition on Hand........................ 10.00 $ 2,363.25
Grand Total.......................................... $113,699.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______ 135
EXPENDITURES OF POLICE DEPARTMENT
YEAR 1914
Operating Expenses
Salary of Chief of Police.......................................... $ 2,600.00
Salary of Subordinate Commanding Officers........ 16,982.99
Salary of Patrolmen.................................................. 93,390.30
Salary of Detectives.................................................. 9,471.71
Salary of Office Clerks.............................................. 1,786.70
Other Salaries.............................................................. 4,490.00
Office Expenses and Supplies.................................. 57.31
Printing and Stationery._......................................... 389.12
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph ........................ 654.27
Light and Fuel............................................................ 897.70
Insurance.................................................................... 142.64
Surety Bond Premiums............................................ 31.89
Telephone SystemOperation and
Maintenance...................................................... 1,109.78
Motor VehiclesOperation..................................... 578.00
Motor VehiclesMaintenance ................................ 2,630.73
Maintenance of Other Vehicles .............................. 197.90
Maintenance of Buildings........................................ 523.16
Care of Live Stock.................................................... 6,651.07
Replacement of Live Stock...................................... 345.00
Care of Uniform Equipment.................................... 99.85
Replacement of Uniform Equipment..................... 2,962.61
Jail Operation............................................................ 2,205.80
Dog Impounding Expense........................................ 1,112.83
Police Military Reserve............................................ 3,000.00
Traveling.................................................................... 170.90
Equipment and Maintenance Thereof .................. 754.44
Furniture Repairs and Replacement...................... 170.75
Miscellaneous Items ................................................ 278.18
Total Operating Expenses............................. $154,015.63
136 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CHANGES IN DEPARTMENT DURING 1914
Promoted
Private J. F. Bentley..................to................................Detective
Private J. P. DeLeon..................to..........Detective
Private H. Center........................to...........................Sergeant
Appointments
J. A- Woods........................................................ Third Lieutenant
J. H. Bunger........................................................................Private
M. F. Clark.......................................... ..Private
A. C. Clark................................................Private
M. S. Cowart.............................. ......Private
M. F. Davis..........................................Private
H. A. Heape.............................................Private
D. D. Miles............................................Private
J. H. Monsees..-..........................................Private
Gus Smith-..........-..........Private
P. P. Turner.....................................................Private
F. S- Freeman.........................................................Private
E. H. Henry................................ ..Private
W. D. Kennedy......................................Private
H. H. Price......-..-......-..-...-..-...-..-........Private
W. L. Roberts..........................-.................Private
E. H. Todd...................Assistant Electrician
W. W. Thomson......................Dog Catcher
R. Lockett (c)..............Assistant Dog Catcher
Resignations
W. B. Brooks..........-...........-.-...-..............Private
M. Goslee....................................... ..Private
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________137
Changes in Department (continued')
W. C. Hendry-.....................................,.............................Private
P. H. Moehrke..............................................................Private
H. E. Sharpe........................................................................Private
V. H. Wortham....................................................................Private
Dismissals
J. McCool..........................................................................Sergeant
J. H. Bunger........................................................................ Private
D. C. Boulware..................................................................Private
J. P. Caras............................................................................Private
A. T. Neal............................................................................Private
J. B. Barthelmess.............................................................Private
B. F. Saddler._.-......................................-..........................Private
J. R. Tucker.................................................................Private
J. J. Gill...................................................................Dog Catcher
George Roberts (c)..........................Assistant Dog Catcher
Reappointments
J. J. Doherty........................................................Private
M. Goslee................................................... ......Private
C. M. Malphus....................................................................Private
J. Poulos..............................................................................Private
M. C. Gallaher...........................................................Private
J. Guilfoyle.... .................................................................Private
Deaths
C. A. Smoak.................................................................Private
138 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
SALARIES PAID MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT
1 Cbief................................................at...................... $2,600.00
1 First Lieutenant..............at...................... 1,860.00
1 Second Lieutenant..........................at...................... 1,580.00
1 Third Lieutenant............................at...................... 1,520.00
1 Clerk, Police Department and Police Court........ 1,800.00
1 Clerk, Detective Department......at..................... 900.00
1 Matron............................................at...................... 600.00
1 Chief Detective.......,............at.............,..- 1,680.00
2 Detectives.......................................at...................... 1,280.00
3 Detectives.......................................at...................... 1,220.00
1 Detective........................................at...................... 1,160.00
1 Detective.........................................at...................... 1,100.00
1 First Sergeant..................................at................... 1,320.00
5 Sergeants.........................................at..................... 1,300.00
1 Sergeant............................................at.... 1,240.00
1 Sergeant..........................................at...................... 1,120.00
2 Sergeants..........................................at...................... 1,180.00
8 Patrolmen........................................at...................... 1,020.00
8 Patrolmen........................................at..................... 1,080.00
29 Patrolmen........................................at...................... 960.00
60 Patrolmen........................................at...................... 900.00
1 Electrician (half salary)._...........at...................... 900.00
1 Assistant Electrician (half salary)at...................... 540.00
4 Drivers............................................at.................... 900.00
1 Stable Keeper..................................at.................. 1,200.00
1 Stable Keeper (night)....................at................... 780.00
1 Dog Catcher..............................at...................... 720.00
1 Assistant Dog Catcher (c)..............at........~............ 360.00
1 Porter (c)................................... at...................... 360.00
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______ 139
Salaries Paid Members (continued)
Retired Men
1 Sergeant............................................at...................... $ 746.56
2 Sergeants........................................at...................... 560.00
1 Sergeant..........................................at...................... 650.00
2 Privates..........................................-.at...................... 540.00
1 Private.............................................at...................... 510.00
1 Private..............................................at...................... 300.00
140 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ROSTER OF THE FORCE, DECEMBER 31, 1914
NAME
M. L. Meldrim -.__
B. S. Bryant.. .......
P. J. Eivers __ __ .
J. A. Woods....- ....
J. F. Bemhardt. __ .
Wm. A. Lufburrow...
J. J. Reilley. ........
D. J. Cronin.-. ......
J. S. Halford ........
J. D. Semken.. ......
J. H. Lange ...
L. P. Morgan........
J. J. Clancy. ...__...
E. D. Alexander ...
H. Center. __ ....
Jno. J. Murphy. ....
J.C. McCarthy......
C. T. Christie. _ ....
M. G. Cohen. .......
M. Scully-. .........
J. K. Beach ..--...
J. P. DeLeon.. _ _
J f? Ron t IpV
P. J.KeUy.. ........
T. P. Sandiford. .....
E. H. Todd.. ........
Mre. L. E. Fisher ....
J. M. Akin-.,. ......
g

Chief........
1st Lieutenant
2nd Lieutenant
3rd Lieutenant
Clerk.... ... _
Clerk ......
1st Sergeant -.
Sergeant......
Sergeant......
Sergeant __ ..
D. Detective ..
Detective.....
Detective.....
Detective _ -.
Electrician _ .
Asst. Elect. ...
Matron ___ _.
Private.... .

"-P
1
Georgia ....
Georgia....
Ireland
Georgia. __
Georgia ....
Georgia....
Georgia....
Ireland..-.
5. Carolina
Germany __
Germany..
Georgia....
Georgia ....
Ohio. .....
Poland. _
England...
Georgia __
Georgia ....
New York
[reland-.-.
S. Carolina
Creland---.
jeorgja ....
Beorgia ....
Georgia. -
Gteorgia. ...
Georgia ....
Oenrtria.
Married
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
*
C
a>
8.1
J8 s&<*
Q<
Feb. 14, 1896
Chief Jan.27, 1913
/July 23, 1902
\Feb- 1, 1913
Jan. 27, 1890
/Oct. 25, 1897
\Feb. 28, 1914
Jan. 27, 1913
Jan. 5, 1914
Oct. 25, 1901
Dec. 10, 1887
Sept. 13, 1894
Feb. 4, 18%
Oct. 9, 1897
Jan. 31, 1907
Oct. 8, 1900
/Feb. 5, 1907
\Feb. 1, 1913
Dec. 27, 1912
Nov. 27, 1897
July 2, 1900
Oct. 1, 1890
Feb. 1, 1913
July 23, 1902
Feb. 1, 1913
Feb. 7, 1890
Feb. 1, 1913
Feb. 29, 1902
April 7, 1913
Aug. 2, 1909
April 7, 1913
Jan. 31, 1907
Oct. 18, 1913
Jan. 26, 1891
March 29, 1909
Sept. 1, 1914
May 12, 1913
Dec. 18. 1907
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 141
Roster of the Force (continued)
NAME
P. L. Anderson ...-
J. L. Andrews ..-.
G. J. Atkinson
J. B. Barthelmess. . . .
G. E. Beach.------.-
W. L. Becker. -------
E.L.Bell. .-----....
S. Berner ---------
T,. Bliimberg
R. F. Brant __ __ ...
S. Bradley----------
T. Brennan. ---------
H. J. Brown. --------
T. J. Cameron. --
R. C. Cannon --..-
W. S. Cave - -
M. F. Clark. --------
A. C. Clark -----
T. F. Clarey.. -------
S.W.Coursey- -.-...
M. S. Cowart. -__----
E. F. Davis .--..
M. F. Davis--------.
R. F. Dooley---.....
A. M. Dominick. .
J. J. Doherty. -------
R. F. Donaldson .....
P. J. Fahey..........
J. J. Farrell .......
J.A.Felder ------
H. Fine. ... ___ ..
M. Fleming --..__
W. H. Fleming _ ...
C. J. Flynn ___ '. ....
R. A. Forehand ------
F. S. Freeman,.-....
J*
Private.-..
Private.......
Private--.
Private..-.. .-
Private.
Private _ --..
Private... --. .
Private..---. -
Private.--. .-.
Private. ..
Private -...
Private. -.--. .
Private. ------
Private ...-
Private.. -.-. .
Private... ..--
Private .
Private -----
*
I
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
S. Carolina
S. Carolina
Georgia
Poland....
S. Carolina
Germany --
Georgia. ...
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia. ...
3. Carolina
3. Carolina
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia. ...
Georgia ....
Ireland. ...
Georgia ....
Georgia _ .
Ireland....
Austria. ...
Mass.. ....
Georgia ....
Georgia. ...
England.-.
3. Carolina
Russia
Georgia __
Georgia ....
Georgia. ...
Georgia ....
Ohio.
Married
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
-*3
g
Jffi O
S 0.
a p, Q<!
Aug. 5, 1913
Feb. 1, 1911
/April 8, 1896
\April 17, 1913
Feb. 9, 1907
Aug. 27, 1914
Feb. 27, 1909
July 25, 1891
April 7, 1913
March 3, 1913
Feb. 4, 1896
July 5, 1907
June 10, 1912
Jan. 31, 1907
Oct. 18, 1913
July 23, 1903
Nov. 3, 1911
Aug. 5, 1913
Aug 5, 1913
April 15, 1914
Feb. 28, 1914
Aug. 3, 1902
Feb. 10, 1913
March 8, 1907
April 15, 1914
Aug. 18, 1881
Oct. 18, 1913
April 7, 1913
April 16, 1910
Feb. 27, 1909
/Dec. 1, 1911
l.Jan. 15, 1914
Feb. 1, 1911
April 16, 1910
Jan. 3, 1895
Oct. 18, 1913
April 7, 1913
Oct. 26, 1900
/Nov. 28, 1893
\Feb. 8, 1913
June 7, 1908
July 5, 1907
Aug. 27, 1914
142 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Roster of the Force (continued)
NAME
M.C Gallaher ,,...,
M. Goslee .........
J. Guilfoyle.. ....... .
H. A. Heape --.....
P. M. Hendrix...... .
E. H. Henry -
W. F. Hodges. ......
H. P. Howard ..
H. W. Hutto ...
H. C. Hutson ___ ...
A. T. Jackson.-....
F. J. Keamey __ .
T. Keane .........
H. H.Kemp... ......
C. W. Keller... ......
W. D.Kennedy-....-
C. F. Leach... .......
G. P. Lively .. -
C. R. Long. .........
J. D. Longabaugh . . . .
R. F. Lovett. .......
T. E. McAlpin .... .
J. McGrath... .......
J. J. McGinley... ....
C. M. Malphus- -
R. H. Mallette. ..-
D. D. Miles....--.
J. Milikin ..........
W. J. Morse... ......
J. H. Monsees -__. .
L. H. Nantz _
W. L. Nichols .....
J. J. O'ReUly.. --,...
H. T. Page--.-.....
W. C. Parker. .......
J. Poulos __ ........
H. L. Price ___ .....
H. H. Price ______
c
Private _ ..--
Private... .- -.
Private
Private
Private
Private......
Private ..--
Private.
Private
Private ..
Private ..-- -
Private- ------
Private.. .
Private--.....
Private ..
Private ..
Private.... ...
Private... ..
Private .
Private.... ...
Private __ ...
Private.. .
1
fc
Florida _ .
Maryland
Georgia.. ..
Georgia- ...
S. Carolina
Georgia
Georgia ....
Germany
3. Carolina
Georgia- ...
3. Carolina
S. Carolina
Georgia ....
Georgia -
Ireland..
Georgia. ...
Georgia --
Georgia .
Georgia
Georgia ....
Georgia-
Ohio-.. -
Georgia
Canada.
Georgia.- ..
Georgia- .
3. Carolina
Georgia
S. Carolina
Georgia .
Georgia- ...
Georgia
N. Carolina
S. Carolina
New YorkGeorgia.
Georgia ....
Greece .....
3. Carolina
S. Carolina
Married
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
' 1
/Dec.
\Aug.
Apnl
/Nov.
lAug.
Nov.
April
Feb.
Ang.
Feb.
March
Sept.
Sept.
Dec.
Aug.
Sept.
Feb.
April
April
Aug.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
March
Dec.
Nov.
July
Sept.
/Nov.
\April
Dec.
April
June
Feb.
Feb.
Dec.
Dec.
Nov.
Feb.
June
/April
\May
Sept.
Aug.
2,1908
27, 1914
12, 1907
4, 1896
27, 1914
3, 1910
15, 1914
10, 1913
27, 1914
1, 1911
24, 1910
12, 1912
12, 1912
2,1908
5, 1913
7,1908
9, 1907
12, 1907
12, 1907
27, 1914
27, 1907
31, 1907
5, 1910
24, 1910
3,1906
13,1902
21, 1902
3, 1909
29, 1902
15, 1914
1,1901
15, 1914
19, 1910
27, 1909
27, 1914
1, 1911
1, 1911
19,1908
10, 1913
10, 1912
7, 1913
2, 1914
25,1907
27, 1914
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 143
Roster of the Force (continued)
NAME
J.W.Pruitt. _.---..-
B. R. Pryor... ..---..
H. L. Purvis...... ...
H. Reisen -..-......-
W.L.Roberts--.---.
M. H. Sherrod---....
G. W. Slocum--....-.
G. Smith ___ --....-
C. E. Stephenson ....
H. C. Taylor..---....
P. P. Turner ____ ..
J.O.Wallace-.----..
J. A. L.Weber.......
R. G.Williams..-. ...
V,. L. Williams
T. O.Wilson---.....-
J. C.Wilson.........
W. S. Winn .......
H. W. Wright _ .....
G. L. Smith..... ...
J. Rottenberg- .......
W. H. Tuttle--......
J. Rice _____ ....
J. J. McGrath. ......
W. W. Thomson.....
R. Lockett(c)_. ------
W. C. Frazier(c)._...
,
Private. ------
Private...... .
Private... . ...
Private.......
Private _ ....
Private. .-...-
Private _ ....
Private _ ....
Private- ---.. .
Private...... .
Private _ ....
Private. __ ..
Private. ......
Stable
Foreman _
Stable
Keeper. _ .
Driver.... ...
Dog Catcher. .
Assistant
Dog Catcher
Porter __ _

1
N. Carolina
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Germany- .
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
New York.
Georgia ....
N. Carolina
Georgia ....
Georgia. ...
S. Carolina
Bulgaria. ..
Georgia ....
S. Carolina
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia. ...
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Ireland..--
Russia .....
Georgia
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Georgia ....
Married
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
I
Yes
Yes
4s&
$3
Aug. 5, 1913
Dec. 1, 1911
Sept. 9, 1913
Oct. 9, 1907
Nov. 16, 1901
Dec. 2, 1908
Aug. 27, 1914
Oct. 18, 1907
March 3, 1913
Feb. 1, 1911
April 15, 1914
June 9, 1910
March 24, 1910
Aug. 5, 1913
April 15, 1914
April 11, 1889
Jan. 15, 1914
Feb. 27, 1909
Oct. 18, 1913
Oct. 24, 1910
Sept. 17, 1912
Sept. 17, 1912
Dec. 8, 1896
Feb. 10, 1913
fc * Feb.J 1, 1913
; 5 *" Sept. I 1, 1913
Nov. 3, 1910
Dec. 1, 1911
Feb. 1, 1911
Aug. ;- 5, 1913
Oct. ,' 1, 1914
r up,-h*
Oct.* 1, 1914
July 3, 1907
144 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
NUMBER OF DAYS LOST BY EACH MEMBER
OF THE DEPARTMENT
On Account of Sickness, Sickness in Family, Injured on Duty,
Special Leave, Excused, Vacation, Suspended,
During Year 1914
NAME
M. L. Meldrim...... ......
B. S. Bryant.... ........ ......
P. J. Eivers... ...............
J. A. Woods. ..............
J. F. Bernhardt............
J. J. Reilly....................
D. J. Cronin. ...............
J. S. Halford................
J. D. Semken................
J. H. Lange.. ................
L. P. Morgan................
J. J. Clancy.... ..............
E. D. Alexander.. ........
H. Center.....................
J. McCool ....................
P. J. Kelly....................
J. J. Murphy................
J. C. McCarthy............
C. T. Christie..............
M. G. Cohen................
M. Scully......................
J. K. Beach..................
Sickness
8
3
1
31
?
1
1
6
?,
1
1?
_>.
ll
afe
1
9
it3 W
<
95
a3 Q)
Itcci-5
13
6
3
5
4
31
3
17
7
?,
Excused
?
1
1
1
?!
?
?
3
4
1
Vacation
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
1 Allowed forTime
Meritorious
Service
Suspended
Ifi
I
in
?,3
16
13
5
?,0
14
1?
11
47
15
1?
54
m
11
6
10
10
?9
18
24
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 145
Number of Days Lost, Etc. (continued)
NAME
J. P. DeLeon...... ..........
J. F. Beatley................
T. P. Saadiford............
W. A. Lufburrow........
Mrs. L. E. Fisher........
J. M. Akin ....................
P. L. Anderson... .........
J. L. Andrews..............
C. J. Atkinson....... .......
J. B. Barthelmess........
G. E. Beach..................
W. L. Becker................
E. L. Bell......................
S. Berner......................
L. Blumberg..................
R. F. Brant.... ..............
S. Bradley...... ............. .
T. Brennan....................
H. J. Brown. ...............
C. Burns....... .................
J. H. Bunger..... ...........
D. C. Boulware............
W. B. Brooks... ............
T. J. Cameron. .............
R. C. Cannon.... ..........
W. S. Cave...................
T. F. Cleary..................
S. W. Coursey....-.---
Sickness
Q
72
2
1
11
2
4
4
3
6
14
4
12
fi4
11
12
fi
19
1 Sickness |In Family
2
2
1
R
9
1
1
6
8
1
4
1
6
1
it
as
2
18
9
2
g.
O.HJ
OQM
4
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
6
Excused
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
4
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
6
1
2
Vacation
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
m
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
Time Allowed lor
Meritorious
Service
4
7
3
Suspended
3
13
2
6
2
9
7
9
I
19
74
in
i?
14
15
27
28
22
28
29
15
18
18
14
28
32
17
37
7fi
?,
10
in
9,7
3fi
28
12
87
W sd
1
,J O. CL
g?-H5-
B sr

?Q 2-S 3
to : to
o o o o o
O !
1-" O5
Cn ^-- <I to
to i-*
<l W
W
FR-B.
cr
g
O bO rf. i-> IO 00 i- i-* to H-*
O5 to
to
ooooooooooooooo oooo
to :
l-> h-> O9 tO 1-1 W t-> tOi-'WtOtOi-'i-'OSWl-'^ i_>)_ii_>tO
-JOiOi'I'OiOOOrO^W^IOOO^OO
NAME
Sickness
Sickness
In Family
Injured
On Duty
Special
Leave
Excused
Vacation
Time Allowed for
Meritorious
Service
Suspended
Total
!
s
r
IGO
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 147
Number of Days Lost, Etc. (continued)
NAME
W. F. Hodges................
H. P. Howard....... .......
H. W. Hutto..... ...........
H. C. Hudson..............
H. A. Heape............ ......
A. T. Jackson..............
T. Keane............ ..........
F. J. Kearney..............
H. H. Kemp..................
C. W. Keller................
W. D. Kennedy............
C. F. Leech..................
G. P. Lively..................
C. R. Long....................
J. D. Longabaugh........
R. F. Lovett................
T. E. McAlpin..............
J. J. McGinley..............
J. McGrath..................
R. H. Mallette..............
J. Milikin ....................
P. H. Moehrke............
W. J. Morse. ...............
C. M. Malphus............
D. D. Miles..................
J. H. Monsees..............
L. H. Nantz..................
W. L. Nichols..... .........
Sickness
19
11
2
33
1
7
4
6
fi
7
12
23
6
28
8
15
33
19
Sickness In Family
1
1
2
1

1
1
2
a
i
2
2
2
7
it
S3
3
2
3
3
4) gj
fV ^
th5
1
1
7
1
1
4
1
Excused
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
12
1
2
2
Vacation
10
10
10
10
7
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
1010'
Allowed Time for
Meritorious
Service
10
5
Suspended
3
?,
1
1
3

30
37
14
12
11
21
44
12
19
10
7
11
16
12
11
13
24
24
19
24
27
28
11
38
20
28
49
42
148 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of Days Lost, Etc. (continued)
NAME
A. T. Neal....................
J. J. O'Reilly................
H. T. Page....................
W. C. Parker................
J. Poulos. .....................
H. H. Price..................
H. L. Price....................
J. W. Pruitt..................
B. R. Pryor.... ..............
H. L. Purvis..............
T. A. Quarterman........
H. Reisen... ...................
J. A. Rouse........ ..........
B. F. Saddler................
H. E. Sharpe................
M. H. Sherrod..............
L. B. Simpson..............
G. W. Slocum..............
C. A. Smoak...... ..........
C. E. Stephenson........
J. J. Sullivan. ...............
G. Smith........................
H. C. Taylor................
J. R. Tucker................
P. P. Turner................
B. Ungar........................
J. A. L. Weber..............
E. L. Williams..............
Sickness
1
33
13
1
1
10
5
?,
4
8
R
1
fi4
9
9!
7
14
34
fi
5
?,7
I Sickness |In Family
0
7
1
1
13
1
?.
3
3
?,
it
as
7
3
3
ljOQ3
1
1
1
1
8
19
1
?,
11
1
3
4
?,
1
7
Excused
?!
6
1
1
4
15
1
1
13
1
1
?,
1
3
3
8
Vacation
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Allowed 1forTime
1 Meritorious
|Service
5
Suspended
13
1
1
fll
?,
4
1
9
10
3
$
13
16
40
33
13
8
14
33
17
16
35
50
13
19
?,1
19
17
11
66
33
15
31
43
2
47
37
30
55
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 149
Number of Days Lost, Etc. (continued)
NAME
T. O. Wilson................
R. G. Williams............
J. C. Wilson. ...............
W. S. Winn..................
V. H. Wortham............
H. W. Wright..............
J. O. Wallace................
G. L. Smith..................
J. W. Hennessy. ....
W. L. Roberts..............
J. Guilf oyle... ...............
J. Rottenberg... ...........
W. H. Tuttle................
J. J. McGrath. ...........
J. Rice. _ .....................
W. C. Thomson. .....
J. J. Gill........................
Geo. Roberts (c)...__ ...
W. C. Eraser (c) ._.._.....
R. Lockett (c)._.._ .......
Sickness
7
3
1
3
2
3
7
4
3
15
Sickness Family In
2
1
1
4
3
3
1
it
3$
12
?,?,
Is&i OSM
7
1
2
3
2
Excused
2
6
2
2
2
3
3
1
Vacation
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
....
Allowed forTime
Meritoriou*
Service
....
Suspended
11
1
1
35
2
3
2
4
I
12
32
21
13
3
29
54
191
10
3
2
13
16
22
17
3
3
916
21
150 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
NUMBER OF ARRESTS MADE BY EACH MEMBER
OF THE DEPARTMENT DURING YEAR 1914
NAME RANK ARRESTS
M. L. Meldrim..........................Chief of Police.................. 29
B. S. Bryant.............................. 1st Lieutenant................. 58
P. J. Eivers.............................2nd lieutenant.................. 84
J. A. Woods............................3rd Lieutenant.................. 172
J. F. Bernhardt........................Clerk._................................. 3
J. J. ReiIley..-..-.......-.......--....lst Sergeant........................ 2
D. J. Cronin..............................Sergeant.............................. 25
J. S. Halford ..........................Sergeant.............................. 23
J. D. Semken.........................Sergeant...................... 1
J. H. Lange............Sergeant.............................. 0
L. P. Morgan............................Sergeant.............................. 64
J. J. Clancy...........................Sergeant......................... 27
E. D. Alexander........................Sergeant.............................. 40
H. Center..................................Sergeant.......................... 47
J. McCool.................................. Sergeant........................... 0
P. J. Kelly................................Q. M. Sergeant.................. 2
Jno. J. Murphy........................Chief of Detectives.-.... 341
J. C. McCarthy-.....................Deteetive........................ 127
C. T. Christie...........................Detective............................ 139
M. G. Cohen.......................Detective............................ 226
M. Scully.............................Detective..................... 270
J. K. Beach...............................Detective.......................... 169
J. P. DeLeon............................Detective................. 232
J. F. Bentley............................Detective....-......... 141
J. M. Akin................................Private................................ 20
P. L. Anderson..........................Private.......................... 237
J. L. Andrews...........................Private................................ 51
C. J. Atkinson..........................Private.......................... 67
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 151
Number of Arrests (continued)
NAME RANK ARRESTS
J. B. Barthelmess....................Private................................ 150
M. A. Bazemore........................Private................................ 15
G. E. Beach..............................Private................................ 45
W. L. Becker............................Private................................ 20
E. L. Bell,.................................Private................................ 20
S. Berner....................................Private................................ 258
L. Blumberg..............................Private................................ 69
R. F. Brant................................Private................................ 43
S. Bradley..................................Private................................ 53
T. Brennan................................Private................................ 54
H. J. Brown..............................Private................................ 118
C. Burns....................................Private................................ 219
J. H. BujQger..............................Private................................ 0
D. C. Boulware........................Private................................ 10
W. B. Brooks............................Private................................ 25
T. J. Cameron..........................Private................................ 38
R. C. Cannon............................Private................................ 34
W. S. Cave................................Private................................ 44
T. F. deary..............................Private................................ 50
S. W. Coursey..........................Private................................ 110
M. J. Counihan........................Private................................ 5
M. F. Clark.............................Private................................ 102
A. C. Clark................................Private................................ 43
M. S. Cowart............................Private................................ 63
J. P. Caras................................Private................................ 46
E. F. Davis................................Private................................ 5
J. A. Darsey..............................Private................................ 66
M. F. Davis..............................Private................................ 64
R. F. Dooley............................Private................................ 55
A. M. Dominick........................Private................................ 139
R. F. Donaldson...................Private................................ 47
J. J. Doherty............................Private................................ 188
P. J. Fahey................................Private................................ 24
J. J. Farrell................................Private................................ 44
152 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of Arrests (continued)
NAME RANK ARRESTS
J. A. Felder._.............................Private................................ 219
H. Fine......................................Private................................ 83
M. B. Fleming..........................Private................................ 173
R. A. Forehand..-...............Private,,....................... 137
W. H. Fleming.........................Private................................ 97
C. J. Flynn._.............................Private................................ 71
F. S. Freeman..........................Private....................^......... 17
M. C. Gallaher..........................Private............................... 12
M. Goslee..................................Private............................. 41
J. Guilfoyle...............................Private............................ 11
R. J. Hayes-.......... ..............Private................................ 149
P. M. Hendrix.......................... Private............................ 229
E. H. Henry..........................Private............................ 22
W. C. Hendry..........................Private................................ 39
J. A. Herman............................Private................................ 95
W. F. Hodges.-...-............Private.......................... 171
H. P. Howard.-....................Private................................ 132
H. W. Hutto..................... Private............................ 58
H. C. Hutson............................Private.......................... 44
H. A. Heape.......................... Private................................ 148
A. T. Jackson.-.....................Private................................ 93
T. Keane......................Private.......................... 40
F. J. Kearney............................Private....-..................... 35
H. H. Kemp..............Private............................ 43
C. W. Keller._...........................Private............................ 41
W. D. Kennedy...................Private............................ 12
C. F. Leach........................... Private............................ 268
G. P. Lively........................Private............................ 72
C. R. Long.................... ......Private................................ 441
J. D. Longabaugh....................Private................................ 47
R. F. Lovett.............................Private....................... 50
T. E. McAlpin..........................Private............................ 53
J. J. McGinley..................Private................................ 381
J.McGrath............................Private............................ 53
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________153
Number of Arrests (continued)
NAME RANK ARRESTS
R. H. Mallette..........................Private................................ 67
J. Milikin..................................Private................................ 317
P. H. Moehrke-,....-..--.Private.......................... 148
W. J. Morse..-..----..-.-.-Private.-...-.-.....-...--- 285
C. M. Malphus........................Private... v......................... 12
D. D. Miles...........-................Private....*............................ 32
J. H. Monsees.......................Private................................ 18
L. H. Nantz--.....--.--......Private..-..-.--............. 50
A. T. Neal._...............................Private................................ 0
W. L. Nichols.........-.................Private................................ 27
J. J. O'Reilly.......................Private............................. 163
H. T. Page.........-......Private........ 112
W. C. Parker.........Private......................... 38
J. Poulos..................................-Private............................... 24
H. L. Price.........................Private................. 53
H. H. Price..........Private......................... 32
J. W. Pruitt.....Private................. 130
B. R. Pryor..............Private..................... 23
H. L. Purvis.......Private................. 177
T. A. Quarterman........Private......................... 54
H. Reisen -.....-.........Private.. 63
W. L. Roberts............. ...........Private......................... 12
J. A. Rouse................................ Private................................ 51
B. F. Saddler...............Private................................ 7
H. E. Sharpe............................Private......................... 82
M. H. Sherrod................Private......................... 52
L. B. Simpson..........................Private............................. 39
G. W. Slocum......Private................. 47
C. A. Smoak.............Private... 3
C. E. Stephenson...............Private................................ 185
J. J. Sullivan..................... Private......................... 109
G. Smith-..-..-.-.-..-.......-Private........----...-...- 155
H. C. Taylor..............Private................................ 177
J. R. Tueker....-..-...-.....-....Private.......-.-.................. 16
154 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of Arrests (continued)
NAME RANK ARRESTS
P. P. Turner._...........................Private..........................:..... 20
B. Ungar....................................Private................................ 13
J. A. L. Weber._........-.-.........Private.......................... 153
E. L. Williams..........................Private................................ 51
T. O. Wilson._...........................Private................................ 214
R. G. Williams.__.....................Private................................ 158
J. C. Wilson..............................Private................................ 22
W. S. Wina._.............................Private................................ 43
V. W. Wortham........................Private................................ 7
H. W. Wright._.........................Private................................ 43
J. O. Wallace............................Private................................ 123
G. L. Smith,.............................Stable Keeper.................... 2
J. H. Hennessy.-.......Stable Keeper.................... 0
J. Rottenberg.........Patrol Driver.................~ 1
W. H. Tuttle......Patrol Driver._............... 4
J. J. McGrath.......................... Ambulance Driver............ 0
J. Rice..................................Ambulance Driver............ 6
Mrs. L. E. Fisher._.........-.-...Matron.......................... 2
Classification of Arrests Made During 1914
White Men.......................................................................... 3,089
White Women...................................................................... 330
White Boys........................................................................ 206
White Girls.......................................................................... 11
Negro Men.......................................................................... 4,817
Negro Women._....................................................... 1,607
Negro Boys........................................................... 329
Negro Girls.................................................................. 75
TotaL_.................................................................... 10,461
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 155
ARRESTS EACH MONTH
January.... ...... ...
February...........
March.................
April...................
May.. .................
June.. .................
July.....................
August...............
September.........
October......... ......
November.. .......
December............
ADU
Negroes
....... 532
....... 479
....... 582
....... 470
....... 890
....... 503
....... 543
....... 500
....... 540
....... 440
....... 389
....... 463
LTS MINORS
White Negroes White
297 44 25
269 20 19
348 16 25
259 47 14
484 ' 30 27
224 37 14
218 45 13
247 38 25
289 33 19
230 32 12
263 32 11
282 30 14
Total
898
787
971
790
1,521
778
818
810
890
714
695
789
Totals................6,421 3,419 404 217 10,461
ARRESTS IN PREVIOUS YEARS
1908...................................................................................... 8,493
1909...................................................................................... 8,752
1910...................................................................................... 9,965
1911...........:.......................................................................... 10,433
1912...................................................................................... 10,350
1913...................................................................................... 11,363
156 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CAUSES OF ARRESTS MADE DURING 1914
Abandonment of Wife and Children................................. 1
Accessory to Murder............................................................ 1
Adultery and Fornication................................................. 17
Aiding Convict to Escape................................................. 2
Arson...................................................................................... 3
Attempted Arson.................................................................. 1
Assault and Battery............................................................. 52
Assault with Intent to Murder......................................... 79
Assault with Intent to Rape._......................................... 7
Assaulting and Stabbing...................................................... 119
Attempted Burglary.............................................................. 15
Attempted Highway Robbery............................................ 0
Attempted Horse Stealing.-.............................................. 1
Attempt to Incite Riot........................................................ 1
Attempted Kidnapping........................................................ 0
Attempted Larceny.............................................................. 12
Attempted Larceny from the Person................................ 2
Attempted Robbery by Force............................................ 6
Attempted Sodomy.............................................................. 1
Attempting to Cheat and Swindle .................................... 8
Attempting to Pick a Pocket........................................... 0
Attempting to Stab...................................... 2
Attempting to Break Jail............................................... 1
Arrests at Request of Other Counties and States .......... 148
Bastardy................................................................................ 2
Beating a Board Bill................................................ 12
Bigamy._..___.................................................... 3
Breaking and Entering a Railroad Car............................ 7
Burglary.--................................................... 135
Carrying Concealed Weapons............................................. 47
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________157
Causes of Arrests (continued)
Carrying a Pistol Without a License......................- 21
Cheating and Swindling...................................... 42
Contempt of Court....................................................... 51
Cruelty to Children..................................... 4
Cruelty to Animals....................................... 54
Cow Stealing.-.........,...................,...................................... 3
Desertion from Army and Navy........................................ 17
Desertion from Foreign Vessel...........,............................. 28
Disorderly Conduct........................................................... 2,672
Disposing of Mortgaged Property................................... 2
Disturbing Public Worship......................................... 2
Drunk on a Railroad Train.................................... 0
Drunk on the Public Highway............................. 0
Drunk and Disorderly..................,.................................... 1,761
Embezzlement....................................................................... 1
Escaped Convict................................................................ 29
Exhibiting Indecent Pictures............................. 1
Exposure of Person........................................................... 0
Fast and Reckless Driving......................................... 6
Fast and Reckelss Riding of Motorcycle, thereby
Causing Accident................................................ 4
Fast and Reckless Driving of Automobile, thereby
Causing Accident._.............................................. 22
Fast and Reckless Driving of Other Vehicle, thereby
Causing Accident.................................................... 12
Forgery....................................................................... 13
Gambling.......................................................................... 195
Highway Robbery....................................... 0
Hog Stealing.-....-......-......... 2
Illegal Voting.................................................................... 6
Involuntary Manslaughter......................... 4
Inciting Riot................................................................. 6
Keeping a Disorderly House.............................................. 3
Keeping a Gambling House....................................... 3
Keeping a Gambling Device.-....................................... 13
Keeping a Lewd House.......................................... 3
158_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
Causes of Arrests (continued)
Kidnapping............................................................................ 1
Larceny After Trust........................................................... 81
Larceny from Person............................................................ 28
Larceny, Simple................................................................. 501
Larceny, over $50.00............................................................ 23
Larceny from House............................................................ 154
Larceny from Railroad Train........................................... 2
Loitering..................................... 454
Lunacy................................... ................ 88
Malicious Mischief........................................ 14
Mayhem..._.................................................................... 0
Murder.................................................................................... 14
Obtaining Goods Under False Pretenses.......................... 0
Obtaining Money Under False Pretenses.......................... 1
Perjury................................................................................. 2
Picking a Pocket................................................. 1
Public Indecency............................................................ 5
Pointing a Pistol at Another........................................... 27
Rape............................................................................... 2
Robbery by Force................................................................ 60
Receiving Stolen Goods............................................... 12
Selling Cigarettes to Minors......................................... 1
Selling Cocaine................................................................... 1
Selling Obscene Pictures................................. 0
Selling Liquor to Minors................................................... 0
Shooting at Another Not in His Own Defense................ 3
Stealing a Ride on a Railroad Train.................................. 32
Suspicious Character............................................................ 889
Seduction........................................................... 1
Sodomy.................................. 4
Trespassing................................................... 5
United States Court (Arrested for)............. 16
Usury................................................................. 3
Vagrancy............................................... 5
Violating Automobile Ordinance........................................ 1
Violating City Ordinance........................................... 540
_____MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________159
Causes of Arrests (continued)
Violating Dog Ordinance.............. 1................................ 762
Violating Garbage Ordinance...........................__................ 0
Violating Milk Ordinance.................................................... 10
Violating Moving Ordinance.............................................. 10
Violating Pawn Shop Ordinance........................................ 5
Violating Restaurant Ordinance........................................ 4
Violating Traffic Ordinance............................................... 926
Violating Street Car Transfer Ordinance.......................... 6
Violating Weed Ordinance.................................................. 53
Violating Prohibition Law.................................................. 42
Violating State GameLaw.................................................. 3
Vote Bujring.......................................................................... 2
Vote Selling........................................................................... 2
Wife Beating.......................................................................... 0
Total.......................................................................10,461
Disposition of Cases
Sentenced................-......-...-........-..-............................ 4,012
Dismissed........................................................ 3,838
Sentence Suspended.......................................................... 202
Turned Over to Superior Court.......................................... 280
Turned Over to City Court............................................ 823
Turned Over to Ordinary's Court.................................. 91
Turned Over to Juvenile Court ....................._.... 119
Turned Over to Various Sheriffs, Etc................................ 148
Turned Over to Foreign Vessels........................................ 28
Turned Over to Army and Navy........................................ 16
Suspicious Characters Released................................... 887
Held for U. S. Court............................................................ 17
Total._.................................................................10,461
160 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
FINES COLLECTED IN POLICE COURT
Fines Collected in Police Court During 1914..._..... $14,900.00
Fines Collected in Police Court Each Year
From 1902 to 1913, Inclusive
1902...................-.........-.............___. $ 6,242.95
1903._.................................... 9,492.90
1904._............................................................ 9,328.90
1905......................................................................... 10,057.00
1906..-..-............................................................... 12,236.00
1907...-.-.............-............................................... 18,255.25
1908......................................................................... 35,113.60
1909....................................................................... 19,332.01
19ia_.................................................................... 23,562.20
1911................,......................... 25,200.35
1912................................................................................ 25,590.85
1913................................................................................ 23,519.95
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 161
CALLS RESPONDED TO FROM MOTORCYCLE
SUB-STATION
January.................................................................................. *
February................................................................................
March.....................................................................................
April........................................................................................ 100
May........................................................................................ 107
June........................................................................................ 120
July.......................................................................................... 102
AugUSt.....................-:.........................-.......-........-...... 137
September.............................................................................. 123
October................................................................................... 122
November.............................................................................. 110
December................................................................................. 99
Total................................................................................ 1,020
'Station established-in April.
162 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORTS MADE TO POLICE DEPARTMENT BY
PAWNBROKERS DURING YEAR 1914
January............................................................................ 21,180
February............................................................................ 19,050
March.................................................................................. 20,200
April.................................................................................. 18,900
May.................................................................................... 20,500
June.. ................................................................................. 19,600
July.................................................................................... 18,825
August.............................................................................. 20,675
September................................................................... 18,225
October.............................................................................. 17,500
November.......................................................................... 20,760
December,.................................................................... 21,000
Total.__.........................................$236,415
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 163
AMOUNT OF PROPERTY REPORTED LOST OR
STOLEN AND AMOUNTS RECOVERED
Lost or Stolen Recovered
January........................................$ 4,094.00 $ 2,831.00
February...................................... 6,359.50 4,930.00
March.......................................... 3,614.50 2,356.00
April............................................ 8,541.00 6,486.00
May.............................................. 3,756.35 .2,461.00
June.............................................. 2,213.00 1,427.00
July.............................................. 2,389.75 1,678.00
August......................................... 3,354.00 2,483.00
September................................... 5,377.50 4,014.00
October...................................^.... 4,292.00 2,886.00
November.................................... 2,505.50 1,505.00
December.................................... 3,055.00 1,018.00
Total....................................! 49,552.10 $34,075.00
164 BIAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
LODGERS ACCOMMODATED
MONTH
January.................................... .. ..............
February..................................................
March
April........................................................
May... ..................................................... ..
June... .......................................................
July..........................................................
August... ........................................... ........
September................................................
October... .................................................
November..... .................................... .......
December.... ............................................
Total................................................
White
74
83
77
43
37
32
15
23
22
65
205
338
1,004
Colored
4
2
2
1
1
4
4
2
11
31
Total
78
83
79
45
37
33
15
24
26
69
207
349
1,035
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 165
FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE ARRESTED BY THE
SAVANNAH POLICE DEPARTMENT
FOR OTHER CITIES
Date Fugitive Arrested for Arrested by
Jan.
2 H. Phillips (c)_.---.-.. Crisp County.-...--.. Christie and Beach
2 Willie Fibe (c)_........ Crisp County.-------- Christie and Beach
8 Jas. Murray (w)......... S. S. Richmond.------ T. E. McAlpin
8 W. D. Patterson(t0)-...- Tampa, Fla........... C. Burns
10 W. E. Carson (w) ....... Ft, Pierce, Fla.....-..- J. J. Sullivan
10 A. Ellisoii (w)...--...-.. Richmond County..--. C. F. Leech
12 Stacey Bradley (w)....... Ways, Ga.__........ M. Seage
13 FurotePelan (w)......... S.S.Richmond.-----. W. S. Winn
13 Kyle Meander (w)....... S.S.Richmond---.-.. W. S. Winn
13 Emele Fessele (w)........ S. S. Mavisbrook. -.... W. S. Winn
18 Richard Bryant (c)-..__ Vidalia, Ga.. ....--.-- W.H.Fleming
19 Franz Schatzer (w)....... S. S. Dominion-.--.-.. M. G. Cohen
20 Dan Polling (c).__.-__- Statesboro, Ga.-.-.... J. P. DeLeon
21 Harry Howell (w)....... U. S. Authorities...... W. J. Morse
23 O. C. Tarver (w) -------- Jefferson County...... C. R. Long
25 John Mitchell (c)........ Abbeville, Ga.-------- J. K. Beach
29 Simon Green (w)......... Statesboro, Ga. ------- S. Berner
Feb.
1 Geo. Bowman (c)._..-_.- Orangeburg, S. C.----- C. R. Long
1 Albert Johnson (c)..--... Bamburg, S. C._------ M. H. Sherrod
2 Ethel Woods (w)......... Ridgeland, S. C.-..- C. R. Long
2 Hutson Turner (w)....... U.S. Authorities ------ W. J. Morse
2 Grace Wilson (w)........ U. S. Authorities.----- J. C. McCarthy
7 M. M. Talkin (w)........ Statesboro, Ga........ J. J. Murphy
9 Claud Carter (w)........ St. Johns Co. Fla...... J. J. Murphy
10 C. D. Brown (tc)__..... Midville, Ga.......... Lt. P. J. Eivers
10 C. Inmann (w).......... Midville, Ga.--...-.-- J. J. Murphy
10 E. D. Coleman (w)....... Midville, Ga..--_--..- M. Seully
13 J. Lawrence (c) ---------- Emanuel County. -.... C. R. Long
14 Green Preston (c)........ Hancock County ------ C. R. Long
15 Ed Mclntosh(c)...-..- U. S. Authorities------ J. McGrath
17 Joe Smurda (ic)__..-.. Liberty County.------ M. Seully
17 Andy P. Coff (w)........ U. S. Authorities.-..-. M. Seully
20 Wm. Barber(c)...-...--. Tattnall County....... C. R. Long
23 ChanKeeCm)-...... S. S. Franklin...__..
T. E. McAlpin and M. G. Cohen
28 Robt. Walton (c)........ S. S. Yamacraw.___ M. G. Cohen
28 J. F. Clark (w).......... Albany, Ga...-____...
J. K. Beach and C. T. Christie
166 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Fugitives from Juatice (continued)
Date Fugitive Arrested for Arrested by
March
4 Raymond Smoak (to)..... U. S. Authorities. . _ .
C. R. Long and C. T. Christie
7 Estelle McCluny (to)..... U. S. Authorities___ C. R. Long
7 G. S. Hutson(u;)-------- IT-S. Authorities___ C. R. Long
7 Otto Carbon (to).-_.__.__ S. S. Yamacraw.......
M. Scully and M. G. Cohen
13 Henry Lutz (tc).--.------ Jacksonville, Fla._.____ J, J. Murphy
16 Gertie Parks (c)......... Atlanta, Ga.--._...... J.O.Wallace
20 Unno Kytanner (w) ...... S. S. Parley....____--. T. E. McAlpin
M Sam Lowther (tc)-------- Liberty County....... C. R. Long
21 Isaac Jackson (c)--....-. Darien, Ga.__..-.-..
J. Million and J. J. McGinley
24 G. Alderman (w)-__--- Statesboro, Ga.._.__ W. H. Fleming
24 Mrs. E. J. Craven (w).... U. S. Authorities.___ Chief Meldrim
24 Dave Goldstein (w)...... U.S. Authorities. ___
J. J. Murphy and M. Scully
25 Clyde Pearson (a?)....... U. S. Authorities...... C. R. Long
25 Harold Hayes (to)........ U. S. Authorities...... C. R. Long
26 Bell Manigault(c) ....... Whitehall, S. C........ J. W. Pruitt
April
2 Geo. Coleman (c)........ Screven County...--.. Christie and Beach
7 Robt. Gadson(c)........ S. S. Yamacraw-...-.. J. J. McGinley
7 T. H. Walton (ID). ------- Emanuel County..... _ C. R. Long
14 E. Henderson (c)........ Jacksonville, Fla....... Sgt. E. D. Alexander
15 W. G. Osbome (w)....... S. S. Joachim_____ Lovett and Darsey
15 Theo Excell (w)......... S.S.Joachim_-....- Lovett and Darsey
15 J. S. Stoddard (tc)....... U. S. Authorities.._ - J. J. Murphy
15 Jas. Powell (c) ...--.. Brunswick, Ga,....... J. J. Murphy
16 A. Lopez(w)............ Jacksonville, Fla......_ DeLeon and Beach
22 Arthur Haddon(to)...... Emngham County..-.. Scully and Cohen
23 Council Rountree (to)___ Swainsboro, Ga........ Bent ley and Christie
28 Max Green (to).__..... New York City.-..... M. G. Cohen
29 Wilkin Grant (c)......... Beaufort, S. C......... DeLeon and Beach
30 H. C. Bull (u>)__.___ Beaufort, S. C......... Beach and Parker
May
6 Harry Davis(c)...-.-... Americus, Ga.__--... W.J.Morse
7 OrviDe Lowther (w)...... Waynesboro, Ga.___ C. R. Long
9 Sam Haslam (c). -. - -__ Dooley County___.. Cohen and Scully
25 S. Boman (to)........... S. S. Yamacraw....... S. Bradley
June
1 Win. Jackson (ur)........ U. S. Authorities...... M. Scully
2 Willie Smith (<)---__-..._ Washington, Ga....... C. R. Long
2 George Griffin (c)____. Barnville, S. C..__._ W.H.Fleming
6 Raymond Gilbert (c)..... S. S. Anglo-Canadian. . Murphy and Bentley
7 JoeHicks(c)___.-... Springfield, Ga........ M. Seage
9 Oliver Claybom (c)___ . Ben Hill County. . __ C. R. Long
10 Joe Beckam (c)-.---...-. Bentwood, Ga....-.--. Long and Howard
11 Sam Boman (to)......... S. S. Yamacraw....... T. J. Cameron
17 Isaac Ropey (c)__..... Bryan County........ H.P.Howard
22 R. T. Fletcher (to).... _ U. S. Authoriteis...... C. R. Long
27 Richard Albany (c)...... Bryan County. ....... Lt. Woods and Long
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 167
Fugitives from Justice (continued)
Date Fugitive Arrested for Arrested by
July
1 Jim Bell (c)...._...... Augusta, Ga.......... M-Scully
3 John MeCraeken (w)___ S.S. Anglo-Mexican... R. H. Mallette
3 W. Watts (w)........... S.S. Anglo-Mexican... R. H. Mallette
3 Mattie Washington (c)... Jacksonville, Fla.... P. M. Hendrix
3 Geo. Washington (c)._.._ Jacksonville, Fla...... P. M. Hendrix
5 John Manigo (c)__..... Jenkins County....... E- L. Bell
5 Chas Jackson (c) -.-...... Screven County....... J. P. DeLeon
7 ChasHayms(c)......... Screven County....... J. F. Bentley
14 C. L. Ester (w) .......... Apalachicola, Fla. ---.. Murphy and Cohen
17 Sam Gippis (>)----._--- Springfield, IU..._... M. G. Cohen
23 Arthur Gaffney (c)__.. tinion County, S- C.... C. R. Long
23 John Grant(c).......... Mitchell County...... C. R. Long
28 Ed Jackson (c).......... Burke County........ M. Scully
31 H. J. Fields (w).......... Tifton, Ga._........ T. J. Cameron
1 BenCooper(c)_....... Jacksonville, Fla....... E. F. Davis
3 May Nelson (w) --------- Knoxville, Tenn. ......
Lt. Woods, Murphy and Scully
3 W. E. Fordan(ui)......-- Knoxville, Tenn.......
Lt. Woods, Murphy and Scully
4 Will Jones (c)-.____._- Mobile, Ala.._____. Lt. Woods and Wmn
5 Chas Verney(w)......... S. S. Yamacraw.__.. H. W. Wright
5 J. E. Mock (MI)_..._. Effingham County__ T. J. Cameron
5 J, A. King(w)___... U. S. Authorities___ J. O. Wallace
12 John Smith (c) ---------- Burgan, N. C.-------- Cohen and Christie
24 Lillie Stewart (w)........ Bryan County..-----. C. R. Long
26 Paul Sheffield (c)-.-.--.. Walterboro, S. C.... H. L. Price
29 Robt. L- Mincy (c)__.. Valdosta, Ga,___... Murphy and Scully
31 Ernest McGee (c) __ . . . . Washington, Ga....... Murphy and Scully
Sept.
4 Will Johnson (c)--.-.-.-- Jacksonville, Fla-...-- M. Scully
7 Ivadella Rhone (c) ------- Jenkins County ------- M- Scully
8 George Moye(c)__.__ Ola, S. C.---___... W. H. Fleming
8 Joe Bass (to)------_... Columbia, S. C.------- Murphy and DeLeon
8 T. Brentwood (w)........ Albany, Ga..._.__ M. Scully
16 Alex Clark (>)__.__... Bulloch County....... J. J. Murphy
25 J. H. Mayes(w).-------- Salisbury, N. C. .__- M. G. Cohen
27 Wm. Washington (c) __. Screven County. ...... Wright and Herman
Oct.
2 Ralph Stewart (w)....... Orlando, Fla.......... J, C. McCarthy
6 F. J. Bland (to)...._... Bulloch County....--. W. J. Morse
7 Clifford Doyle (c)........ Bulloch County..-.,.. Christie and Beach
7 Harry Dawes(tc)_........ S. S. Ornon --..--.--. T. A. Quarterman
12 John Trice (c)...__.... Atlanta, Ga.---__---._ J. J. Murphy
13 J. Vance (w)............ Charleston, S. C...--.. J. J. Murphy
13 Levin Elliott (w)......... BlufftonS. C.____. J. Million
14 H. M. Poythress (w)..... Ridgeland S. C. ....... A. T. Jackson
21 EmilThorsen(tc)..---... S. S. Uller....._._..__ W. S. Winn
29 Jasper Anderson (c) ------ Screven County....... C. T. Christie
30 Willie Davis (c)__----- Sumter, S. C.______ Cohen and DeLeon
31 L. L. Vosburg(t0)__ Greenville, S. C. .. Murphy and DeLeon
168 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Fugitives from Justice (continued)
Date Fugitive Arrested for Arrested by
Nov.
3 Morgan OlifF(tc) ........ Statesboro, Ga..-.-.-. Beach and Christie
4 Joe Barnes(c)----------. Statesboro. Ga.------- Cohen and Christie
5 O. L. Sheely
alias Duffy (;)---_--__ Columbia, S. C....... C. R. Long
11 OrvilleLowther(u;)------ Jesup, Ga.-..-....... H. C. Hutson
15 John Brown (c)-.---..... Brooklet, Ga.......... R.G.Williams
22 Harrison Rice (c)........ Fitzgerald, Ga......... P. L. Anderson
22 Bob White (c)_........ Statesboro, Ga........ C. R. Long
24 J. G. Simmond (tc).--...- Anderson S. C......... C. R. Long
28 Silas Williams (c)........ Sumter, S. C._...... DeLeon and Cohen
29 Will Robinson (c)........ Waynesboro, Ga...... - C. R. Long
30 Granderson Lark (c) ----- Sylvania, Ga.......... T. E. McAlpin
Dec.
2 H. L. Eunice (c)--_ __._._ Appling County....... C. R. Long
7 J. H. Xorman(u:)-------_ S. S. Yamacraw....... W. S. Winn
10 John Williams (c) -------- U. S. Authorities ------ Beach and Anderson
11 A.W. EoTg(w).......... S. S. Ester............ H. H. Kemp
11 JohnHohnberg(tc)...... S. S. Ester............ H. H. Kemp
12 E. J. Howard (w).. ...... Knoxville, Tenn....... M. Scully
12 C. H. Smith (w)......... Columbia, S. C-------
Lt. Eivers and McCarthy
20 Charles Mitchell (c) ..... U. S. Authorities...... C. R. Long
20 Isiah Scott (c)_ -------- U. S. Authorities...... C. R. Long
20 Will Jones(c)........... U. S. Authorities..-..- C. R. Long
20 Steve Jones (c).--_._..__ U. S. Authorities...... C. R. Long
24 W. H. Parker(c).--..... Columbus, Ga......... S. Berner
25 Chas. Cowan(c)......... Bryan County........ C. R. Long
25 Wm. Carter (c)-.......-. Columbus, Ga..-----_. Bentley and Beach
26 H. Hillholtden (to)_______ U. S. Navy........... G. L. Smith
28 Brooks Love(c)......... Statesboro, Ga........ M.B.Fleming
30 Homer Reed (w)......... Baxley, Ga._........ J. F. Bentley
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 169
PRISONERS HELD FOR SAFE KEEPING FOR
OFFICERS PASSING THROUGH CITY
Date Prisoner Officer Arrested for
Feb.
5 B. S. Bond (w).......... T. R. Haddock........ U. S. Navy
5 Ed McAndrews (w) ...... T. R. Raddock_ ----- U. S. Navy
9 Wm. Baxter (c).__-.-.. Sheriff Hendricks------ Tampa, Fla.
16 J. T. Robinson (to) ...... Sheriff Johnson........ U. S. Authorities
March
7 Jack Brown (w) ......... Sheriff Bolick......... Ashburn, Ga.
7 John Lewis (c)........ Sheriff Green...--...- Dublin, Ga.
13 Wm. Kinlaw(c)......... Sheriff White......... Beaufort, S. C.
14 H. C. Whitney (w)....... Sheriff Silver.......... Fernandina, Fla.
21 Dan Lewis (c)........... Sheriff Cavery....--.. Lawrence County
30 W. E. O'Connell (>)..... J. Murnane.......-.-- U. S. Navy
30 James Bradley (w)------- J. Murnane...-------- U. S. Navy
April
17 Essie Jackson (c) ........ Sheriff Nicholson...... Grady County
17 Morris Smith (c)......... Sheriff Phillips-.------ Jasper County, S. C.
23 Walter Stewart (c)....... Sheriff Donaldson ..... Statesboro, Ga.
June
3 Rpbt. Wantz (c)......... Sheriff Striekland...... Swainsboro, Ga.
8 Bill Williams (c)......... Sheriff Joyner ....-..- Screven County
18 Harry Long (w)......... Sheriff Post...-..--... Huntington, Pa.
20 SamBoman(w).-------- H. Borquin........... U. S. Navy
24 Arthur Welton (to)....... R. F. Harrock........ U. S. Navy
July
5 Dan Watson (c)......... Sheriff Harper........ Bulloch County
17 Henry Williams (c)....... Sheriff Srtickland...... Emanuel County
17 John Hicks (c)........... Sheriff Striekland ... Bmanuel County
17 Jim Houston (c)......... Sheriff Striekland...... Emanuel County
Aug.
8 Jupiter McLeod (c)...... Sheriff Raulerson...... Liberty County
Oct.
18 John Griffith ()).....__ Corp. Klayer......... U. S. Army
Nov.
9 J. A. Luke (w)........... Sheriff Dixon.. ....... Ben Hill County
17 Hutson Mosely (c)....... Sheriff Mitchell....... Bulloch County
24 Holmes Leaker (c)-..-... Sheriff Daniel......... Bulloeh County
24 J. T. Anderson (c).-...-. Sheriff Daniel......... Bulloch County
26 Lee Owens (c)--......... Sheriff Davis.......... Pierce County
26 Marion Miller (c)........ Sheriff Dayis...... Pierce County
28 Will Brown (c).......... Sheriff Striekland...... Emanuel County
28 Joe Stewart (c) __...... Sheriff Striekland-. Emanuel County
Dec.
1 E. H. Eubanks (w) ....... Sheriff Morgan........ Augusta, Ga.
7 John Bash (c)-.......-.. G. S. Godbold........ A. C. L. Authorities
9 Jafus Brown (>)..____ H. E. Barley......... U. S. Authorities
15 Jas. Cosgrovefa) ....... T. E. Flaherty........
M. &. M. T. Co- Authorities
20 Granville Seville (w)..... W. R. Mitchell...___ Chatham Co. Police
21 H. S. Hooker (w) ........ G. D. Howell U. S. N._ U. S. Navy
23 H. L. Powers(to).------- Sheriff Powers... Columbia, N. C.
FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE ARRESTED FOR THE SAVANNAH POLICE
DEPARTMENT IN OTHER CITIES
DATE
January 10
January 10
April 5
July 22
August 30
September 19
September 19
September 24
FUGITIVE
WillieWright... . ...
Jas. Seabrook... ...
Geo. Hampton.. .... .
R. Alien.... ..........
M. Green.......... ........
Wm. Wren._..... ........
Chas. Wren ..............
Robert Brown...........
Color
.....C...
......a...
......C......
.....w...
......C......
......C......
.....C......
......C......
CHARGE
Burglary.. .......
Burglary.... ......
Jumping Bond..
"Pnrfyprv
Larceny..............
Larceny........ .....
Larceny.. ...........
Larceny... ...........
Arrested at
Augusta........ .. ..
Augusta.. ............
Leesville........ .....
Augusta.. ............
Meldrim.... .........
Guyton..............
Guyton..............
Jacksonville...... ..
Brought Back by
M. Scully
M. Scully
C. T. Christie
J. K. Beach
J. J. Murphy
C. T. Christie
C. T. Christie
M. G. Cohen

55
P
M
1
REPORTS OF LOST CHILDREN, ACCIDENTS, ANIMALS IMPOUNDED, ETC.
Lost Children.......... ........................
Babies Deserted.. ........................
Attempted Suicides........................
Suicides........................ ....................
Offices and Stores Found Open....
Animals Impounded.......... ............
Electric Lights Reported Out ......
Defective Sidewalks..... .................
Loose Water Box Covers....... .......
Water Mains Leaking....................
Dead Bodies Found........................
Deaths Reported to Coroner........
Deaths by Drowning......................
Motorcycles and |Autos Found....
Accidents
Automobile...................................
Motorcycle..... .................................
Street Car............. ...........................
Other Vehicles..... .... ........... ........
Jan
8
0
3
0
19
8
27
28
4
8
1
3
0
0
10
4
2
1
Feb JMch|Apr |May| JunjJuly|Aug|Sept|Oct JNov|Dec|Total
0
0
0
1
36
12
18
1
1
2
0
2
0
0
5
2
2
4
0
0
1
0
38
8
17
0
0
5
3
1
1
0
14
4
2
2
0
0
1
2
40
5
8
4
0
3
0
4
0
0
7
3
3
3
0
0
1
1
29
11
10
0
0
7
0
4
0
0
6
3
2
2
1
0
2
2
23
7
31
4
1
5
2
2
3
0
9
3
2
0
1
0
2
0
23
10
31
5
2
6
0
2
2
2
7
1
1
5
0
0
1
0
26
8
29
4
0
6
0
4
2
1
4
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
44
5
16
4
0
4
1
1
0
3
3
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
40
10
22
12
0
7
1
0
0
3
8
1
2
2
0
0
1
0
33
9
25
3
0
7
0
1
0
2
8
4
1
2
0
3
0
0
33
14
42
1
0
8
0
1
0
4
7
4
2
2
10
3
12
7
384
106
2,811
66
8
68
8
25
8
15
88
30
20
27
MAYOR'S ANNUALREPORT 17
172 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PAID FIRE DEPARTMENT
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
JOHN H. MONROE
CHIEF ENGINEER

FIRE COMMITTEE REPRESENTING THE CITY OF
SAVANNAH, YEAR 1914
W. A. PIGMAN, Chairman
W. J. PIERPONT W. W. WILLIAMSON
JOHN E. FOY H. B. GRIMSHAW
FIRE DEPARTMENT
JOHN H. MONROE........................ .................Chief Engineer
A. JOHN TOSHACH ...........First Assistant Chief Engineer
T. J. FOGERTY...... ... ... ....Second Assistant Chief Engineer
VOLNEY B. JONES....................................................Secretary
J. C. McDOWELL.. ...............................Electrical Insspector
T. P. SANDIFORD...........Supt. Fire Alarm and Telegraph
E. H. TODD................Asst. Supt. Fire Alarm and Telegraph
WALTER ZEALEY.................Superintendent of Machinery
S. W. PECK.... ..... ..Assistant Superintendent of Machinery
J. C. TYSON............................... ...Chief Fire Inspector
F. J. KILROY...... ... . .................... .Fire Inspector
F. M. GIRAND....................................... .........Fire Inspector
J. A. BERGMAN.................................................Fire Inspector
N. J. FRIZELLE, Jr.............................................Fire Inspector
C. W. TAYLOR. . ... ...... ................... ..... ....Fire Inspector
CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT
Savannah, Ga., January 1, ^915.
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah:
Gentlemen:
I have the honor to submit to you my second annual
Report of this Department, for the year ending December.
31, 1914. This being the Twenty-fifth Annual Report of the
Paid Fire Department, of the City of Savannah.
At the close of the year the total number of members
of the Department was as follows:
1 Chief Engineer.
1 First Assistant Chief Engineer.
1 Second Assistant Chief Engineer.
1 Secretary.
1 Electrical Inspector.
1 Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Telegraph.
1 Assistant Supt. of Fire Alarm and Telegraph.
1 Superintendent of Machinery.
1 Assistant Superintendent of Machinery.
1 Chief Fire Inspector.
5 Fire Inspectors.
3 Chauffeurs.
7 Captains of Engine Companies.
1 Captain of Truck Company.
1 Captain of Chemical Company.
178_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
7 Lieutenants of Engine Companies.
1 Lieutenant of Truck Company.
1 Lieutenant of Chemical Company.
6 Engineers of Pumpers.
62 Privates.
2 Substitutes.
106 Total.
1 Vacancy.
During the year 1914, changes in the Department were
made as follows:
1 Superintendent of Machinery Resigned.
1 Superintendent of Machinery Appointed.
6 Privates Resigned.
1 Private Dismissed.
2 Privates Died.
2 Privates Pensioned.
13 Privates Appointed.
1 Engineer Pensioned.
1 Engineer Appointed.
1 Asst. Supt. of Fire Alarm and Telegraph Appointed.
1 Fire Inspector Appointed.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 179
FIRE DEPARTMENT BY COMPANIES
Fire Station No. 1
518-522 Broughton Street, West
Name Position Service
Years Months
J. Murphey........................Captain............................ 14
T. J. Duffey.....................Lieutenant........................ 5
C. D. Henderson............ .Engineer.......................... 2 6
Fritz Goritz......................Private.............................. 11
M. J. Roache....................Private.............................. 14
T. Ryan............ ...............Private.............................. 6
T. Welsh............................Private............................. 11
T. G. Kearney..................Private............................. 11
G- F. Byrnes........ ............Private............................. 6
Fire Station No. 2
Indian and West Broad Streets
Name Position Service
Yean Month*
A. M. Rogers....................Captain............................ 16
W. J. Powers.................Lieutenant........................ 3
G. F. Kilroy......................Engineer.......................... 10
M. F. Harvey...................Private............................. 8
L. F. Henderson................Private............................. 16
G. Campsen......................Private.............................. 6
T. Foran...........................Private.............................. 1 5
L. W. Hathaway..............Private.............................. 2
C. D. QuarIes....................Private.............................. 4
180_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _______
J. W. Whallen..................Private.............................. 8
A. Smith............................Private............................. 4
B. BIumberg.__.................Private............................. 2 5
A. C. Rollerson................Private.............................. 9
Fire Station No. 3
Oglethorpe Ave. and Abercorn Streets
Name " Position Service
Y*n Month*
C. V. Egense....................Captain............................ 30
J. J. Wbeelan....................Lieutenant...................... 11
S. C. Gardner ...................Engineer.......................... 1 2
R. B. Hearne....................Private.............................. 15
J. P. Duffey......................Private............................. 18
J. L. Eady..........................Private.............................. 1 9
J. C. Hirt..........................Private.............................. 9
Jas. Hunter........................Private.............................. 7
S. V. Paul..........................Private ............................ 1 9
W. E. Turner ...................Private ............................. 1
Fire Station No. 4
606 Barnard Street
Name Position Service
Ye*n Month*
D. P. Murphy..................Captain............................ 16
T. J. Fogerty....................Lieutenant....................... 9
W. F. White......................Engineer.......................... 9
G. C. Donnelly.................Private.............................. 24
W. H. Remley..................Private.............................. 13
E. J. Seymour..................Private.............................. 8
E. M. Bart.......................Private.............................. 2
Geo. H. Schroder..............Private ............................. 1
R. P. Shehan....................Private............................ 5
J. B. Minor........................Private ............................. 6
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________ 181
Fire Station No. 5
11 Henry Street, East
Name Position Service
Yean Month*
D. V. Whitaker................Captain............................ 15
M. F. Sullivan..................Lieutenant........................ 12
Leo Walsh..........................Engineer.......................... 8
W. J. Hanlon....................Private.............................. 4
W. S. Blanton..................Private............................. 5
O. H. Clark........................Private............................. 1 5
C. W. EHis.......................Private.............................. 9 4
J. O'Leary ........................Private............................ 21
A. Turner....-....................-Private.............................. 9
W. J. Futch.....................Private.............................. 16
Fire Station No. 6
Thirty-Eighth and Barnard Streets
Name Position Service
Yean Month*
C. M. Burnham................Captain............................ 18
Chas. Stein........................Lieutenant........................ 7
C. Christensen..................Engineer.......................... 16
W. J. Cleary......................Private.............................. 30
J. A. McGrath..................Private.............................. 14
W. L. DuFour..................Private.............................. 6
J. J. Hearne......................Private.............................. 19
R. L. Home......................Private.............................. 8
M.Shefftall........................Private.............................. 7
J. W. Wittee......................Private.............................. 5
Fire Station No. 7
Gwinnett and Paulsen Streets
Name Position Service
Year* Month*
E. V. Pacetti....................Captain............................ 16
B. Leddy............................Lieutenant....................... 16
182 ___ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
S. W. Peck........................Engineer.......................... 9
J. J. Buttimer....................Private.............................. 6
J. J. Fitzpatrick................Private.............................. 9
B. E. Sbeppard................Private.............................. 9
T. A. Maguire........... ....Private.............................. 2
F. E. Leonard....................Private............................. 3
J. H. Bell-................,......Private........................... . 6
A. L. Alexander................Private.............................. 7
Chemical Company No. 1
Ogelthorpe Ave. and Abercorn Street
Name Position Service
Yean Months
Geo. Johnson....................Captain............................ 14
J. F. Hartnoll....................Lieutenant........................ 5
E. T. Morrisey..................Private.......................... ... 13
R. J. O'Keefe.......... .... ....Private............................. 7
J. P. Chaplin...................Private.......................... 4
T. Fogarty.............. .........Private............................ 1
Substitute Firemen
W. F. Fallon L. Spronz
Truck Company No. 1
Oglethorpe Ave. and Abercorn Street
Name Position Service
Years Month*
A. P. McFarland..............Captain.......................... 29
T. Flynn...........................Lieutenant........................ 16
J. C. Bailey....................Tillerman........................ 11
B. F. Potter.... .................Ladderman.................... 3
H. V. Summerlin..............Ladderman................... 2
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________183
J. C. Shehan......................Ladderman...................... 11
J. R. Wohanka..................Ladderman...................... 7
C. H. Zace........................Ladderman...................... 3
A. Hirt..............................Driver Asst. Chief's Car 5
J. P. Kavanaugh..............Driver Chief's Car.......... 8
W. F. Carrick..................'..Driver Chief's Car......... 11
R. E. Long........................Ladderman..................... 2
Pensioners
Month
J. J. Connolly, Pensioned January 22, 1913................ $62 50
C. A. Christian, Pensioned March 12, 1912................ 50 00
John Carrick, Pensioned March 8, 1911...................... 37 50
W. W. Pringle, Pensioned February 4, 1914................ 45 00
F. H. Thompson, Pensioned February 4, 1914............ 45 00
Louis Treboney, Pensioned February 4, 1914.............. 50 00
Chimney Sweeping Department

T. A. Gunderson..............Chimney Sweeper................ 2 Years
184 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ESTIMATED VALUE OF DEPARTMENT
PROPERTY
Lands........................... ................................... $ 34,600 00
Buildings................................................................ 88,000 00
Fire Alarm System...... .................. .................... 35,524 25
Live Stock................. ................................................ 2,400 00
Fire Apparatus........ ....................... ........................ 114,950 00
Shop Tools..................... .......................................... 2,100 00
Hose.......... ........................................ ........................ 15,283 80
Harness................................................ .................... 350 00
Furniture and Fixtures........... ............................... 4,600 00
Material and Supplies.................................... ........ 200 00
Uniform Equipment.................................................. 870 00
Motorcycle...... ................................................... 250 00
$299,128 05
ROLLING STOCK
Automobile Pumpers and Hose Wagons, American LaFrance Fire Engine Company, Manufacturers
The rolling stock in this department consists of the
following Fire Apparatus:
7 Automobile Pumpers, Type 12, 100 H. P., develops 110
H. P., 6 Cylinders each.
4 Automobile Combinations Chemical and Hose Wagons,
Type 10, 48 H. P., develops 72 H. P., 4 Cylinders each,
40-gallon tanks under seats.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________185
1 Automobile Chemical Engine, Triple Tank, two 50-gallon,
and one 40-gallon Type 10, 40 H. P., develops 72 H. P.,
4 cylinders.
Reserve Steam Engines
2 First Size Double Pump American La-France Fire Engines.
1 Double Extra First Size Double Pump, American LaFrance Fire Engine.
Reserve Chemical Engines
1 Chemical Engine with Holloway Double Tank, 85 gallons
each,
Hook and Ladder Trucks
1 American La-France Aerial Extension Ladder, 75 feet long.
1 Hays Aerial Extention Ladder, 55 feet long.
1 Ramsey & Go's, Light Steel Frame Truck, with 35-gallon
Chemical Tank hung under frame.
2 City Service Trucks, Savannah Fire Department make,
each with a 65-gallon Chemical Tank hung under frame.
Hook and Ladder Truck in Reserve
1 Leverich Wood Frame Tiller Truck.
Supply and Gasoline Wagons
2 One-Horse Wagons for Hauling Supplies.
1 One-Horse Wagon equipped with Gasoline Tank and Turret Nozzle.
Officers' Automobiles
1 Chief Engineer's Stevens-Duryea Automobile, 24 H. P.
1 First Assistant Chief Engineer's Automobile, Hudson
No. 20 H. P.
186 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
IN MEMORIAM
George Mouro, Assistant Superintendent
This man entered the Savannah Fire Department under
date of February 1, 1873, at that time being connected with
the Washington Hose Company, then elected Secretary of
that Company February 6, 1873; and elected Assistant Chief
January 2, 1882. He died December 20, 1906, from injuries
sustained at a fire December 19, 1906.
E. P. Daley
This man entered the service of the Savannah Fire Department, on October 6,1902, as hoseman of Engine Company
No. 5, and died December 20, 1906, from injuries sustained
at a fire under date of December 19, 1906.
H. J. Eady
This man entered the Department as hoseman under
date of November 9, 1904, doing duty at Engine Company
No. 5, and was killed in the discharge of his duty at a fire
December 19, 1906.
H. J. Larkin
This man entered the Department under date of February 1, 1886, and died from injuries received sliding down
a pole answering Fire Alarm Box 123, January 3, 1911.
Henry F. Corley
This man entered the service of the Department on
February 3, 1890, and died May 10, 1913, from injuries sus-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 187
tained while responding to a false alarm from Box 142, at
Montgomery and Forty-second Streets, on August 1, 1912.
Prior to his death he was pensioned by the Department.
John C. Henderson
This man fiirst entered the Department under date of
June 6, 1895, and died of natural causes under date of January 10, 1914.
Augustus Pritchard
This man entered the Department under date of July
2, 1910, and died of natural causes under date of March
21, 1914.
188 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ACCIDENTS OCCURRING DURING THE YEAR
January 18, 1914. Fritz Goritz of Engine Company
No. 1, had his hand mashed while moving a ladder in the
building. Treated from Red Cross Box on Pumper.
February 2, 1914. First Assistant Chief Engineer's Automobile with Chief T. J. Fogarty, machine being run by
Albert Hirt, was forced into the curbing at Charlton and
Abercorn Streets in order to avoid a Street Car, breaking
off the two front wheels. Fire Alarm Box 41.
February 8, 1914. John Ohsiek at West Broad and
Bay Street, had his hand burned, same dressed from Red
Cross Box by Engine Company No. 2.
April 12, 1914. While Engine Company's No. 2 Pumper
was answering Box 24 at 10.44 p. m., she threw a tire at
Liberty and West Broad Streets, and skidded into curbing,
smashing rear right wheel and damaging gas tank; no one
injured.
April 25, 1914. J. J. Hearne, of Engine Company No.
6, injured by having a stepladder fall on him while closing
the Station House doors; he sustained slight injuries to his
head and shoulders.
May 27, 1914. At 6-00 p. m. a film ignited in the
Princess Theatre on East Broughton Street, which caused a
slight panic, but by the careful handling of the moving picture
machine by the operator in charge, also the management of
the theatre, no one was injured.
July 2, 1914. While Truck Company No. 1 was returning
from fire, entering the Station House, at Oglethorpe Ave.
and Abercorn Streets, Street Car No. 473 run too close and
had a glass window in side of car smashed. No one was
injured.
November 2, 1914. R. L. Home, of Engine Company
No. 6, while coming down pole answering Fire Alarm Box
_______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ________189
147 at 1.30 a. m. sprained his ankle. Same treated from
the Red Cross Box, by members of the Company.
November 5, 1914. While S. W. Peck, Engineer of
. Engine Company No. 7, was in the act of cranking an automobile, had his right arm broken.
November 8, 1914. While Engine Company No. 3 was
watering down the playground, Street Car No. 478, run
over and cut into one length of hose belonging to the Company.
November 11, 1914. S. Wilson, a citizen at 123 West
41st Street, was badly burned about his hands and face,
and treated by the members of Engine Company No. 6,
from the Red Cross Box.
November 14, 1914. Engine Company No. 7's Pumper,
struck a wagon while answering Fire Alarm Box 147, mashing
fender of machine. No one injured.
December 11, 1914. Professor Gray's little girl badly
burned, at 834 Park Ave. East, same treated by the members
of Engine Company No. 7. The child afterwards died from
the burns sustained.
December 1, 1914. Engine Company No. 6, received a
telephone message from the Savannah Lumber Company, at
10.13 a. m.; upon arrival found there was no fire in progress
but that a tube had blown out of the boiler in the plant,
thereby badly scalding a negro fireman named Jim Kearse.
He was treated by the members of the crew from the Red
Cross Box.
December 25, 1914. While Engine Company No. 2's
Pumper was responding to Fire Alarm Box 24 at 6.15 p. m.,
she skidded at West Broad and Liberty Streets, smashing
the right front wheel. No one was injured.
190 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR
Electrical Inspectors Fees............................................ $1,637 25
Receipts from Chimney Sweeping ............................ 324 90
Receipts from Barrels and Sacks............................. 14 35
Old Hose Turned Over to the Street and Lane
Department, 1,323 feet at 40 cents...................... 529 20
Gasoline Supplied the Street and Lane Department, 728 gallons..................................................... 76 97
Lubricating Oil Supplied the Street and Lane Department, 22>^ gallons at 32 cents....................... 7 20
Old Automobile Rims Returned to Dayton Rubber
Manufacturing Company, Dayton, Ohio, and
Credit Received on Tire Orders............................. 77 00
Old Rubber Tires Sold..................*............................ 7 20
Total................................................................ $2,674 07
HOSE SUPPLY
Engine Conpamy No.l.............. 55 Lengths....... 2,750 Feet
Engine Company No. 2............ 48 Lengths........ 2,400 Feet
Engine Company No. 3............ 60 Lengths........ 3,232 Feet
Engine Company No. 4............ 44 Lengths........ 2,200 Feet
Engine Company No. 5........... 44 Lengths........ 2,200 Feet
Engine Company No. 6............ 35 Lengths........ 1,750 Feet
Engine Company No. 7 ............ 44 Lengths........ 2,200 Feet
Chemical Company No. 1........ 5 Lengths........ 250 Feet
Total....................................335 Lengths....... 16,982 Feet
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 191
MISCELLANEOUS
Under date of February 4, 1914, Firemen W. W. Pringle
and F. H. Thompson, members of this Department, who
had served the Department for many years, and upon
more than one occasion sustaining injuries while in the discharge of their duty, were pensioned on one-half pay. On
February 18, 1914, Engineer Louis Treboney, who had served
the Department both as a private and as an engineer for the
better portion of his life, was pensioned.
On or about the first of the year, the city's Chimney
Sweeper, who had heretofore appeared on the rolls of the
Street and Lane Department, was transferred to this Department. The total amount paid into this Department during
the year for Chimney Sweeping fees being $324.90.
As noted in the report of Mr. T. P. Sandiford, Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Telegraph, Mr. E. H. Todd was
appointed as Assistant to Mr. Sandiford, under date of September 1, 1914. The constant growth of the city demanded
an Assistant to the Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Telegraph, and I am absolutely convinced that it will be the result of a better fire alarm and telegraph system.
On April 23rd, this Department took part in the floral
parade given in honor of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, having first arranged open telephone lines along the
line of march, in order that the Department might be in close
touch with any telephone or box alarm. Chemical Engine No.
1 was carefully decorated by the members of this Department
also Mr. George Adair, with flowers furnished both by Mr.
Adair, and the friends of the members of the Department.
At my request the American La-France Fire Engine Co.,
of Elmira, N. Y., sent one of their experts, also an officer of
the Company, to make a thorough examination of the several
192 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
motor apparatuses furnished by them. They found that the
motors and pumps were not giving the same satisfaction and
service as the more improved motors and pumps now being
built by them. Taking into consideration the fact that Savannah was one of the first cities in the United States to motorize its entire department, all apparatus being built by the
American LaFrance Fire Engine Company, they decided to
install, without cost to the city, the more modern and improved pumps and motors, which has been done.
During the year this Department experienced four fires
for which it was necessary to send in calls for assistance, in
addition to the apparatus responding on first alarm, as follows:
February 25, 1914, at 9.18 p. m., Box 35, fire at 430 West
Broad Street, used as a saloon and residence, belonging to J.
Juchter estate, and occupied by John Eliopolo. The call
for assistance was sounded at 9.21 p. m.
March 17, 1914, at 3.22 p. m., Box 8, at River and Whitaker Streets, straw and hay warehouse, belonging to the
Henry Blun estate, and occupied by C. N. Roberds. This
building being located on the river front, it was necessary
to call for assistance within a few minutes after the Department had arrived.
September 1, 1914, at 11.45 p. m., Box 12, 318 West
Broughton Street, furniture store occupied by J. B. Whitaker,
and owned by R. C. Balfour. Assistance call sounded at
11.52 p. m.
December 26, 1914, at 2.49 a. m.,Box 35, at 408 and 410
West Broad Street, dry goods and clothing store belonging to
Marcus & Co., and owned by George Christopher. Three 2's
was sounded at 2.55 p.m., and later, at 3.29, all the Departments were called out.
The four fires mentioned above cover the largest losses
sustained during the year. The losses in question being on
the contents, with the exception of the Marcus fire, in which
case the contents and building were a total loss.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________193
The two most destructive fires with which we had to
contend with during the year were that of the Atlantic Coast
Line wharf, which occurred under date of March 25th, and
that of the Marcus building at 408 and 410 West Broad Street,
which occurred under date of December 26th.
The fire on the Atlantic Coast Line wharf was first detected by Policeman Brown at Bay and Bull Streets. He
at once proceeded to Fire Alarm Box No. 7, at Drayton and
Bay Streets, and listened at the box to ascertain if an alarm
had been sent in. Not hearing any, he proceeded to Fire
Alarm Box No. 6, at Habersham and Bay Streets, where he
again tried to find out if an alarm had yet been sounded from
the Atlantic Coast Line wharf. Not hearing any, he proceeded
to East Broad and Bay Streets, where he pulled Box No. 5,
which was at 5.30 a. m. Policeman Brown says that when
he first detected the fire, that the entire heavens were a
mass of flames and smoke; upon arrival of the Department to
the scene of the fire, the rosin fields, fertilizer sheds, overhead
tramway, lumber wharves, and the British steamship Parley,
were ablaze. While the Department was under way to the
scene of the fire, Fire Alarm Box 75 was sounded, which was
possibly due to the fact that the watchman on duty at the
Atlantic Coast Line had been awakened to his duty. I would
also call your attention to the fact that this part of the Atlantic
Coast Line wharf is not within the corporate limits of the city;
however, I think it should be included, that is, if they expect
fire protection at the hands of the city.
. The second largest fire was that of the Marcus building.
This fire started downstairs, on the ground floor, and when the
Department arrived on the scene, the flames were issuing out
from every opening from the ground to the roof. The building was built of brick and was of very poor construction, the
walls not being sufficiently put up to stand any amount of
fire whatever. This was the most destructive fire in the
business section of the city, during the year. The Department
confined its efforts to retain the fire to this building, and by
its efficient work, the surrounding buildings, which were mostly
194_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
of wooden structure, were saved from damage.
With the exception of the two fires above noted, the Department, considering the great number of alarms it had for
fires, confined the losses to a very small percentage.
Athletic Sports
During the past year, both this Department, as well as
the Police Deparmtent members, have enjoyed several games
of baseball and football. These athletic sports were inaugurated with the intention of bringing the two departments
closer together socially, and at the same time, improving their
physical abilities to a considerable degree. I would respectfully suggest that these athletic sports be made annual
affairs.
Reports
The reports of the different heads of the departments, included in my report as herewith submitted, are concise and
complete, and I commend them very highly for your consideration.
Suggestion
I would suggest that it be made possible for the Chief
Fire Inspector to pass on all flues being built, as well as the
installation of stove pipes. Heretofore there has been a lot
of faulty construction of flues, and a great number of stove
pipes have been installed in a dangerous manner, either by
carelessness or ignorance.
False Alarms
Elsewhere in my report shows the tabulation of false
alarms. During the year there was twenty box and twentytwo telephone alarms that proved to be false. The causing
of these false alarms is due to malicious mischief.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 195
Fires Outside City
I would direct your attention to the number of large
fires outside the city limits which this Department responded
to, in addition to all alarms within the city limits.
Fire Losses
The total amount of losses on buildings during the year
was $58,763.21, loss on contents $'100,027.65, a total loss of
$158,790.86.
The total amount of insurance carried on buildings and
contents being $2,358,633.00. My report shows that the
amount saved on buildings amounted to $2,701.816.79,
while amount saved on contents of buildings amounted to
$1,468,867.22, a total saved to the city amounting to $4,-
170,684.01.
The fire losses for the year 1913 were 5.8 per cent, while
the percentage for the past year amounted to only 3.6 per
cent. Had it not been for the disastrous Marcus fire, the fire
loss to the city for the year would have been less than 2 per
cent.
Recommendations
I would respectfully recommend that Fire Alarm Box 324,
now situated on the Seaboard Air Line terminals across the
Savannah river, be discontinued. The cable that leads to
this box from this Department loops through the Southern
Bell Telephone's cable, and upon more than one occasion the
Department has been badly hampered by the entire Gamewell
System being put out of commission, caused by the Southern
Bell either working on their cable, or by the anchor of some
ship coming in contact with the cable on the bottom of the
Savannah river, thereby putting our service on Circuit No. 5
out of commission.
196 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
I would respectfully recommend the purchase of another
automobile for fire headquarters, for the use of the Chief, as
the small car (Hudson No. 20) now being used by the First
Assistant Chief, has been in use for several years, and is now
beginning to show the effects of hard wear. This particular
car was for a long time used by Dr. Brunner prior to being
turned over to this Department. My car alone has been in the
service of the city six years.
I would also recommend the purchase of a supply or service car to be used for the transportation of supplies to fires.
This car could also be used in the place of one of the hose
wagons, when one is out of service.
I would recommend the purchase of 2,500 feet of
additional fire hose, which would give Savannah something
like 19,000 feet of fire hose. The constant growth of the city,
which necessarily increases the fire hazard, makes it very important that additional hose be purchased.
With reference to the purchase of a fire boat for the protection of the river front property, will say that I made as
strong a recommendation in my last year's report in favor
of this purchase as I possibly could. I am quite sure that
the disastrous fires that have already occurred on the river
front will prove to the terminal interests the absolute necessity of this purchase.
The motorizing of the trucks and two steamers, now
horse-drawn, is a very import ant feature. I cannot too strongly
recommend the purchase of tractors for same, and more especially the big three-horse-drawn aerial truck, stationed at
fire headquarters. Unless this feature is looked into this
year the Department will be forced to pucrhase at least two
additional horses.
In my last year's report I urged the building of new headquarters, as the present building was inadequate for the requirements of the Department. I also called attention to bad
conditions existing at that time, which exist today, only worse
than then. To begin with, the roof of the presemt building is
in very bad condition; the foundation is more or less rotten
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________197
and in bad shape. Sometime ago I took this matter up with
the city's chief engineer, to learn as to what it would cost the
city to have the necessary repairs made, and upon making an
examination it was decided that the building was not worth the
money it would take to put it in repair. A number of the men
at headquarters are forced to sleep on the concrete floor as
the dormitory accommodations are entirely too small. This,
of course, subjects them to unnecessary hardships.
I would recommend that the present city ordinance governing regular leave of absence for the members of the Department be amended to read that members of the Department be
let off duty every sixth day instead of every eighth as is at
present. An additional number of three or four men in the Department would enable me to keep up the full complement.
I would recommend that the Board of Public Safety be
authorized by ordinance to condemn and tear down any building damaged or depreciated more than 50%. There are a number of buildings in Savannah that are very dilapidated, dangerous and detrimental to surrounding property.
I also recommend that an ordinance be created governing
theatres and moving picture houses.
In Conclusion
In conclusion, I desire to extend my thanks to His Honor,
the Mayor, to the Honorable City Council, and the Committee
on Fire, for their kind co-operation in responding to my requests during the past year.
I want to extend my thanks to the Police Department of
this city for their valued assistance at fires, and at other times,
and to the city officials in general for the interest manifested
by them in my behalf.
To my Assistants, A. John Toshach and Thomas J. Fogerty, I wish to express sincere thanks for their assistance in
the conduct of the Department. They have exhibited a
spirit of willingness and co-operation responsible for a large
part of the efficiency attained.
198_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _______
Mr. Volney B. Jones, my Secretary, has been one of my
greatest aides. He has looked after the details of the Department with a diligence that has made me at all times feel he had
the best interests of the city at heart.
The work this year has been largely one of prevention.
The idea of "safety first" inoculated in the officers, inspectors,
and members of the Department, I am sure, has saved the city
and its property owners much expense and inconvenience, and
I cannot thank them too much for efficiently furthering this
movement. I would also like to take this way of thanking the
newspaper men for their co-operation.
Respectfully submitted,
JOHN H. MONROE,
Chief Engineer.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 109
CAUSE OF ALARMS
MONTH
January........................................
February... ..................................
March...... ..................................
April.......... ...................................
May........... ........... ........................
June....... ...................... .................
July ..............................................
August..........................................
September....................................
October.................... ......... ...........
November...................:................
December....................................
Totals...... ............................
bfl
v a
"P
IJ
54
26
41
20
?6
?0
1?
15
16
17
48
40
335
1 "H.
X
W
4
3
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
4
?
24
00 i!
(iO
4
6
?,
?,
1
5
20
V
jaat PK
5
2
5
1
9
3
4
1
7
2
4
43
1
67
37
50
?,?.
38
25
ID
17
18
28
50
51
4??,
1 Outside City Limits
3
1
4
1
3
1
1
?,
16
200 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
- r- o CM GO 10 < t- oo oo o *-i
CO CO IOC4 CO CM I-H I-H .-l CM U3 1C
*<
CM
CM
>C 1C CO CO -l CO Tl *-l CO co co CM
aaoqd
CO 1-1
Oi CM i* <O I-H 10
CM
nxog
CM i-l S2
O i-H *
I-H CM CM
Ofi
Ed
OS
z
w
OS
O
O
(d
PHI
ft.
H
pa
O
CO
S to: t 1
- 35 10 ri-< CO -
CM ea . CM
CM ^ - CO
_ ,H 00
CO _ 1~l -
^ iO ^^
-
^H o . s
1 .CO (M
~ O "5
t- n -
to
ic
CO
CO
CO ^3
- *
"3 -
gS o
<o . <
-H o
t
>C
CM
CM
T-H
CO
(
oo
CN
- 2?
co o
CO
CO
CO
t~
- CO
r* t-H
CO r-l
*
CO
CO
Hi
00
1C
co
US
r -
-
cc K ijj
" eo
'"l'^^eeM-'H CO r-t r-H fs y-4
CO
"3
MONTH! 3 i S fe
s1 1
3-| I
tt -3" a g- o o
^ ^<JccO ^ P
TIME OF RECEIPT
MONTHS
January ..................................................................................
February ................................................................................
March ....................................................................................
April ........................................................................................
May
June .......................................................................... ............
July ...................... .................... ............................................
August .............................. .....................................................
September ..............................................................................
October ..................................................................................
November ..............................................................................
December ................................. ............................................
Totals..................... ........................................................
a*a
fa
32 <
Sw
7
4
4
1
2
2
2
1
4
5
32
2
as
4<CO ID
1
3
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
17
K
S
a
<
CO
12
6
12
8
3
5
4
3
7
8
15
10
93
SP-'
w
5
1
16
6
6
1
6
2
4
1
2
5
6
10
65
3
22
feh
ccto
13
8
8
6
14
5
4
3
2
2
8
7
80
S-g
4o<;
18
10
17
5
12
8
6
7
7
11
17
17
135
1
67
37
50
22
38
25
19
17
18
28
50
51
422
09
I
FALSE ALARMS RESPONDED TO BY THE DEPARTMENT 8to
MONTH AND DATE
Janaury 1st............. .... ......... ....... ..... . ... ... ........ .
January 18th.... ................ ................................. ...........
January 19th... ................ .. ... ....................... .. .... .. .......
January 23rd................. ............................. . ... .........
January 26th............................. ........................ ...........
February 22nd................... .......... ..... ....... .. ... ........
February 28th .................. ...... ........... ..........................
March 2nd..... .................... . ... . .................................
March 3rd...... ............................... ....................................
March 8th.......................... ............................................
March 15th..... ....................... ............................ ..... .......
March 18th................................. .......................... .........
April 12th...................................... ..... .............. .....
May 1st.................... .........................................................
May 3rd.................... ................................. ...............
TIME
2.08 am
8.55 pm
1.33 am
9.55 pm
7.35 pm
8.10pm
9.34 pm
1.06pm
7.05 pm
9.38 pm
2.15 am
7.36 pm
10.45 pm
9.30 pm
6.43 pm
ii
512
5
9
25
56
24
kS3
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
"3
3
Local
1
5
2
ft
1
3f?
OB
2
I
S
False Alarms Responded To by the Department (continued)
MONTH AND DATE
May 4th.................... ........................................................
May 7th............................................................................
May 7th................ ............................................................
May 8th............................................................................
May 10th..... ................................................................... ..
May 17th.................... ......................................................
May 25th............................................................................
June 16th.. ........................................................................
June 17th;..... ....................................................................
June 22nd............... ............................... ......... ...................
July 6th......... ...................................... ...............................
July llth............................................................................
July 18th......... ...............................................................
July 20th......... ........................................................... .......
September 14th. .......................................................... ......
October 3rd.............................................. ..........................
TIME
5.20 pm
4.41 pm
5.33 pm
7.55 pm
12.20 am
7.38 pm
5.05 pm
7.15 pm
12.55 am
3.55 am
6.05 pm
5.14 pm
6.10 am
10.05 am
7.50 pm
4.40 am
ll
*5
117
512
147
147
147
145

a
o _
tl
$<
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
"3
1
a
1
3
4
1
*Ctud by Cron Wirei,
False Alarms Responded To by the Department (continued)
MONTH AND DATE
October 7th.............. ............... .............. .. ........... .. ........
October 13th................. .........................................
October 24th.................. .................................. .... ...... ... .
October 27th.................. ....................................... ... .....
October 27th................... .................... ........................ .
October 31st.............................. ... .......................... .......
November 15th.................. ...............................................
November 20th....... ...........................................................
December 1st............. ................................... ....... ........
December 5th...... .............. ................... .................... ...
December llth.............. .................... ...................... ........
December 22nd........ . ................................................. ....
TIME
11.30am
6.28 pm
10.50 am
1.35pm
8.02 pm
8.18pm
7.05 pm
11.05 am
9.50 pm
6.00 pm
6.29 pm
7.05 pm
ll
147
112
142
*16
66
54
17
20
0)
a o _
"8.1
H
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
Telephone
22
i
1
1
7
7,
4
43
2
I
CO
Caused by Wire Troubles
HOW FIRES WERE EXTINGUISHED
MONTHS
January ................................ ...........
February ..........................................
'\/[tiY{*\\
April ...............................................
May .................................... ...........
June .................................................
July .................................................
August ........................ ....................
September ....... ..... ........... ...........
October .......................... .........
November ............. .......................
December ...................... ...............
Totals.......... ......................
a'C1
$
&p 38-
OQ
11
12
1237224229
16
82
Byrooms 33121
10
o
1
>. M11114
Buckets of
Water 9
106675312745
65
By PyreneExtinguishers 1112221
10
Chemicals By
249
15
10995
1098
18
20
146
Hydrant By
Streams 9161334127
37
By Engine
Streams 43332253
25
to
J9&525193417
' 24
43
'l
67
37
50
22
38
25
19
17
18
28
50
51
422
sI
CO83
ORIGIN OF FIRES
HEATING ILLUMINATING MISCELLANEOUS
MONTHS
January............ ............................ ....
February....... ................................
March................... ......................... .....
April.............................. ........ ...............
May................................ ......................
June................................................ .......
July......................................................
August...................................................
September................... .........................
October................................. ...............
November..............................................
December...................... .....................
Totals............ ....... ...........................
Dwellings
23
14
8
5
7
5
1
3
2
11
14
20
113
Business
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
3
2
4
2
22
+3
O I
24
14
10
7
8
7
2
5
5
13
18
22
135
Dwellings
2
2
3
1
2
3
1
1
15
ffl
1
1
1
3
1 O 1
2
3
4
1
1
2
3
1
1
18
Dwellings
18
10
15
8
11
fi
4
2
6
2
13
9
104
Business
9
fi
10
4
4
fi
4
fi
2
4
8
9
72
I
9
2
fi
1
5
1
2
4
4
2
8
fi
50
1
5
2
5
1
9
3
4
1
7
2
4
43
I
41
20
3fi
14
29
Ifi
14
1?,
13
15
81
28
2R9
0,3
ef
OH
67
37
50
?,?,
38
25
19
17
18
28
50
51
422
CAUSE OF FIRES
MONTHS
January.................................. ................
February...............................................
March.. .............................................. ....
April......................................... .............
May............................... ........................ .
June......... .....-............ ...... ........
July........... ........... ...... ......... ......
August... ........................................ .....
September .......... .................................
October.................... .............................
November.... ............................. ...
December............ .............................
Totals............... ..................... ...
Mischievous
|Children
7
1
?,
1
3
1
5
?,
?,?,
a
i^
1
1
1
1
3
1
?,
1
9,
?,
IS
Overheated
Stoves
1
1
1
7,
ft
Defective
|Places Fire
7
3
?,
4
3
19
Defective
Flues
ft
?
?,
?,
3
1
8
4
4
81
Flying Sparksi
3
1
5
3
?,
?:
1
5
3
flfi
I
(So.
4
fi
?,
?,
ft
?;n
Explosions
4
3
?,
1
1
?
3
1
4
?,
?4
i
15
16
15
9
q
R
4
5
ft
11
8
11?
Incendiary
1
1
1
3
Unknown
15
4
15
?,
8
8
4
Q
f,
15
11
QA
1
1
1
3
1
4
7
1
5
?!
5
1
9
4
8
1
7
91
4
43
I
67
37
50
?2
00
915
1Q
17
18
OR
en
51
4?,?,
NUMBER RUNS MADE BY COMPANIES
MONTHS
January.............. ................... ..
February.............. ....... . ... . .. .. . . .........
March...................... ................... .... ...... ...
April.............. ............. ............. .. ... ... ......
May...... ................................ ........................
June............................... ...... ........ ..............
July.............................................................
August................................ ................ ........
September.............. ...................... .................
October......... .......... ......................... ..........
November.... ................................................ ..
December ......................................................
Totals.......................... ..........................
M

I
17
5
10
4
8
7
5
4
5
4
8
12
89
N

'a
W
17
8
14
9
8
8
4
4
5
ft
15
17
115
to
0)
24
9
1ft
7
8
7
4
5
5
9
15
18
127
*
V
W
13
15
19
8
7
ft
4
7
4
10
12
11
lift
U)J
18
13
18
8
13
9
3
ft
3
9
1?,
17
129

V
15
10
15
4
10
4
5
3
2
7
1ft
9
100
IN.
8Q>
1
14
5
7
2
7
7
2
?,
7,
4
10
11
73
Chemical 1
25
12
21
8
14
10
5
7
9
8
23
28
170
^-t
M

10

13
5
4
7
2
4
3
5
7
12
78
N
*
3
ft
5
3
5
2
2
1
3
ft
8
44
w
g
1
21
1ft
15
5
ft
4
3
2
3
7
10
11
102
*
s1
14
5
4
9!
6
5
1
1
3
8
6
55
U) 8
12
8
7
3
10
2
4
4
1
6
8
ft
71
2
i
V
S!
t, J
s
NUMBER FEET OF LADDERS RAISED BY COMPANIES
MONTHS
January.. ..............!............ ...............
February............ ....................... .........
March.............................................. .
April....................................................
May....................................................
June........ ...........................................
July....... ...........................................
August................................................
September...... .................................
October......... .. ......... ... . ..........
November..........................................
December........ .......... ..... . ...........
Totals.............. ..........................
iH
S &
G
W
in
m
M
t)
w
68
18
8fi
w
V
a
a
W
5fi
?n
ifi
36
16
5?n
491
sn
*
g
I
US
V
c Qb
1
36
36
CO
3 a
w
t^
V
W
16
16
Chemical 1
M
?,n
^(
|
Ifi
88
7?,
88
162
56
16
117
96
m
996
o
1
32
4?
74
n
M
I
3?,
32
25
89
*
s
1
9n
9n
us
J4
o
fin
fin
1
wn
184
15fi
88
Ifi
198
73
Ifi
117
lfi
394
1,fi83
I
en
S
NUMBER FEET HOSE LAID BY COMPANIES
MONTHS
January..... ...................... ..... .. ... ... ...
February...... ....... ......... .........
March...... .. ......................... ........ ......... .
April....................... ........... .. .............. .... ..
May...... .................. ...................... ..... .. ..
June............. ................ ...............
July..............................................................
August....- ......................... ... ...........
September..... .... ................... ..................
October............ .............. ...................... .
November.......... ...... ........ .................. ....
December............. .............. ..... . ......... .
Totals..............................................
*-*
aV
1

850
150
4,500
2,200
1,900
300
1,750
800
2,450
4,700
19,600
N
6
1a W
2,950
2,800
5,850
2,450
2,500
200
1,800
900
3,450
3,950
26,850
Engine Co. 3
4,700
3,700
6,050
2,650
1,550
400
300
2,800
1,200
2,100
3,750
29,200
<*
3
ia
W
1,300
3,100
3,400
500
1,550
1,650
150
700
1,000
1,500
14,850
US
6
A
4,000
1,600
3,850
250
850
1,300
300
600
1,500
1,350
15,600
to
6
w
4,350
2,350
3,200
600
350
850
300
100
1,950
1,100
15,150
r
6
2,600
300
1,600
150
1,850
550
1,850
2,150
11,050

20,750
14,000
28,450
750
10,450
11,100
2,100
1,250
7,650
3,000
14,300
18,500
132,300
I00
NUMBER GALLONS CHEMICALS DISCHARGED BY COMPANIES
MONTHS
January......................................................................
February....................................................................
March..........................................................'..............
April............................................................................
May............................................................................
June............. ............... ............'............................. .......
July............................................................................
August........................................................................
September............................................................ .....
October......................................................................
November....... ..................................................... ......
December..................................................................
Totals................................................................
1-4
6V
a
1
200
80
40
160
130
80
40
8
86
40
932
e*
6
w
160
40
120
46
163
40
3
3
86
83
129
873
m
6V
I
289
43
40
120
40
46
40
1fi6
160
944
*
a
I i
68
150
9
6
68
3
fi8
65
65
83
68
653
U)
6
O
0
'I
1
163
126
129
43
6
86
40
93
43
46
206
49
1,030
5O
6
O
I
399
68
6
68
130
65
3
739
t*.
o
O
i
I
44
79
35
9
70
41
fi
65
349
v-4
6
O
laQ>
J3
O
554
329
365
49
483
583
230
89
80
226
845
952
4,775
I
1,867
767
846
187
661
1,210
542
423
329
528
1,537
1,398
10,295
FIRE STATISTICS
MONTHS
January ......... ...... ............ ............ . .... ............
February .. ... ... .................... ....... ..... . ........
March... ............................................ .....
April ........... ............................................... ..
May .............. ... ....................... ... ... .. ....... ...
June .......... ................................ ....... ...... .............
July ........................................... ....... ...................
August .................................. ....................... ........
September ............ ................... ............ ... .... ..
October ..................................................... .......
November ........ .... ............................... . ... . ...
December ............................. ....... . ..... ...... ...
Totals............ ............ ................ .. . .......
Kiro Originated In
Buildings Wood
46
26
28
15
18
15
10
10
10
16
31
29
254
Brick andStone
Buildings
7
7
12
5
5
6
3
3
3
3
9
12
75
Other Than
Buildings
9
2
5 1
6
1
2
4
4
2
8 6
50
J
5
2
5
1
9
3 41
7
2 4
43
Confined Pont to
Origin of
52
30
38
21
27
15
14
17
14
19
38
39
324
Confined Floort
Origin of
3
1 242
1 31
17
i$& i< |-5
O
M
6.3
5
4 4
2 1
1
1
4 6
28
Extended to
Adjoining Property 2
2 1
3 19
Conflagaration 11
2
5
2
5
1
9
3 4
1
7
2 4
43
3
67
37
50
22
38
25
19
17
18
28
50
51
422
*b
*< Oo
3
1 413
1 12
16
3
OQ
REPORT OF FIRES FOR THE YEAR 1914
Showing Actual Values and Losses Sustained Together With Insurance Carried and Amounts Saved
MONTH
Jnury...
February. .
March ....
April.....
M*y......
July......
Auguat....
September.
October _
November.
December .
Totml...
Value of
Building!
t 546,300.00
165,775.00
628,880.00
255,150.00
106,806.00
152,318.00
67,650.00
78,330.00
69,770.00
177,300.00
261,250.00
245,715.00
12.755,344-00
Value of
Contents
* 135,690.00
105,750.00
198,881.00
147,270.00
43,785.00
169,600.00
38,650.00
56,550.00
41,325.00
130,975.00
262,145.00
234,900.00
11,665,521.00
Total
Value
t ' 681,990.00
271,525.00
827,761.00
402,420.00
150,691.00
321,918.00
106,300.00
134,880.00
111,095.00
308,275.00
523,395.00
480,615.00
S4,420,865.00
Loss on
Buildings
3,644.35
4,025.52
4,889.10
285.00
2,746,70
3,464.00
292.90
667.37
11,088.05
973.90
4,586.26
22,100.00
f 68,763.21
Lose on
Contents
2 2,970.32
2,434.00
3,144.67
124.00
1,585.00
15,615.74
859.00
516.00
3,671.98
2,760.50
3,615.94
62,730.50
$ 100,027.65
Total
Loss
f 6,614.67
6,459.52
8,033.77
409.00
4,331.70
19,079.74
1,151.90
1,183.37
14,760.03
3,734.46
8,202.20
84,830.50
f 158,790.86
Insurance
on
Building!
S 333,850.00
112,750.00
203,550.00
160,025.00
73,206.00
92,260.00
43,600.00
50,650.00
32,500.00
62,100.00
160,100.00
140,870.00
tl, 465,461. 00
Insurance
on
Content*
S 80,350.00
45,550.00
85,452.00
102,450.00
15.820.00
98,350.00
26.050.00
35,450.00
20,600.00
48,200.00
193,500.00
141,400.00
f 893,172.00
Total
Insurance
f 414,200.00
158,300.00
289,002.00
262,475.00
89,026.00
190,600.00
69,650.00
86,100.00
53,100.00
110,300.00
353,600.00
282,270.00
12,358,633.00
Saved on
Buildings
f 542,655.65
161,749.48
623,990.90
254,865.00
104,159.30
148,854.00
67,357.10
77,662.63
58,681.95
176,326.04
256,663.74
223,615.00
$2,701,816.79
Saved on
Content!
S 132,719.68
103,316.00
195,736.33
147,146.00
42,200.00
153,984.26
37,791.00
56,034.00
37,653.02
128,214.50
258,529.06
172,169.50
11,468,867.22
Total
Saved
f 675,375.33
265,065.48
819,727.23
402.011.00
146,359.30
302,838.26
105,148.10
133,696.63
96,334.97
304,540.54
515,192.80
395,784.50
$4.170,684.01
Percentage of Total Lot* 3.6 Per Cent. Percentage of Insurance Losi 6.2 Per Cent.
FIRES OUT OF THE CITY RESPONDED TO BY THE DEPARTMENT
Month, Date, Time LOCATION OWNER OCCUPANT REMARKS
1
January 16..... 4.20 PM
January 17..... 1.00 PM
January 26.....11 35 PM
February ...... 2.43 FM
March 17...... 5.30 PM
March 21...... 1.40 AM
March 26...... 6.30AM
March 26...... 3.30 PM
May 6...... 10.45AM
Auguit 14...... 7.35 FM
August 20......11.31 AM
August 28...... 5.25 PM
October 17.._10.00 PM
November 3.... 1.39AM
December 1....10.13 AM
December 16...11.50 PM
LaRoehe Avenue, Near Iile of Hope
Sixty-second Street and Middleground Road
Fifty-fourth Street and Middleground Road
Ogeechee Road and C. A S. Railroad Crossing
Lathrop Avenue
Lathrop Avenue
Atlantic Coast Line Wharves, Near East
Savannah
Atlantic Coast Line Wharves, Near East
Savannah
Louisville Road, West of City Limits
Atlantic Coast Line Wharves, Near East
Savannah
Fifty-fourth Street and Middleground Road
Thunderbolt Road at Wagner's Station
Lathrop Avenue, West of City Limits
Waters Road, South of City Limits
Fifty-fourth Street and Middleground Road
Isle of Hope, Ga.
Norwood Estate
J. Wallace, B. DeLoach and O.
DeLoach
Savannah Lumber Company and
Savannah Lighting Company
Henry Woeltjen
Southern Cotton Oil Company
Mutual Fertiliser Company
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
E.' Lovell EstateAtlantic Coast Line Railroad
Savannah Lumber Company and
Savannah Lighting Company
Athletic Park
Mill-Haven Lumber Company
Frank Smith
Savannah Lumber Company and
Savannah Lighting Company
J. A. G. Canon
Horroek's Hall
J. Wallace, B. DeLoaeh and 0,
DoLoaoh
Savannah Lumber Company and
Savannah Lighting Company
Henry Woeltjen
Southern Cotton Oil Company
Mutual Fertiliser Company
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
J. S. Harrison
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
Savannah Lumber Company and
Savannah Lighting Company
Savannah Baseball Association
Hilton-Dodge Lumber Company
Vacant
Savannah Lumber Company and
Savannah Lighting Company
J. A. G. Carson
Woods and Underbrush on Fir*
Woods and Underbrush on Fin; Property
Destroyed
Fire in Planing Mill Department, Caused by
Motor
Out House on Fire
Seed Crusher on Fire, Caused by Flying Spark*
Small Fire in an Old Shed
Rosin Fields. Fertiliser Sheds, Overhead Tramway, and Steamship Farley on Fir*
Rekindling of Debris
Chimney Burning Out
Lightning Set Fire to Electric Pole and
Transformer
Fire Caused by a Hot Journal Setting Fire to
the Woodwork
Slight Fire in Grandstand
Sawdust House on Fire
House Destroyed
Explosion of Steam Pipes; One Colored Fireman Badly Scalded; No Fire
Home Destroyed
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 215
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF MACHINERY
FOR THE YEAR 1914
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. JOHN H. MONROE, Chief Engineer,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit herein my Report of Operation in my Department for the year 1914. At the close of the
year I find the different apparatuses of the Department in
good condition with the exception of one steamer, which needs
extensive repairs to her boiler.
Inventory of the Repair Shop
1 15-inch Swing Screw Cutting Lathe.
1 Emery Wheel.
I 1$4 Horse Power Motor.
1 20-inch Drill Press.
1 Power Hack Saw.
1 Universal Drill Attachment for Breast Drill.
1 Anvil.
4 Screw Jacks.
1 Sledge Hammer.
1 16-inch Machine Wrench.
1 Set Bolt Taps.
1 Set Pipe Dies.
1 Boiler Ratchet.
3 Pair B. S. Tongs.
216_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
1 Portable Forge.
1 Special Set Taps and Dies for Autos.
8 Cold Chisels.
1 Blow Torch.
1 Vice.
30 Twist Drills.
4 Drill Sockets.
12 Old Spanner Wrenches.
4 Taper Reamers.
1 12-inch Stilson Wrench.
4 Tire Wrenches.
1 Set Motor Socket Wrenches.
1 Pipe Cutter.
1 Set Stencils.
30 Open-End Wrenches.
1 Breast Drill.
1 Emery Wheel Dresser.
1 Box Carter Pens (Assorted.)
38 Clutch Plates.
1 Oil Tank.
1 Motor Crank Handle.
8 Transmission Bearings.
1 Piston.
2 Coils.
4 Wheel Bearings.
3 Intake Valves.
4 Carburetor Floats.
1 Air Gauge.
1 Box ^-inches by 3-inches Bolts.
1 Hub Cap.
2 Pump Runners for Circulating Pump.
12 Transmission Gears.
1 Connecting Rod.
1 Box Spring Washers.
2 Oil Tank Glasses.
6 Oil Cups.
2 Equalizers.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 217
1 Air Valve.
6 f^-inch Brass Nipples.
3 Dozen ^-inch Nuts.
2 Hood Clamps.
2 Dozen ^-inch Nuts.
]^ Dozen Couplings for Circulating Pump.
2 Dozen 9-16-inch Nuts.
/2. l Dozen Socket Gaskets.
2 Dozen 5-8-inch Nuts.
]/2 Dozen Nuts for Axles.
^ Dozen Hose Clamps.
4 Quadruns.
1 Head Light.
1 Dozen Spark Plugs.
2 Clutch Brakes.
2 Sprockets for Pumps.
3 Intake Manifolds.
2 Driving Chains.
1 Old Radiator.
1 Exhaust Manifolds.
3 Dozen Spring Clamps.
4 Springs (2 for Wagon and 2 for Pump)
48 Skid Chains.
2 Dozen Wheel Bolts for Tires.
1 Hand Pump.
1 Pumper Axle.
1 Set Wheels for Type 10 Wagon.
1 Set Wheels for Type 12 Pumper.
1 Lot Old Rims and Tires.
1 Extra Type 10 Magneto.
In addition to my daily and weekly inspections, I have
attended to all night alarms and fires during the day. During
the year I have turned out 360 different jobs, consuming about
1,650 hours, besides the many calls, both day and night, for
minor repairs and adjustments.
I would respectfully recommend the purchase of a large
lathe, also a shaper, which is badly needed.
218_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
With the aid of my Assistant, Mr. S. W. Peck, and with
the help of the members of the Department, I trust I have
given satisfactory service. In conclusion, I would like to
thank you, as well as the other officers of the Department for
your many courtesies in the past. I am,
Yours very respectfully,
WALTER L. ZEALEY,
Superintendent of Machinery.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 219
ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT
FOR THE YEAR 1914
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. JOHN H. MONROE, Chief Engineer,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit to you herewith my Report for
the year 1914, as follows:
The total number of applications received by my Department to do work in the city of Savannah numbered 1,979.
The Total Number of Inspections Made as Below
Lights......................................................25,025
Fans........................................................ 750
Motors.................................................. 150
Arc Lights.............................................. 100
Electric Stoves........................................ 25
Electric Irons.......................................... 25
Rectifiers......................................... 3
Total Inspections.................26,078
Receipts for the Year from Inspection Fees
Were as Follows
January........................$ 127.75
February...................................... 76.25
March............................................ 159.75
220_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___
April.................................................. 162.75
May.................................................. . 128.25
June............. ............... ..................... 113.25
July.......... ..................................... 145.25
August........ ................................... 154.50
September...... .......................... .... 200.00
October........ ........... ................ 157.00
November....................................... 114.50
December... .................................... 98.00
$1,637.25
Expenditures for the Year for My Department
Were as Follows
Motorcycle.............,................,........$ 250.00
Repairs...... ...................................... 14.75
Gasoline and Oils............................. 19.54
$ 284.29
Printing and Stationery... .............$ 35.75
Uniforms............................................ 34.75
Salary.............................................. 1,500.00
$1,854.79
During the year there were four fires within the city limits
caused by defective wires, three of which were the direct results of leaking gas jets, which was set off by the defective
wires.
In my last report I laid stress on the fact that the conduit
district should be enlarged, and it is with pleasure that I wish to
report that during the past year the conduit district has been
extended, taking all property from the Savannah river, with
the west side of East Broad Street, and running thence along
the west side of East Broad Street, to a point 105 feet south of
Liberty Street, thence along a line 105 feet south of the south
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________221
side of Liberty Street, to a point 150 feet east of the east
side of West Broad Street, thence south on a line 150 feet east
of the east side of West Broad Street, to the north side of Hall
Street, thence west along north side of Hall Street to a point
150 feet west of the west side of West Broad Street, thence
north along a line 150 feet west of the west side of West
Broad Street, to the north side of Indian Street, thence west
along the north side of Indian Street, to Waters Street,
thence north along the east side of Waters Street to the
harbor line of the Savannah river, thence in an easterly
direction along the harbor line of the Savannah river to the
point of the beginning.
I would respectfully recommend that an ordinance be introduced by the Honorable Fire Committee making it punishable by a fine for any electrical contractor to jump fuse with
wire, or use wire in place of a fuse, taping joints without first
soldering same, making joints in conduit, the making of joints
in wooden moulding, or metal moulding only in fittings, or
the concealing of wiring before it is inspected.
During the past year the Savannah Theatre has been rewired in conduit, it having been recommended by myself.
AH electrical contractors are required to first secure a permit before the starting of any job.
All defects recommended to be fixed by the Southeastern
Tariff Association, has been promptly attended to, with the
exception of the Pulaski House, same being in very bad condition.
In conclusion, I want to thank both the members of this
Department, also the Police Department, for their assistance
during the past year. I want to personally thank the electrical contractors for their promptness in attending to requests issued by me during the past year.
Respectfully submitted,
J. C. McDOWELL,
Electrical Inspector.
222_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
REPORT OF FIRE ALARM SERVICE, YEAR 1914
T. P. SANDIFORD, Supt. Fire Alarm and Telegraph
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. JOHN H. MONROE, Chief Engineer,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to make the following Report of the Fire Alarm Service for the year ending December 31, 1914, together with an
inventory of the Fire Alarm System, a resume of the year's
work and recommendations for the year 1915.
Inventory
City Hall Equipment............................... $4,00000
Engine House Equipment...........,......... 3,500.00
Outside Gongs and Indicators.................. 300.00
Two Tower Bells and Equipment............ 4,000.00
104 Street Fire Alarm Boxes................... 14,000.00
Overhead Wire and Fittings...................... 2,158.00
Cable, Conduit, Manholes and Posts..... 7,416.25
Extra Material and Equipment................ 150.00
$35,524.25
Fire Alarms for the Year
Fire Alarms from Street Boxes................ 171
Fire Alarm Boxes Pulled for 12m Tests.. 300
False Alarms from Street Boxes........... 20
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________223
Telephone Fire Alarms.............................. 209
Telephone False Alarms............................ 22
Local Fire Alarms...................................... 42
Local False Alarms.................................... 1
Savannah Theatre Circuit False Alarm.. 1
Condition and Operation
The present condition of the system is somewhat improved as compared with the previous year, considerable repairs having been made to the overhead equipment during the
past three months. There is, however, much work yet to be
done to this part of the system to place the wires where trees
and high voltage conductors will not interfere with or jeopardize the service. The underground equipment will require
extended improvements during the coming year, replacing defective pot-heads and outlet boxes. A complete renewal of
batteries is needed for the entire system. The work done
during the year has resulted in reducing the troubles previously
experienced, and greatly improved the service; no box failures when pulled for fires being recorded, and only one instance reported when the fire apparatuses responded to the
wrong box due to incorrect indication at the station. This
one error was on July 4, 1914, when Box 57 was pulled; the
apparatus at Engine Company No. 2 responded to Box 58, but
fortunately observing that the other companies were headed
for 57, followed and arrived at the fire without loss of time.
Other troubles experienced were of minor importance and
usually developed on test alarms. On February 25th and 26th,
sleet did considerable damage, breaking down wires, crossarms and poles at several points; the service, however, was reestablished within an hour after each break, but repairs continued as a result of the storm for several weeks.
The gong located in the First Assistant Chief's office was
removed and installed in the residence of the Superintendent
of Machinery, Mr. Walter L. Zealey, which constituted the
only change made in the equipment during the year.
224_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
On September 1st, the position of Assistant Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Telegraph was created and Mr. E.
H. Todd was appointed to fill the place. The creation of and
the filling of this place meets a need that has been stressed in
different reports of the Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Telegraph for several years, and I am satisfied that the results following will show the wisdom of this move. Since his appointment, Mr. Todd has shown that he is both capable and willing,
exhibiting a conscientious attention to all duties assigned him.
With his help, I expect to greatly improve the system during
the coming year, if funds for the necessary purchases are
available.
No new boxes have been added to the system since 1912,
and I would again urge that these be provided for. Interior
gongs should be installed in the Fire Inspector's residences and
in the dormitories of the stations, connected to the fire alarm
circuits. The need of these gongs has been demonstrated
repeatedly. Location for new boxes to be determined when
the number to be purchased has been determined on.
In conclusion, I would respectfully refer you to the
recommendations made in my 1913 report (pages 28, 29, 30
and 31,) all of which are still needed, and if adopted and
carried out, would greatly improve the fire alarm system,
and make it practically up to-date.
I am respectfully,
T. P. SANDIFORD,
Superintendent Fire Alarm and Telegraph.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT , 225
REPORT OF BOARD OF ELECTRICAL EXAMINERS
YEAR 1914
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. JOHN H. MONROE, Chief Engineer,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
We respectfully submit a Report of the work done by the
Board between December 31, 1913, and December 31, 1914, as
follows:
Examinations
Applicants Passed on First Examination................ 2
Applicants Passed on Second Examination............ 1
Total Examinations............................................ 3
Certificates Issued...................................................... 3
One meeting was called to take action against the holder
of a certificate who was not complying with requirements.
However, the matter was adjusted without his certificate being
withdrawn.
Respectfully submitted,
C. L. HOWE, Chairman
T. P. SANDIFORD
J. C. McDOWELL
226 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS'
EXAMINING BOARD, YEAR 1914
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. JOHN H, MONROE, Chief Engineer,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
We beg to submit herewith our first annual Report of the
work done during the year 1914.
Examinations Held
First Class Operators Passed on First Examination.............. .10
First Class Operators Passed on Second Examination..... ...... 4
Second Class Operators Passed on First Examination............ 5
Second Class Operators Passed on Second Examination........ 3
Permits to Apprentices............................................................... 5
In addition to the above number of applicants, we have
had seven apply for license who failed to pass.
Special Examination Held for Traveling Operators
Passed............................................ 4
Failed............................................. 1
During the year we have declined to grant license to three
applicants on account of their age, each of them being under
twenty-one years of age.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________227
Recommendations
We would respectfully recommend that a second-hand
moving picture machine be purchased, to better ascertain the
practicability of the applicant.
We would also recommend that an ordinance be created
legalizing the board, prescribing its authority and defining its
duties.
We would recommend that an appropriation be made by
the city for the expenses necessary for the year and that a fee
of two dollars be charged for each examination, and that onehalf of the fee be given to the member of the board not employed by the city.
Respectfully submitted,
J. C. McDOWELL, Chairman
J. C- TYSON
J. J. REBESKE
228 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF CHIEF FIRE INSPECTOR J. C. TYSON,
YEAR 1914
Inspectors:
F. J. KILROY F. M. GIRAND
J. A. BERGMAN N. J. FRIZELLE, Jr.
C. W. TAYLOR
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Mr. JOHN H. MONROE, Chief Engineer,
Savannah Fire Department,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit to you herewith my annual
Report for the year 1914, which covers in detail the duties performed by the inspectors, together with the number of inspections made and defects found and corrected.
During the year there was 40,314 inspections made by this
department, as shown elsewhere in this report.
My report shows that the majority of the defects found
were caused by inflammable material in buildings and yards,
defective stove pipes and defective fireplaces and flues. It
required but one notice to the most of the agents or owners to
correct these defects. However, in a good many cases it was
necessary to send them a third and fourth notice before the defects could be corrected. I would call your special attention to
the number of places found with gasoline on hand, the most of
which are carrying gasoline in improper receptacles, such as
glass jars, bottles, tomato cans, and other receptacles not properly protected.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________2
I again call attention to the careless manner of the construction of new houses relative to the fireplaces and flues. A
number of them have been found to be defective and dangerous. In several instances the Department has experienced
some fires due to this particular cause.
With regard to stove pipes, a great many people have no
consideration whatever for the safety of themselves or others,
and in many instances stove pipes are placed through windows
and side walls without any protection whatever. But for the
diligence of the inspectors, a great many fires would occur.
Another great danger which we have to contend with is
that builders who erect small houses, mostly wooden, build
false work around the flues, over the fireplaces, which leaves an
open space between this false work and the flue. The occupants of a great many of these particular houses either knock
or punch a hole in this false work, in which they place stove
pipes. The stove pipe in question has, therefore, never reached
the flue. This causes a great many fires and destruction of
property. I would suggest that all these defects be remedied
and any further construction of such defective work be prohibited by an ordinance.
A decided decrease in fire losses during the year is shown
elsewhere in this report as compared with the year 1913.
For the first time in the history of the Department, an
earnest effort has been made by your Chief Inspector to ascertain the actual values of property and the losses thereon, as
well as the amount of insurance carried and their losses. My
report on fires will give as near the actual values as it was possible to obtain. I have been assisted very materially in this by
the local insurance agents and the building inspector, and I
desire to thank them for their cordial co-operation.
There is the utmost necessity for an ordinance covering "
theatres and moving picture houses relative to entrance,
exits, and standing. I do not think that standing should be
permitted in any of the amusement houses, but if it is allowed,
the space so designated should be sufficiently wide as to permit
230 ____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
the free passage of patrons in addition to the space occupied by
those already standing.
I attribute the decrease in fire losses directly to the gradual perfecting of the inspection system, and urge the appointment of at least two additional inspectors to better perfect this
Department in the work of the protection of life and property.
I respectfully call attention to the loose method of some
of the insurance companies in the issuance of policies without
considering the risks or moral hazards involved. Cases have
been brought to my attention where a person having a fire was
carrying insurance to the amount of three and four times the
total value of the stock.
I wish to thank the inspectors who have labored with me
during the year for their loyalty in responding cheerfully to
all calls made upon them, both night and day. I desire to extend my thanks to the members of the Police Department for
their co-operation in rendering assistance to the inspectors of
this Department when called upon. To the managers, operators and employees of theatres and moving picture houses I
wish to express my appreciation for their cordial co-operation.
I cannot too strongly urge that better accommodations
be furnished the inspectors at headquarters, as the place
allotted them is entirely too small.
I again invite your attention to the necessity of a better
system in handling supplies than we have at present, and respectfully refer you to my last year's report on this subject.
My last year's recommendation relative to the increasing
of the inspectors' salaries I re-recommend, and urge a favor
able consideration.
Your Chief Inspector finds himself very much handicapped
at times, in that he has no vehicle at his disposal in which to go
from place to place, and has to depend entirely on the street
car service, which is not at all satisfactory, considering the various places he is expected to visit. I therefore recommend
that some provision be made to relieve this 'much needed
necessity.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________231.
In conclusion, permit me to express my thanks to you for
the uniform kindness and consideration shown us during the
year. To your Assistants, First Assistant Chief A. J. Toshach,
Second Assistant Thos. J. Fogerty, and Secretary Volney
B. Jones, I desire to extend my thanks for their cordial
co-operation.
Respectfully submitted,
J. C. TYSON,
Chief Fire Inspector.
FIRE INSPECTOR'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1914
MONTH
January................................
February.............................
March....................................
April......................................
May......................................
June......................................
July......................................
August...............................
September............................
October................................
November........ ....................
December .............................
Totals................. .........
ll
72
137
185
190
156
194
142
136
252
209
328
517
91,518
Inflammable MateBuildJuB(8 rial in
Yard* an
25
57
34
81
31
58
80
86
200
128
138
261
1,179
Hydrants Fire andAlarm BoxesFire
Obstructed
1
1
3
3
1
2
2
1
14

||
llSft<
41
1
1
43
Dynamite
and Explosives
Found
1
1
1
2
5
3
13
Wires Defective Buildings Found in
3
8
6
10
14
9
20
13
23
15
13
134
Bars Ordered Winds Across Elevators At
21
2
1
10
15
30
Defective Stove*od Stove Pipes
125
106
?,13
156
77
178
9116
122
85
300
270
182
2,030
I
Defective Fire
and Flue* Paces
645
608
846
484
339
776
1,088
753
229
774
663
384
7,589
and Cellars
Doors, C. Material
and Trash
4
11
1
9
3
11
20
32
46
8
145
K. First O.on
Inspection
850
498
494
748
623
757
1,011
799
1,297
1,117
321
564
9,079
K. Second O.o
Inspection
10
350
725
33
784
372
42?,
393
392
388
59
383
4,311
K. ThirdO- on
1Inspection
1
105
296
118
108
136
79
205
25
251
1,324
I
ej
fc
Fire Inspector's Report for the Year 1914 (continued)
MONTH
January....... ........................ . February.... ........ ..................
March......... .................. ...-.
April............... .......................
May ...... ...... -.
June......... .............. ...............
July......................................
August. .................................
September............... .............
October........ .......................
November.......... ..............
December....... ............. ........
Totals...........................
JS *a
fc, a
o.2
3
i
32
107
50
81
8
110
6
307
702
1
2 1 1 1
Broken Wit
Glasses Ordered Re
3
4
7
3
15
15
47
1

*> o
p
So
21
84
16
23
5
8
81
16
18
238
31
152
693
Is
Orde MetalStov About
18
48
12
96
10
40
106
30
8
41
129
54
592
5-5
SS
Gasoline T
Under Gro
5
3
2
9
3
6
6
2
36
> _,'S
Parties OuFirst Vi on
339
168
195
322
197
118
199
239
154
257
533
167
2,888
.tJ *I3
.,S
Parties OSecond o
177
330
21
283
258
258
127
100
346
48
286
2,234
ao
a
i
Doors andObstructed
2
11
1
15
7
2
123
161
fcy
Alarms 1
Special Du Answering
135
75
109
27
121
117
50
40
30
50
30
26
810
S
%
Chimneys
375
412
438
621
314
216
167
67
51
366
678
3,706
Poles O. B
1
2
13
1
2
19
ElevatorInspections
10
1
11
i
Cat Docket
1
1
6
g
I
GO

ANNUAL REPORT
OP THE
CHIEF ENGINEER
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
E. R. CONANT
CHIEF ENGINEER

REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor,
Dear Sir:
I would respectfully submit the following Report upon
the operation of the Departments under my charge for the
fiscal year ending December 31, 1914.
In my first report to you covering the operation of the
work under my charge for the year ending December 31,
1913, it was stated that on account of the records of the
Public Works Department in the past not having been kept
in such a manner as to analyze the cost of the units of the
work, no direct comparison could be made between the cost
of the work performed during the fiscal year with that performed during previous years. In this report, I would state
that the new auditing system has permitted of correct cost
data being kept, in accordance with the distribution of the
various classes of work done, so that the unit cost of the
work carried on during the past year is correctly known.
My Department was unusually busy during the year 1914.
Many large improvements were commenced or completed
during the year. The Destructor Plant, which had been
contracted for during the previous year and which was partially constructed during the year 1913, was completed during
the year 1914. Careful records have been kept of the cost
of operation, of the amount of refuse destroyed, and it can
be said without hesitation that the plant is efficient and that
it destroys the city's garbage and rubbish in a sanitary
manner.
238 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The plant has attracted wide attention, and engineers
and municipal authorities have made special visits to Savannah from many parts of the country to observe its operation.
The most important undertaking commenced during the
year was the extension of the storm water and sanitary
sewerage system. While the city had a generally complete
system of sanitary and drainage sewers in the heart of the
city, yet, since this system has been installed, the city has
spread out to the east, to the south and to the west, and
the old system was inadequate to care for this expansion of
the city. The extension of the drainage system will provide,
together with the old system, for the entire city within the
corporate limits.
Work commenced during the year upon a portion of
the extension, which when completed will give a net work of
trunk sewers to which laterals can be connected at any
time when such are required. The city was particularly
fortunate in entering into contracts with reliable contractors,
who are pushing the work to completion with greater rapidity
than was even anticipated when the contracts were awarded.
It is imperative that the city provide means for continuing
the work when the present available funds are exhausted.
This was anticipated when the work now under way was
planned, and in order to make use of the expenditures now
being made, which as stated above, are for trunk sewers,
money for the laterals must become available, and the laterals must be put in, to put the system as planned into operation.
AH of the trunk sewers will be completed before the end
of the fiscal year 1915.
Another most important improvement commenced during
the year 1914, provides for the elimination of one of the
canals, "Musgrove Creek", on the western side of the city,
with the rehabilitation of the Ogeechee Canal, so as to place
same in a sanitary condition. This improvement will materially aid the heretofore unsatisfactory darinage and sanitary
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________239
conditions upon the western side of the city, and, more than
that, will improve the drainage conditions of the area south
of the city, which will have its outlet in the Ogeechee Canal.
A most satisfactory agreement was made with the Central of Georgia Railway Company, whereby the city obtained
without cost a greater area of land lying in the Ogeechee
Canal than is given over to the railway company in the
Musgrove Creek Canal. Further, practically the entire cost
of rehabilitating the Ogeechee Canal, of constructing a modern
and suitable flood gate, and of building a new bridge across
the Louisville Road, is met by the giving over to the city of
$39,000.00 by the railway company.
Another improvement that was carried out during 1914
was the construction of a new wharf 350 feet long between
the east side of Bull Street and the east side of Drayton Street.
The Federal Government is demanding that States and
Municipalities asking for large allotments for river and harbor improvements shall co-operate with the Government and
shall become interested in obtaining control at least to some
extent of the harbor and wharves, and in many cases demands
that they share a portion of the cost of improving the waterway.
The purchase of the wharf property by the city, and the
construction of the present wharf at one of the most favorable sites along the river front redounds to the credit of the
city.
Among lesser improvements made during the year was
the placing of street signs, so much needed, over a good
portion of the city.
Again, as funds permitted, extensions were made to the
lighting system, and increased endeavors were made to improve the cleanliness of the streets.
I am glad to report that there was a marked improvement as regards the cleanliness of our streets compared with
the previous year. This, to a large extent, was brought
about by the co-operation of the public, and credit should
be given to the various women's clubs which are trying to
240 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
increase the civic pride of our people, and to show them
that their co-operation is needed in order to accomplish the
desired results.
Feeling that it is incumbent upon me to show the cost
and doings of this Department, and to furnish full information in connection with duties performed, I herewith submit, in
more or less detail, the work done under each class, showing
the expenditures made in accordance with the distribution
and arrangements as prescribed by our Comptroller, under
the following general headings and sub-divisions:
Sanitation Department
Cleaning Streets and Lanes: It is hoped that the
public has observed a decided improvement as regards the
cleanliness of the streets over previous existing conditions.
This has been brought about by greater efficiency and pride
taken on the part of the superintendents and foremen, by
the co-operation of the public, and in part by the efforts,
as stated above, of the various women's clubs. It was slow
progress to change the custom which has been in effect in
the past for janitors and messengers of office buildings, whereby they threw into the streets and lanes paper and rubbish.
With the co-operation of the Police Department, and with
the sending out of a large number of letters to various merchants and offices, this unnecessary and objectionable feature
has been, to a large extent, eliminated. This city does what
very few cities do, by furnishing, whenever called upon, a
wooden box into which rubbish and paper can be placed.
These receptacles are emptied by the city forces daily. At
this time there are approximately one hundred and fifty (150)
boxes placed in the lanes and at the entrances to office
buildings and stores, at the various school houses and other
localities where this class of rubbish accumulates.
The city employs a few paper pickers, who gather pieces
of scattered paper and other rubbish.
The method of cleaning the streets and lanes during
the past year is practically the same as has been followed
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 241
heretofore. On account of the flat grade of our streets,
flushing is not practicable, as we want to keep out from the
sewers and catch basins as much solid matter as possible,
whereas in the cities where the grades are sufficient one of
the most economical methods is to flush the dirt from the
streets into the sewers through which the flow of water takes
the debris to the outlet.
The area of the sheet asphalt streets in the city is approximately 141,000 square yards. These streets are cleaned
daily. The total cost for cleaning the asphalt streets during
the year was $8,575.00.
The square yardage of other paved streets, which include asphalt blocks, vitrified brick and belgian block, is
approximately 820,000 square yards, the mileage of which is
forty (40) miles. The total cost for cleaning the above paved
streets for the year 1914 was $24,335.00. The city has a
large area of unpaved streets and lanes over which there is a
large amount of traffic. The cleaning of these unpaved
streets and lanes has to be done periodically, and this work
is expensive. The amount expended during the year to clean
unpaved streets and lanes was $8,242.00. The Municipal
Journal, a publication which deals entirely with municipal
operation, gives a tabulation of a large amount of data concerning street cleaning methods and costs of various cities.
Detail data from over one hundred cities was received by this
publication, much of which was of little value. Thirty-one
principal cities of the country, however, furnished such data
as may be considered reliable, among which was our city.
It is observed that the average number of streets cleaned
for the year 1914 was 182, against an average of 156 for
these thirty-one cities. The cubic yards of sweeping for the
year for 1,000 squares, subject to cleaning, was 25.9, against
20.5 for the average of the thirty-one cities. The cost of
1,000 square of street-cleaning done in our city was 25 cents,
as against 35 cents, the mean for the thirty-one cities, and
the cost per cubic yard for collecting sweepings for our city
was$1.74,against$2.70 as the average for the thirty-one cities.
242_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ____
While the above does not give any assurance that this
city is cleaning its streets at the lowest possible cost, yet it
is interesting to note that the cost is markedly less than the
average cost for those cities who have kept reliable data.
Refuse Collection and Disposal
Refuse Collection: By refuse, we mean household,
kitchen, restaurant and hotel garbage, rubbish collected from
households, stores and elsewhere outside of manufacturing
plants, carcasses of dead animals and, to some extent, stable
sweepings. Street sweepings are not considered under the
above heading.
From January 1, 1914, to March 23, 1914, all of the
refuse collected was taken to a loading platform at the City
Lots, where it was placed in cars, and under a previous
contract with the Savannah Electric Company, was taken to
the city dump, located about four (4) miles from the city
limits.
On March 24, 1914, the refuse commenced to be hauled
to the Destructor Plant, and all of same was taken to the
Destructor Plant for the remainder of the year. AH of the
refuse collected by the city during the year, was weighed.
The amount of refuse taken to the city dump was 636 tons,
and the amount that was collected and taken to the Destructor
Plant was 21,278 tons. The cost of collection per ton for the
year was $2.29. This cost includes the maintenance of the
equipment used in collecting the refuse and the replacement
and care of live stock, all labor, including superintendence
employed for the work.
Other than Sundays, a daily collectoin is made from
the greater portion of the city. On Sundays a collection is
made from the restaurants and hotels in the downtown districts and special collections made from other parts of the
city where it is necessary.
Under the ordinance, a separate collection is made for
ashes, but an ordinance has been passed since the beginning
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________ 243
of the fiscal year requiring householders to have metal receptacles, and householders are permitted to place ashes in
the same receptacle with garbage.
A record is kept of all complaints from householders of
intermittent or irregular collection of garbage, and with the
adoption of this system, there is very little trouble in having
the garbage men perform their duty in a satisfactory manner.
When necessary, a deoderizing disinfectant is used, and
in the summer time each cart carries a small amount, which
is used upon garbage that gives obnoxious odors.
The city at this time only uses canvas covers for garbage
wagons, and a great improvement would ensue if a more
permanent and tighter cover could be adopted, but so much
light rubbish, tinware, etc., is collected that the wagons
have to have an elastic volume, and it would be difficult,
without changing the method of collection, to have the more
modern type of garbage wagons, which is used in some cities
where garbage alone is collected in same.
Refuse collection requires the services of thirty-four twohorse wagons, ten carts and two paper wagons, besides two
to five carts for the collection of ashes. During the year,
21,284 two-horse wagon loads and 9,390 cart loads of garbage
and rubbish and 1,252 loads of paper was collected.
Of the total refuse collected, approximately 40 to 50%
in weight is strictly garbage, the greater amount being collected during the vegetable season, the smaller amount during the winter. The variability of the amount of garbage is
best shown by the fact that during July and August of the
fiscal year, approximately 1,200 tons of watermelon and cantaloupe rind was collected.
Garbage consists of from 40 to 45% in weight, rubbish
50% and ashes from 5% in the summer to 10% in the
winter.
Refuse Disposal: From January 1st, to March 23rd,
inclusive, the garbage and rubbish collected in the city was
disposed of in the same manner that had been followed in
previous years, which was to place same in a dump on the
244____________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
county farm about four miles from the city. With the completion of the Destructor Plant all of the garbage and rubbish collected during the remainder of the year was disposed
of by incineration at the new plant, which operated continuously and practically without any interruption from the
first day that it was operated to the end of the year. AH of
the refuse burned at the Destructor Plant is carefully weighed
and the amount consumed for each month in tons was as
follows:
March.......................................................... 428 Tons
April............................................................ 2,055 Tons
May.............................................................. 1,779 Tons
June .......................................................... 2,123 Tons
July*........................................................... 2,772 Tons
August* ...................................................... 2,536 Tons
September.................................................... 2,097 Tons
October........................................................ 2,260 Tons
November................................................... 2,071 Tons
December.................................................... 2,442 Tons
Total...................................................20,563 Tons
* 625 tons of cinders were also consumed during July
and August, making the total amount of refuse consumed
21,278 tons.
The burning of the refuse at the plant not only ressuited in furnishing all the necessary power to operate the
plant, but also furnished steam to the adjoining waterworks
pumping station, saving fuel to the value of $4,450.00.
On account of the widespread interest in the plant
which Savannah has constructed, a general description of the
plant, of its method of operation, and the cost of operation,
is deemed worthy of mention at this time.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________245
Destructor Plant
A destructor of the Heenan-Froud type was constructed
by the Destructor Company, of New York. The contract
price for the plant was $120,000.00. This did not include
excavation, concrete foundations, and extras paid the contractors amounted to $2,366.90. Cost of inspection and of
miscellaneous work done by the city amounted to $2,298.30,
of which $623.98 was for laying of new paving to approaches
to the plant; $234.72 for construction of clinker walls;$785.00
to lay pipe from the Ogeechee Canal to the plant, including
filter boxes to furnish soft water to the boilers; $307.14 for
testing material and for other incidental expenses $347.53,
making the total expenditure for the plant $124,665.20. The
destructor has a daily capacity of destroying 130 tons of
mixed refuse, which consists of garbage, rubbish, ashes and
stable sweepings. There are two units or furnaces each having
a capacity of 65 tons. Each unit comprises four cells, which
cells are fitted with trough grates, and each has a separate
large combustion chamber, regenerator or preheater, a 200-
horse power water tube boiler and a centrifugal fan. The
refuse is conveyed from the hopper or storage pit to the containers over the furnaces by means of an electric hoist, which
travels along a beam. The plant is also equipped with the
necessary instruments for recording the condition of the furnaces, combustion chambers and boilers. The plant also has
a steam turbo or engine-driven generator of 75 K. W. for
furnishing the necessary current for lighting the plant and
operating the motor. A superheater superheats the steam
generated by the boilers. The supply of air for force draft
is taken from the ventilator system in the building, and this
heated air is carried back to the grates which are perforated
so as to give proper distribution of air through the refuse,
and at the same time to secure the maximum cooling effect
on the iron supports. The cells of each furnace, which are
four in number, are so constructed as to have a burning area
over each grate of 20 square feet, and the amount of refuse
246_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
to be burned per hour per square foot of grate area is not to
be less than 68 pounds.
The guarantees made by the contractors are that the
plant should be capable of destroying under normal operation
without additional fuel, 130 tons of refuse in 24 hours. No
odors or obnoxious gases shall escape from the chimney or
building. At no time during the normal operation of the
plant shall the temperature fall below 1,250 degrees F., and
the average temperature of 1,500 degrees F., shall be maintained in the combustion chambers. The number of pounds
of steam generated in the boilers from and at 212 degrees F.,
per pound of refuse consumed shall not be less than 1.3
pounds of refuse consumed. The net effective boiler capacity
in horse power for steam utilization over and above that
required for operating the plant shall be 330-horse power
based on 34.5 pounds per boiler horse power. The cost per
ton for the incineration or consuming of the refuse based
upon the schedule of wages to be paid, and with the force
set out in the specifications shall not exceed 40.4 cents per
ton. The number of pounds of refuse to be burned per hour
of square foot of grate area shall not be less than 68 pounds.
Operation: All of the refuse brought to the plant is
weighed and then dumped into the storage hopper at the
ground level. It is taken from the hopper by a grab-bucket
operated by an electric transporter and delivered to the containers, one of which is located over each cell of the furnace.
At the bottom of the containers is a solid door operated
hydraulically, operating of which is done on the stoking
floor, which enables the stokers to fill their grates in accordance with the requirements of their fires.
Stokering is done through a supplementary door, which
avoids the necessity of opening the large door through which
the clinker is withdrawn.
The clinker formed on the grate is removed by semimechanical means. The sides of the grates diverge slightly
from the rear to the stoking door. There is a large bar to
which is fastened a plate which forms an upturned hoe laid
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 247
on the bottom of the grate before the first charge is dropped
upon it, and the clinker is pulled out bodily by power obtained
from a hydraulically driven winch onto a hand-pushed car,
which is pulled over a level, paved surface to the dump. This
method of clinkering permits of the clinker being removed
from the grates within from three to four minutes. The
platform at the dump is on the same level as the stoking
floor and the clinker is dropped upon a sheet iron platform
and the clinker is scraped into wagons or carts and hauled
away. While withdrawing the clinker, regulating valves are
operated so as to shut off the air supply coming from the
air heater.
One great advantage of the furnaces at this plant over
furnaces constructed at some other cities is that a deep fire
is maintained, which enables the wet portion of the refuse
to be more thoroughly dried and destroyed than in shallow
grates. In my opinion, the success of this plant is partly
due to this particular feature.
The average time of burning charge is twenty minutes.
Usually six charges are made for each clinker produced on
the grates. When the plant is working at its full, or nearly
full capacity, the labor required is operated in three shifts of
eight hours each. With the destruction of from 60 to 75 tons
of garbage only one unit is used with three shifts of labor.
This is better than to use two shifts, working both furnaces,
for a more even supply of steam is delivered to the pumping
station.
During July and August, when the delivery of watermelon rinds delivered to the plant averages 20 tons daily
this amount of extra wet garbage, bringing the percentage of
garbage above the guarantee, is only destroyed by adding
dry material, which has sufficient heat units in same to offset
the excessive moisture in the garbage. This is brought about
by adding about 10 per cent in weight in cinders collected
from manufacturing plants. With the addition of these cinders complete combustion of the garbage is obtained.
248 _______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The pumping station has a two-million duplex compound
Holly Gaskill pumping engine and two cross-compound air
compressors, all of which are operated condensing. The
steam pressure carried at the waterworks plant is 90 pounds,
but at the Destructor Plant is carried up to 150 pounds,
with 100 degrees superheat. The pressure, however, is reduced
by passing through a reducing valve on the main steam
header in the boiler room at the waterworks.
The total amount of refuse consumed from March 24th,
when the plant was completed, to December 31st, was 21,614
tons, an average of 77 tons daily. The total cost for operating the plant for destroying garbage was $13,290.71, or a
cost per ton of 61.5 cents. Allowing for the saving of fuel at
the pumping station for this period, amounting to 21 cents
per ton destroyed, the net cost for destroying the refuse was
40.5 cents per ton. This does not include demortization or
interest on cost of plant. (This net cost per ton of refuse
consumed would be reduced to approximately 30 cents per
ton of the refuse supplied the destructor amounting to 130 tons
daily, the capacity of the plant.)
The percentage of clinker obtained from destroying the
refuse varies from 20 to 30 per cent of the total of refuse
burnt. During the season when the refuse is dry the weight
of the clinker is from 20 to 25 per cent. During July and
August this varies form 25 to 30 per cent. The clinker is
being used for road building and raising low lots, and it is
estimated to have a value equal to the cost of removing
same from the plant.
The cost of destroying the refuse, the amount of evaporation of water, and steam obtained, is based on the refuse
having the following percentage of material: 45 per cent
garbage, 40 per cent rubbish, 10 per cent ash or cinder, 5
per cent manure by weight; the garbage to consist of organic
material, vegetable and animal, with water and grease; rubbish to consist of paper, rags, excelsior, straw, glass, etc.
Labor Required to Operate: Labor for each shift
with plant operating at full capacity requires one man to
___ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________249
feed hoppers, four stokers, one engineer, one craneman for
each shift of eight hours, making the total labor charges per
watch $17.50, or $52.50 per day of twenty-four hours. This,
however, is not adhered to, and with the amount of refuse
destroyed, viz: 77 tons per day of twenty-four hours and
the following pay roll is now in force:
Three Engineers........ @ $4.00......................... $12.00
Three Cranemen........ @ 2.25............................ 6.75
Nine Firemen.............. @ 1.75......................... 15.75
Three Laborers.......... @ 1.50............................ 4.50
Total............................................. $39.00
Tests: The plant was operated for five months before it
was accepted by the city and final payment was made to the
contractors, in order that its operation could be watched for
a reasonable length of time, and also to observe if any weakness would develop requiring changes. There were also three
tests made under conditions that would enable the city to
ascertain whether the plant could work to its guaranteed
capacity, and whether it would fulfill all of the requirements
of the contract and specifications.
The details of the final test are given below, and it is
observed that the plant exceeded its requirements of the
specifications and contract in the test. It has also worked
efficiently throughout the period that it has been in operation.
No obnoxious odors emanate from the stack or building.
Under normal operation of the plant, the temperature in the
combustion chamber averages 1,900 to 2,100 degrees, and at
times it is necessary to wet the garbage and rubbish before
it is taken to the furnaces, in order to keep the temperature
below 2,100 or 2,200 degrees. To permit of a higher temperature might endanger the lining of the combustion chamber.
The water evaporation exceeds by about .2 of a pound the
guaranteed evaporation.
250 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Results of Test of Heenan Destructor at
Savannah, Ga., August 21-22, 1914
Duration of Test: 3.00 a. m. 21st to 12.30 a. m. 22nd, 21 # hours.
Type of Refuse: Garbage 45 per cent; Rubbish 40 per cent; Manure 5 per cent; Ash 10 per cent.
Type of Destructor: Two, four trough grates, furnaces with forced
draft.
Number of Furnaces at Work: Two.
Total Grate Surface: Both furances, 160 square feet.
Type of Boilers: Wicks' vertical water tube equipped with Foster
Superheaters.
Builders'
Guarantee
Total Heating of Each Boiler _.__..., 2,000 square feet
Total Refuse Burned..___........ 277,550 pounds
Total Refuse Burned per Hour....... 12,909 pounds 10,833 Ibs.
Total Refuse Burned per Square Foot
Grate Surface per Hour............. 80.6 pounds 68 Ibs.
Total Clinker and Ash Residue: (Approximate)__--....--...-.---. 68,608 pounds
Percentage of Clinker and Ash to
Refuse Burned................. 24.7 percent
Maximun Combustion Chamber
Temperature................. 2,000 degrees F.
Minimun Combustion Chamber
Temperature___.............. 1,700 degrees F. 1,250F.
Average Combustion Chamber
Temperature.................. 1,845 degrees F. 1,500F.
Average Steam Pressure (gauge)...... 120 pounds
Average Temperature of Steam...... 523 degrees F.
Average Superheat................. 173 degrees F. 100F.
Average Temperature of Feed Water.. 206 degrees F.
Total Water Fed to Boiler ___..... 397,162 pounds
Total Water Evaporated and at
212F........................ 450,382 pounds
Total Water Evaporated per Pound
of Refuse ................... 1.62 1.3
Water Evaporated per Pound of
Combustible-....-.-.-.-.------ 2.15 pounds
Total B. H. P. Developed per Hour. 607
Estimated H. P. Used in Plant for 75
K. W. Non-Condensing, Turbo
Generator Set and Boiler Feed
Pump...................__.. 118
Excess B.H. P..................... 489 330
Average Air Pressure Under Grate.... 3% ins.
Average Air Temperature........... 252 degrees F.
Average Stack Draft-..--.-..-..---. .72 ins.
Average Co.-....---.-.......--.... 11.43 percent
Total Number Charges Both Furnaces 447
Average Weight of Charge_..--.... 621
Total Number Clinkers Drawn, Both
Furnaces....--.-.......-..-.-. 64
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 251
Cost of Operation, Based on Contract
Hoisting: One Man per Shift of 8 Hours at __ .... $2 40 $ 2 40
Stoking: Four Men per Shift of 8 Hours at. .--.... 2 40 9 60
Clinker Removing: One Man, 8 Hours at. ..--._.- 150 150
Engineer: One Engineer, 8 Hours at... ._.,..__, 400 400
Total Labor Charges per Shift. ................. 17 50
Total Labor Charges per Day of 24 Hours ....... 52 50
Total Labor Charges per Ton @ 130 Ton Rate.... .404c
Coat of Operation, Based on Actual Cost
Hoisting: One Man per Shift of 8 Hours at ....... $2 25 $ 2 25
Stoking: Four Men per Shitf of 8 Hours at. ....... 1 75 7 00
Clinker Removing: One Man, 8 Hours at-..--.-.. 150 150
Engineer: One Engineer, 8 Hours at.. ............ 400 400
Total Labor Charge per Shift. .................. 14 75
Total Labor Charge per Day of 24 Hours ......... 44 25
Total Labor Charge per Ton at 130 Tons Rate. . . . .3403c
Total Labor Charge per Ton for 138.75 Tons in
Hours............................... .318c
Remarks: Test made with running start. All hoppers
were empty, and then charged with test mixture. On completion of test, hoppers were empty.
All combustion chamber temperatures taken with thermoelectric recording pyrometer. All other temperatures were
taken with mercury thermometers. Water measured with
Worthington hot-water meter. Steam pressures taken with
recording pressure gauge connected with main steam line.
Steam delivered to main header at waterworks, and used to
operate one 10,000,000-gallon pumping engine and one 1,850
cubic-feet, cross-compound condensing air compressor. From
12.15to5.10 p. m. 10,000,000-gallon pump speeded up. Steam
from plant also used to operate all prime mover units used for
generation of power for use in plant. At 7.00 a. m. of August
22nd, all refuse in storage pit was burned, and from then
until 8.00 a. m. insufficient refuse was delivered to keep the
plant going at capacity.
Weather during the test was hot and humid, with occasional showers. Test was started at 3.00 a. m. of 21st and
completed 12.30 a. m. of 22nd. All calculations based on
A. S. M. E. Standards. Safety valves of boilers were popping
off from 5.30 p. m. until 6.30 p. m.
252 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
As seen from the test when the two units were worked
to capacity, the steam which was furnished the pumping
station was sufficient to operate the pumping engine, it beinc
necessary to keep the fires banked, so that in case of a fire
in the city the boilers could be used for emergency use. About
two tons of coal was used at the waterworks, as against
twelve tons, the normal amount used daily.
The city of Savannah has no storage reservoir, water
being pumped directly through the mains.
Under normal conditions a pressure of fifty pounds is
carried, but should a fire break out this pressure is immediately
raised at the pumping station to sixty pounds, so it is seen
that the net cost of operation is far greater per ton with the
amount of refuse destroyed than it would be if there was a
sufficient amount to work the plant to its capacity.
Not only were satisfactory tests made of the plant, but
it was operated for five months before the city accepted
same and made final payment, which final payment was
made on September 2, 1914; moreover, the city is protected
by bond whereby the cost of maintenance for five years is
guaranteed to be not above a certain amount, viz: the cost
of maintenance for one year from the time the plant was
accepted is paid by the Destructor Company, excepting
where breakage or damage occurs through no fault of the
plant.
Delegations and engineers from other cities contemplating installing incinerators or destructors have made inspections of our plant and of its operation, and in every instance
communications have been received from those visiting the
city speaking of the plant in a most commendatory manner.
When the plant was first operated no attempt was made
to utilize the clinker and it was taken away and used as
filling in low ground. Experience has shown, however, that
it can be used as a foundation for certain roadways, and a
roadway over a mile long has been placed with this material,
and heavy traffic does not appear to greatly deteriorate same.
Again, a considerable quantity has been sold for filling
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 253
purposes, so it is anticipated that the clinker will have a sufficient value at least to pay for its removal from the plant.
The approximate amount of clinker removed from the plant
from March 24, 1914, to December 31, 1914, inclusive, was
6,000 tons. The total cost of removing same was $1,099.06
or a cost of 11 cents per ton.
Maintenance of Storm and Sanitary Sewers
Sanitary Sewers: During the fiscal year there was constructed 4,265 lineal feet of 8-inch sanitary sewers located,
as follows:
Maupaus Avenue, East Broad to Price...................... 455 Feet
Maupaus Avenue, West of Reynolds.......................... 100 Feet
40th Street, East Broad to Price................................ 475 Feet
31st Street, Waters Road to Cedar............................ 755 Feet
Rockefeller Street, Harmon to Atlantic.................... 385 Feet
47th Street Lane, West of Waters Road.................... 500 Feet
48th Street Lane, West of Waters Road.................... 500 Feet
49th Street Lane, West of Waters Road.................... 500 Feet
45th Street Lane, West of Reynolds.......................... 125 Feet
41st Street, West of Atlantic ...................................... 240 Feet
A number of minor breaks occurred in the sanitary sewers requiring maintenance, and one serious break occurred on
42nd Street requiring the replacing of the old sewer with a
new one for a distance of 350 feet, extending between
Jefferson and Barnard Streets. On account of the depth of
this sewer, and the character of the bottom, it was necessary
to concrete the pipe that was relaid. The old sewer was 18
inches in diameter, but in replacing same, pipe of 20-inch
diameter was used. The total expenditure for the maintenance of sanitary sewers for the fiscal year was $4,943.00,
of which $757.75 was expended for extending the sewers,
$1,538.00 for rebuilding the sewer in 42nd Street, and $2,642.25
for cleaning sewers and repairing minor breaks.
254 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Storm Sewers: During the ficsal year a total of 3,445
lineal feet of storm sewers was constructed, the location of
which, and lengths and sizes are, as follows:
Waters Road, East Side, DeRenne Canal and
49th Street................................................... 480-Ft. 18-In.
Waters Road, East Side, 49th and 48th.......... 250-Ft. 15-In.
Waters Road, East Side, 48th and 46th......... 485-Ft. 12-In.
Waters Road, West Side, 50th Lane and
49th Lane.................... ............................... 280-Ft. 8-In.
Drayton Street, 34th and 35th......................... 400-Ft. 12-In.
Habersham Street, 36th and 37th.................... 320-Ft. 12-In.
Habersham Street, 32nd and 33rd.................... 260-Ft. 10-In.
Habersham Street, 33rd and 34th.................... 200-Ft. 8-In.
Price Street, East Broad Street, West............ 500-Ft. 8-In.
River Street, Indian Street.............. ................. 85-Ft. 12-In
River Street, Montgomery Street.................. 50-Ft. 12-In.
Taylor Street, Montgomery Street................... 70-Ft. 12-In
Duffy Street, Montgomery Street.................... 65-Ft. 12-In.
In connection with the storm water sewers, there was
constructed five syphons, which are independent lines carried
under streets or sidewalks where no connection could be
made direct from the catch basins to sewers in the streets.
The total length of piping laid for these was 425 feet. Minor
repairs were made to storm water sewers, and the total
amount expended during the year for the extensions and
repairs and cleaning the sewers was $2,330.00.
Dry Culture: By dry culture is meant the cleaning of
the canals and ditches located on the outskirts of the city,
but within the corporate limits of same, also care of flood
gates and trunks in the canals, which have their outlets into
the Savannah river. The mileage of these canals was considered in my last report. During the year 1914, approximately five miles of canal was cleaned out, ten miles of ditches
and a mile-and-a-half of sand traps. During the fiscal year
there was expended for cleaning canals and ditches and making repairs to flood gates and trunks, $7,825.00.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 255
Cutting Weeds: During about three months in the
early fall, the question of removing weeds from the un'paved
streets and along the sidewalks is of considerable amount.
The amount expended during the fiscal year, 1914, for this
work was $1,520.00. The cleaning of weeds from private
property is under the supervision of the Health Department,
and this Department only cuts weeds for property owners
when requested to do so by them, and then the cost of the
work is billed directly against the property owners.
A new ordinance is recommended, which will better regulate the elimination of the weed trouble from unimproved
lots and lanes within the city limits.
Sprinkling Streets: The city has approximately 60,000
square yards of pavements surfaced with gravel, oyster shells
or cinders, and in the dry months of summer it is imperative
that these streets be sprinkled daily, if possible, excepting
when frequent showers occur. During the year 1914, $1,000.00
was expended for sprinkling the streets. This amount was
inadequate to keep all of the streets in a satisfactory condition, and a greater expenditure should be made for this work.
Sweeping Crossings: The city had at the end of the
year, 1,184 streets crossings, which were regularly cleaned.
The expenditure for sweeping the same during the year
was $2,229.00.
Oiling Catch Basins: Savannah is located upon the
Savannah river, a fresh water stream. The city generally is
comparatively free from mosquitoes. To some extent, the
elimination of the mosquitoes is brought about by the persistent inspection of back yards and out-of-way places, by
the Sanitary Department, and by keeping in a cleanly
condition the open drains around the city, and by one
special method which is to apply a low grade kerosene oil
to all of the catch basins regularly during the summer
months, and also by applying the same material to any
standing water that is found within the heart of the city.
During the year 1914, this Department commenced the oiling
256_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
of catch basins and all other places where standing water
was found on April 1st, and applied this oil regularly
until October 15th. 4,252 gallons of oil was used. The
number of catch basins oiled during the year was 55,088.
The total cost of applying the oil was $1,180.00, which is
equivalent to IJ/z cent per capita, a most economical expenditure resulting in a great benefit to the community.
Cleaning Catch Basins: At the end of the year the
city had 1,479 catch basins. These catch basins were cleaned
on an average of fifteen times a year the number cleaned
for the year being 22,560. The amount expended for cleaning
same was $5,845.00, making the average cost for cleaning
26 cents each.
The above classifications complete the work under the
general heading of sanitation.
During the year 1914, the total expenditure made for
this Department was $11,015.00. This expenditure not only
includes the cost of the work enumerated above, but the
general salaries of the main office, of insurance and other
miscellaneous items.
City Stables and Shops
The city stables are located adjacent to the Laurel
Grove Cemetery on Magnolia Street. The buildings on the
city lots at this location comprise not only stables for stock,
but blacksmith, wheelwright, carpenter and harness shops;
also warehouses and sheds for housing a portion of the city's
equipment, testing apparatus and besides a general office.
During the year only minor repairs were made to the buildings, requiring an expenditure of only $106.00. The upkeep
of the machinery and implements used by this Department
is carried on at the shops. Besides this, considerable work is
done at the shops for other departments. A complete record
is kept of the cost of material and labor for all of the work
that is done, and where the work is done for other departments, and the cost of same, through the Comptroller's office,
is charged to the proper allotment made in the budget for
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________257
the particular work executed. During the year, all of the
wagons, harness, machinery and implements used in the highway and sanitary departments were repaired; all stock was
shod and inventories kept of all property, which reduced loss
of same to a minimum.
Particular attention is paid to the care of stock. The
feed of same is upon a well defined basis, and a monthly report is submitted showing the cost of feeding. In order to
prevent tetanus, a large percentage of the stock is kept
inoculated with antitoxen. An oats crusher was purchased
during the year, whereby the oats was crushed, furnishing
a more digestible feed for the stock, and a more economical
use of feed. An inventory taken on December 31, 1914,
shows the estimated value of the buildings at the City Lots
to be $13,475.00. The material and supplies on hand $8,469.00
Equipment, which includes stock, machines and other implements, $47,519.00. At the end of the year there were
147 head of stock. Thirty-seven two-horse scavenger wagons,
fifty-nine carts, fourteen buggies, eleven miscellaneous wagons,
two road scrapers, two mowing machines, one brick rattler,
three steam rollers, one harness machine, one squegee street
cleaner, three machine scrapers, one hundred and three
sets of double and single harness, two automobile runabouts
(Ford's),two concrete mixers and other miscellaneous implements. During the year .six head of stock, which became
unserviceable were sold, fifteen purchased and five died. The
amount of feed used by th'e stock of the City Lots during the
fiscal year was 25,576 bushels of oats, 438^ tons of hay,
27^2 tons of mixed feed. The average cost of feeding the
stock was $12.43 per head per month. The average cost of
horseshoeing per month was approximately $210.00, or a
cost of 28 cents per hoof, including shoes, nails and labor.
At the City Lots are impounded the dogs that are collected from the streets. During the year 1914, 847 dogs were
taken to the dog pound, 342 delivered to owners upon the
payment of the fee of $1.00 each, and 410 killed. The immediate control of the collection of dogs is under the Police
258_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Department. They are cared for, however, by this Department.
The operation of the stables and various shops, together
with the expenditure of the material, is directly assessed
against the cost of work done by other departments.
Highway Department
Lights: There were added during the year twelve arc
lights and five hundred and forty-two incandescent, liehts,
which include the ornamental lights taken over by the city
on Broughton Street, between Lincoln and Abercorn Streets,
Bull and Whitaker Streets, Bull and Drayton Streets, Barnard and West Broad Streets, Whitaker and Barnard Streets,
and Congress Street, between Whitaker and Barnard Streets.
The total number of arc lights on December 31, 1914, was
seven hundred and fifty, and one sixty candle-power incandescent light.
The distribution of the types of the city lights on December 31, 1914, was as follows:
8 of Wire or Bracket Lamps, Underground Feed
605 of Wire or Bracket Suspended Lamps, Overhead Feed
64 Sheppard Crook Suspended Lamps, Overhead Feed
69 Sheppard Crook Suspended Lamps,Underground Feed
4 Inverted Ornamental Lamps, Underground Feed
1 Series Incandescent Lamps, Overhead Feed
43 Five-Lights Ornamental Posts
109 Three-Lights Ornamental Posts
of which the total number of arc lights overhead feed was
669. The type of arc lights are G- E. There are four amperes,
320 watts per arc of the magnitite series. The schedule
hours per arc per year is 4,100. The annual amount paid
for overhead arcs is $60.00. The number of arc lamps underground feed is 75. The type of arc lamps are G. E. These
are four amperes, 320 watts per arc of the magnitite series.
The schedule watts per arc per year is 4,100.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 259
The city has also one 60 candle-power Mazda overhead
feed, for which it pays $25.50 per year.
There are now thirty-five straight ornamental poles, of
which about 20% are owned by private parties, who are charged
various flat rates according to conditions. They are 60
candle-power Mazda, and each lamp is on twenty minutes
after sundown, until midnight.
The ornamental lights referred to above were taken over
by the city on May 1, 1914. Previous to this date, the
lighting had been paid for by the merchants. During 1914,
the city paid the Savannah Electric Company for its incandescent lights $45,049.84,for the ornamental lights $1,973.14.
Every light in the city was inspected by this Department
and a count made in order to check the bills rendered, which
were found to be correct. A map was prepared on a large
scale which shows the location and type of every light in the
city, to which are added additional lights as they are ordered.
With the rapid growth of the city many demands and
requests are received for additional lights, and it is recommended that a supplementary contract be made so that the
city can respond to a greater number of requests for lights
by furnishing a more moderate power arc light, which will
result in a less cost than the $60.00 paid per year, and which
would permit of a greater number being used.
Sidewalks: A large amount of work was done during
the year in having property owners repair their sidewalks or
in laying new sidewalks, and the city also improved many of
its sidewalks in the public squares. A summary of the
work done is as follows:
The city laid for property owners, the cost of which was
paid by the property owners, fifty-two new concrete sidewalks where none had existed ;relaid two hundred and thirtysix concrete sidewalks and repaired seven hundred and ninety
sidewalks of various types. It is estimated that contractors
put in for property owners 15,000 square yards of concrete
260 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
sidewalks. There was also laid in our squares the following:
Chatham Square and Telfair Square, 997 square yards of
concrete sidewalks, and in Oglethorpe Square, 174 square
yards of brick sidewalks.
The total amount expended by the city for laying new
sidewalks and repairs of old sidewalks was $7,302.71. The
total amount charged to property owners for work done by
the city was $5,875.82. The remainder, $1,426.89 was chargeable to the city, account of construction of new sidewalks
through various squares, etc.
Since the fiscal year 1914, a revised ordinance concerning
sidewalks has been passed by the city, which now provides
that it is the duty of the owner or lessees of any lot or lots to
keep in good repair the sidewalks along the whole length
and depth of said lot or lots, including iron boxes for gas
and water connections in said sidewalks. Further:
"Section 2. Provides that the owner or lessee is
liable to the City of Savannah for any damages that might be
recovered against the city growing out of personal injuries
by reason of defective sidewalk, hole in sidewalk, broken,
displaced or loose brick and stones, or of gas or water boxes
with covers protruding above the level of the sidewalk, or of
other similiar defects or obstructions to the said sidewalk."
Section 5. Makes it the duty of the Chief Engineer
to cause inspection from time to time of all sidewalks of said
city; to notify abutting property owners or lessees in writing
of any defects; to require said defects to be remedied or
sidewalk to be relaid within 10 days, and authorizes him to do
the work in event of the failure of the property owner or
lessee doing the same."
It is recommended that an ordinance be passed protecting property owners, so as to assure good work being
done by contractors, or others who are employed by them to
construct or rebuild sidewalks. A specification should be
adopted by Council prescribing how sidewalks shall be laid,
and when contractors put down sidewalks they shall be com-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 261
pelled to do the work in accordance with the specifications,
and further inspection should be made by the city to see that
the work is done in accordance with the specifications. At
the present time the property owners rely entirely upon the
contractors to use suitable material and to do the work in
the proper manner. The city has no jurisdiction over the
class of work being done excepting to see that the sidewalks
are constructed of the proper width, to the right grade and
that the general type of construction corresponds to that
required by ordinance.
The work done during 1914 has resulted in a very marked
improvement being observed as regards the general conditions
of the sidewalks.
Maintenance Streets and Lanes
The paved streets were kept generally in good repair
throughout the year. Approximately 127 square yards of
sheet asphalt streets were resurfaced, and the cost of this
work was approximately $254.00. In some instances extensive repairs were made to brick pavements. A portion
of West Broad Street, between Broughton and Liberty Streets,
comprising 3,833 square yards, was repaired by removing
brick, resurfacing and grading the street, sorting the brick
and replacing same, using about 15% new brick to take the
place of the old that were too much worn or broken to be
put back. The cost of this work was $1,566.19, or 41 cents
per square yard. Repairs were made to pavements laid
with asphalt block to the extent of 3,562 square yards. In
most instances new block had to be supplied, and the cost
of this work was $1,510.64. Miscellaneous repairs to other
brick and granite block pavements were made, which cost
approximately $6,047.55. 16,215 square yards of streets were
repaired or repaved. These individual repairs covered areas
of from perhaps one to fifty square yards. Bills were rendered
against corporations and property owners for repairs in these cases, where cost of repairs fall upon same, amounting to $2,855.40.
During the year it was the practice to haul cinders from
262_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
manufacturing plants to many lanes and sand streets where
there was auto traffic, in order to improve to some extent
the character of the roadways, and a thorough test was
made of this material, the result of which shows that it is
costly and very unsatisfactory, except under certain conditions.
In dry weather the cinders powder and cause annoyance to
residents abutting the streets on which they are placed.
Holes soon form in the streets, and there is a continual cost in
maintaining the surface after cinders are once put down.
The practice of using this material has been stopped, it being
believed that whatever money is expended is better utilized
in constructing permanent pavements. With cinders, so it is
with gravel, the cost of same in place is practically 50 cents
per square yard, and permanent pavement can be put down
for SI.50. The gravel is unsatisfactory, costly to maintain
and the use of same has been discontinued except under
special conditions. During the fiscal year 36,912 square yards
of streets were graveled, the property owners abutting the
streets paying one half the cost. Approximately 5,750
square yards of streets were covered with cinders, the entire
cost, amounting to $759.00, was paid by the city.
The total expenditure made by the city for the maintenance of paved streets and lanes was $9,378.38.
The unpaved streets and lanes of the city, owing to the
character of the surface, in most instances 'sand, are difficult of
being kept in such condition as to afford easy traffic through
same. About all that can be done until they are paved is
to keep ame graded and keep the gutters clean, so that
the surface water can drain from the streets and where the
character of the material permits, to keep the streets somewhat crowned. A great deal of resurfacing work was done
during the fiscal year 1914, the cost of which was approximately $8,042.50.
As stated elsewhere, the city has 49 miles of permanent
paved streets and there are approximately 80 miles of unpaved streets or lanes with heavy traffic, and others with more
or less traffic, which have to receive attention. There are
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 263
besides approximately 60 miles of streets and lanes, which at
this time require no attention, as very little, if any, traffic
go over same.
An experiment has been made with the clinker from the
Destructor Plant, to see if this material could be used on the
outlying streets as a top surface or foundation for roadway,
covering same with a layer of dirt. At this date a mile of
roadway, known as Stiles Avenue, has been so prepared, and
every indication points to success for the material noted.
Stiles Avenue was almost an impassable roadway, but now
nas a hardened surface over which a great deal of heavy
traffic passes without any apparent deterioration or breaking
of the surface. It is the writers opinion that all of the clinker
that will be taken from the Destructor Plant can and will
be used for surfacing outlying streets of the city.
Bridges: Only maintenance of bridges was kept up
during the year. The amount expended for this work was
$598.00. Diverting Musgrove Creek into Ogeechee Canal
will do away with two bridges, one on Bay Street and one
on Louisville Road, and under the contract between the
Central of Georgia Railway and the city, a third bridge of
the old type will be done away with, the railroad company
paying for the construction of a new bridge across the Ogeechee Canal on Railroad Street. With the elimination of the
three birdges referred to, and the construction of a new one
the previous year, the cost of maintaining the principal
bridges owned by the city will in the future be materially
reduced. Wooden bridges or even wooden-floored bridges
are costly to maintain, and the remaining small wooden
bridges as fast as they have to be replaced should be reconstructed of more permanent material.
Constructing Catch Basins: The number of catch
basins in use January 1, 1914, was 1,463; the number added
in 1914 was sixteen, making a total of 1,479 at the end of
the fiscal year. This is exclusive of any new work that is
being done under the present extension of the strom water
264_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
and sanitary sewers. The cost of putting in catch basins,
maintaining and repairing broken basins was $112.05.
Street Crossings: The number of street crossings put
in during 1914 was 147, making the total existing number
1,184. The number removed during the year on account of
new paving was 50. The total number existing at the end
of the fiscal year was 1,281. The amount expended for putting in crossings was $1,470.00. As fast as the streets are
paved these crossings are eliminated but at the same time,
there are many unpaved streets abutting where much new
building is going on, necessitating the putting down of cross*
ings.
The above work completes that coming under the division of Highway Department, excepting for certain items
that are not important enough to dwell especially upon.
Harbor and Wharves
Under this Department comes the maintenance of the
wharves, docks and slips and the maintenance of equipment
used by the Harbor Master.
Improvements of Savannah harbor by the Federal Government progressed uninterrupted during the fiscal year. At
the present time the controlling depth in the channel from the
city to the deep sea is twenty-five feet at mean low water.
This, however, does not represent the general depth, the
same being from twenty-six to twenty-eight feet. This increased depth, and the maintenance of the depth, is gratifying to report to the outside world. Savannah is one of the
few ports that enjoys the distinction of obtaining necessary
funds without difficulty to obtain sufficient depth to meet
the needs of commerce. This is brought about by the increase of the commerce of the port, by the gradual and regular
improvement of the harbor.
In my last report I gave the length of the wharves and
the ownership of same at the port, together with the terminal
facilities existing at the end of the fiscal year, 1913.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 265
During the fiscal year 1914, a project for extensive extension of the terminal improvement of the Central of Georgia
Railway Company and the Ocean Steamship Company was
formulated. Work upon the project commenced during the
fiscal year, and there is under construction terminals of a
modern type, which are expected to be equal to any located
along the Atlantic Coast. The expenditure that will be made
by the railway company and steamship company will be
in the neighborhood of one and one-half millions dollars.
A wharf was constructed by the city which will be referred to under outlays.
The amount expended during the year for the maintenance
of the city's docks was $280.00.
The total expenditure made by this Department for office expenses of the Harbor Master's office, salaries, upkeep
of launch, etc., was $3,441.00.
Outlays
Opening Streets: The city acquired practically 2,000,-
000 square feet of land during 1914 for opening streets, a
detailed tabulation of which is given under the heading of
engineering and surveys. There was expended during 1914,
for grading new streets and lanes, approximately $4,000.00.
The lineal length of streets and lanes attained was 8,276
feet. The new streets graded, were:
47th Street.................................... 510 Feet
47th Street Lane.......................... 510 Feet
48th Street.................................... 510 Feet
48th Street Lane.......................... 510 Feet
49th Street.................................... 510 Feet
49th Street Lane.......................... 510 Feet
50th Street................................... 510 Feet
50th Street Lane........................ 510 Feet
51st Street.................................... 510 Feet
51st Street Lane..................... 510 Feet
59th Street.................................. 1,350 Feet
Abercorn Street.............. 238 Feet
Total...................................... 6,688 Feet
STREETS PAVED 1914
New Paving: Not the least among the improvements projected and carried on during the fiscal year was
the new paving. During 1914 new pavements were laid as per the following tabulation:
Wheaton Street Liberty to McDonough. .....
GwinnettStreet Magnolia Street to U.S.Viaduct
River Street Fahm toAbercorn .........
Louisville Road, Stiles to Lathrop Avenue . . .
Perry Street Lane, Bull to Whitaker ........
Bay Street Lane, Bull to Whitaker ..........
Bay Street Lane, West Broad to Montgomery
York Street Bull to Whitaker ..............
Duffy Street Barnard to West Broad ........
Congress Street Lane, Dray ton to Aberrant . .
Hull Street Dray ton to Abercorn ...........
Montgomery Street Bay to Bryan ..........
Taylor Street Whitaker to West Broad ......
Material
Vit. Bk.
Gran. Blk.
Gran. Blk.
Vit. Bk.
Vit. Bk.
Vit. Bk.
Vit. Bk.
Vit. Bk.
Aspt. Blk.
Aspt. Blk.
Aspt. Blk.
Aspt. Blk.
Aspt. Blk.
Square Yard*
1,620.
2,480.80
12,963.90
2,560.59
747.40
649.92
579.50
716.94
3,476.39
736.04
763.63
1,101.45
2,647.38
31,043.94
Lineal Fet
543.
741.
3,332.
923.
302.
302.
242.
304.
870.
304.
303.
205.
940.
9,311.
Cot Total
2,340.61
3,634.07
22,038.80
3,812.80
1,143.45
1,064.99
1,032.29
994.00
6,667.42
1,181.88
1,535.68
2,001.42
5,312.53
52,659.94
One-third City'.
Proportion
770.12
1,211.36
3,652.79
1,270.93
381.15
354.99
344.09
331.34
1,548.33
393.96
511.90
667.14
1,770.85
13,208.95
Coitity Inter section Street*
and Lane*
463.62
274.03
738.10
190.70
267.99
33.08
126.59
45.90
561.62
2,701.53
Cost Prperty to
Ownen
1,076.64
2,148.68
6,567.48
2,351.17
762.30
710.00
688.20
662.66
2,828.67
754.84
897.19
1,288.38
2,980.16
23,716.37
Cot Railway to
Companies
30.23
11,080.43
1,922.43
13,033.09
CoetPer Square Yard
1.43948
1.4648
1.70
1.07
1.07
1.07
1.07
1.07
1.8893
1.6057
2.011
1.8222
2.007
CottPer
IFoot Front
H
1.416891
1.6358
1.10
1.3768
2.5885
1.1744
1.42116
1.08927
1.74872
1.2398
1.6862
3.25
1.6108
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________ 267
No unusual difficulties were met nor any material changes
were made in the method of laying pavements from the
manner in which they had been laid previously. The greatest improvement to any street was the paving of River
Street from Fahm Street to Abercorn Street. It was intended
to carry this pavement through to East Broad Street, but
legal obstructions, as regards ownership of the street at certain localities, prevented the completion of the paving to the
point originally proposed. This pavement was laid with
granite block, the most suitable type of pavement for roadway where there is heavy traffic, and where the question of
noise is not objectionable. There were a number of lanes
paved with vitrified brick. The pavement of streets in the
residential section was laid with asphalt block. The city
purchased from the Barber Asphalt Company, for paving,
560,000 block at $59.75 per 1,000 f. o. b. wharf Savannah.
This is equivalent to approximately $1.24 per square yard of
pavement. The material was purchased upon specifications
that were specially prepared to meet the requirements of the
southern climate, and the block together with the material
constituting same was thoroughly inspected at the plant
where they were manufactured at Maurer, N. J. At the end of
the year the city had 16 miles, or 379,300 square yards of vitrified brick pavements. The average cost per square yard for
this pavement was $1.53. Of asphalt block the city.at theend
of the year, had 12.54 miles, or 315,500 square yards; the
average cost per square yard for this pavement was $1.77.
Of sheet asphalt the city had five and one-half miles,
or 141,300 square yards, the average cost of which, to the
city, was $2.58; however, practically all of this pavement
has been resurfaced at a cost of approximately $1.10 per
square yard. Of granite block the city has 5.73 miles, or
122,300 square yards, the average cost of which was $2.15
per square yard. The old cobblestone pavement of the city
is being rapidly replaced with a more modern and better
type of material. At this time there is between four and five
miles of this pavement. Streets and Lanes have been hard
268 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
ened with Augusta gravel, shell and pyrites, amounting to
between four and five miles. The cost of the cobblestone
has been approximately $1.00 per square yard, of Augusta
gravel 40 cents and of the old shell and pyrites streets approximately 68 cents per square yard. Including the streets
hardened with cobblestone, gravel, shell and pyrites, the
city now has forty-nine miles of paved streets, which represents an outlay to the city alone of approximately $2,000.000,
although the present estimated value of the pavement is a
Million-and-a-Quarter. All cobblestone that is removed
from the streets is taken to the City Lots, where it is being
crushed as required, and at this time there is on hand about
6,000 tons of this stone.
The work proposed for 1915 includes the paving of three
of the srteets on the west side of the city leading out from
the business section. These streets are known as Bay Street
Extension, Louisville Road and Gwinnett Street, and are in
very bad condition. At the same time a portion of the residential section will be paved.
A great deal can be accomplished with the allotment for
the 1915 work and in a few years, provided a similiar amount
is alloted each year and the paving is carried on systematically, a great improvement will ensue as regards the
condition of the streets of our city.
The southeastern portion of the city is developing rapidly,
and paving is demanded in this section in the very near
future.
From a close study of the method of doing paving work,
which had been done with hired labor and purchase of material,
I am satisfied that this method is preferable in this city to
contracting for the work. I believe it can be done as economically with the city forces, where efficiency is required, as
can be expected if let out by contract.
Street Signs: $1,000 was alloted during the year towards placing street signs in the city, a much needed improvement. During the year ornamental signs were placed at
street intersections, usually two at an interesction for that
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 269
section of the city bounded by the river, and Anderson Street
on the south, and between East Broad and West Broad
Streets. One thousand four hundred and twenty-seven ornamental galvanized iron street signs were carefully placed;
also sixty four two-way ornamental metallic signs on Bull
Street between Bay Street and Forsyth Park. The cost of
the ornamental signs in place was $3.28 each. The cost of
the metallic signs in place was $623.10, or 43.6 cents each.
The total amount expended for the signs was $833.10.
New Wharf: The city purchased from Mr. R. S. Salas,
wharf property between Bull and Drayton Streets, with a
lineal length of three hundred and three feet for the sum of
$55,000.00.
The city constructed upon this property a substantial
wharf which was built entirely of cypress lumber. The cost
of the construction, including inspection was $9,557. The
wharf, as constructed, extended from the east side of Drayton
Street to the east side of Bull Street, making the total length
three hundred and fifty feet, and depth approximately 75
feet.
The controlling depth in front of this wharf varies from
16 to 18 feet. A moderate expenditure of possibly $1,000
will create a depth of not less than 24 feet at low water, and
it is recommended that an improvement be made by dredging
so as to obtain a depth sufficient for the dockage of any
steamer that comes to our port. The channel opposite the
wharf is only 40 to 50 feet distant from the face of the wharf.
The wharf at the foot of Abercorn Street is in a deplorable condition, but an allotment was made in the 1915 budget
sufficient to rebuild same.
Drainage: The completion of the extension of the
house drainage system in 1900 left a considerable section of
the rapidly developing city unprovided with a modern sanitary sewerage system. Even then it was appreciated that
arrangements for the completion of the system to cover the
entire city could not be postponed for any great number of
years. The large number of offensive open vaults still left,
270 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
even in well built up sections, and the extensive building
operations over new areas, made it imperative that a large
sum should be made available for this purpose. The previous
work had been done without recourse to a bond issue, but it
was manifestly impossible to finance the much greater operation that yet remained to be done out of the ordinary revenues
of the city, or by issuing notes that were clearly illegal and
subject to injunction, as had been threatened in 1898.
Off and on there was considerable discussion in the public
prints and otherwise, but not until 1909 did this take definite
form, a bond issue of $350,000 being submitted to the people
on June 29th, and defeated. This was followed by a clearer
presentation of the vital importance of the project to the
citizens and another bond election, held December 6, 1911,
gave an overwhelming vote for the issuance of bonds to the
extent of $600,000, although it was appreciated by those
most conversant with the situation that even this much
larger sum was entirely inadequate to do the work necessary
to provide the entire city with sanitary conveniences, the
original engineering estimates calling for expenditures of over
$1,100,000.
The bonds thus authorized were sold at public sale on
May 27, 1914, netting the city $604,797.00. In the meantime, a commission appointed under the provisions of the
election had done much preliminary work in the preparation
of the plans and accumulation of material as to rights-of-way,
etc. Differences of opinion arising, the legality of the commission was tested in the Superior Court, and its decision
made July 25, 1914, was that the commission had no authority, which opinion was accepted, and the conduct of the work
left entirely in the hands of the Mayor and Aldermen, who
had refused to approve certain bids previously received and
now called for new bids on a new sub-division of the work.
When this transfer of control took place, the writer was
directed to revise the specifications that had been prepared,
for a second advertising, for the work to be done, and an
advertisement calling for proposals for constructing the sewers
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 271
was published on September 21, 1914. On October 2, 1914,
proposals were received. After being tabulated and carefully reviewed, contracts were entered into between the city
and the Gadsden Contracting Company and Guild & Company
for Sections 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8, and A. J.Twiggs & Sons for
Section 1-A, which included the Bilbo Canal, in place of the
Lamar Route, for the outlet of the east side trunk sewer.
The tabulation of the bids received basing work upon the
type of construction that the city adopted is, as shown on
the following page:
Bilbo Canal Route
COMPARATIVE PROPOSALS FOR MATERIALS ADOPTED
Section 1-A Section 1 Section 2 Section 3 Section 4 Section 6 Section 7 Section 8
Gadsden Contracting Company.
A. J. Twiggs & Sons...........
Bailey. Reeder & Company ....
M. OjHerron& Son...........
Mishler & Flinn...............
Cement Stone & Tile Company.
Dobbs & Wetmore............
J.H.Cahill...................
Porter & Boyd..-.----....-.-.
W. Z. Williams Company.
T. McFarlandcfe Son._._.._.._
R.B. Tufts...................
170,054 50
136,904 00
170,005 00
176,182 50
163,443 00
147,000 00
126,801 30
129,143 20
152,174 50
86,535 70
97,904 50
151,433 60
48,687 70
60,193 50
54,147 00
68,009 50
58,474 50
62,997 50
24,207 70
28,900 00
24,341 00
30,569 50
34,333 50
83,030 20
94,291 50
124,938 00
21,101 10
27,979 00
22,096 00
2
*S GO
g
LOWEST BIDDERS
Section 1-A A. J. Twiggs & Sons......... $136,994 00
Sections 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, Gadsden Cont.Co. 390,453 50
Grand Total...................... $527,447 50
Estimates given above based on the following types of construction:
Section 1-A Reinforced concrete box sewer.
Section 2 Reinforced concrete box sewer 2,000 feet, 36", 42_", 48" diameter circular sewers sectional re-concrete pipe.
8" to 24" diameter circular sewers, vitrified clay pipe.
Section 3 36"diameter circular sewer, sectional reinforced concrete pipe. 18" to 30" diameter circular sewers, vitrified clay pipe.
Section 4 Reinforced concrete box sewer, 990 feet. Circular sewers 27" to 66" inclusive sectional reinforced concrete pipe. 12'
to 15" inclusive vitrified clay pipe.
Sections 6, 7 and 8 circular sewers above 24" diameter to be sectional reinforced concrete pipe. 12" to 24" inclusiveto be vitrified
clay pipe.
NOTEO'Herron & Son's bid on Section 3 based on using sectional reinforced concrete pipe for 30" and 36" sewers.
October 2, 1914. E. R. CONANT, Chief Engineer.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 273
Messrs. A. J. Twiggs & Sons, began the work the latter
part of November, and the work during December was of a preliminary nature, and no actual material was placed for which
payment was made.
Under the contract with Gadsden Contracting Company
and Guild & Company, the work under Section 2 was started
in the middle of November and at the end of December 7%
had been completed. On December 31st, 24% of Section 3
had been completed. 15% of Section 4 was completed at
the end of the year. Section 6 was commenced on November
30th, and at the end of the year 28% was completed. No
work had been done on Section 7 at the end of the year, nor
on Section 8.
At the present writing there is every indication that all
of the contract work will be completed before the end of 1915.
A resurvey of the work, that is being carried on is, as follows:
The work being done is divided into seven sections. The
construction of each section is a complete unit in itself, and
a separate contract is made for each section. There are
under construction two main trunk sanitary sewers, one located on the east side and one located on the west side. These
two sewers extend from the river in a southerly direction to
the southern corporate limits of the city. The outlet of each
sewer is in the Savannah river.
Section 1-A, includes a reinforced concrete box sewer
2,950 feet long, 7x13 feet, and extends from the mouth of the
old Bilbo Canal up the canal.
The next section is also in the canal, 1,800 feet long,
concrete box sewer, 7x11 feet 6 inches. The same section
includes the construction of Perry Street line sewer extending
from the Bilbo Canal sewer up the canal for a distance of
1,500 feet. This is a 4x6 concrete box sewer.
Section 2, is a continuation of the Bilbo Canal section
and extneds from Wheaton Street to Gwinnett Street, across
to Paulsen Street, to Bolton Street, then south on Paulsen
Street to 51st Street Lane, then west to Bull Street and then
north to Roswell Street. The section of the sewer extending
274 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
from Wheaton Street to Gwinnett Street is of reinforced
concrete box type, 7x11 feet 6 inches, 2,000 feet long. From
Gwinnett Street to Bolton Street, thence up Paulsen Street
to 45th Street, is constructed of sectional reinforced concrete
pipe of the following sizes: 3,000 lineal feet 48 inches, 1,750
lineal feet of 42 inches and 1,810 lineal feet of 36 inches.
From 45th Street Lane to the end of the section vitrified
terra cotta pipe is used of the following diameters and amount:
1,700 lineal feet 24-inch pipe, 2,670 feet of 15-inch, 2,850 feet
of 10-inch and 450 feet of 8-inch pipe.
Sections 1 and 2 constitute the main sanitary sewer on
the east side. Section 3, known as the Brow Ditch section,
is the main sanitary sewer on the west side. This sewer
connects with the present trunk sewer about 200 feet south
to the Savannah river. The first 6,900 feet of sewer is constructed of sectional reinforced concrete pipe, 36 inches in
diameter; then of the same type of construction there is
7,150 lineal feet of 30-inch diameter pipe. This concrete
connects with vitrified terra cotta pipe, of which there is
600 lineal feet of 24-inch diameter, 550 feet of 20-inch diameter
and 850 feet of 18-inch diameter. The terminus of this sewer
is at 51st Street Lane.
Section 3 is a storm water sewer, known as the 39th
Street section. It extends from the DeRenne Canal to Habersham Street, and a branch extends on Price Street south to
Hamilton Street. The outlet of this sewer is of reinforced
concrete rectangular box, 4x10 feet, 1,050 feet long. The
remainnig section is of sectional reinforced concrete pipe of
the following lengths and diameters: 900 feet of 66-inch, 70
feet of 60-inch, 650 feet of 48-inch, 1,000 feet of 42-inch,
900 feet of 36-inch and 350 feet of 27-inch.
Section 6 is also a storm water sewer, known as the
Perry Lane section. This is a sectional reinforced concrete
pipe sewer of the following sizes and lengths: 636 feet of 48-
inch diameter, 1,350 feet of 42-inch diameter and 1,052 feet
of 36-inch diameter.
Section 7 is a storm water sewer known as the 45th
Street section. The main line of this section extends from
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 275
the Minis Canal to Montgomery Street, thence north on
Montgomery Street to Best Street, thence east on Best Street
to Barnard Street, thence north on Barnard Street to 36th
Street. A branch sewer extends from the main on Bulloch
Street south to 50th Street and east on 50th Street to Barnard
Street. The outlet into Minis Canal is of 72-inch diameter
sectional reinforced concrete pipe, of which there is 775 lineal
feet. The remaining work consists of 900 feet of 60-inch
reinforced concrete pipe, 3,300 lineal feet 42-inch diameter
reinforced concrete pipe, 3,600 feet of 36-inch diameter reinforced pipe and 2,430 of 24-inch vitrified terra cotta pipe.
Section 8 is in three parts, all of which is for storm water
drainage. The west part extends from the Springfield Canal
to Butler Street, the east part is on Bolton Street from
Abercorn Street to Price Street, and the central part is on
Gwinnett Street from Brow Ditch to Reppard Street, thence
south on Reppard Street to Bolton, thence east on Bolton
Street to Cuyler Street. The type of construction, size and
lengths are as follows: 700 lineal feet of 48-inch diameter reinforced concrete pipe, 1,660 lineal feet of 36-inch diameter
reinforced concrete pipe. The remainder is of vitrified terra
cotta pipe360 lineal feet of 24-inch diameter, 2,000 feet of
18-inch diameter, 500 feet of 15-inch diameter and 950 feet
of 12-inch diameter.
It will be seen from the preceding that a large portion
of the work consists of sectional reinforced concrete pipe.
Before the writer recommended the adoption of this type of
material, he thoroughly investigated the use of this in other
cities, and from best information received there was no hesitation in recommending to the city the use of this material,
especially where the character of the soil is supersaturated
with water. AH of this material was made in the city before
it was put into the ground, and it had set for at least fifteen
days and most of it had a chance to set for at least a month
before it was used.
Severe tests were applied to this pipe. In one instance
eleven tons and a half was applied to a section of 66-inch
276 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
diameter and four feet in length on a knife edge bearing with
the pipe resting upon the ground without sand cushion or
concrete bed with no fracture of the pipe.
The sectional reinforced pipe extensively used at this
time is known as the Meriwether system. It provides for
continuous reinforced concrete pipe laid in sections, in which
the joints between sections are so made as to insure freedom
from leakage and gives a very smooth inside surface so that
the frictional flow is reduced to a minimum by means of a
lock joint, whereby the individual sections overlap the other
pipe by a system of grouting around the reinforcement that
is lapped. The joints are practically as strong as the rest of
the pipe. This type of reinforced concrete pipe has advantages over the monolithic type, which is constructed in the
trench as the work proceeds. It is practically impossible to
construct a thin shell of concrete in the trench, so as to insure proper inspection which will bring to light all defects
in the concrete itself. Again, as to pipe made in sections, the
progress of the work is very much enhanced by means of the
sectional pipe and a result of saving in the cost of work consumed. When the contract was made for supplying sectional
reinforced concrete pipe, the largest size expected to be used
was 60-inch diameter, but as the work progressed it became
apparent that it would be advantageous to use sectional pipe
in place of the monolithic type, and the largest diameter
pipe being placed in the contract is 72-inch. The specifications required for this pipe a thickness of concrete varying
from 3^-inch for the 13-inch diameter pipe to 7-inch thickness
for the 72-inch diameter. Where the diameter of the pipe
equaled 48-inch or exceeded this, a double line of reinforcement
is being used. The specifications also required certain crushing
hydrostatic and absorption test. A 48-inch diameter pipe
for the crushing test must stand 4,400 pounds pressure per
lineal foot. For 72-inch it must stand 5,500 pounds per lineal
foot, and this pressure is applied on the ground at a knife
edge of 1-inch in width. The mixture for the pipe that is
being made is from one to four, with Clinchfield Portland
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 277
cement, Savannah river sand and Columbia crushed granite, the granite running from ^ to 1-inch. The length of
these sections of pipe is four feet from the end of the bell to
the shoulder at the collar. Upon applying 4,170 pounds per
lineal foot, or over seven and one-half tons, distributed over
42 inches of the pipe, only hair cracks formed in the invert
and crown. The total deflection was found to be 3/8 of an
inch. The pipe did not rupture and the cracks only extended
to one line of reinforcement. The test of the 66-inch pipe
showed that after loading with 21,000 pounds or 6,000 pounds
per lineal foot, a deflection of 1/16 of an inch was noted,
three hair cracks were apparent on the inside of the pipe,
two at the bottom and one on the outside of the stringing
line. None of the cracks was over 1/40 of an inch wide,
and upon removal of the load the cracks perceptibly decreased
in width. The pipe did not rupture and the cracks only extended through one line of reinforcement. In order to test the
jointing of the pipe, two were jointed in the customary manner,
each end of the double supported on the cradle, and a weight
was applied to the saddle on top over the joint. Over eight
and one-half tons was applied to the saddle and no deflection
could be noted and no cracks were detected. A hydrostatic
test was made of the pipe, and there was practically no
seapage until the hydrostatic test reached over ten pounds
per square inch, and only a moderate erculation occurred
when the pressure was increased to twenty-two pounds per
square inch, when the test had to be discontinued on account
of the lack of greater pressure of water. These tests together
with the close inspection of the pipe as it is being made
satisfies the writer that the city is obtaining a type of construction most suitable to existing conditions and one which
guarantees success, and a sewer that will require little if
any maintenance.
The contractors furnished, although at additional cost
to them, vitrified terra cotta pipe made by the Blackmer
& Post'Company, for that pipe of 30-inch diameter. All
other pipe was of the Chattanooga Brand. AH materials
278 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
furnished by the contractors have been thoroughly tested;
the Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory being employed to test all
of the cement which came to the city with cars sealed with
the laboratory seal, and due notice was furnished of the complete test made of the cement. The same testing company
was employed to test the reinforcing steel, and a portion of
the terra cotta pipe. Believing that economy would ensue
by testing the terra cotta pipeupoon arrival, the city purchased
a compressing testing machine at a cost of about $700, which
machine will be available for other purposes as well as for
testing pipe that will be used in this contract.
The city was very fortunate as regards the class of inspectors that are being employed to supervise and inspect
the contract work. With the business depression, engineering help as well as other professional men suffered, and the
city has under employment as inspectors capable engineers,
many belonging in the city and men who are graduates of
colleges or technical institutions and some of them of wide
experience. These engineers are being employed at a moderate
salary, and the city is receiving the benefit of inspection that
is practical, thorough and efficient.
The city was particularly fortunate in obtaining proposals, which permitted the work to be done at a very satisfactory cost. The business depression throughout the country
practically stopped the progress of general contracting work,
and contractors were eager to obtain work and competition
was very sharp, as regards the bidding upon the work in
question. The second proposals received permitted of the
work being done at a far less cost had the work been done
under the first advertisement. Further, the greater proportion of the work was let to contractors identified with Savannah's interests.
Ogeechee Canal: An agreement was made and entered
into on October 10, 1914, between the city and the Central
of Georgia Railway Company, whereby the city will divert
into the Ogeechee Canal all waters from the watershed south
of the railway's right of way, now flowing into Center's
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 279
Ditch and Musgrove Creek, with the understanding that the
city will relinquish all rights of drainage through Musgrove
Creek and Center's Ditch. The Canal Comapny, through
the Central of Georgia Railway, will convey further fee title
to its right-of-way along the Ogeechee Canal. The city shall
do all work necessary to make the Ogeechee Canal suitable
for the drainage contemplated. The railway company pays
to the city for dredging from the mouth of the river to where
Musgrove Creek is intercepted, $25,000. The railway company will further pay to the city $2,000 towards building a
new bridge over the canal at the Louisville Road crossing,
and the railway company will further pay to the city $12,000
towards constructing modern concrete and steel flood gates.
The above covers the principal physical features contained in
the agreement, which this office has to deal with.
The dredging of the Ogeechee Canal commenced on
October 26, 1914,and at the end of the year 20%of the work
had been completed. The carrying out of the contract between the Central of Georgia Railway Company and the
City of Savannah will result in a marked benefit in the sanitary conditions on the west side of the city of Savannah.
At this time it is anticipated that the Musgrove Creek Canal
will be diverted in Ogeechee Canal on or before August
15, 1915.
Surveying and Engineering: All of the city survey
work, including the laying out of the work for the sewerage
extension, Ogeeehee Canal and other improvements was under
the immediate charge of W. O'D. Rockwell, Assistant
Chief Engineer. A recapitulation of the routine work done
by this office is as follows:
Survey of Lots for Private Parties.................................... 431
Plats Made of the Above Lots for Private Parties.......... 254
Measurements of Street Paving for Assessment Rolls.... 18
Miscellaneous Measurements and Surveys .................... 85
Grades and Lines Furnished for Curbing, Grading and
Miscellaneous Purposes ............................................. 73
280 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Levels Taken of Streets for Sewerage and Grading........ 14
Levels Taken for Miscellaneous Purposes........................ 5
Profiles for Street Grades, etc........................................... 15
Street Lines Given During the Year.............. .................. 441
Grades and Lines Given for Sidewalks........................ ..... 54
Estimates Prepared for Street Paving, Grading, etc ..... 30
Estimates Made for Miscellaneous Purposes.................. . 26
Maps and Plats of Lots................................ .................... 25
Maps and Plats of Streets................................................. 10
Maps and Plats, Miscellaneous.... ........................... ... 39
Tracing of Lots................................................................ . 19
Tracing Miscellaneous................. .............................. ... 56
Blue Prints Made.................................................... ... 2,609
Miscellaneous Reports, etc........................................... ..... 20
Besides the above routine work, a survey party was continuously engaged from the time actual work commenced on
the extension of the sewers to the end of the fiscal year,
giving lines, grades and surveying rights-of-way.
There is given below a tabulation of the land acquired
for opening streets and for other purposes:
Sq.Foot Ft. Length
Lots C and F, Norwood Ward, for Opening
Barnard Street _......................... 6,262 83.5
Lota 11, 13 and 16, Norwood Ward, for Opening
BamardStreet............................ 9,954 180.
Lots E and D, Norwood Ward, for Opening
Barnard Street ........................... 6,220 83.5
Anderson Lots 5 (outside of city limits) Opening
59th Street................................ 113,450 1,334.5
Anderson Lots (outside of city limits) Opening
Abercorn Street ........................... 33,180 504.
Anderson Lots (outside of city limits) Opening Lanes 53,878 2,669.
Central of Georgia Railway Company Opening
RiverStreet. ........................... 38,000 501.9
Southeast Part Lot 22 Swell Ward Opening
Jones Street............................... 875 58.33.
Lot 47, Norwood Ward Opening Montgomery Street 3,600 90.
Parkside Tract, Opening 48th Street........-.-.- 156,564 2,609.
Parkside Tract, Opening 49th Street............. 163,164 2,719.4
Parkside Tract, Opening 50th Street............. 163,164 2,719.4
Parkside Tract, Opening 51st Street.............. 163,164 2,719.4
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 281
Sq. Foot Ft. Length
Parkside Tract, Opening Bee Road........--.-... 52,206 745.8
Parkside Tract, Opening Bull Street__..----..-- 28,545 1,141.8
Parkside Tract, Opening Lanes.................. 150,690 10,656.8
Parkside Tract, Opening Live Oak Street......... 43,770 1,171.8
Parkside Tract, Opening Cedar Street............ 43,770 1,171.8
Parkside Tract, Opening Ash Street.............. 43,770 1,171.8
Parkside Tract, Opening Hickory Street.......... 43,770 1,171.8
Western Land & Improvement Company (outside
city limits), Opening Elliott Street...---.-.-. 80,000 1,620.
Western Land & improvement Company (outside
city limits), Opening Alien Street............ 65,200 1,620.
Western Land & Improvement Company (outside
city limits), Opening Decatur Street.......... 6,600 220.
Western Land & Improvement Company (outside
city limits), Opening Murphy Street--------- 22,500 445.
Western Land & Improvement Company (outside
city limits), Opening McCarthy Street-......- 28,500 400.
Western Land & Improvement Company (outside
city limits), Opening Carr Street............. 17,500 340.
Lot No. 1 (King's Sub.) Wright Ward, Opening
Barnard Street............................ 12,925 172.33
Lot No. 1 (King's Sub.) Wright Ward, Opening
Montgomery Street...--...........^-..---- 7,755 172.33
Lot No. 1 (Block D) Harden Ward, Opening Ott St. 1,566 90.34
Lot No. 1 (Block D) Harden Ward, Opening 41st St. 223 44.61
Lots 54 and 55, Schwarz Ward, Opening 35th St... 5,000 100.
Lot No. 37, Meldrim Ward, Opening Burroughs St. 2,167 98.6
Lot No 37, Meldrim Ward, Opening 35th Street__ 667 14.7
Lots 34 and 36, Southville Ward, Opening Estill Ave. 283 4.72
Lots 16 and 18, Southville Ward, Opening EstiOAve. 137 2.28
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah)
Opening Bay Street.........-.--......----. 23,136 964.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Richards Street.................... 53,800 1,076.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Jenkins Street.......---.....___ 48,800 1,220.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening BakerStreet.------.-.....---....- 61,000 1,220.
Urban Development Company ,(West Savannah),
Opening Fell Street........................ 90,300 1,290.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Sugden Street..................... 32,500 550.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Mercer Street.---------..-.----. 58,050 1,290.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Chapman Street................... 58,950 1,310.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Lane Street...-....-....---------. 31,440 1,310.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Gumming Street..._.........__ 36,750 735.
Urban Development Company, (West Savannah),
Opening Eagle Street._....-.-......-----. 18,375 735.
Lots 119, 120, 129, 143, 144, 123, 137, 131, 132 and
149 Grayson Ward, Opening Paulsen Street... 24,000 240.
Lots 249-254 Harmon Ward, Opening Harmon St... 4,641 187.32
Minis Tract, Demere Ward, Opening 40th Street.. 13,320 222.
282 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Land Acquired Other Than for Opening Streets
Part of Lot B, Heyward, (for newer right-of-way).... 460 Square Feet
Part of Lot 92, Noel Ward, (for sewer right-of-way) ... 1,500 Square Feet
Lots 33, 34, 35 and West 4' of 36 and North Parts of
52, 53, 54 Thomas Ward, (for Carnegie Library) 23,813 Square Feet
Wharf Lots 7, 8 and 9, (for wharf) ................ 25,773 Square Feet
Sale of City Property
Lot C, Southville Ward, (ordinance Jan. 21, 1914).-.- 2,934 Square Feet
Lots 1. 2. 3. 4. Law Ward, (resolution, Nov, 25,1914) .. 1,721 Square Feet
Lot 148, (Schwarz Ward), (resolution Nov. 25,1914)... 884 Square Feet
Lot 112 Brownsville Ward, (resolution of Council No..) 1,250 Square Feet
A record is kept on file in the offi ce for "Public Reference," showing localities of all lands surveyed for private
parties, miscellaneous measurements and surveys of streets
and lanes given during the year, and also maps and plats
are on file showing streets and other properties acquired.
The last Legislature passed an Act, which will be of
great benefit to the city, as it is intended to have the streets
and lanes of tracts taken in by the city laid out in conformity
with the city's plan. This Act is as follows:
"Be it further enacted, That no tract of land lying
within the corporate limits of the City of Savannah, as they
are now, or hereafter may be defined, or within two miles
of such corporate limits, shall be laid off into lots and streets
or lanes, or subdivided in any manner, until a map or plan
of such subdivision shall have been first submitted to and
approved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah. A copy of the map or plan of such subdivision, when
so approved, shall be recorded by the parties making such
subdivision in the office of the Clerk of the Superior Court
of Chatham County, Georgia, and copies deposited with the
Board of Commissioners of Roads and Revenue of Chatham County, and with the Chief Engineer of the City
of Savannah before offering any such lots for sale, and the
filing of such map or plan shall constitute a dedication for
public purposes of all the streets, lanes or other highways
thereon delineated.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 283
"Be it further enacted, That the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah shall have authority to pass all
necessary ordinances, .not conflicting with the provisions of
this Act, regulating the laying off and sale of lots of land
within the corporate limits of said City, and within two miles
thereof, and providing punishment for violations of such
ordinaances and the preceding section, of this Act."
The city has passed an ordinance covering the Act passed
by the Legislature. It is unfortunate that such a law was
not in force many years ago. While Savannah is generally
laid out regularly, there is great difficulty at times in controlling streets in tracts, which have been connected to the
city or developed in recent years, which tracts were divided
independently, whereby they would be connected with the
streets of the city.
Board of Purchase
An ordinance was passed by Council January 21, 1914,
providing for a Board of Purchase, to prescribe the duties for
said Board and for other purposes.
Council ordained that the Board should consist of the
Mayor, Chief Engineer and two members of City Council,
the latter to be appointed by the Mayor. The Mayor should
further appoint one of the members as Purchasing Officer,
whose duties during the fiscal year 1914, were assigned to
the Chief Engineer. The Board of Purchase is charged with
the sole and exclusive purchase of supplies and materials
whatsoever needed and required by all departments of the
City Government.
The Board meets regularly on Tuesdays to receive proposals in response to advertisements for supplies. Previous
to the organization of the Board of Purchase, purchases had
been made by the various committees of the departments
for which supplies were needed.
Greater care is now exercised in the placing of orders
for supplies and every requisitien for supplies and material
284_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
has to pass through the Board of Purchase, and if it appears
that unnecessary supplies are asked for, or the quantities
exceed that which are thought to be needed, the Board
make necessary corrections.
Again, many articles, such as stationery and printing,
have become standardized for all of the departments and a
great saving has resulted in stationery and printing by this
improvement. The Board endeavors to buy in quantities,
which also results in greater saving than when small orders
were issued from time to time.
Certain supplies that might be used by one department
to a very limited extent are used in large quantities by another, and a system is now in vogue whereby one department
can draw on another for articles or material; the department
drawn upon is then credited with the cost of the article
through the Comptroller.
Miscellaneous Office Work
Permits Issued : A careful record is kept of all permits
issued, and the following tabulation gives the number issued
and for what purpose:
To Plumbers and Property Owners for Cleaning Out the
House Connections Between the City Sewers and
Dwellings........... ............................................................... 475
For Opening Streets in Order to Give Water Connections and Repairs to Connections....................... ... 496
To Contractors and Others Desiring to Put Down
Cement Sidewalks............................................................ 165
For Opening Streets to Give Connection to Sewers........ 117
For Streets Used for Building Construction.................... 79
To Put Up Electric Signs.................................................. 67
To Put Up Gasoline Tanks............................ .................... 17
Removal of Trees................................................................. 31
To the Savannah Electric Company, Savannah Lighting Company and Savannah Gas Company for Street
Openings........ ................................................................. 397
New Connections to House Drainage................................ 165
________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___ 285
Number of Notices Issued by this Office Requiring New
Sidewalks was.................................................................... 52
Number of Notices Sent to Relay Sidewalks was............ 236
Number of Notices Sent to Repair Sidewalks was ........ 796
Total Number of Notices Sent._......................... 1,084
An Act was passed by the last Legislature requiring property owners to make connections between mains in the
public streets to the curb line, and an ordinance has been
passed covering this Act. Notices are now being sent to all
property owners 20 days before paving is commenced in
conformity with the following Act.
"Be it further enacted, That when any street or lane,
or other highway in the City of Savannah is to be paved,
notice shall be served by the City Marshal upon the owners,
or agents of owners of the adjoining property, that all gas,
water, sewerage, conduits and underground connections must
be made to the curb line before said paving is laid, and in
the event of the refusal or failure of any such property owner
to make such connections he may be prohibited from making
any underground connections which would require the tearing
up of the street pavement, for a period of five years, except
under such penalties as the City by ordinance may impose."
Poles and Conduits: The following tabulation shows
the following poles set, removed, replaced and lineal feet of
conduits laid:
Savannah Electric Company
New Poles Set........................................................................ 242
Poles Removed...................................................................... 280
Poles Replaced...................................................................... 72
Poles for Ornamental Street Lighting................................ 29
Lineal Feet of Conduits Constructed During the Year.. 2,700
Savannah Lighting Company
New Poles Set...................................................................... 280
Poles Removed..................................................................... 5
Poles Replaced...................................................................... 19
286 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Western Union Telegraph Company
New Poles Set...................................................................... 4
Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company
New Poles Set....................................................................... 51
Poles Removed........ .......................................................... 2
Poles Replaced...................................................................... 6
Work in the Park Extension Outside of Work Done
for the Playgrounds
Considerable work was done in the upkeep of the Park
Extension and the ground around the Confederate Monument. The band stand was placed in condition to prevent
deterioration. Fifty benches were purchased and the grounds
were frequently mowed, not only to give same a presentable
appearance, but to keep down the cockspur. The total
amount expended for the upkeep of the Park Extension by
this Department was approximately $350.00.
Work Done for Property Owners, Which the City
Was Reimbursed For
The Parkside Land Company, in accordance with contract between the said company and the city for laying
sewer, setting curb, placing catch basins between 48th and
51st Streets, total amount of cost of said work for said
company, $2,407.
Standard Fuel Supply Company: While River Street
was being paved a portion of the wharf owned by this company
between Drayton and Abercorn Streets was paved with granite block. The total amount laid was 746 yards, for which
the company was billed $300.
The Ocean Steamship Company had a portion of River
Street paved west of the Ogeechee Canal, for which they
were billed $2,168.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________287
The Savannah Electric Company paved, at their own
expense, the foot of West Broad Street in front of the power
house, for which a collection was made of $456.
Curbing: During the year, 12,000 lineal feet of granite
curbing was laid outside of that required for street paving,
the cost of which was assessed against property owners. The
average cost of straight curbing as assessed varied from 33
to 36 cents per foot, the curve curbing approximately 40
cents per foot. The laying of curbing on the unpaved streets
materially assisted in the drainage of the streets, and also
assisted in keeping in good condition the sidewalks. The
cost of laying curbing is very economical compared with the
cost of same to some other cities where it averages from 60 to
75 cents. Granite curbing 18 inches deep and 4 inches wide
is purchased in this city at 23 cents per lineal foot for the
straight, and from 24 to 26 cents for the curve.
Personnel of the Office for Fiscal Year Ending
December 31, 1914
E. R. Conant, Chief Engineer....................................$ 4,800 00
W. O'D. Rockwell, Assistant Chief Engineer.......... 2,000 00
J. C. Bernhardt, Chief Clerk...................................... 1,800 00
R. M. Bailey, Surveyor............................................... 1,500 00
W. H. Shellman, Draftsman........................................ 1,200 00
C. R. Goette, Clerk-Stenographer.............................. 1,320 00
J. R. Haym, Record Clerk......................... ................ 1,200 00
T. H. Jordan, Record Clerk...................................... 1,200 00
C. A. Hartloge, Inspector (per day)............................ 3 00
N. Shur, Inspector Service Cuts (per day).............. 3 00
O. M. Miller, Sidewalk and General Inspector (per
day).......................................................................... 3 00
Drainage
J. A. Logan, Jr., Inspector.............................. ........... $ 900 00
Geo. R. Boyd, Surveyor............................................ 1,200 00
288 ____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___
M. Shur, Rodman ........................................................ 900 00
J. F. R. Kuck, Inspector.............................................. 900 00
M. F. Smith, Inspector................................................ 1,200 00
F. K. Webb, Inspector................................................ 1,200 00
W. J. Wood Jr., Inspector.......................................... 1,200 00
C. E. Faber, Inspector................................................. 1,020 00
J. F. Charlton, Inspector........................................... 1,200 00
A. S. Goebel, Inspector................................................ 780 00
C. P. Abrams, Clerk-Stenographer............................ 900 00
Collections made from service corporations for inspectors
engaged in inspecting service cuts, $2,855.40.
Very respectfully,
E. R. CONANT,
Chief Engineer.
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
WATERWORKS
DEPARTMENT
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
J. P. FIGG
SUPERINTENDENT and
ENGINEER
10
WATER DEPARTMENT
Committee on Water
JOHN E. FOY, Chairman
W. J. PIERPONT H. L. KAYTON
JOSEPH P. FIGG....................Superintendent and Engineer
THOMAS J. SHEFTALL......................................Chief Clerk
HARRY B. BEATTY...........................................Bookkeeper
WM. P. RIDLE........--Foreman Extension and Repair Work
ROBERT T. RUSSELL....Asst. Foreman Exten. and Rep.Wk.
THOMAS J. REID, First Assistant........ 1 Engineers
FLAVOR B. QUARTERMAN................ V Gwinnett Street
JOHN B. SITLER,.......:......................... J Station
SIFLEY F. COOK, First Assistant........ 1 .
CHARLES M. McBRIDE........................ I J^^^
CHARLES E. WILLIAMS...................... j Rlver StatlD
GEORGE R. SMALL..................Meter Reader and Repairer
THOMAS J. McELLINN....................Turncock and Plumber
JACOB LASKY..................................................................Florist
BLAKE M. COOPER.
WM. J. KELLY............
WM. F. BOYLSTON.-.
Compressor Oilers
Gwinnett Street
Station
BENJAMIN F. WIEHRS........................ ] Oilers
LEVY A. STANFIELD ............................ [ Gwinnett Street
JOHN M. THEE........................................ j Station
JOHN FLATHMAN........ ....................
JOHN C. GARWES................................ D.
JOHN W. GAILLARD.............................. j Rlver Statlon
SAMUEL COOLEY............................ Chief Water Inspector
LAWRENCE P. CONE..........................
GEORGE O. PENTON................. ........
JOHN L. HUTSON..................................
CHARLES B. PATTERSON.
WILBUR L. PRICE...............
EUGENE W. SIKES................
THOMAS E. SMITH..............
Water Inspectors
REPORT OF WATERWORKS DEPARTMENT
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAY ANT, Mayor.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to herewith submit the Annual Report
of the Waterworks Department for the year ending December
31, 1914, showing in detail statements covering the operation, expenditures and additions to system during that
period.
Operation
The physical condition of system for the year has been
excellent, thereby resulting in safe and satisfactory service,
all minor interruptions occurring having been speedily overcome.
However, with a marked increased demand on system,
on account of city's growth, I am constrained to respectfully
call your attention to my report for the year 1913, in reference
to additions to our pumping capacity, which matter I hope can
receive attention as early as practical.
Accounts
Beg to advise that transfer of water accounts from City
Treasurer's office to Waterworks office, as recommended by
recent audit has been successfully accomplished, and report
system as working satisfactorily.
292 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Incinerator
The completion of incinerator and its connection to waterworks boiler service by steam line, was successfully accomplished during the year, and result of connection are manifest
in a saving of approximately forty per cent, coal consumption by Water Department annually.
A full report of this service, however, will naturally occur
in report of Chief Engineer.
The report in detail, which follows, shows in full the operation, expenditures and receipts of the Department.
Operating Expenses
General Expenses
Superintendence............ ....................... $ 2,000.00
Salary of Office Clerks.......................... 2,625.00
Inspection Salaries................................ 7,561.79
Office Expenses and Supplies.............. 98.76
Printing and Stationery...................... 296.20
Postage, Telephone and Telegraph... 295.00
Insurance.............................................. 201.87
Surety Bond Premium.......................... 12.27
Total........................................... $13,090.89
Operation Gwinnett Street Pumping Station
Fuel....................................................... $13,875.85
Fuel Handling...................................... 284.20
Lubricants and Waste......................... 852.09
Wages................................................... 13,787.75
Other Expenses...................................... 72.89
Steam Furnished by Incinerator........ 4,403.00
Total............................................ $33,275.78
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 293
Operating River Pumping Station
Fuel........................................................ $ 4,406.16
Lubricants and Waste.......................... 123.05
Wages................................................... 8,674.05
Other Expenses.................................... 141.50
Total.............................................. $13,344.76
Maintenance Gwinnett Street Pumping Station
Material.................................................. $ 1,700.53
Total.............................................. $ 1,700.53
Maintenance River Pumping Station
Wages................................................... $ 8.55
Material................................................ 304.68
Total.............................................. $ 313.23
Maintenance Distribution System
Wages.................................................... $ 3,675.78
Material................................................ 162.22
Total............................................ $3,838.00
Miscellaneous Expenses
Tools, Repairs and Replacement........ $ 30.08
Care of Live Stock................................ 515.20
Traveling................................................ 100.00
Meter Service................................. 1,045.25
Maintenance Vehicle Equipment........ 55.13
Plumbing and Turncock Expense...... 1,095.00
294 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Furniture and Fixtures
Repairs and Replacements ......... 46.50
Miscellaneous Items......................... 21.03
Total.......................................... $ 2,908.19
Grand Total...................................................... $ 68,471.38
Extensions
Extensions.. ........... ....... ............$ 11,790.50
Total. .................................. $ 11,790.50
NoteNo provision having been made in Budget for extension of mains, necessitated resolutions covering amounts,
which were duly authorized by Council as needed.
Appropriations and Disbursements
Amount Appropriated for
Operating Expenses........................ $ 68,000.00
Extension of Mains......................... 11,790.50
Total.......................................... $ 79,790.50
Amount Disbursed for
Operating Expenses.......................... $ 68,471.38
Extension of Mains........................ 11,790.50
Total.......................................... $ 80,261.88
Receipts and Expenditures
Total Receipts for the Year 1914.... $144,874.96
Total Expenditures.......................... 68,471.38
Net Revenue............................ $ 76,403.58
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 295
The Total Pumpage for Gwinnett Street and
River Pumping Stations is as Follows:
Gwinnett Street Station........................................ 3,256,948,400
Daily Average.......................................... 8,923,146
River Station.......................................................... 366,243,496
Daily Average................................................ 1,003,406
Total Gwinnett and River Stations................. 3,623,191,896
Total Daily Average...................................... 9,926,552
Coal Consumption
Tons
Gwinnett Street Station.................................................. 3,474.3
Daily Average._................................................... 9.5
River Station................................................... 1,107.5
Daily Average.................................................................. 3.04
Total Consumption Both Stations.-......................... 4,581.8
Daily Consumption Both Stations'................................ 12.54
Extensions of Mains
LOCATION Feet8Ue iir.
St. Julian Street to Commerce Street............................ 180 12
Commerce Street from St. Julian to Bay................ 348 12
Waters Avenue from 32nd Street to 35th Street.......... 804 8
Waters Avenue from Estill Avenue to 50th Street..2040 8
Montgomery Street from 46th Street to 48th Street . 532 8
Lathrop Avenue from Cope Street to Richards St....... 468 6
Richards Street from Lathrop Avenue to Eagle St.1248 6
Scarborough Street, north of Richards Street.. 612 6
Augusta Avenue from Ferrill Street to Millen Street.,1772 6
Eagle Street from Augusta Avenue to Love Street.-... 732 6
Millen Street from Augusta Avenue to Richards St... 648 6
Gwinnett Street from Stiles Avenue to Elliott Ave..... 720 6
296 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
LOCATION
Elliott Avenue from Gwinnett Street to Blun Ave.. ...1668 6
Maupas Avenue from Price Street to East Broad St... 600 6
Habersham Street from 38th Street to 39th Street...... 240 6
39th Street from Habersham Street to Harmon St.. ...2268 6
Atlantic Avenue from 39th Street to 40th Street........ 252 6
47th Street from Waters Avenue to Live Oak Street.. 528 6
48th Street from Waters Avenue to Live Oak Street.. 528 6
49th Street from Waters Avenue to Live Oak Street.. 528 6
50th Street from Waters Avenue to Live Oak Street.. 528 6
Orchid Street from Montgomery to near Florence St 1272 6
South Street from Montgomery to near Florence St.. 1272 6
6th Street, East of Wheaton.. ......................................... 219 2
Rockwell Street from Louisville Road, South .............. 380
Sarah Street from Ogeechee Avenue, West .................. 400
Carr Avenue from Elliott Avenue, East........ ............... 320
Total........................................................................... 21,117
Twickenham and Avondale (Sub-Divisions)
Gwinnett Street from Wheaton St. to Lawton Ave..~.1104 6
Lawton Avenue from Gwinnett Street to Jones St...... 1704 6
Gwinnett St. and Lawton Ave. South to Gordon Tract 180 6
From Gordon Tract East to New Jersey Avenue........2950 6
New Jersey Avenue from Louisiana to Tennessee........ 1190 6
Tennessee Avenue from Georgia to Ohio......................1560 6
Ohio Avenue from Tennessee, North............................ 312 6
Total.......................................................................... 9,000
Grand Total Feet ....................................................30,117
Total Miles of Mains, 86 Miles and 570 Feet
Fire Hydrants Placed
Northeast Corner 39th and Habersham Streets.
Northeast Corner 39th and Price Streets.
________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________ 297
North Side 39th, East of Price Street.
Northeast Corner 39th and East Broad Streets.
Northeast Corner 39th and Reynolds Streets.
North Side 39th Street, East of Reynolds Street.
Northeast Corner 39th Street and Atlantic Avenue.
North Side 39th, West of Harmon Street.
North Side Maupas Avenue, East of Price Street.
Northeast Corner Maupas Avenue and East Broad Street.
Southeast Corner Waters Avenue and 33rd Street.
Northeast Corner Waters Avenue and 35th Street.
Southeast Corner 47th Street and Waters Avenue.
South Side 47th Street, West of Live Oak.
Northeast Corner 48th Street and Waters Avenue.
North Side 48th Street, West of Live Oak.
Northeast Corner 49th Street and Waters Avenue.
North Side 49th Street, West of Live Oak.
Northeast Corner 50th Street and Waters Avenue.
North Side 50th Street, West of Live Oak Street.
Northwest Corner Orchid and Montgomery Streets.
North Side Orchid, West of West Broad Street.
North Side Orchid, West of Burroughs Street.
Northwest Corner South and West Broad Streets.
North Side South Street, West of Burroughs.
North Side Gwinnett Street, West of Stiles Avenue.
Northeast Corner Gwinnett Street and Elliott Avenue.
West Side Elliott Avenue, South of Gwinnett Street.
West Side Elliott Avenue, North of Murphy Avenue.
Northwest Corner Elliott and McCarthy Avenues.
Northwest Corner Elliott and Blun Avenues.
Southwest Corner Richards Street and Lathrop Avenue.
Southeast Corner Richards and Scarborough Streets.
Northwest Corner Scarborough Street and Exley Avenue.
Southeast Corner Richards and Eagle Streets.
West Side Eagle Street, North of Church.
Northeast Corner Augusta Avenue and Eagle Street.
Northeast Corner Augusta Avenue and DeLyon Street.
Northeast Corner Augusta Avenue and Millen Street.
298 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
West Side Millen Street, North of Augusta Avenue.
North Side Gwinnett Street at Golf Club.
North Side Gwinnett Street, East of Golf Club.
Northwest Corner Lawton Avenue and Gwinnett Street.
West Side Lawton Avenue, North of Hall Street.
Southwest Corner Lawton Avenue and Gaston Street.
North Side Lawton Avenue, Between Gaston and Wayne
Northwest Corner Lawton Avenue and Wayne Street.
Southwest Corner Lawton Avenue and Jones Street.
Southwest Corner New Jersey and Louisiana Avenues.
Northwest Corner New Jersey and Texas Avenues.
Southwest Corner New Jersey and New York Avenues.
Northwest Corner Tennessee and Georgia Avenues.
North Side Tennessee Avenue, East of New Jersey Ave.
Northeast Corner Tennessee and Ohio Avenues.
Fire Hydrants Replaced
Drayton and State Streets.
Duffy Street, East of Price.
Whitaker Street and Congress Lane.
Habersham and Thirty-second Streets.
Habersham and Thirty-sixth Streets.
Florence and Thirty-ninth Streets.
Total to DateEight Hundred.
New Valves Placed
LOCATION gS,S
Lathrop Avenue and Cope Street............North Side 6
Richards Street and Lathrop Avenue......West Side 6
Scarborough Ave. and Richards Street....North Side 6
Augusta Road, West of Ferrill Street....North Side 6
Eagle Street and Augusta Road................North Side 6
Millen Street and Augusta Road ............North Side 6
Gwinnett Street and Stiles Avenue..........West Side 6
Elliott Avenue and Gwinnett Street........South Side 6
47th Street and Waters Avenue................East Side 6
48th Street and Waters Avenue................East Side 6
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 299
LOCATION
49th Street and Waters Avenue........... ....East Side 6
50th Street and Waters Avenue...... .......... East Side 6
39th and East Broad Streets........... ...... -..West Side 6
39th Street and Atlantic Avenue.... ..........West Side 6
Atlantic Avenue and 39th Street...... ........South Side 6
Maupas Avenue and East Broad Street West Side 6
Gwinnett Street, East of Wheaton .......... North Side 6
Lawton Avenue and GwinnettStreet......North Side 6
Lawton Avenue and Gwinnett Street.... ..South Side 6
Louisiana and New Jersey Avenues........ West Side 6
Tennessee and New Jersey Avenues.... ....West Side 6
Tennessee and New Jersey Avenues ........East Side 6
Orchid and Montgomery Streets........ ......West Side 6
South and Montgomery Streets................ West Side 6
Duffy and West Broad Streets .............. ....East Side 6
Waters Avenue and 35th Street................North Side 8
Waters and Estill Avenues..................... ...South Side 8
Waters Avenue and 47th Street.............. ..North Side 8
Montgomery Street, South of 46th.. Northeast Side 8
St. Julian Street, West of Commerce...... ..West Side 12
Total to Date..... .................. ..................................557
Fire Connections Placed
LOCATION ga
Pierpont Manufacturing Company......LathropAve. 8
Schafer Bakery.........-...............212 Jefferson St. 4
Wage Earners Loan & Inv. Co. 468 West Broad St. 3
Water Meters Placed
Thirty-five new meters have been placed during the year,
making a total in service of two hundred and forty-three.
300 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______
Miscellaneous
Broken Mains Repaired................................................... 5
New Valve Boxes Placed ................................................... 59
Water Shut Off for Leaks................................................ 510
Water Meter Tested and Repaired............................... 72
Leaks Reported ................................................................ 20,456
Inspections Made......................'....................................... 197,537
Re-Inspections .................................................................. 25,570
Private Hydrants Repaired by Department Plumber.. 10
Cesspools Inspected.................................... 480
Cesspools Repaired ........................................................ 18
Gas Meters Tested......................................... 6
Leaky Mains Caulked ................................................. 18
New Taps Placed......................................................... 385
Valves Packed............-................................. 140
New Nozzles in Fire Hydrants........................................ 6
Stem Nuts in Fire Hydrants............................................ 5
Water Shut Off for City Taxes......................................... 34
Water Turned On....................................................... 18
Old Valves Removed.......................................................... 1
New Valves on Fire Hydrants.......................................... 5
New Taps Put in Henry Street Main.............................. 10
Meter Boxes Placed........................................................ 2
Drinking Fountains Placed.............................................. 5
Fire Hydrants Removed.................................................... 3
Mains Lowered.................................................................... 2
Fixtures Inspected.............................................................. 376
Fixtures Inspected for Leaks............................................ 21
Water Turned Off for Leaks.............................................. 41
Water Turned Off by Request................................... 27
Extension of mains in Twickenham and Avondale (Subdivisions) are not included in estimated expense of extensions,
these services being financed by promoters under contract
with city.
All valves and hydrants have been cleaned and packed
when necessary.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 301
During the year this Department has assisted the City
Treasurer in collecting delinquent water rents to the amount
of $4,798.60.
Pumps, Compressors and Boilers
The pumps, compressors, and boilers at both stations are
in good condition. Upon recommendation of boiler inspector,
new tubing were placed during the past year in boilers Nos.
1, 2 and 3 at Gwinnett Street Pumping Station.
Buildings and Grounds
Buildings are in good condition, but would suggest that
necessary painting for preservation and appearance should be
done. The general condition of grounds are good, but would
suggest that some substantial roadway be constructed at the
Gwinnett Street Pumping Station to accommodate the constant hauling from destructor, as present arrangement renders
grounds rather unsightly.
Recommendations
I would recommend that four-inch mains in various sections of the city be replaced by larger service, on account of
giving adequate fire protection in these localities.
In conclusion, I wish to thank His Honor, the Board of
Aldermen, and the employees of the Department for their cooperation in the successful management of the Department for
the past year.
Very respectfully,
J. P. FIGG,
Superintendent and Engineer.

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PARK AND TREE
COMMISSION
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
P. D. BAFFIN
CHAIRMAN
PARK AND TREE COMMISSION
CHARLES S. ELLIS, term expires January 1, 1916.
PHILIP D. BAFFIN, term expires January 1, 1918.
ISAIAH A. SOLOMONS, term expires January 1, 1918.
THOMAS H. McMILLAN, term expires January 1,1920.
ROBERT M. BUTLER, term expires January 1,1920.
Chairman
PHILIP D. BAFFIN
Vice Chairman
CHARLES S. ELLIS
Secretary
ISAIAH A. SOLOMONS
Superintendent
WILLIAM H. ROBERTSON
Foremen
JAMES B. WISE
WILLIAM J. LOVE
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery (White Portion)
A. B. LaROCHE
Keeper Bonaventure Cemetery (White)
J. T. McCORMICK
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery (Colored Portion)
HENRY WILLIS
REPORT OF THE PARK AND TREE COMMISSION
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor,
City.
Sir:
In accordance with Section 6 of an Act of the Legislature
of the state of Georgia, approved November 30,1895, to create
and organize a Park and Tree Commission for the City of Savannah, the Commissioners have the honor to submit this
Report of their doings for the past year:
Our Public Grounds
Acres
Forsyth Park....................................................................... 10.
Forsyth Extension............................... ............................. 21.
Colonial Park....................................................... ............. 6.6
Twenty-five Squares....... .................................................... 21.8
Oglethorpe Green................................................................. 3.44
Liberty Street Green............................................................ 2.18
Dasher Park......................... ............................................... .16
Thomas Park...................................................... ................ 2.
Wells Square......................................................................... 1.4
Emmet Park....................................................................... 4.75
Myers Park............................................................................ 1.56
Cann Park............................................................................ 2.18
Dixon Park.......................................................................... 1.29
Grayson Park....................................................................... 1.75
Daffin Park............................................................................ 80.40
Park in Southville Ward (not named).............................. .17
Tiedeman Park...................................................... .............. 2.75
McCauley Park.................................................................... 1.2
306_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Solomons Park .................................................................... 1.2
Theus Park.......................................................................... 1.2
Baldwin Park........................................................................ 1.2
Guckenheimer Park.............................................................. 1.2
Entelman Park......._............................................................. 1.
Kavanaugh Park.................................................................. 1.
Vetsburg Park...................................................................... 1.
Lattimore Park.................................................................... 1.
Gaudiy Park.......................................................................... 1.
Adams Park.......................................................................... 1.
Total.............................................................................. 175-43
Total Area of Park and Squares ...................................... 175.43
Laurel Grove Cemetery (White 57.1, Colored 60.8)......... 117.9
Bonaventure Cemetery....................................................... 99.69
Total Area of Our Public Grounds............................ 393.02
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Parks and Squares
There was Appropriated ............................................ $14,000.00
There was Expended................................................ 14,281.25
Appropriation Overdrawn.................................. 281.25
Tree Planting
There was Appropriated.............................................. $ 1,000.00
There was Expended.................................................... 999.98
Balance Unexpended............................................ $ .02
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 307
Bonaventure Cemetery
There was Appropriated........................................... f 6,000.00
There was Expended............................................. 6,762.06
Appropriation Overdrawn.................................. f 762.06
. Laurel Grove Cemetery
There was Appropriated................-........................ $ 6,000.00
There was Expended................................................. 6,308.71
Appropriation Overdrawn.................................. $ 308.71
Daff in Park 4
There was Appropriated........................................... $ 500.00
There was Expended................................................ 500.00
Bonaventure Cemetery
Receipts
Received from Sale of Lots........................................ $ 2,112.57
Received from Burial Fees..............................-..... 643.50
Received from Care of Lots.......................... 3,216.67
Received from Water Rents.......................... 872.08
Received from Miscellaneous Work.................... 1,216.73
Received from Fees for Deeds to Lots........ 44.00
Received Exchange on Checks.............................. .10
Total Amount Paid to City Treasurer.............. $ 8,105.65
Laurel Grove Cemetery
Received from Sale of Lots (White).......................... $ 834.75
Received from Burial Fees (White)......................... 1,745.50
Received from Sale of Lots (Colored)................ 533.80
Total Amount Paid to City Treasurer.............. $ 3,114.05
308 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Forsyth Park and Bull Street Squares
The regular routine work has been carried on in this
park and these squares during the past year, and, such work as
repairing of benches, placing new ones, painting of same,
edging of walks, the mowing of the lawns and keeping of
same in good condition.
Many attractive flower beds were planted, and they
added much to the attractiveness of the park and the squares.
The Commission is very much gratified to see that Council has seen fit to make an appropriation of $780.00 to begin
the laying of artificial stone walks in Forsyth Park, and we
trust that each year appropriations will be made to cover the
cost of completing this work, which has been needed for such a
long time.
We are very greatly pleased to note that the Streets and
Lanes Department placed four high candle power lights around
the fountain in Forsyth Park, and it not only serves a great
purpose by providing lights for those who wish to frequent
this park at night, but also adds greatly to its attractiveness.
We regret that it is necessary for us to make report of the
depredations and acts of vandalism which have occurred in
Forsyth Park during the year, but feel that you should be
advised of them. The acts complained of were as follows:
The statue of Mercury, which has been in this park for a
great many years, was totally destroyed by vandals on the
night of February 14, 1914.
It seems impossible, for some reason, to prevent the stealing of plants and Sowers from Forsyth Park, also to prevent
their mutilation and destruction.
We beg to also call the attention of Your Honor to the
continued moving of benches and their destruction, and trust
that you will find some means by which the practice can be
stopped.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________309
The Commission regretted that it could not plant Forsyth Park in Italian Rye Grass the past year, but its appropriation for parks and squares would not permit of the expenditure. We were able, however, to plant the Bull Street
squares, and they were very beautiful.
The large fountain in Forsyth Park has been thoroughly
cleaned the past year.
Greenhouse
The greenhouse on Barnard Street was repaired as best
wecould, but it is in a very dilapidated condition, and is no
longer a fit place to house and propogate plants.
Stock taken of the plants in our greenhouse as of December 31, 1914, shows as follows:
Dracaena............................................................................... 900
Croton.................................................................................... 650
Plumbago Rosea................................................................. 425
Acalypha................................................................................ 825
Hybiscus................................................................................ 675
Sancevia................................................................................ 450
Euvanimus............................................................................ 100
Hydrangia.............................................................................. 200
Phylodendron........................................................................ 500
Clerodendron........................................................................ 125
Phylanthus..................................................................... 450
Oleander........-........................................................... 60
Roses...................................................................................... 175
Angle Trumpet...................................................................... 650
Strobolanthus..................................................................... 550
Cockscomb............................................................. 500
Palms (assorted).................................................................... 75
Poinsettia.............................................................................. 75
Arabian Jessamine............................................................. 150
Cape Jessamine.................................................................... 75
Night-Blooming Jessamine.................................................. 75
Abutilon................................................................................ 350
310_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Small Cedars........................................................................ 50
Ficus Elastica........................................................................ 45
Dieffenbachia. ...................................................................... 35
English Ivy._......................................................................... 200
Asparagus SprengeriL.......................................................... 75
Begonias................................................................................ 35
Cactus................................................................................. 30
Geranium................ ........................................................... 50
Saliva Splendens.................................................................. 1,100
Coleus................................................................................... 4,300
Acheranthum ...................................................................... 800
Alternanthera._..................................................................... 1,600
Mixed or Miscellaneous Plants.......................................... 800
Total.............................................................................. 17,155
Thomas Park, Wells Square and Dasher Park
Thomas Park was planted in Italian Rye grass and was
most attractive
Owing to the fact that children will persist in throwing
trash in the basin of the fountain in this park, same keeping
the waste pipe stopped up, we cannot run the fountain, much
to our regret.
The trees and shrubbery have been trimmed and shaped
up. New benches have been placed, others repaired and
painted.
Again we respectfully beg to call your attention to the
moving of the benches in this park from their original positions
to other places about the park, and to ask that you kindly
take such steps as you deem best to stop the practice.
Again it becomes necessary for us to complain of the fact
that fires were again built in this park during the past year,
and we trust that instructions will be issued to have same prevented in future.
The Commission granted permission for the erection of a
police sub-station in this park, and we feel that same should
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 311
help greatly in the protection of the said park, besides serving
the purpose which the Police Department had in mind when it
asked permission to place it there.
Wells Square, upon request of the Playground Commission
was turned over to them for the use of a public playground.
The trees in the said sqaure have been given attention,
but other than that, no work has been done.
Dasher Park has received only routine care.
Squares East and West of Bull Street and
North of Gaston Street
These squares have received the regular routine care
during the past year.
We beg to respectfully direct your attention to the fact
that bon fires are often built in these squares and sometimes
do much damage to the trees, and we respectfully recommend
that it be not permitted.
The Commission was very much pleased to see that the
Chief Engineer's department had placed concrete walks in
some of our squares last year, and trust that they will continue this improvement, as it is very badly needed.
Of course, these squares are still used by children for the
purpose of play, and so it is impossible to keep the lawns in as
good condition as we would like.
Upon the request of the Playground Commission, Franklin Square was turned over to it for the purpose of making a
public playground.

The Strand
It is with regret that we did not receive the appropriation
asked, for the further improvement of the Strand, and sincerely trust that Council will see its way clear to make a special
appropriation during the year for that purpose.
We have cared for the Strand and have kept it in excellent condition.
312 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Myers and Cann Parks
Only routine care was given these parks. We again beg
to bring your attention to the fact that these parks have
never been curbed, and to ask that it be done as soon as
practicable during the coming year.
Grayson and Dixon Parks
Both of these parks have been given general care. Trees
have been planted and others trimmed and kept in good condition. We have kept the grass mowed and the walks edged.
We planted twenty palmetto trees in Grayson Park, and beg
to report that all of them lived and are beginning to make a
beautiful appearance.
These parks need artificial stone walks in them, and we
sincerely trust that special appropriations be made to cover
the cost of the work.
Grass Plats
The grass plats have been given as good attention as possible with the funds in hand, and we are gradually filling them
up and planting in grass.
The Commission contemplates a campaign against the
obstructions, encroachments, and other unsightly things which
are constantly being placed upon the various grass plats of
the city, and before the year has advanced very far, we hope
to have the said plats clear of all these things.

Trees
During the year we planted 511 trees and the following
will show the variety and number of each:
Sweet Gum................................................ 238
Live Oaks................................................. 150
Dogwood.................................................. 56
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________313
Palmetto................................................... 35
Sugarberry.................... ........................... 20
Crepe Myrtle....... .................................. . 10
Red Bud.................................................... 2
Total................................................. 511
Trees that were planted were watered, wired and otherwise cared for.
Council upon our request, passed a tree-planting rule which
permits us to plant trees for property owners and residents
without cost as long as the appropriation for tree, planting
lasts, and when said appropriation is exhausted, the plantimg
may be done at the expense of the person making the request.
In regard to the appropriations which are made for the
planting of trees, we beg to again call the attention of Your
Honor to the necessity of making these appropriations available the 1st of January each year, as the season for planting
trees covers January, February, July, August, September,
November and December, and if the appropriation is made
available on January 1st, we can accomplish our work much
better and without the loss of a great many trees, and we trust
that in future you will see that there is no delay in making
this particular appropriation available.
Trimming of Trees
We devoted as much time to the trimming of trees as we
could, and accomplished good results.
On February 25th, of last year, we had a very- severe
snow and ice storm, which did great damage to our trees, and
we were several months trimming off the broken branches and
trying to get the trees shaped up again, but there is still much
more of this work to be done. A force of men, under the personal direction and supervision of our superintendent, was
kept busy all night and well into the next morning, clearing
the streets of the fallen trees and limbs, in order that the
Fire Department might not be handicapped in answering
314_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
alarms, and we had just cleared Henry Street when the
Department was called upon to use that very street in the
answering of an alarm.
Spraying of Trees
This important branch of our work has been as carefully
looked after during the past year as was possible, and a great
deal of work done, but we still recommend that a special appropriation be made to cover this important work.
Removal of Trees
We removed 178 trees during the past year, and the following will show the variety and number of each:
Sycamore................................................... ' 64
Water Oaks............................................ 30
Elms.__.............-............................. 24
Chinaberry................................................ 18
Ash._....................................................... 11
Live Oak._................................................ 6
Sweet Gum................................................ 5
Poplar................................................_.... 5
Magnolia.................................................... 4
Sugarberry................................................ 3
Maple.....................'.................................. 2
Sea Myrtle.............................................. 2
Dogwood................................................... 2
Copel........-....-..,,..-.......-....,.......... 2
Hickory...................................................... 1
Haven......................................... 1
Catalpa...................................................... 1
Cherry........................................................ 1
Total............................................... 178
________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 315
Emmet Park
This park has received general care during the past year.
We beg to call your attention to the removal and destruction
of benches in this park, and to ask that you please see if better
protection cannot be afforded the new ones which we may
place there.
Parks in Chatham Crescent
These parks were beautifully kept up by the Chatham
Land and Hotel Company.
Parks in Ardsley Park
The Ardsley Park Land Corporation have given the parks
in their sub-division good care during the year past.
Colonial Park
Colonial Park was kept in good condition, but it could
have been even better kept if it had been possible for us to
have provided more men for its upkeep, but it was impossible
for us to do so, so this 6.6 acre park had but one man to care
for it.
We desire to call attention to the destruction of benches
in this park, and also the mutilation and destroying of shrubbery, and even the tearing away of parts of the burial vaults,
and trust that more police protection will be afforded as soon
as possible.
The beautiful privit hedge on the south side of Colonial
Park was badly torn and cut during the past year, and while
we did everything possible to repair the damage done, still it
was impossible to obliterate entirely the work of the vandals.
We are indeed glad to see that Council has passed an appropriation of $300.00 with which to repair the vaults and
tombs in this park.
We again wish to mention the fact that this park is very
poorly lighted, and recommend the placing of additional lights
in same at the earliest possible time.
316 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Daf f in Park
Owing to the lack of funds provided for the improvement
of this park, we were not able to accomplish very much, but
we did replant some trees which died during the year, and
filled in some of- the low places which were breeding mosquitoes and kept the hedge trimmed and in growing condition.
We also used dynamite again in the planting of our new
trees, as the success which we had with the trees planted before
by this method was so good that we have decided to use dynamite wherever practicable.
We also did some more deep ballasting for the purpose of
affording better drainage, and accomplished some good in that
direction.
We were given the old press stand which had been used
during the automobile races, and with this as a beginning, we
started the erection of a house for the keeper of this park, and
while we were not able to complete the same last year, because
of the lack of funds, we were able to make it habitable, and
expect to complete it the coming year. The house is rather
attractive and really adds to the appearance of the park and
makes it possible for us to have some one to keep an eye on the
park and protect it. The other buildings which were given us
have been made into a stable and barn. We also have one
small house towards the eastern end of this park, in which one
of our trusted employees lives, and so have some further protection afforded the park because of this fact.
There is a great deal of work necessary to be done on this
park, and we earnestly ask that as large appropriation as possible be given us for its improvement.
We planted about ten acres of this park in hay, and were
able to save, in spite of the bad weather, enough hay to last us
for over four months.
We have planted a crop of winter oats in this park, and
hope that we will be able to make a good crop, in order that we
might save as much as possible in the feeding of our stock.
________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________317
Application was made to the Commission by the Parkside
Land Company for permission to cut a wide strip off of the
southern portion of this park for the purpose of making 47th
Street continuous, but as the amount asked and necessary to
accomplish this amounted to approximately one-sixth of the
area of the park, the Commission decided that it could not
grant the request of the said Parkside Land Company.
Miscellaneous
We delivered 136 loads of wood during the year to the
various charitable institutions and to the worthy poor.
We have rebuilt our wagons, trucks and all blacksmith
work of our departments has been done in our own shops.
Our mowing machines have all been repaired by our own
workmen.
We purchased a cutaway harrow, and have found same
to give excellent results.
The Cadillac automobile which was purchased for the use
of our Department, is still giving excellent service, and the cost
of its upkeep has been very light.
We filled in and graded the small park at the northeast
corner of Estill Avenue and Bull Street, and the Chief Engineer
curbed the north side of the said park for us. We contemplate
making some improvements in the said park during the early
part of 1915.
The Commission wishes to most heartily commend the
action of the Mayor and Aldermen in passing an ordinance on
August 5, 1914, in which a reward of $50.00 is offered for evidence to convict persons guilty of acts of vandalism, and to say
that the above action on their part is greatly appreciated by
the Commission.
We beg to respectfully call your attention to the length
of time it takes to issue a deed for a cemetery lot, after the said
lot has been paid for and certified receipt filed, and to ask that
the matter be taken up at your earliest convenience and some
method adopted that will make the issuing of deeds more
prompt, as we have had much complaint about the said matter during the past year.
318 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Bonaventure Cemetery
The work in this cemetery, both general and detail, was
very carefully attended to and we were greatly pleased with
the results obtained. The avenues were planted in Italian Rye
grass and were most beautiful.
We have continued to dump trash, etc., over the river
bank in the hopes of being able to protect the same until such
time as Council makes an appropriation to properly protect
it from the inroads of the river and high winds.
We planted forty live oak and fifty-eight magnolia and
three palmetto trees. We cared for 313 lots and furnished
water to 310 lots, besides doing a large amount of miscellaneous
work.
We desire to again call your attention to the need of a new
house for the keeper of this cemetery, and trust that some steps
will be taken during the coming year to provide one.
We connected up our large pump to the new eight-inch
well, but the said well developed sand trouble and we were
forced to disconnect the pump and again pump from the reservoir.
We are glad that Council has made an appropriation of
$500.00 with which to rectify the sand trouble of our artesian
well and to extend water mains, and we will proceed with the
work immediately that appropriation is made available.
In addition to the lots we care for under annual agreement, we are caring for fifty lots in perpetuity, for which the
City of Savannah has received $14,920.00.
We are glad to note that Council has an appropriation of
$4,163.12 in its Budget for the year 1915, same being to rebuild
the perpetuity fund which was placed in the general fund of
the city by a former administration. We hope to see this done
every year until the perpetuity fund has been entirely restored.
The trees in this cemetery were very severely injured by
the ice storm of February 25th, and while we have done some
work on them, there is still much that is necessary to be done
and we will accomplish as much more this year as we can with
the funds at our disposal.
I
_______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________319
Laurel Grove Cemetery
This cemetery has been kept in good very condition during
the past year. We planted Italian Rye grass and it added
greatly to the appearance of the cemetery.
We beg to report that the ice storm of February 25th did
untold damage to the trees in this cemetery; in fact, some of
the trees were ruined entirely and had to be removed. The
trees which suffered most were the magnolias and cedars. We
have trimmed up those trees which were injured and hope to
restore as many as possible to their former beauty.
We purchased a mule for use in this cemetery at a cost of
$225.00, this mule taking the place of the horse which served
us for many years and which died the early part of last year
from old age.
We had Joe E. Roberson, one of our regular employees,
sworn in as a special officer, with the idea of affording better
protection to the cemetery and with the hope that he might
apprehend some of the persons guilty of thieving and depredations. We are glad to report that this special officer has
helped quite a little, and we trust that he will be able to break
up the practices entirely. Numerous arrests have been made
of persons guilty of cutting our fences and they have been
placed on the docket and brought before the recorder for trial.
We have repaired our fences a number of times and expect to continue making arrests of all persons who cut them
until we break the practice up.
We beg to report that we have cared for the Mary E.
Williams lot in this cemetery, in accordance with contract entered into with the City of Savannah by her executors. We are now' caring for seven lots which have been
placed in perpetuity and for which the City of Savannah has
been paid $1,525.00.
The greenhouse in this cemetery collapsed and we rebuilt
the same but were unable to complete all the work necessary
on account of lack of funds, but hope to complete the work
with the appropriation which Council has provided in the
Budget for the year 1915.
l
320 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The appropriation for the repair of the keeper's house,
etc., at this cemetery, was not provided for any too soon, as it
is in dire need of attention, and as soon as appropriation is
made available, the work will be commenced.
Laurel Grove Cemetery
(Colored Portion)
The keeper of this cemetery has given very satisfactory
service during the past year, and has kept the cemetery in
very good condition, and no complaints have been received
regarding same.
We again beg to call your attention to the fact that there
is very little ground left in this cemetery which is suitable for
burial purposes, and it will be necessary for the city to purchase land for the opening of a new negro cemetery, and this
in the very near future; and we would respectfully recommend
that the matter be looked into without delay.
I attach to this Report the mortuary statistics of the
keepers of the cemeteries.
Yours respectfully,
P. D. BAFFIN, Chairman.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 321
Mortuary Report of Bonaventure Cemetery
(White)
January 1, 1914 to Janaury 1, 1915
MONTH
January............
February..........
March.. ........ ....
April. ............... ..
May..................
June..................
July..................
August... ...........
September........
October............
November........
December........
Grand TotalII Died in
Savannah
9
4
7
10
6
7
7
3
9
3
7
7
79
Died Out of
Savannah
3
1
1
4
3
1
1
?:
1
17
1 Still Born andBirths Premature
1
?,
3
Removed Laurel from
Cemetery Grove
3
1
3
7
Removed from
Cathedral Cemetery
....
Removed from|Cities Othr
1
1
Removed Onfrom|Lot Another t
....
Removed One Partfrom
Another ofSame Lot t
1
1
25 "3
*
>

s
1
1
Removed t|Cities Othr
Removed Laurel to|Cemetery Grove
1
1
"3
1
16
5
10
11
10
10
8
4
11
4
191
9
110
Respectfully,
J. T. McCORMICK, Keeper
11
322 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Mortuary Report of Laurel Grove Cemetery for 1914
MONTH
January.... ..... .......
February... ........ ...
March..................
April......................
May........ ..............
June......................
July ......................
August... ....... ...... ..
September............
October................
November.. ..........
December............
Grand Total....
WHITE
City Deaths in
28
19
13
27
31
26
17
11
19
8
14
22
235
Still Born and
Premature Births
3
8
3
1
5
6
3
6
9
3
2
6
55
Other
Interments
3
5
10
2
8
3
6
2
4
3
8
54
I
34
32
26
28
38
40
23
23
30
15
19
36
344
Burials Fee
3
K
<L
3
1
4
2
3
4
3
1
3
3
35
COLORED

O
_a
1
65
61
59
59
63
86
63
55
50
62
52
53
728
and Still Born
Births Premature
11
7
10
9
13
16
9
10
11
10
e
.
7
118
Other
Interments
8
7
4
6
10
7
6
5
8
5
5
4
75
1
&
84
75
73
74
86
109
78
70
69
77
62
64
921
Burials Free
9
5
6
12
11
17
9
8
9
17
12
10
125
Total
in Interments
Cemeterie* Both
118
107
99
102
124
149
101
93
99
92
81
100
1265
Interments
Interments During Year (White)...... .................................... 344
Interments During Year (Colored)............ ............................ 921
Total Number of Interments........................................ 1,265
Free Burials (White)................................ .............................. 35
Free Burials (Colored)........................ .................................... 125
Removals in Cemetery (Adults 14, Children 7)................ 21
Removals to Bonaventure Cemetery (Adults 3, Chil'd4) 7
Removals Away from City (Adults 4, Children 1)............ 5
Respectfully,
A. B. LaROCHE, Keeper.
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PLAYGROUND DIRECTOR
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
FOR THE YEAR
1914
MONTAGUE GAMMON
DIRECTOR

REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL PLAYGROUNDS
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANTr Mayor, and
Chairman of Playground Commission.
Dear Sir:
Herewith I submit a brief report covering the work of
the Municipal Playgrounds from June 8 to December 31, 1914.
This report supplements one presented last August, which is
attached hereto.
AttendanceFor this period of thirty weeks, the total
attendance recorded was: At Anderson 23,173; Franklin 47,-
437;Davant 53,667; Wells 69,181; Forsyth 95,295; or 288,753
altogether. This is an average of 9,625 per week, or 1,604 per
day. As we have ten employed leaders, each has an average
attendance of 160 per day. We should have in mind, however,
that most of the children remain for only part of the daily
session.
Bad weather is the largest influence in restraining attendance. The school and home duties of many children limit
the amount of time they can spend on the playground. On
the accompanying detailed statement of attendance, you will
find a graph showing the variation in weekly attendance.
The weeks of June 20 and 27, and December 12, in which examinations were held in the public schools, show a minimum
attendance, as does the week of October 3, when the re-opening
occurred. Of 178 sessions, there were 24 rainy days and one
cold day that seriously affected the attendance.
CostThe total city appropriation for this period was
$6,475.00. Under my direction, there has been spent $6,007.52
326 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
for salaries and $737.00 for equipment supplies and incidentals,
an excess of $269.87.
Relative CostTheactual cost per session for each child
is 2.3 cents. This is the smallest operating expense incurred by
any American city for this purpose. The next lowest that I
have been able to find are: St. Paul 4.8 cents, Oakland 5 cents,
Denver 5.5 cents, Schenectady 6 cents, and so on up to 14.8
cents in Chicago, and 16 cents in Los Angeles.
Training Play LeadersThe ten leaders regularly employed, the substitutes, and a number of volunteers, have had
systematic instruction in the technical knowledge and activities necessary in conducting playgrounds. Sixty-three
meetings, of about two hours each, have been held. The
attendance averages about twenty-five and has at times
reached fifty-eight. A systematic record has been kept of each
individual's attendance. This feature has probably been the
most potent factor in promoting the efficiency and success
of our playgrounds.
Budget for 1915At the suggestion of the Mayor, a
budget providing for four new playgrounds, in addition to the
five now operated, was submitted by your Director. The
Finance Committee of Council reduced the request from $16,-
752.00 to $10,500.00, the a'mount necessary to conduct the
playgrounds on their present basis. The Mayor subsequently
induced Council to spend $1,000.00 additional to provide for
one new playground. We believe that it will be possible to so
arrange the assignment of leaders that a number of the grounds
may be opened in the evenings through the summer with this
sum.
ActivitiesThe more systematic introduction of folk
dancing, that was possible after the employment of Miss
Beecher, has met a gratifying response.
It is recommended that the forenoon sessions of next summer be largely devoted to instruction in handicrafts. This
will be both recreational and educative in character.
In a general way the policies pursued have met success
and seem worthy of continuance.
_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________327
Attention is again called to the recommendations of the
last report.
ProblemsTwo specific problems demanding solution
are (1) improvement and care of surfaces of the grounds and
(2) the provision of toilets and shelter houses. Possibly a special appropriation could be secured to make the necessary permanent improvements on one playground, and the others
could be provided for in turn.
Very respectfully,
MONTAGUE GAMMON,
Playground Director.
Playground Report
Savannah, Ga., August 1, 1914.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Chairman
Playground Commission.
Dear Sir:
In accordance with a recent resolution of the Commission,
I herewith submit a report covering the work of the playgrounds from June 8th to August 1st a period of eight weeks.
During this time we have entertained 72,512 individuals, at a
total cost of about $2,600.00.
Your Director reached Savannah on May 15th, and four
playgrounds were opened on June 8th, three with quite complete equipment. The Forsyth Playground had no permanent equipment for some six weeks after it was opened. The
attendance in this particular place was low at first. The play
leaders, however, worked faithfully and built up the attendance to over 2,500 a week, without any permanent equipment.
Permission was secured from the Board of Education to
use the Anderson School yard as a playground. It was opened
July 21st, as an afternoon playground. The space is small,
but the attendance is satisfactory, and will improve.
328 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Equipment
The equipment is of a simple but useful, permanent type;
galvanized pipe set in concrete is used for the frames. These
will not need to be replaced for an indefinite period. The outfit of all playgrounds is practically the same, consisting of:
1 12-foot Swing Frame, carrying 6 swings.
1 7-foot Baby Swing Frame, carrying 5 swings.
1 Basket Ball Court with backs and goals.
1 Volley Ball Court.
1 Pair Jumping Standards.
1 Horizontal Bar.
1 Vaulting Buck.
1 Frame, carrying 4 see-saws.
1 Sand Bin.
1 Cable Slide.
10 Benches.
Some old pipe stored at the city lot was utilized in this
construction, and a considerable saving was thus effected. Of
material that had to be purchased, some clamps and fittings
were the only things not secured locally. Essentially the
whole equipment is home-made. City labor was used in erecting the frames, and the city shops constructed four-fifths of
the pieces.
Modern sanitary drinking fountains have been purchased,
and will be placed in each playground.
The equipment installed, exclusive of labor and material
furnished by city departments, costs about $15.00 for each
playground. City labor, material and manufacture, have cut
the cost in half.
Supplies
The playgrounds are well supplied with small material,
especially balls, which are the most useful of all apparatus.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________329
They form the chief item of constant expense for materials. A
record is made and kept of the material delivered to each playground.
Location
Playgrounds now operated are: Franklin, in Franklin
Square, the extreme northwest square in the city; Davant,
adjoining Colonial Park; Forsyth, in the northern section of
the Park Extension; Wells, in Wells Square, on West Thirtyeighth Street; Anderson, in the yard of the Anderson Street
School, on East Anderson Street.
The Orphanage at Bethesda is being visited two forenoons
each week, by one paid and two volunteer play leaders, for the
purpose of assisting in the recreation of the boys there. These
visits have been joyfully received, and the boys have shown
great aptitude for the games taught.
One of the volunteer workers is conducting recreation at
the Episcopal Orphanage regularly twice a week.
Baseball League
A boys' baseball league has been organized with teams
classified according to weight. Ball games are played each
Tuesday and Friday forenoon on the diamonds of the Park
Extension. There are seven teams in the 100 pounds class
and two in the 115-pounds. Organization of teams is still in
progress.
Session
The daily session of the Playgrounds, after several experiments, has been fixed as 8.30 to 11.30 a. m., 4.00 to 7.30 p. m.
The forenoon session is less formal in character, and the attendance is about one-fourth of that of the afternoon.
330 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
4.00Assembly.
Program
Salute the Flag.
Patriotic Songs.
Talk by play leaders on civic or
hygienic topics, recitations, etc.
4.15Mass Games.
5.00Track and field athletics for boys.
Folk dancing for girls.
5.45Team Games.
6.45Free Play.
7.00Practice for athletic badges.
7.20Care of grounds.
7.30Dismissal.
The program is intended to be helpful in supplying a
change of activities, and it is not required that it be followed
absolutely. There is considerable variation of conditions on
the individual playgrounds, affecting the adaptation of the
program.
Activities
Some of the varied activities of the playgrounds are:
games, athletics, gymnastics, kindergarten games, sand play,
songs, practice for athletic badges, and inter-playground competition. Among the most popular and successful games are:
dodge ball, cage ball, baseball with a soft ball, volley ball, and
basket ball.
Inter-Playground Competition
An elaborate series of contests for city championships in
cage ball, dodge ball, basket ball, indoor baseball, volley ball,
relay racing and broad jumping is being conducted. Competitions for both boys and girls are held once a week in a
home-and-home series. The boys are classified as 85 pounds
__ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________331
100 pounds, and 125 pounds; the girls as 100 pounds and unlimited weight. Each classification competes in three or four
specified events. A point score is kept, and teams are held
responsible for the conduct of spectators. Awards and penalties are provided for good or bad sportsmanship. Emphasis
has been placed upon good spirit and fair dealing. Teams are
expected and required to meet on the plane of host and guest.
These competitions have met with great enthusiasm and success.
Team games give an excellent opportunity to teach loyalty,
fairness, self-control and intensity of effort. The girls are as
enthusiastic and as interested as the boys. They are developing a habit and love for outdoor games that is destined to
become a great factor in making their lives happier and more
vigorous, healthier and more useful.
Attendance
Every day one of the play leaders on each ground counts
the attendance and records it. At the end of the week, an
official report is made on a printed blank, showing the attendance, the hours of service of the leaders, results of inter-playground competition, and other features of the work.
The best index of the success of an individual playground,
or of a system of playgrounds, is the attendance. A steadily
growing attendance is the highest recommendation of the conduct of the grounds. It means that the children find there
something that satisfies the demand of their nature; it is an
evidence that supervised play is preferred. Judged by such a
standard, we may safely rest our case on the following results,
shown on the next page.
REPORT OF ATTENDANCE FOR WEEKS ENDING
Franklin................... ................
Davant................. ... ...............
Forsyth... ...................................
Wells.........................................
Andereon................... ................
Total by Weeks...... .........
JUNE
13th
1,282
2,977
2,321
2,512
9,092
20th
1,465
1,176
1,255
2,016
5,912
27th
1,165
1,404
1,252
1,952
5,773
JULY
4th
1,760
2,087
1,703
2,480
8,030
llth
2,298
2,647
1,570
2,838
(Three
9,353
18th
2,635
2,762
2,583
2,043
Days)
10,023
25th
2,219
2,450
2,860
2,851
510
10,890
AUG.
1st
2,764
2,292
4,456
2,696
1,231
13,439
(
Sjj
JL
15,588
17,795
18,000
19,388
1,741
72,512
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________333
We know no way in which human beings may be amused
at less cost, to say nothing of the value of the form of entertainment. The total expenditure of the city to date has bee
about $2,600.00 for the 72,000 attendants, or, a fraction over
three cents per day for each child. The most popular and
cheapest form of amusement, the moving picture show, costs
five cents for a two-hour period. To attend a baseball game
as a spectator, costs twenty-five cents or more. As time elapses, the relative cost of playground administration will decrease, for the initial cost of installing permanent equipment
is counted in here. The increase in attendance will also decrease the relative expense. For a term of months, the cost
will be about two cents per day per child.
Play Leaders
There are now eleven regularly employed play leaders
five men and six women. Two of the women are employed
for the afternoon only; the men receive $75.00 to $80.00 per
month, and the women $2.00 per day, for six hours work. Ten
of the eleven are residents of Savannah. The success with
which they are working shows the feasibility of our plan of
training local people for play leadership. The selection of
these workers was placed in the hands of the Director. We
chose active, vigorous young men and women, who had a personality worthy of imitation. The next step was to give them
some technical knowledge of playground activities. This has
been done by converting the group, together with some volunteer workers, into a normal training class.
Play Conferences
Twice a week in the forenoons we meet at the Y. M. C. A.
One hour is given to the discussion of the work and one hour
to practical instruction in games, athletics and folk dancing.
The instruction has proved to be enjoyable as well as profitable. In addition to the eleven paid workers, whose attend-
334 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
anee is required, about twenty volunteers attend regularly.
On two occasions the group has voted unanimously to meet
twice a week rather than once. There have been twenty-one
meetings of the class with an average attendance of about
twenty-five. Thirty games and ten folk dances have been
taught.
Results of the Work
An exact measure of the success of the playgrounds can
be had only in attendance. We have no means of ascertaining
or expressing mathematically, the benefits to the individual.
We may, however, distinguish and enumerate different results
that may normally be expected, and observe some concrete
evidences of these effects.
Physical
1. In the human body, structure depends upon function.
These children are muscularly active in a wide variety of ways.
Nature responds by giving them better bodies.
2. Along with greater muscular development, comes better co-ordination, greater skill and grace in action. Muscular
training is necessarily mental training. Exercise is not muscular, but neuro-muscular.
3. Activity in vigorous games produces a better vital systemheart and lungs of greater capacity and endurance.
4. The playground, with its sunshine and fresh air, is a
great preventative and eradicator of tuberculosis.
5- There was a great deal of smoking on the playgrounds
during the first week or two; now it has almost disappeared.
6. Instruction in personal hygiene is given in the talks at
assembly. Attention has been especially directed to the care
of the teeth.
7. A plan is being prepared to secure medical inspection
for the playground children. The co-operation of the trained
nurses of the city has been offered, and a number of physicians
are interested.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _______335
Moral
1. The gang instinct of boys is being changed into team
loyalty. This spirit which has been so potent in this city for
vandalism and for defiance of law and authority, is being progressively converted into devotion and loyalty to the play
leader, the playground, the home, the school, the city, the
state, and society in general.
2. The boy recognizes the authority of the umpire and
leader in his team game, which appeals to his deepest interest.
He must abide by decisions and accept them gracefully; this is
real training for him.
3. Swearing and bad language are not tolerated on the
playground. Some of the boys have been addicted to this
habit as a usual accompaniment of their sports. An instance
will serve to show how a beginning was made in curing one
youngster of this habit. He failed to respond to repeated
corrections, and was finally banished from the playground for
a week. On the third day of his penance, his team was playing another playground in a championship contest. He came
to the leader and promised to "be good" ever after, if allowed
to return and play. He was welcomed, and has lived up to
his promise.
4. A special effort has been made to teach regard for property rights, particularly public property. There are some evidences that the instruction is bearing fruit.
5. Bullying and fighting are no longer practiced on the
playground.
6. Positive teaching of morality is most effective. We
are trying to keep the children so busy and happy doing the
right things that there is no time nor opportunity for evil.
Mental
The ideal of the playground is a positive one. The movement constitutes an effort to extend the educational influence
of the home and the school to play time. Evil tendencies and
336_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
bad habits tend to prevail without adult supervision. We are
simply enlarging the sphere of a beneficial environment.
Intense interests, the source of effort in all successful
lives, are being aroused and developed. Alertness, courage,
perseverance and self-control are developed in the games.
Habits of energy, happiness and optmism are initiated and
made a part of character.
In the aggregate, the playgrounds have brought many
hours of happiness to the children of Savannah. They are
substituting habits of activity for those of inaction, energy for
idleness, joy for dreariness. They are a boon to overworked
mothers, relieving them of nervous strain and worry, offering
time and opportunity for recreation and rest.
The Need of a Recreation System
We need to develop in this city, not only a system of
playgrounds to reach all of the children, but an adequate
scheme of recreation for all classes of adults as well. A system
of recreation can be secured only by co-operation. A natural
means of co-operation in a democratic community is the municipal government. This is being recognized and applied all
over this country. Ten cities, having a population comparable
to that of Savannah, selected from different states, spent during
the year 1913 the following sums for recreation:
CITY Population Amount
Birmingham, Ala..... ............................ 132,685 $12,735-00
Oakland, Cal............................................... 150,174 50,385.00
New Haven, Conn..................................... 133,000 10,500.00
Scheneetady, N. Y..................................... 72,000 38,930.00
Youngstown, Ohio......... ............................ 79,000 12,500.00
Springfield, Mass.................................... 88,000 12,780.00
Grand Rapids, Mich................................. 112,000 17,000.00
Brookline, Mass......................................... 27,000 33,878.00
Hartford, Conn.......... ................................ 98,000 8,940.00
Rochester, N. Y......................................... 218,000 27,000.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________337
In Savannah, playground space in the yard is very limited. The children are compelled to use the streets for their
games, and are consequently in constant danger from traffic.
A comparison of the activities of the street and of the
playground may be had from these facts. Actual observation
and record was made of 215 children using the street for recreation. Of these, 121 were sitting, standing, or simply looking
on. 60 were playing games of low organization, 21 were playing baseball, 15 were walking aimlessly. Of 319 children
counted on the playground, 247 were actively engaged in beneficial activities; thus, without regard to the value of the form
of activity, less than half on the street were active, while more
than two-thirds of those on the playground were playing.
Existing Facilities for Recreation
The chief form of amusement available for Savannah
children is the commercialized entertainment provided in the
theatres and moving picture places, with a total seating capacity of 5,032. The boys' branch of the Y. M. C. A. has a total
membership of 566. The children's library is an effective
means of recreation, and is active in promoting story-telling.
The Jewish Educational Alliance provides a reading room and
a quiet game room, parlors for dances and social gatherings
and a large yard equipped for basket ball.
In connection with the Kate Baldwin Free Kindergartens,
there are maintained fifteen clubs for boys and girls, with a
total membership of 177. These clubs have been quietly doing
very effective and praiseworthy work. In fact, the small club
is the most efficient means for social betterment.
Proposed Budget
In considering a budget for the future conduct of playgrounds and general recreation, the expenditure should be
deemed a necessary one, for the betterment of childhood and
of the community. The task before a Board of Recreation is
338 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
no less difficult than that before a Board of Education. They
both deal with all the children in the city, and the Board of
Recreation must also have in mind the adults. Schools are in
session 1,000 hours in a year. The playgrounds, if made permanent and kept open throughout the year, will be in session
1,280 hours.
Recommendations
1. That the Playground Committee be denominated the
Board of Recreation; to have advisory powers in recommending to City Council all measures relating to public recreation.
2. That an executive officer, known as Superintendent of
Recreation, be employed by the year.
3. That the playgrounds be made permanent and kept
open the year round, as far as practicable.
4. That evening recreation centers be maintained for
the benefit of those who are no longer in school.
5. That with the co-operation of the Board of Education,
athletics for the boys and girls of the schools be promoted and
encouraged in a way to secure better scholarship.
6. That permanent improvements be made on the playgrounds in the form of shelter houses, gymnasium, swimming
pools, toilets, etc., as soon as possible.
7. That the projected city auditorium be provided with
a gymnasium and swimming pool for the use of guests and
citizens.
We believe with Jacob Riis, that to do these things is
more than justice and common senseit is sane government.
Very respectfully submitted,
MONTAGUE GAMMON,
Playground Director.
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PUBLIC LIBRARY
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
WILLIAM HARDEN
LIBRARIAN

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS
OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah,
and to the Georgia Historical Society.
Gentlemen:
In the agreement made between the Georgia Historical
Society and the City of Savannah, on March 26, 1903, it is
stipulated that "reports shall be made annually by the said
Board of Managers of said Free Public Library to the Georgia
Historical Society and to the Mayor and Aldermen of the City
of Savannah, showing all the actings and doings of said Board,
the manner in which the moneys handled by it shall have been
expended, what books may have been added to the Library,
what interest the white people of Savannah shall have taken
in the same, and all other matters and things which may be
considered by said Board of importance to the contracting
parties, as well as to the people of Savannah, so that the said
Society and the people of Savannah, through the publication
of said reports, may be kept duly informed of the conditions
of said Free Public Library."
In accordance with this agreement, I have the honor to
submit the Twelfth Annual Report of the Board of Managers
of the Savannah Public Library.
The activities and accomplishments of the Library are
fully set forth in the report of the Librarian herewith attached,
and but little needs to be added. The Treasurer's report accompanying this shows in detail all the resources and expend-
342 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
itures of the Library for the year 1914, and the cash balance
on January 1, 1915.
It will be seen from these reports that the work of the
Library has steadily gained in volume and importance, and
that the appreciation of the public for the facilities it affords
is unmistakably expressed in the increasing use made of its
privileges.
During the year the number of visitors was 112,837, a
gain of 10,374 over 1913. In 1913, 103,030 books were taken
out. In 1912 the number was 112,428, a gain of 9,398- This
gain for several years has been steady and marked, and it indicates not only a public appreciation of the work of the Library, but it also shows a very gratifying and increasing tendency on the part of our people for reading good books.
Character of Reading
A comparative study of the character of the books taken
from the Library for several years past, shows that there has
been a very marked tendency towards the better class of reading. The greatest gains have been in the departments of History and Sociology. This indicates that the people now are
taking a more vital interest in human affairs and in the problems that more directly affect every-day life. Fiction, as it
does everywhere, holds the front rank in the volume of library
reading, but much use has been made of books in the departments of Philosophy, Religion, Philology, Natural Science,
Useful Arts, Fine Arts, Sociology, History, and Literature.
During the year many books of a substantial character
have been added to the Library, and in this way the public
taste is cultivated and improved. A public library should
afford to the people not only the books they want, but also the
books they need. The Library now contains 53,690 volumes,
and nearly every subject of human interest is represented upon
its shelves.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________343
Children's Department
The work of the Children's Department has been very
successful during the year, and the results have been very
gratifying to the Board of Managers. 45,595 children visited the
Library during 1914, and 40,453 volumes were taken out. The
interest of the children is aroused by stories told to them at
stated times, and in this natural oral way the foundations of
reading good literature is laid. The Board feels, however, that
there are a number of children living at a distance from the
Library who seldom or never visit it, and that it is very desirable to reach these. An experimental step has just been taken
to extend the benefits of the Library to children living in the
northeastern part of the city. A branch of the children's department has been established in that part of the city, and one
afternoon a week will be devoted by an assistant to the work
of distributing books and of interesting the children in the use
of the Library. Although this new step has just been taken,
great interest has been developed in it by the children, and it
will unquestionably prove to be a wise one.
Classification of Readers
The report of the Librarian contains a classified list of
card holders of the Library, and a study of this list is very interesting. From it will be seen how widely the Library is used
by all classes of our people. Of the 18,819 persons taking
books from the Library in 1914, 2,960 were clerks, 8,548 were
students, 257 were teachers, 72 lawyers, 28 physicians, 30
bankers, 286 merchants, 301 stenographers, 70 trained nurses,
37 carpenters, 38 policemen, 40 printers, 34 electricians, 33
engineers, 20 blacksmiths, 15 clergymen, and many others.
New Library Building
For several years the Board of Managers has called attention to Savannah's need of a larger and more modern library
344 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
building than the one now used. It is gratifying to the Board
and to our people to know that such a building is now to be
constructed. This new building with its added facilities will
greatly benefit our prople, and it will more fully extend the
privileges of a public library so well established by the present
arrangement. It has been fortunate for the people of Savannah that so large and so valuable a collection of books as that
possessed by the Georgia Historical Society should have been
made available by an agreement between that society and the
city for so long a time, and it is to be hoped that the impulse
thus given to public library work in our city will find a still
wider scope of usefulness in the future.
Finances
The Treasurer's report submitted herewith shows the details of all the receipts and expenditures for the year, and a cash
balance of $1,515.98 on January 1,1915. This balance is about
sufficient to meet all unpaid bills on account of 1914. The
resources and expenditures of the Library are very carefully
considered at every meeting of the Board, and great care is
taken to keep the expenditures within the income.
Insurance
Both the Library building and its contents are kept adequately insured against loss from fire. An insurance of $15,-
000.00 is carried upon the building, and $25,000.00 upon its
contents.
Conclusion
The Board of Managers feels that the work of the Library has been very successful, and that the facilities it affords
are duly appreciated by the public. It is pleasing to state
that the work of the Board and of the entire Library staff has
been very harmonious, and that every effort has been made to
render prompt and efficient service.
Respectfully submitted,
OTIS ASHMORE, Chairman.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 345
SAVANNAH PUBLIC LIBRARY
Treasurer's Report
January 1, 1914 to January 1, 1915
Receipts
Cash on Hand January 1, 1914......................-...... $ 903.06
From City of Savannah.................................. 9,999.96
From Duplicate Collection Book Rent.................. 696.23
From Fines and Reserves.......................................... 671.44
From Books Lost and Paid For.................................. 4.00
From Gifts.............................................................. 5.00
112,279.69
Expenditures
Salaries............................................................... $ 5,460.00
Binding........................................................... 132.52
New Books.................................................................... 3,862.37
Periodicals...................................................................... 274.90
Fuel.............................................. 115.25
Lighting............................................................... 281.62
Stationery............................................................... 105.20
Printing........................................................................ 110.75
Repairs.......................................................................... 117.45
Furniture............................................................. 65.50
Insurance........................................................................ 60.00
Miscellaneous............................................................. 178.15
$10,763.71
Cash on Hand January 1, 1915.................................. I 1,515.98
The December (1914) bills have not yet been presented
for payment.
Respectfully submitted,
(Signed) JOHN M. THOMAS, Treasurer.
344__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______
building than the one now used. It is gratifying to the Board
and to our people to know that such a building is now to be
constructed. This new building with its added facilities will
greatly benefit our prople, and it will more fully extend the
privileges of a public library so well established by the present
arrangement. It has been fortunate for the people of Savannah that so large and so valuable a collection of books as that
possessed by the Georgia Historical Society should have been
made available by an agreement between that society and the
city for so long a time, and it is to be hoped that the impulse
thus given to public library work in our city will find a still
wider scope of usefulness in the future.
Finances
The Treasurer's report submitted herewith shows the details of all the receipts and expenditures for the year, and a cash
balance of $1,515.98 on January 1,1915. This balance is about
sufficient to meet all unpaid bills on account of 1914. The
resources and expenditures of the Library are very carefully
considered at every meeting of the Board, and great care is
taken to keep the expenditures within the income.
Insurance
Both the Library building and its contents are kept adequately insured against loss from fire. An insurance of $15,-
000.00 is carried upon the building, and $25,000.00 upon its
contents.
Conclusion
The Board of Managers feels that the work of the Library has been very successful, and that the facilities it affords
are duly appreciated by the public. It is pleasing to state
that the work of the Board and of the entire Library staff has
been very harmonious, and that every effort has been made to
render prompt and efficient service.
Respectfully submitted,
OTIS ASHMORE, Chairman.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 345
SAVANNAH PUBLIC LIBRARY
Treasurer's Report
January 1, 1914 to January 1, 1915
Receipts
Cash on Hand January 1, 1914.................................... $ 903.06
From City of Savannah................................................ 9,999.96
From Duplicate Collection Book Rent...................... 696.23
From Fines and Reserves............................................. 671.44
From Books Lost and Paid For.................................. 4.00
From Gifts...................................................................... 5.00
$12,279.69
Expenditures
Salaries.......................................................................... $ 5,460.00
Binding.......................................................................... 132.52
New Books.................................................................... 3,862.37
Periodicals...................................................................... 274.90
Fuel................................................................................ 115.25
Lighting.......................................................................... 281.62
Stationery...................................................................... 105.20
Printing.......................................................................... 110.75
Repairs.................................................-................... 117.45
Furniture........................................................................ 65.50
Insurance.......................................-............................. 60.00
Miscellaneous............................................................. 178.15
$10,763.71
Cash on Hand January 1, 1915............................... $ 1,515.98
The December (1914) bills have not yet been presented
for payment.
Respectfully submitted,
(Signed) JOHN M. THOMAS, Treasurer.
346_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
The Finance Committee has examined the accounts and
books of the Treasurer of the Public Library from the First of
January, 1914, to the First of January, 1915, and find the same
correct, with proper vouchers produced, and a balance in the
hands of the treasurer of one thousand, five hundred and
fifteen dollars and ninety-eight cents ($1,515.98.)
(Signed) WM. M. DAVIDSON,
Chairman Finance Committee Public Library.
Librarian's Report
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
To the Board of Managers of the Savannah Public Library.
Gentlemen :
The year just closed has been one of the best in the history
of the Savannah Public Library. Indeed, all things considered,
I feel justified in saying that it has been the most prosperous,
and this statement will, I am sure, be fully verified by the figures about to be submitted.
In the year 1913, the number of volumes in circulation
amounted to 103,030; but in 1914 it ran up to 112,428, making
a gain of 9,398. Thegain in the Adult Department was 3,218;
and in the Children's Department, 6,180. In the latter, stories
were told 73 times to 8,613 listeners, and Miss Dodgen made
27 visits to the city schools.
The gain made in the number of visitors is as gratifying
as that made in the volumes borrowed. In 1913, 102,463 persons were registered as visitors, and in 1914 the record showed
112,837, an increase of 10,374. The Children's Department
made a gain of 4,516, and the Adult Department, 5,858.
Included in the books in circulation are the volumes of
fiction in the duplicate collection, on which a charge of one
MAYOR'S ANNUAL R1PORT ______34?
cent a day is made for each book. From this source the sum
of $685.04 has been collected, and the number of books borrowed was 12,728.
As usual, a certain amount of binding has been necessary,
and from the Adult Department 206 volumes were sent to the
bindery and from the Children's Department 114 volumes.
These figures do not, of course, include the books repaired in
the Library.
The work of cataloging has gone steadily on. In the
Adult Department 3,697 old books have been cataloged and
2,367 new ones accessioned, in which work 6,648 cards have
been used; and in the Children's Department 1,395 volumes
accessioned and 3,817 cards used.
In mentioning the increase in the books added to the Library during the year, I would have you bear in mind that the
gifts from the IT. S. Government were 291 volumes and 1,960
pamphlets; and gifts from other sources 140 volumes and 962
pamphlets. Subscriptions to two newspapers are also among
the gifts.
The duties of all the members of the Library staff have
been faithfully and willingly performed, and every one is to
be commended for diligence and effective work. Thanks are
due, and are tendered, to the members of the Library
Committee and to your honorable body for ready compliance
with every suggestion made.
It is proper that something be said concerning the proposed enlargements of the operation of the Children's Department. By your action at a recent meeting, authority was
given for the opening of a branch of that service in the northeastern portion of the city, with the intention of enlarging the
work if the first attempt be successful. The experimental
station will be in operation in a very short time, and it is confidently expected that the best results will surely follow.
I will close this report with a statement of increase in the
Library since the last report, giving the sources from which
the increases have come.
348_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Number of Volumes at Beginning of Year 1914.............. 49,519
Number of Volumes Added by Purchase
Adult Department..................................................2,441
Children's Department.......................................... 1,395
3,836
Number of Volumes Added by Gift.................... 140
Number of Volumes Added by Government........ 291 4,267
53,786
Number of Volumes Worn Out and Condemned............ 96
Total Number of Volumes at Beginning of 1914.... 53,690
Respectfully submitted,
WM. HARDEN, Librarian.
I Books, 1914
|
*$3
5
53
46
36
33
29
34
29
33
34
36
37
25
425
1
3
E
94
101
119
73
97
89
84
74
76
64
68
73
1,012
B
B
1
376
461
385
345
321
321
294
268
284
231
340
313
3,939
3
.S
522
472
533
415
408
533
418
408
361
370
451
359
5,250
a
o
1
7,557
7,374
7,970
7,284
7,213
7,369
8,150
8,030
8,136
7,561
7,396
6,851
90,891
"2
1
9,373
9,340
10,006
9,010
9,143
9,684
10,100
9,778
9,695
8,865
9,049
8,385
112,428
Adult Department..........-..-. ............. 71,975
Children's Department......................... 40.453
Total......................... ...................... 112.428
g
HJ
o
GO
!
/ i
1
3
H
K
350 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Classified Circulation in Both Departments, 1914
General. .................................................
Philosophy......... .................................
Religion..................................................
Sociology. .................................... ...........
Philology........... .....................................
Natural Science....................... ..........
Useful Arts............................................
Fine Arts...............................................
Literature..............................................
History..................................................
Fiction......................................... ........
Total............................................
Adult
Dept.
13
265
169
576
18
182
246
531
2,218
2,269
65,488
71,975
Children1 !
Dept.
12
42
279
7,610
1,181
564
179
481
1,721
2,981
25,403
40,453
Total
25
307
448
8,186
1,199
746
425
1,012
3,939
5,250
90,891
112,428
Visitors, 1914
MONTH
January....... ............................. ...... ...... ..
February................................................
March............ ....... ........ ........................
April................................. .......................
May..... ........... ........................................
June....................... ...... ....................
July........................................... .............
August...... ........................... ...................
September........ .......... .............. ..............
October............................... ...................
November...... ........ .......... ......... .............
December.......................... ....................
Total............................. ........ ..
Adult
5,516
5,560
5,851
5,113
5,229
4,894
5,226
5,949
5,092
6,655
6,453
5,705
67,243
Children
3,579
3,741
4,358
3,690
4,248
4,599
4,501
4,171
3,350
2,945
3,280
3,132
45,594
Total
9,095
9,301
10,209
8,803
9,477
9,493
9,727
10,120
8,442
9,600
9,733
8,837
112,837
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 351
Duplicate Collection Circulation, 1914
January.................................................................................. 1,123
February................................................................................ 1,069
March.................................................................................... 1,107
April........................................................................................ 1,085
May._..................................................................................... 1,084
June.-.................................................................................... 944
July........................................................................................ 1,022
August.................................................................................... 994
September.............................................................................. 1,109
October.................................................................................. 1,253
November.............................................................................. 1,017
December............................................................'............:..... 921
Total.............................................................................. 12,728
Cards Issued, 1914
MONTH AdulU Children ToUl
January............................................................ 90 88 178
February.......................................................... 73 59 132
March.............................................................. 85 49 134
April.................................................................. 60 68 128
May.................................................................. 47 70 117
June.................................................................. 48 131 179
July.................................................................. 78 74 152
August.............................................................. 71 56 127
September...................................................... 81 35 116
October............................................................ 74 36 110
November........................................................ 76 63 139
December........................................................ 45 47 92
Total........................................................ 828 776 1,604
352 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Monthly Visits of Library Committee, 1914
January.................................................................................. 13
February.................................................................................... 12
March..............-.................................................................... 14
April........................................................................................... 11
May............................................................................................ 11
June............................................................................................ 11
July...................................................................... 9
August............................................................................. 9
September.................................................................................. 10
October..................................................................................... 11
November............................................................................... 5
December.................................................................................. 8
Total.................................................................................. 124
Classified List of Periodicals Subscribed For, 1914
Literary Reviews................................................................ 6
Popular Literature.................................................................... 29
Historical................................................................................... 4
Fine Arts................................................................. 6
Useful Arts.......................................................................... 11
Bibliography.............................................................................. 4
Religion....................................................................... 5
Domestic Economy.................................................................. 9
Juvenile...................................................................................... 7
Music.......................................................................................... 1
Horticulture................................................................ 2
Humor........................................................................................ 3
Science........................................................................................ 13
Sociology.......................................................................... 4
Trade........-................................................................ 2
Technical.................................................................................... 5
Total.......................,........................ Ill
Receipts from Fines, Reserves, and Duplicate Collection, 1914
MONTH
January............. ....................... ........ .........................
February........ ............................... ..........................
March....................... .................................................
April..........................-..................................... ........
May............................................ .............................
June..... .............. ......... ....................... ..........._.
July....... ............................................. ....... ..........
August..... .................... ..................... ..............
September................. ............. ...................................
October........... ........ ...................................................
November....... ...... ................. .................... ....... .........
December..... ......... ........................ ................... .........
Total... .......-....................-.... .............
FINES
Adult
Department
$ 46.11
41.72
50.14
43.73
50.33
48.57
42.81
36.60
38.53
44.54
43.53
54.76
541.37
Children's
Department
$ 14.43
10.62
13.42
13.28
13.21
7.65
11.89
10.16
9.61
6.93
8.93
8.07
128.20
RESERVES
$ .22
.16
.22
.12
.10
.06
.20
.22
.48
.22
.22
2.22
RENT OF
BOOKS
Duplicate
Collection
$ 62.44
59.74
63.97
68.33
57.87
54.33
51.98
47.30
50.88
60.93
56.45
50.73
684.95
Total
$ 123.20
112.24
127.75
125.34
121.53
110. 65
106.74
94.26
99.24
112.88
109.13
113.78
1,356.74
OJ
354 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Classified List of Card Holders
Architects..............
Artists
Authors..................
Bakers.....................
Bankers..
Blacksmiths...........
Boilennakers.__..
Bookbinders.
Brewers..
Brokers.........
Butchers...
Cabinet Makers.-.
7
... 16
8
... 16
... 30
... 20
... 12
9
... 34
... 11
... 14
... 12
Carpenters.............. 37
Chemists........ 9
Civil Engineers._......... 25
Clergymen.__............... 15
Clerks..................... 2,960
Conductors.... 28
Contractors.. 18
Dairymen..... 10
Dressmakers.... 14
Druggists... 27
Editors._.......-.............. 11
Electricians... 34
Engineers........ 33
Exporters..................... 14
Firemen.. 70
Grocers..... 29
Hair Dressers.... 10
Inspectors................ 28
Insurance Agents._....... 43
Iron Workers. 6
Jewelers. 12
Journalists._................. 20
Kindergarten
Teachers.... 71
Lawyers...... 72
Letter Carriers.... 12
Machinists............. 119
Managers....... 128
Merchants..... 286
Milliners................. 12
Musicians.... 54
Painters........................... 25
Paper Hangers....... 10
Pawnbrokers.-... 11
Photographers....... 16
Physicians. 28
Pilots................................ 13
Planters..... 16
Plumbers. 19
Policemen 38
Printers............................ 40
Railroad Officials............ 18
Real Estate Agents........ 42
Reporters........ 18
Secretaries (Private).. 49
Steamship Officials.... 30
Stenographers.... 301
Students................. 8,548
Teachers.... 186
Telegraph Operators. 27
Tinners...... 14
Trained Nurses.............. 70
Upholsterers... 11
Watchmen..._..... 24
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 355
Classified List of Card Holders (continued)
Wheelwrights.................. 15 Males
Wood and Coal
Dealers 9 (no employment)........ 1,880
Females
(no employment)........ 2,965 Total.................. 18,819
356 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF CARNEGIE COLORED LIBRARY
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah.
Gentlemen:
Find herein Annual Statement of the Carnegie Colored
Public Library for the year 1914.
Books in Library January 1, 1914.......... 2,251
Books Added During the Year (Donations) 405
Cards Issued.................................................... 445
Books Issued to Readers.............................. 1,605
Visitors............................................................ 2,056
Financial Statement
Receipts
City Appropriation.......$ 360.00
Received from Fines............................. 10.96
Received from Other Sources ................ 10.12 $381.08
Expenditures
Librarian's Salary ....................................$ 180.00
Rent..._....................................................... 80.00
Light.......................................................... 27.55
Incidentals............................................. 72.45
Unpaid Bills.................................... 259.63 $619.63
Deficit ...................... $238.53
P. A. DENEGALL,
Librarian.
ANNUAL REPORT
OF TUB
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC
HEALTH
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914
INCLUDING REPORTS OF
THE BOARD OF SANITARY COMMISSIONERS BY THE
HEALTH OFFICER, BACTERIOLOGIST, THE
CHIEF FOOD INSPECTOR AND
PLUMBING INSPECTOR
REPORTS OF THE
CITY PHYSICIANS, HOSPITALS AND
THE CITY DISPENSARY
W. F. BRUNNER
HEALTH OFFICER

REPORT OF BOARD OF SANITARY COMMISSIONERS
To the Hon. RICHARD J. DAVANT, Mayor
City of Savannah, Ga.
Sir:
The Health Officer submits the following Report of that
part of the Health Work for which the Board of the Sanitary
Commissioners are responsible. Accompanying this Report
will be the Report of the Bacteriologist in which the detail of
the conduct of the work under his direction will be given.
The year 1914 was a good one, as the death rate was considerably lower than any other year since morbity statistics
have been kept. The comparison with other years will
demonstrate this fact.
Death from Natural Causes
Annual Ratio Per 1,000
Colored sod Colored nd
YEAR Whites Negroci Total White* Negroei ToUl
1911 568 1,324 1,842 16.22 30.75 24.00
1912 543 1,107 1,659 15.09 27.00 21.48
1913 442 1,038 1,480 11.95 24.71 18.98
1914 449 1,074 1,523 11.81 24.99 18.49
The Following Figures Show the Principal
Causes of Death
Tuberculosis..........
Brights Disease.. ......
Pneumonia.. ..........,
Heart Disease......
Pellaera.. __..... ...
White*
29
44
37
23
6
Colored nd
Negroes
157
96
81
57
27
Total
186
140
118
80
33
360 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Tuberculosis in the white race shows a steady reduction
in the death rate each year. It is a different story with the
colored and negro race, and the increase in this disease among
these people is due mainly to the lack of proper housing laws.
Pellagra, a disease not thoroughly understood yet, but believed to be a disease of defective diet, is not considered transmissible. It would appear that the negro seems to have a
predisposition over the whites with this trouble.
ChildrenDeath Rate
It is said that the death rate of children under ten years
of age is the best index of the health work of a community.
The following table shows a satisfactory decline in such deaths
during the last four years:
POPULATION DEATHS
YEAR White Colored Total White Colored Total
1911 35,000 40,000 75,000 144 374 518
1912 36,000 41,000 77,000 105 265 370
1913 37,000 42,000 79,000 90 289 379
1914 38,000 43,000 81,000 98 292 390
While this table shows remarkable decrease in the deaths
of white children under ten (10) years of age, it also demonstrates that we still have too high a death rate among colored
and negro children, and this is due largely to the fact that the
colored child does not have the same chance for its life that
the white child has. For he is born and lives under the most
unsanitary conditions, the greatest evil being the lack of
proper habitation.
If they live in the better parts of the city, it is in the lane
or the basement of the buildings, and if they live in the segregated district they are, more often than otherwise, found in
over-crowded hovels. If a fair, just, housing law was enacted,
not only the death rate of these children would be cut in half,
but the entire death rate of the colored race would be greatly
lessened.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 361
TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES
Diphtheria
There was one hundred and eighty-four (184) cases, of
which one hundred and sixty-nine (169) were among the whites,
and fifteen (15) cases among the colored people. There were
but three (3) deaths; two (2) whites, and one (1) colored.
Mortality was less than two (2%) per cent, due to the
administration of Antitoxin that disease.
Scarlet Fever
There were thirty-three (33) cases; all of them white,
and one (1) death.
Measles
This is not a reportable disease, and the exact number of
the cases is not known. There were no deaths, a most remarkable showing.
Typhoid Fever
There were reported one hundred and twenty-four (124)
cases with sixteen (16) deaths; among the whites there were
five (5) deaths, the other eleven (11) being among the negroes.
The probability is that there were more cases and deaths
not placed in the list above, which appeared in the classification of malarial fever.
Malarial Fever
For the first time we have this disease as a reportable one.
This rule went into effect during the middle of the year; from
this cause there were three (3) deaths among the whites, and
twenty-eight (28) among the colored and negroes. As stated
above some of these deaths properly belong in the typhoid
fever column.
302 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Smallpox
There were three (3) cases among the whitesall nonresidents; came here from Helena, Georgia, Rincon, Georgia,
and Jacksonville, Florida. There were eleven (11) cases among
the colored people, and four (4) of these came from outside of
the city. Over half of our patients at the Smallpox Hospital
were sent here from their different communities to avoid the
expense of caring for them. This city is probably the best
guarded town from Smallpox in this part of the country.
Whooping-Cough
This is not a reportable disease. There were two (2)
deaths among the whites and fifteen (15) among the colored.
Births
It is a demoralizing statement to make that less than
eighty (80%) per cent of the births which occur here are recorded. The blame for the loss of over twenty (20%) per cent
of having a perfect birth record, lies with the medical profession. In spite of the fact that when they fail to register
births occuring in their "clientele", they have failed to do
their duty by the people who employ them. The time is long
gone by, when this city in common with other towns should
keep a perfect system of vital statistics. It is easier to trace
a pedigree of a fine horse, dog or hog, in Georgia, than it is to
trace the pedigree of the average citizen in the state.
BIRTHS, 1014
MONTHS White Colored Total
January.......................... 81 85 166
February........................ 68 78 146
March............................ 64 83 147
April................................ 65 71 136
May................................ 44 70 114
June._............................. 64 64 128
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 383
July...........................
August.......................
September..............
October.. ...................
November.................
December.................
69
71
71
70
78
99
69
85
73
93
64
65
138
156
144
163
142
164
Total........................ 844 900 1,744
During the year the State Legislature enacted a Vital
Statistics Law, but some of the politicians were against the
bill and afterwards supported it, in order that there would be
no administration of the law; this is in keeping with the average
legislation, touching on the protection of the Public Health.
The boll weevil, ticks on a cow, or hog cholera, eets
sufficient money to admit of a prosecution of the law; but,
when it comes to the expenditure of money for the preservation of human lives, the appropriation of the work never goes
beyond the salary of such persons, whose only qualifications
are that they stand in with the political machine. Georgia
stands today without a modern State Board of Health; for,
without vital statistics, practical work is impossible; and this
Board, with the exception of the efforts of Dr. A. G. Fort, who
has done good work in the elimination of "hookworm",
has practically done no field work. The work of Dr. Fort
has been financed by the Rockefeller Institute. This town
will continue to suffer as a dumping ground for cases of
typhoid fever, and smallpox until an efficient Board of
Health is installed in the State of Georgia. Until then the
taxpayers in this community will continue to pay for the care
of outside persons suffering from transmissible diseases.
House Drainage
Before the end of the year 1915, that part of the city
which needs it most, will have been provided with house
drainage, which means the abatement of several thousand dry
wells and privy boxes. It is hardly possible to over estimate
364_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
the sanitary value of this work to this community,by preventing soil polution, which produces typhoid fever and other
intestinal diseases. As soon as it is possible, there is one part
of the city, the drainage of which is not provided for, in the
present work, and that is that portion of the city limits, west
of the Springfield low-lands from the river to the extreme
Southern limits. This section of the city, with probably less
than three thousand (3,000) people, furnishes nearly half the
deaths from typhoid fever.
Milk Law
The milk law is being administered with the same care
and attention as it was when the law first went into effect five
(5) years ago, and the result is, we are getting a better, and a
cleaner product, each succeeding year. By elimination of
incompetent dairymen, the personnel and plants of dairies
have improved. The next step is to eliminate all dairies from
the city limits.
Pure Food Law
By competitive examination held in Chicago, Illinois,
Harvard University, Washington, D. C-, and Savannah,
Georgia, Dr. DeWitt C- Gillis was appointed Chief Food Inspector of the city and he has in his immediate charge the conduct of all markets, butcher pens, bakeries, and restaurants.
The market situation is not entirely satisfactory, especially
from the standpoint of fresh meat; nor will it be, until there is
a common stock yard here, with a municipal abattoir.
It is but fair to say that some of our citizens have been
misled by outside criticisms of the conduct of the public market; it is not a modern building, having been erected about
forty (40) years ago; but if some of our people would go and
investigate the conditions that exist elsewhere, they would
soon learn that it is easier to be critical, than it is to be correct. One important work to be performed during the year
1915, is the testing of the dairy herds for tuberculosis. It
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 365
is probable that there will be found the small percentage in
infection on the local herds.
Sanitary Inspection
It is found impossible to give in this report a detailed
account of the work of the Sanitary Inspectors, but it should be
said that it is one of the most valuable, practical functions of
the Health Work.
Narcotic Drugs
This is an unfinished chapter, and beyond a general
statement of the growth of the drug habit, and the offenders,
a full report will be transmitted during the following year. It
is found that there were possibly about two hundred (200) drug
habitues in this city. The personnel represented from the
lower strata of life to the learned professions. Locally, there
was but one medical man found, who did anything of a business in dispensing narcotic drugs, but even he escaped through
the joker in the Georgia Narcotic Drug Law. It is found that
the forbidden drugs were shipped in here from Jacksonville,
Florida; Chester, Ridgeland, Columbia, and Charleston, South
Carolina. A man by the name of Hugh McKervey, a member
of the Board of Health of Macon, was doing a "land office
business," shipping by express to this city, opium, morphine,
heroin, and cocaine, to eight (8) different parties in the city.
The state aid was invoked, and after some diliatory tactic,
the State Drug Inspector came to Savannah, where he was
given indisputable evidence of the illegal traffic in narcotic
drugs of the physician here, locally, and the miscreant in
Macon.
The State Drug Inspector, after getting possession of this
evidence never took any steps towards the prosecution of the
offending parties, in spite of the fact that your Health Officer
wrote him three communications asking him to do his duty.
A full expose of the drug situation in Georgia will be published
in the near future. It will have to be published probably in
366_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
pamphlet form at the expense of the Health Officer, because,
at least one supposedly reputable daily paper has refused to
publish detailed information on this subject, presumably
being afraid of a suit for libel.
Recommendations
In 1912 your Health Officer recommended that in a few
years this city would be compelled to seek an additional water
supply. While the supply of underground water is the same as
it was when we first began to use it, nearly thirty (30) years
ago, the demand on it has increased every yearnot only from
the city pumping station, but also, there has been a constant
drain of the same underground water, all over the Georgia
coastal plain; this is in evidence in the history of the wells
that have been dug above us in the state, which, with our
constant increase in demand has lowered the static head of
every well in use at our two pumping stations. As recommended in my report of 1912, a survey should be made of the
waters of both the Savannah and Ogeechee river; either one
of these water supplies will make necessary a mechanical
filtration plant, for the purification of the water. In these
modern days, the water of either one of these rivers can be
made absolutely pure and, this being true, it will be a better
water than the underground supply, not only from a sanitary, but from a commercial standpoint. Whether these
measures are adopted or not, the most necessary part of
the Water Department, has been proved to be the lack
of a competent head. The drinking supply of water of
any community is common to every living person in it, therefore it can become a common factor in the production of disease; an hydraulic engineer is an absolute essential of the
protection of the public health. It is true that Savannah has
never had such a man except for consultation, and then we
had to go elsewhere, to remedy the defect found in our water
supply.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________ 367
The growth of the sanitary work in this city has made it
impossible for your Health Officer to expeditiously carry out
the demands forced on it by the passage of the meat, bakery,
and restaurant laws, for, while the field work is amply cared
for, the records in the office are always behind; which is no fault
of the office force, but simply they are unable to keep up with
the work. This office is the only one in the city building which
is open every day in the year, and a good many nights, for the
transaction of business; and it needs sadly the services of another clerk and stenographer. The City of Savannah has carefully looked after its health interests through its Board of
Sanitary Commissioners, who have met regularly every second
week, besides special meetings called to consider sanitary
emergencies.
To you, and to them, the Health Officer is indebted for
official acts of kindness.
Respectfully submitted,
W. F. BRUNNER,
Health Officer.
Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes in City of Savannah, Ga., for 1914
CAUSE OF
DEATH
Abscess ...............
Abscess of Brain .......
Abscess of Prostate. ....
Abscess of Psoas .......
Angina Pectoris ........
Apoplexy ...........
Appendicitis ........
Asthma....... .....
Asthenia ..............
Auto-Intoxication __ .
Brain, Congestion of....
Brain, Embolism of.. ...
Brain, Hemorrhage of
*
W
1
?!
1
1
1
\
C
?
1
1
i
i
j
w
i
2
1
...
j i
I
C
1.
4
1
2
.
*
W
1
1
?,
1
3
a
j
C
?,
1
?.
1
1
1
3
*
W
1
1
1
1
rf
*
C
?,
a
i
2
I
*
W
1
1
1
a
j,
c
1
2
1
h
W
?,
1
1
V
3a

C
1
1
1
2
1
2
t
W
1
3
>,

C
1
1
W
2
1
I
I
C
1
f>
2
W
1
,
1
1
1
|
1
C
1
1
11
2
W
3
1
!
C
1
1
1
1
3
W
2
1
1
1
November
C
1
1
3
1
1
W
3
1
2
1
c
a
1
f.
1
2
w
i
i
8
1
1
4
M
3
6
1
1
3
2
6
H
C
?,
1
1
fi
4
3
4
1
17
5
9
4
4
1
3
2
18
a
1
o
O
w-c
2
1
1
13
fi
3
5
5
37
8
15
fi
fi
4
3
4
24
Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes (continued)
CAUSE OP
DEATH
Brights Disease .... _ .
Bronchitis........ ...
Bronchitis Capillary ____
Brain, Tumor of __ ...
Cancer of Pancreas ....
Cancer.. ......... ...
Cancer of Bladder ......
Cancer of Breast... _ .
Cancer of Face _ . ...
Cancer of Stomach ...
Cancer of Intestines... -
Cancer of Liver. .......
Cancer of Rectum. ....
Cancer of Uterus ... ...
Child Birth .........
Cirrhosis of Liver ___ .
Convulsions........ _
I
t0*
W
fi
3
1
3
1
>
i
i
9
C
111
1
4
t
W
1
1
1
>>i LI
c
fi
1
1
3
.
h
W
5
1
1
C
1fi
3
1
1
1
1
<
W
5
1
1
1
1
4
^
1
C
101
1
1
?,
1
w
3
?,
1
?
\
C
5
1
1
4
c
I
W
4
2
3
1
1
n
t
C
fi
1
1
1
4
W
3
1
1
1
f,
1

C
7
3
?,
4
i
W
1
|
C
9
?,
2
'
t
W
5
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
C
3
1
1
1
1
j
C
W
4
1
|
!
c
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
w
1
1
?,
1
I
>r> 3*
c
R
f,
1
?,
i
W
ft
1
\
I
S
c
9
1
W
44
4
1
fi
1
1
3
a
5
6
7,
4
1
2
3
3
S
C
96
16
?,
I
3
1
1
2
3
3
2fi
1
"S
1
W-C
140
20
2
1
1
8
2
2
3
3
ft
6
4
7
1
5
29
Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes (continued)
CAUSE OE
DEATH
Convulsions Puerperal . _
Cystitis. ..............
Croup __..--.-_.-._
Diabetes. ...-.-.--.-._
Diarrhoea .............
Diphtheria ........
Dropsy.. . ..........
Emphysema ...........
Endocarditis. ...... _ .
Enteritis. .............
Entero Colitis. . ... __ .
Epilepsy ..............
Erysipelas. ........ .
Fever, Malarial __ ....
Fever, Scarlet. . ........
W
1
1
3
1
r
^
c
i
3
1
.
[
W
1
1
&
I
C
1
2
1
1
1
,
*
W
1
1
I
c
1
1
1
;
f
W
3
1
1 j
C
1
1
1
?
*
W
2
1
9
z
c
1
1
2
4
9
to
W
1
1
1
5
1
1

*
C
1
1
1
2
10
fi
tm
W
1
1
2
*.
3
^
C
3
1
1
5
4

W
1
1
1
a3d
}
C
1
1
2
3
2
4
.
c
W
1
1
s 11
c
1
3
2
2
1
1
4
C
W
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
| j
C
1
1
1
1
2
9
i
i
W
1
1
S
1>
5
C
1
2
4
i i
W
2
2
1
1
j
C
3
1
W
1
8
1
2
3
1
1
IS
2
20
2
1
3
1
s
c
2
1
1
1
1
4
13
1ft
14
31
3
28
I
o
w-c
3
i
9
2
3
4
1
1
1
31
1
SI
5
1
31
1
IOB
Z
I
s
Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes (continued)
CAUSE OF
DEATH
Fever, Typhoid ........
Gastritis.. ............
Gastro Enteritis .....
Heart Disease, ValvularHernia ................
Hydrocephalus- . --.-_..
Ileo Colitis ___----.--_.
Indigestion, Acute. .....
Influenza. . ............
Intestines
Hemorrhage of.......
Obstruction of.......
Jaundice. .............
Lungs, Congestion of ...
Lungs, Oedema of . . . . .
i
W
?,
fi
?
>>
i>
c
1
5
1
1
1
i
P
W
71
1
j
i
i
H
C
1
5
4
2
4
1
1
3
1
*
W
1
1
I
t
3
C
1
1
4
3
*
W
1
1
1
"i
?.
i
1
c
f,
4
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
*
W
1
1
?
C
?,
4
4
2
5
3
1
;
i
W
1
1
1
2
1
D
a
3
i
C
4
4
2
?
5
1
1
t>
W
1
1
>,
3
ft
C
1
3
J
5
1
3
2
4 I
: <
w
1
c
3
t,
C
2
3
1
4
?,
i
0
W
1
?,
2
?!
|
*
a
C

1
1
1
1
1
j
J
i
W
1
---
1
1
IJ
c
1
1
3
?,
1
?
1
j

W
?,
1
1
1
I
I\
w
C
1
3
3
?,
1
1
?,
3
j
1
w
1
1
1
1
i1
I
c
1
1
2
1
?,
?:
1
W
fi
5
4
1ft
4
1
6
1
1
?
1
3
3
3
S
c
11
4
7
an
34
23
2
tt) 11
10
10
4
6
1
3
S
o
a
fi
0
w-c
16
4
12
34
53
27
1
?,
2fi
12
10
1
12
5
9
4
Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes (continued)
CAUSE OF
DEATH
Morphinism. ..........
Malformation Congenital
Marasmus. ............
Meningitis ..........
Meningitis CerebroSpinal
Meningitis, Tubercular .
Myocarditis.... _ _ .
Neuritis. ..............
Oesophagus, Stricture of
Old, Age..............
Ovaritis ..............
Prostatitis. ............
Paralysis ..............
Patent Foramin
Ovale..... __ __ ..
Pericarditis. ...........
Peritonitis. ............
i
i
H
w
2
1
1
3
1
>.
!
a
c
1
?,
I
w
2
3
>>
I
-*
C
2
1
1
7
1
1
.j
i
k
W
1
1
1
5
5
a
j
C
1
1
1
1
1
*

W
2
1
1
4
1
C
4
1
1
1
3
3

W
1
1
4
5>
3
C
s
1
11
1
?,
1
t
w
3
2
2
2
1
1
i
9
C
4
1
?,
2
1
W
2
2
r
c
4
1
1
1
2
2
4
4
W
1
1
2
1
C
7
1
2
4
2
4
2
'
i
W
2
1
1
|
2
1
C
3
1
3
<
W
1
2
Hi
s
c
1
1
1
3
1
2
5
W
1
1
2
2
8
! &
5
C
3
2
2
10
3
j
W
1
2
1
!
c
4
1
3
1
W
1
2
14
2
1
ft
1
1ft
22
1
4
I
c
3ft
5
3
2
12
2
1
14
1
1
37
1
19
(Total Grand
C-W
1
2
SO
7
3
3
711
3
1
33
1
1
fi9
1
1
23
Trismus Nascentium ....
_Mt
i
-co

HLr
H->
X1s-
-^
I*
ht
i to to
i-1 IO
i Cn
II
^to
_
M*
to_
to_
I* **
co'
H-Hto
05
to
^_
i H-

MI-*-
1 1
1
1
01 toco
.-*>.. to
r
;
*
t
to
oo co co CD >*.
Septicaemia. . ......... Septicaemia,Puerperal... Snma RifiHji
,_,
(
_
-
K>
to
H-*
to
1 1
t-*
to1
co to1
to.-*
COj
toco
__
to1
1

1-1005
3"
2. ?
h-* 1D8
hPneumonia..-.-..-.-.. Pneumonia, Broncho ... Ptomaine Poisoning .
Rheumatism ^
*
i
to_
to
1 I
| .
Cn
1
t
coo:
Cn
{I
Cn
t
bOO
CO
tone
1hto -i
CO
,_, I
to
1
*
to
to_
i
,__
K31O
toco
' tn
toco
2s
1
' M
Peritonitis, Puerperal.. -
Pellairra
CO
to
Hto
CO1
H-IO
to
^0=1
to
} .
^_i
ICO
^J
CO
;'
K-l
co
h- *. CO I 0>
cot en ~4
** tOtO tO i O 6C
33Q3O^O^0
35O
53O
=3O3O3O
s3O
53O
33O
=3Og
CAUSE OFDEATH
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Total
Grand Total
O<DOXr
SLS TVflNNV S.HOAVW
!CD
en
CO
00
CO
to
_ 00
1
1
o
*
*-
*-
4*
~1g
o.
o>sgH- S8
~i o
CO
-4
-40
to-J
00
Ifc.
O9
*. S
eo
*- g
S
to
>-*
'o
^J
*.
t*
'en
(O
CO
Stricture of Urethia, Whooping Cough...
to
*
1C
(0
CO
10
t
'
I
to
^_,
GCd
SO 2
&
115 g-gS,
a.gg |o
sr
to
tocoj^
h
1
1M
_
t I
ll J
to^--
10
t
<O
l
H-*
1
I*
<
~
h-* -^
t
t-^
*-to
I*
CO*.
)w4
t.
M*
o>->
di
2, ?
TO
Hid
S>1 OOOtOhi-> tO
-J *- >f>. ~J CO M-
^^^
III
o o ,
--tQ
5So
7?
t .
CO
CO
303

CO
H-
to
k~* CO
>-
*
t(^
oo
to
tM
*
*-
i
O
to
to
to
*
oo
1^, c
CO
i~
00
l-o o
to 1->5O
-S
-
00
IOO9
30
3-o3o3o3O3O303o
33o
3! O
:=O1
0

BC
>co
ESM
KO
*i
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Total
Grand Total
c!<>
s, ono
3 z
85
it
e 2
(P
GO!
XHOdSH 1VI1NNV S.HOAVW
Age Summary
Month
January..
April.....
May ..
June.....
July.....
August. ..
Septemb'r
October..
November
December
Total
SS
l-H
1
5
W
7
2
fi
fi
14
7
6
4
4
7
63
C
19
20
10
12
36
27
10
1?
11
15
14
18
204
a
a
a
-4

i

W
2
1
fi
2
3
3
1
1
19
C
1
1
2
4
4
8
7
2
2
1
34
o
SS3
O*
S

w
1
2
3
2
1
2
11
C
3
3
5
2
2
7
5
4
4
8
5
3
46
0

g
*
03
W
1
1
1
i
i
5
c
1
1
1
2
...
1
8
S
1
o
S

W
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
11
C
fi
7
4
1
3
4
4
8
5
g
10
1
55
o
"
S
c
*
ffl
W
2
2
4
4
5
4
3
2
1
1
1
3
32
C
14
12
Ifi
16
13
15
9
10
15
1(1
15
13
161
i
d
S
g
a
s
w
2
4
1
3
fi
8
4
2
5
2
3
42
C
11
21
14
14
10
21
18
8
22
17
13
194
8
a
3
gH
w
PI
3
9
fi
3
5
3
5
4
fi
1
47
C
11
Ifi
13
13
14
13
13
6
9
14
10
141
S
1
g
a

W
W
12
2
fi
8
5
3
5
2
4
4
2
9
62
C
8
13
13
15
7
fi
9
10
8
11
8
12
119
o
d
S
s
0
P9
W
12
4
fi
fi
fi
11
4
1
9
fi
10
2
76
C
fi
6
8
8
5
3
2
5
6
7
fi
7
67
SO
g
a
I
M
W
7
8
8
fi
3
fi
4
1
2
3
7
5
58
C
1
3
2
2
4
2
3
1
2
2
fi
2,
30
g
a
S
G
1
eS
w
5
3
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
20
C
4
1
1
2
1
9
S
a
o 5
a
s
W
1
2
3
C
1
1
2
S
ci
8
J
"1
w c
1
1
i
1
4
3
W
53
28
44
47
46
50
32
17
37
27
34
34
449
C
83
102
88
90
97
108
83
91
70
84
97
80
1074
1
H
1
0
we
136
130
132
137
143
158
115
108
107
111
131
114
1523
I
GO
I
H
SJ
Cn
Deaths from Violence, Still Births, Premature Births, Etc.
CAUSE OF
DEATH
ACCIDENTS
Asphyxiation ............
Brain, Concussion of ......
Drowning. ..............
Gunshot Wound __ .....
Fracture of Arm .........
Fracture of Femur .......
Fracture of Hip.. . .......
Fracture of Legs .........
Fracture of Ribs .........
Fracture of Skull __ .....
Incised Wound.. ........
Poison, Arsenic ..........
Suffocation. . ............
Total...............

e
oHw
1
1
^
I !
1 I *
c
1
1
1
?
<f
1
W
?,
9
^
I i
i
4
C
?,
1
8
j
t
>
W
j >
!
|
C
1
1
?
c

W
.
c
1
1
?
>
i
w
1
?!
3
f
C
1
1
1
3
4
I
W
1
1
?,
c
1
1
1
1
4
j>
-
W
1
1

c
?
1
1
1
e
-4.
a
5
W

1
1
4
>
C
1
1
1
1
w
11
1
3
.
C
1
1
2
\
I
W
i
>
C
1
1
1
1
4
j
j
W
1
1
3
i
C
1
?
3
i
w
>1
c
1
1
*
w
?,
3
4
1
1
2
1
4
1
19
30
C
1
1
ft
7
3
1
1
?,
1
3
fi
1
3?
1
T3
o
w-c
1
8
11
3
1
1
1
?,
?,
fi
1
ft
1
1
fil
Still Birth ............ Premature Births....... Deaths Under 10 Years . Deaths Without Physician
CO to > IO
l->tO tO o*- to*-
~to*~j
I^Jg HJ
i Ol CO
-* H- tO
0000 tCOO*-to
> tO (-
1 h- I
I 001 -1
Sfetog
1 Hto*-' tO
cocoi co
h-cntov-
4tO' 00
; ,-., _
,
88-8
too.- to
S3-8
tOJitO
CD to to tO
10 Cn.- to
> to - OH- tO CO
tOO< CO
8B-Q
>-* CO "-* Ot
DI ob co OS
i tO 00
1
^^ 1
to
to
to
t-LX
Us! oo
Carbolic Poison, Acid..... ^^
LB gQ5" q
i

-^
Gunshot Wound .........
(-*
h-1
to
I I
Jl
a
I" 00 ^
1
to_
to;
,_,
to
,_,
H^
-" CO
to
h-h-en-. to
Skull. Fracture of. _Incised Wound -------- -
to
Gunshot Wound -----^
to
>-*
h-
,_
,_,
HOMICIDES 3O3O3O3O3030
3=! O3O^O
1 ^
-1

_
CO
i-" tooa
h'tOCO
3O^0^Og
CAUSE OFDEATH
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Total
Grand Total
00I
sr
09fwtf
3-
OD I
. i
TVIINNV S.HOAVN
378 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Longevity
WHITEMALES Age
Hull, Joseph M--_.-------- 90
Russell, Waring ........... 87
Alien, George W._......... 84
Starkey, Ed ward D......... 82
Whitaker, Joseph V..... 82
Cohen, Morris M........... 81
Tiernan.John P______.. 80
Geffken, Johann____ ___ 78
Yulee, Carl M....-..-.-. 78
Bloodworth, Littleton J __ - 77
White, Joseph P.----._... 77
Mulligan, Bernard A_..... 76
Yates, Edward H------- 76
Cohen, Jacob -------------- 75
Dixon, Wm. D. 75
Mclnnes, P. McGregor.. ... 75
Vasilia, Anastasios. _ 75
Flood, Thomas F-.......... 74
Matthews, Andrew ... ___ 74
Heckle, W. H.------------- 73
McGrath, James-..-.------ 73
Rose, Jno. A---------- 73
Wilson, AlexK______... 73
Donnelly.W.J---------- 72
McShave, Philip.____ 72
Miller, J. F- ------ 72
Crosby, Francis M---------- 71
Farris, Wm. H------------ 71
Richards, Jas-H----------- 71
Corbett, Wm-L------------ 70
Lenahan, Joseph-.-.-.-.-.. 70
Newman, Charles-.--.-.--- 70
WHITEFEMALES Age
Lynes, Frances D.,Mrs-.-.. 90
Weeks, Catherine J., Mrs__ 90
Minis, Emily, Mrs...... 89
Baltzer, Mattie P., Mrs ___ 88
Boley, Hannah, Mrs.... _. 88
Capwell, Harriet S., Mrs.... 86
Mehrtene, Mary A., Mrs.... 85
WHITEFEMALES Age
Hull, Mary C., Mrs-..-.- 83
Malloy, Mary, Mrs.- _.. 83
Harvey, Mary A. J., Mrs__ 82
Kinney, Elizabeth, Mrs. _. 82
DeGraffenreich, Belle, Mrs.. 81
Epstein, Natalie, Mrs. _... 80
Kriete, Wilhelmina, Mrs... - 80
Seabrook, A. C., Mrs..-. - 80
Tebeau, Julia I., Mrs...-.-. 80
Harper, Harriet, Mrs--.-.-. 79
Spring, Anna M., Mrs. ----- 79
Dodd, Elk M.,Mrs.------- 78
Hamilton, Mary V., Mrs -. - - 78
Hardee, Mary H., Miss... -. 77
Galmon, Maggie, Mrs 77
McGloin, Elizabeth, Mrs.... 77
German, Mary, Mrs.------- 76
Guckenheimer, Sarah, Mrs.. 76
Hazzard, Mary F., Mrs.._ 76
Bryan, Virginia, Mrs.-....-. 75
Diamond, Mary, Mrs - 75
Greene, Ella, Mrs.._____ 75
Snow, Mary, Mrs..--.----- 75
Anderson, Jane M., Mrs-..-- 74
Anderson, Louisa A., Mrs. - - 74
Stewart, Clara, Miss. ...... 74
Carrick, Catherine, Mrs..-.- 73
Cook, Mary, Mrs---.-.-..- 73
Hanley, Hannah, Mrs. 73
Gassman, Mary, Mrs---...- 72
O'Connell, Julia, Mrs ...... 72
Sutlive, Andrenetta J. K. Mrs 72
Wakeman, Harriet E., Mrs.. 72
Bardet, Annie, Mrs.-------- 70
Cullen, Mary A., Miss..._ 70
Joyce, Catherine, Mrs._. 70
Lequeux, Susanna, Mrs... 70
Maloney, Annie, Mrs.--.--- 70
Miller, Martha, Mrs_____ 70
Palmer, Sarah M., Mrs___ 70
Wade, Ellen, Mrs......... 70
Williams, Susan A., Mrs.._ 70
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 379
Longevity (.continued)
COLOREDMALES Age
Jarvis, Richard ....__.... 83
Williams, Raglan........... 83
Spann, James.....------... 80
Dickerson, William......... 75
Dozier, Isaiah........... 74
Gardeen, Louis___________ 73
Frazier, Abraham.......... 72
Carter, John...._...._. 70
Grant, Wesley............. 70
Hart, Nathan.............. 70
Howard, Mack............. 70
Johnson, Richard, H-...---. 70
McDoneU, Andrew, G__... 70
Taylor, Henry.._..___ 70
Walker, William.......__. 70
Williams, John_.......... 70
COLOREDFEMALES Age
Wade, Tina ...___....... 125
Davis, Matilda__......_ 109
Brantley, Sarah............ 103
Newton, Sarah.-..--.--.... 101
Grant, Susan...____..... 90
COLOREDFEMALES Age
Jenkins, Finder............ 90
Sanders, Jennie.-.---...... 89
Brown, Mollie.---......... 88
Lock, Mary..._.......... 87
Robinson, Julia__......... 82
Duncan, Matilda........... 80
Gregory, Mary............. 80
Cohen, Sophia............. 79
Cole, Nancy............... 76
Bell, Betsy....__-------- 75
Bristol, Fannie, K.......... 74
Julian, Rose......__... 73
Lloyd, Mina---............ 73
Law, Claire_............. 72
Marshall, Martha.......... 72
Sabattie, Lucy__......... 72
Black, Josephine.._........ 70
Erwin, Harriet............. 70
George, Susie.............. 70
Jancy, Nancy.............. 70
Lewis, Rosanna.___________ 70
Seabough, Caroline.----.... 70
Wilson, Stella.............. 70
Williams, Darcus......._. 70
Nativity
PLACE OF
DEATH
Savannah .............
Georgia Other Than
Savannah .........
South Carolina ........
Florida. ..............
North Carolina ........
New York .. ....
Alabama. .............
V-irginia _ ... __ ....
Massachusetts. .-.--...
Connecticut..... ......
Vermont- .............
California...... ....
Kentucky.... ......
Illinois ..-.-...-...
Louisiana... .......
Michigan . ....
Mississippi. .....
i
i
W
4
28
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
f
C
12
4ft
15
1
'
j
W
1
7
3
1
1
1
1
*>i
i*
c
9
5ft
23
1
1
5
W
3
1ft
5
1
?:
f,
f,
1
9
?
C
7
49
18
1
1
1
m

W
7
22
3
1
1
i
<!
C
11
4ft
14
1
1
1
ta
W
7
25
2
1
1
1
1
5?
5
C
ft
58
19

W
6
SI?
5
2
?,
?,
1
1
t>

C
17
5?
?A
1
1
2

W
4
14
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
J?
>
c
11
39
12
1
1
i
W
4
8
f,
I
1
11
C
11
47
19
2
1
c
W
3
14
10
2
1
1
*
1
C
8
37
?1
1
(
W
3
11
3
1
1
1
1
!
C
9
4fi
24
1
1
2
!
W
2
14
2
1
4
1
1
1
isovemoer
C
14
54
23
1
1
s.
W
7
14
1
1
2
1
S =
!
c
44
20
1
3
2
W
50
198
42
7
ft
13
4
5
5
3
5
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
I
C
125
568
232
ft
7
8
2
1
2
1
"O
I
O
w-c
175
7fi
274
16
16
13
12
7

5
5
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Nativity (continued)
PLACE OF
DEATH
New Jersey . ..
West Virginia.-.--.-...
United States.. ........
Ireland.. __ ........
Germany. ..........
England
Russia . ........
Canada--.------.----.
Scotland.... _ . __ ..
Greece.. ____ ...
Norway ... ....
France __ _ _ ... ...
Hungary.. .
Nova Scotia _ . _ ....
West Indies... __ ....
Austria----...-.---...
East Indies .........
Switzerland..... __ ..
Wales................
Unknown.............
Total... ..........
W
7
3
53
[
C
10
fi
83
P
W
1
91
3
3
2
1
1
28
1i
H
c
10
1
2
10?
J
*
*
W
1
2
?:
2
1
1
44
a3
1
C
10
1
88
r
+
W
fi
?,
1
1
1
1
1
1
47
-i
i.
c
in
i
90
*
W
1
1
1
3
2
4fi
sc
10
1
97
W
1
1
?,
1
1
1
1
1
1
SO
=3

c
10
1
108
W
1
1
f,
32
r
c
18
1
83
4

W
1
17
1
C
10
1
91
J
.
t
W
1
1
1
1
1
1
37
I
1
g0
C
3
70
"
(
C
W
2
2
1
1
27
j
J
C
1
84
S
W
2
?,
3
1
34
is
3
C
2
?,
97
f
W
1
1
1
1
3
1
34
K
!
c
4
81
W
1
1
11
5W
22
fi
fi
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
449
3

c
98
i
2
18
1,074
1

<5
w-c
1
1
100
26
22
6
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
19
1,623
382 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BACTERIOLOGIST
FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1914
Dr. W. F. BRUNNER, Health Officer and Secretary of the
Board of Sanitary Commisioners, City of Savannah.
Sir:
The City Bacteriologist begs permission to submit
the following Report covering the work of the Laboratory for
the period beginning January 1, 1914, and ending December
31, 1914.
General Statement
The Laboratory has been in operation for a period of six
years and three months, during which time a total number of
48,797 Laboratory examinations has been recorded, as shown
in Table No. 1:
Table No. 1
Showing number of Laboratory examinations made
yearly since 1908.
1908 (3 Months).__............................... 405
1909................................................... 2,603
1910............. 8,735
1911..............10,098
1912...................................................... 8,250
1913................................................. 8,224
1914...........--....-.-.....-.10,482
Total..................___.. 48,797
The number of examinations during the current year has
reached the total of 10,482, which is the largest number recorded for any yearly period during the period of operation.
An estimate of the character of the work and its influence
on public health and municipal sanitation can be made from
Table No. II, in which is recorded the total number of examinations according to items.
Table No. II
Showing Total Number of Examinations by Years
Total No. Examinations for Tuberculosis....
Total No. Examinations for Typhoid Fever. .
Total No. Examinations for Diphtheria ......
Total No. Examinations for Malarial Fever..
Total No. Examinations for Animal Parasites
Total No. Examinations for Meningitis __ .
Total No. Examinations for Special Purposes
Total No. Examinations Food, Chemical ....
Total No. Examinations Food, Bacteriological
Grand Totals. _ _ ___ .. .........
1908
(3Mos.)
35
34
156
24
20
...
15
56
65
405
1909
310
284
553
265
353
7
175
245
411
2,603
1910
379
200
621
228
176
4
171
3,474
3,482
8,735
1911
393
342
876
192
128
89
148
4,099
3,831
10,098
1912
491
299
590
304
175
25
197
2,854
3,315
8,250
1913
547
458
909
409
249
16
199
2,522
2,915
8,224
1914
540
338
897
319
198
5
181
3,357
4,647
10,482
Total
2,695
1,955
4,602
1,741
1,299
146
1,086
16,607
18,666
48,797
S
i
5? GO
> 5S
S5 cj
3
S
384 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The total number of examinations made for the diagnosis
of communicable diseases during the entire period of operation
has been 13,524. During the same period, 35,273 examinations of food, including milk, cream and ice cream, have been
made, as shown in Table No. Ill:
Table No. Ill
Review of the work of the Laboratory since October,
1908, showing number of clinical examinations and number
of bacteriological and chemical examinations of food:
Clinical Food
YEAR Examination* Eliminations Total
1908 (3 Months).... 284
1909........................ 1,947
1910........................ 1,779
1911........................ 2,168
1912........................ 2,081
1913........................ 2,787
1914........................ 2,478
121
656
6,956
7,930
6,169
5,437
8,004
405
2,603
8,735
10,098
8,250
8,224
10,482
Grand Totals 13,524 35,273 48,797
The Department offers facilities for the laboratory diagnosis of communicable diseases, for the examinations of milk
and other food, and for making such other examinations which
bear on problems of municipal sanitation and hygiene as may
be ordered by the Health Officer. The facilities of the Department are properly applied to those examinations which
assist in the diagnosis, quarantine and public control of those
communicable diseases which are by ordinance reportable to
the Health Officer. Clinical laboratory examinations which
have only a private interest and which have no bearing on
public health, are not properly required examinations, and
are not made. It is desired, however, to render as full a
service as possible, and physicians and others who require
special examinations are requested to make application to the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 885
Health Officer, who will determine whether the examinations
in question shall be made.
Venereal diseases are not at present reportable, though
there are those who urge that they should be reported. In
some communities laws have been passed making veneral
diseases reportable. In the absence of a plan for public prophylaxis, the services of the Department in the diagnosis of
these diseases has little effect on their communication, and
therefore it is not a part of the plan of the work to undertake
the diagnosis of such diseases. The examination of exudates
from ophthalmia is, however, made when requested. The
following examinations are made on request of licensed physicians:
(1) Examinations of swabs and cultures for diphtheria
bacilli, for diagnosis.
(2) Examination of cultures from diptheria convalescents for control of quarantine.
(3) Examination of blood specimens for the diagnosis of
typhoid fever, by the Widal reaction.
(4) Examination of blood for malarial and other parasites.
(5) Examination of sputum, urine, and pus, for tubercle
bacilli.
(6) Examination of dogs and other animals for the diagnosis of rabies.
(7) Examination of feces, etc., for the parasites and ova
of hookworm and other parasites.
(8) Examination of the urine of suspected typhoid patients
for the diazo-reaction.
(9) Examination of the urine and feces of typhoid patients and convalescents, or of typhoid carriers, for typhoid
bacilli.
(10) Examination of the blood of typhoid patients, by
culture methods, for typhoid bacilli.
(11) Examination of exudates, from cases of opthalmia,
by bacterioscopic and cultural methods.
13
386 ______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
(12) Examination of fluid obtained by lumbar puncture
for the diagnosis of meningitis.
(13) Such special examination as may be ordered by the
Health Officer.
The Department also offers facilities for the examinations
of milk, water, ice, food, etc., for adulteration and impurities.
In order that the examinations may be freely available,
outfits for the convenient collection of specimens are provided.
These are supplied to physicians and to patients on order of
physicians, and may be secured at the Laboratory and
at a number of culture stations. The following card, containing information concerning the collection of specimens was
issued during the year.
MUNICIPAL LABORATORY
Board of Sanitary Commisssoners, Savannah, Ga.
Stations for Specimen Outfits
Solomons Co. Drug Store, Bull and Charlton Streets,
Phone 63.
Kieffer's Pharmacy, West Broad Street and Park Avenue,
Phone 3660.
Persse's Drug Store, Abercorn and Henry Streets,
Phone 584.
Knight's Pharmacy, 102 Oglethorpe Avenue, East,
Phone 539-
Stanton's Drug Store, 102 Liberty Street, West,
Phone 571.
Schwalb's Drug Store, 40th and Whitaker Streets,
Phone 931.
Outfits: Outfits for collection of specimens may be
obtained at the Laboratory or at any one of the above stations.
Specimens: Specimens for examination may be sent
to the Laboratory or left at any of the above stations.
Hospitals: Outfits will be furnished to messengers
from hospitals, but specimens will not be collected from hospitals.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________387
Collection of Specimens: Specimens will be collected
daily (Sundays and holidays included) at 5 p. m., from the
stations.
Night Specimens: Specimens secured after 5 p. m.,
should be sent to the Laboratory before 6 p. m. After that
time they may be left at Knight's Pharmacy, and will be collected at 9 a. m., the next day.
Incubator: An incubator is maintained at Knight's
Pharmacy, Oglethorpe Avenue and Drayton Streets. Diphtheria cultures taken after 5 p. m., may be left at this station,
instructions being given to place cultures in the incubator,
from which they will be collected the next morning.
Complaints: Complaints in regard to irregular service
should be directed to the City Bacteriologist or to the Health
Officer.
The following outfits are supplied:
(1) Outfit for collection of sputum.
(2) Outfit for making diphtheria swabs and cultures.
(3) Outfit for securing blood for the Widal reaction.
(4) Outfit for securing urine for the diazo-reaction.
(5) Outfit for blood culture, typhoid fever.
(6) Outfit for securing blood smears, for diagnosis of
malaria.
(7) Outfit for securing specimens of feces, for parasites.
(8) Outfit for mass specimens of feces.
(9) Outfit for collecting spinal fluid, for the diagnosis of
meningitis.
(10) Outfit for collecting exudate, from cases of ophthalmia, for bacterioscopic examination and culture.
The outfits for blood culture, for mass specimens of feces,
and for diagnosis of ophthalmia are not placed at culture stations, but are furnished to physicians only on special request.
Reports
The specimens are collected daily from all stations; in addition, specimens left during the night at the incubator station
are collected at 9 a. m. The examinations are made promptly
388_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
i n the order of the receipt of specimens, due regard being given
to the urgency of the examination. Diphtheria cultures are
examined first, and are usually reported by 10 a. m. Other
examinations are made as soon as the routine procedure can
be accomplished. All specimens are reported by telephone,
and also by mail. Daily reports are also made to the Health
Officer of all examinations which by law are reportable. The
data blanks are numbered serially and filed. -
During the year 1914, the Board of Sanitary Commissioners adopted a regulation in regard to the examination of
specimens for the diagnosis of communicable diseases, requiring that reports be made to the Health Officer as required by
law, before such examination be made. Physicians are therefore requested to fill out the report to the Health Officer and
to let this report accompany the specimen. In the event that
the required report has already been made, a notice to that
effect should be made on the data blank accompanying the
specimen. Specimens from cases not so reported will not be
examined until such reports have been made.
Statement for 1914
During the year, the total number of examinations was
10,482, as shown in Table No. IV. The increase has been
mainly in bacteriological and chemical examinations of food.
There has been a small decrease in the number of examinations
for the diagnosis of communicable diseases, the number of
such examinations depending on the increase or decrease in
the prevalence of such diseases.
Table No. IV
Showing Number Laboratory Examinations by Months
1914
Examinations of Sputum and Other Material for Tuberculosis
Positive -__----.----_--------_--.--.---..----..-.
Examinations of Sputum and Other Material for Tuberculosis
Negative...---------.--.-... -....----....-......
Diphtheria Cultures for Diagnosis, Positive,. ...... __ .-
Diphtheria Cultures for Diagnosis, Negative. ------------
Diphtheria Cultures for Release of Quarantine, Positive...
Diphtheria Cultures for Release of Quarantine, Negative..
Typhoid Fever, Widal Test, Positive ________ . __
Typhoid Fever, Widal Test, Negative. .. __ ___ __
Typhoid Fever, Widal Test, Suggestive ..- ________
Typhoid Fever, Urine Examinations ... --..__---_____
Malarial Fever, Blood Examinations, Positive. .-.-..-....
Malarial Fever, Blood Examinations, Negative -......-
Animal Parasites, (Other than Malaria,) Positive. --.___
Meningitis, Positive .............. ..............
Meningitis, Negative ............ __.__.-___-___
Special Examinations ..-...------...-.-..----..--.....
Chemical Examinations, Milk, Cream, Ice Cream, Foods, Etc
Bacteriological Examinations, Milk, Cream, Ice Cream,
Foods, Etc __ .- _ ...... ______ - ...-- .....
Total Examinations ...-..--------_.-..------------..
Grand Total. _______ _____________
January
20
42
4
28
6
7
1
12
19
5
12
1
24
244
292
717
February
11
33
5
25
4
3
2
9
4
1
15
8
2
14
285
236
657
M
|
1
15
39
3
19
18
6
5
9
8
16
3
13
15
230
282
681
=3
a.
9
47
6
22
5
6
2
15
13
31
9
4
is
216
292
695
&
S
13
28
II
"I
1
21
5
33
8
15
16
283
329
764
*>
>>
21
28
8
8
6
3
4
15
10
27
7
8
1
1
15
328
323
813
>>
3
20
37
6
11
23
9
9
32
14
3
. 46
3
8
1
29
301
467
1,019
<
3
25
7
13
6
6
2
25
7
1
39
2
10
17
297
470
930
September
14
20
32
25
37
25
5
19
10
21
2
12
~8
373
552
1,155
1October
10
49
48
41
53
43
12
14
10
"4
33
8
14
1
10
321
509
1,180
November!
5
27
32
63
59
48
3
14
6
"I
19
9
19
~8
228
417
958
|
6
18
13
45
24
24
1
12
4
2
1
10
6
11
7
251
478
913
I
147
393
164
311
241
181
47
197
91
3
10
309
70
128
1
4
181
3,357
4,647
10,482
10,482
S
I
CO
390_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
The following discussion of the examinations made is
presented:
Tuberculosis
Five hundred and forty (540) specimens were examined
for tubercle bacilli in 1914, as compared with 547 in 1913.
Bacilli were found in 147 and the examination in 393 instances
was negative.
The method of making the examination has been described in the annual report for 1913. A long search is made in
negative specimens. An average period of 29 minutes was
spent on each negative specimen reported.
It is evident that the Laboratory service in the diagnosis
of tuberculosis is not used to the fullest possible extent; for if
this were the case, the number of examinations would be counted by thousands rather than hundreds. It is clear that many
cases escape observation, especially among the colored people.
Malarial Fever
Three hundred and nineteen examinations were made for
malarial fever, but in only ten instances were parasites found.
An average period of 24 minutes was spent in the search for
parasites in each negative specimen. It is considered that a
search of this thoroughness would result in the finding of
parasites in all cases except those in which the organisms
were very scantily present. The failure to secure diagnosis is
more often due to the fact that the blood examination is not
made at the proper time, frequently after the use of quinine.
Wright's Stain is used in most instances, but also Giemsa's
Stain, Koch's Stain and Romanowsky's Stain.
Of the ten cases with parasites, eight were infections
with aestivo-autumnal parasites. In one case, a single tertian infection was found; in one a double tertian infection.
No mixed broods were found during the year.
If one may judge from the number of positive cases found
in this routine examination, it may be inferred that cases of
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________ 391
malarial fever have not been so numerous during the present
year as in previous years. In fact, it is quite certain that with
better drainage, the disease is becoming less common. This
is shown also by a decreasing mortality rate from this disease.
It is also quite certain that many fevers, regarded by the laity
as malarial, are not cases of malarial fever. The more frequent and systematic use of blood examinations in this class of
cases would result in clearing up the misunderstanding. The
misuse of certain patent medicines containing quinine is also
responsible for difficulty in the treatment and diagnosis of
many cases of fever. In Table No. V is presented a resume
of the Laboratory examinations for malarial fever since 1908:
Table No. V
Showing the number of Laboratory examinations for
malarial fever since October 1, 1908.
Number of Examinations
YEAR Podtive Negative Total
1908 (Oct., Nov., Dec.)........ 1 23 24
1909.................................... 33 232 265
1910........................................ 55 173 228
1911.................................... 23 169 192
1912................................. 49 255 304
1913................................. 51 358 409
1914................................. 10 309 319
Totals.......................... 222 1,519
Grand Total-.-..-....-.................. 1,741
Typhoid Fever
Three hundred and thirty-eight (338) examinations were
made for the diagnosis of typhoid fever, including 47 positive
Widal tests, 197 negative tests and 91 tests which were not
conclusive. Three examinations of urine were made. In
392 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
addition, differential blood counts were made in 36 cases.
The recommendation of previous years, that typhoid blood
cultures should be more freely used for diagnosis is repeated.
Animal Parasites
For the diagnosis of animal parasites, mainly fecal, one
hundred and ninety-eight examinations were made, of which
70 were positive. A few cases with double infection were
observed. The following table shows the parasites found:
Table No. VI
Showing number of positive examinations for animal
parasites:
Hookworm............................................. 52
Cercomonas Intestinalis.......................... 8
Taenia Saginata....................................... 4
Oxyuris Vermicularis............................ 1
Encysted Flagellates................................ 1
Ascaris Lumbricoides.............................. 9
Trichocephalus......................................... 1
Amebas...................................................... 1
Total.................................................. 77
Including several double infections.
Meningitis
Five examinations were made for meningitis, of which one
was positive.
Diphtheria
Eight hundred and ninety-seven (S97) examinations were
made for the diagnosis and control of diphtheria. Of these,
four hundred and seventy-five (475) were for diagnosis, of
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________ 393
which one hundred and sixty-four (164) were positive, and
three hundred and eleven (311) negative. A considerable
number of the positive cases were immediately diagnosticated
by bacterioscopic examination of stained smears made directly
from throat swabs secured for the purpose of such direct examination. Sixty-nine and nine-tenths per cent (69.9%) of cases
were so diagnosticated, without waiting for the results of
cultures. The advantage in indications for more immediate
isolation and treatment are obvious.
Four hundred and twenty-two (422) cultures were examined for control of quarantine, of which two hundred and fortyone (241) were positive, and one hundred and eighty-one (181)
negative. Only one negative culture is required for release of
quarantine. It is recommended that, in accordance with the
common practice, two negative cultures be required for release
of quarantine. The average number of cultures made on each
case for release is from two to three cultures, to secure a single
negative culture. Little additional work would be required
if two negative cultures were demanded for release. The
average term of quarantine, under the regulation requiring
one negative culture, has been, during the year, only fifteen
and four-tenths (15.4) days. It is evident that the requirement of two negative cultures would not materially
lengthen the time of quarantine, on the average. The shortest
period was six days, the longest forty-two days.
Of the cases of diphtheria under examination, 86% were
pharangeal, 12.8% laryngeal, and 1.2% nasal in type.
Rabies
During the year, eight (8) animals were examined for
diagnosis of rabies. In seven (7) cases, a positive diagnosis
was made. Of these, six (6) were dogs, one only a cat. One
dog was negative.
In addition, thirteen (13) eases were under observation in
which dogs had bitten individuals under suspicious circumstances. In these cases, the dogs were held under observation
394_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
and not killed. The number of cases examined has been less
than in 1913.
All cases of dog bite should come immediately under the
care of a physician, and the wounds cauterized. The use of
ordinary antiseptics, such as hydrogen peroxide, though excellent for cleaning the wound, is worthless to prevent infection
with hydrophobia. It is recommended that nitric acid be
used, or the actual cautery, in cases in which the animal is
known to be rabid. Iodine is also recommended.
In all cases in which dogs or other domestic animals have
bitten human beings, the animals should be isolated and kept
under observation for a period of seven days, until it is certain that they are not rabid. It is cruel and unnecessary to
kill the animals unless they present unmistakable evidence
of rabies; it is also reprehensible, since it may prevent or
render difficult the exact diagnosis, which is more easily and
certainly and quickly determined if the animal is kept under
observation instead of being killed. Bites on the face or
neck are especially dangerous, and should receive immediate
and careful attention.
Examination of Food
Eight thousand and four (8,004) examinations of food
were made in 1914, of which three thousand, three hundred
and fifty-seven (3,357) were chemical, and four thousand, six
hundred and forty-seven (4,647) bacteriological. Most of the
samples examined were of milk, cream and ice cream.
The Department possesses a very complete equipment
for the examination of milk, cream and ice cream, including a
Soleil-Ventzke double quartz wedge, triple field polariscope, a
Zeiss Immersion Refractometer, an Abbe Refractometer, and
apparatus for the accurate gravimetric estimation of fat and
total solids. These instruments are used as indicated for
the examination of samples of milk and cream which fail to
meet the standard.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 395
Milk
One hundred and sixty-six (166) samples of milk were
examined for preservatives. Formaline was found in six instances. It is evident that preservatives are not used to any
great extent.
Of two thousand, five hundred and nineteen (2,519)
samples of milk examined, eight (8) were returned as watered
and fifty-nine(59) as skimmed. Fifteen (15) samples were defective as regards total solids; eight (8) samples were defective as
regards solids not fat. Sixty-four (64) samples were defective in fat. Four hundred and ten (410) samples contained an
excessive number of bacteria. The results of these examinations are shown in Tables No. VII, VIII, IX, X, XI.
A study of Table No. XI will show that the milk supply
has improved very much as regards the chemical composition
of the product. The number of illegal samples is now a small
percentage of the total number of samples examined. The
results are not quite so good as regards bacterial content, but
it is gratifying to note that 56.8% of samples contain less than
50,000 bacteria per cc., and that 71.3%of samples contain less
than 100,000 bacteria per cc., and meet the ordinary requirements for market milk.
Table No. VII
Showing the results of the examination of two thousand,
five hundred and nineteen (2,519) samples of milk with regard
to total solids. (Standard 12% of total solids.)
Samples With 13% of Total gg,
Solids or More.......................... 2,211 87.8
Samples With from 12.5 to 12.9%
of Total Solids.....................:.... 239 9.5
Samples With from 12 to 12.4%
of Total Solids.......................... 54 2.1
Samples Below Standard With
Less Than 12% of Total Solids 15 0.6
396_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Table No. VIII
Showing the results of the examination of two thousand,
five hundred and twenty (2,520) samples of milk with regard
to the fat content. (Standard, 3.5% fat.)
Number of FereeaiM* of
Simple* TouT
Samples With 4% of Fat or More.... 2,167 86.0
Samples With from 3.5 to 3.9% of Fat 289 11.4
Samples With from 3 to 3.4% of Fat 50 2.0
Samples With Less than 3% Fat 14 .6
Samples With Less than standard
of 3.5% Fat................................ 64 2.5
Table No. IX
Showing the results of the examination of two thousand
ive hundred and nineteen (2,519) samples of milk with regard
to amounts of solids other than fat. (Standard not less than
8.5% solids not fat.
Number of PereenUfe
Sample* of Total
Samples With 9% of Solids Not
Fat or More ........................ 2,366 93.9
Samples With from 85 to 8.9%
of Solids Not Fat._................... 145 5.8
Samples With from 8.0 to 8.4%
of Solids Not Fat._............... 5 ' 0.2
Samples With Less Than 8% of
Solids Not Fat.......................... 3 0.1
Samples Below the Standard of
8.5% of Solids Not Fat.......... 8 0.3
Table No. X
Showing the results of the examination of two thousand,
five hundred and nineteen (2,519) samples of milk with regard
to the bacterial content. (Standard during the period from
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 397
November 1st to April 1st, not more than 100,000 bacteria
per cubic centimeter.) (Standard during the period from
April 1st, to November 1st, not more than 300,000 bacteria
per cubic centimeter.)
Number of Pereentem
Samples of ToUl
Samples With Less Than 50,000
Bacteria per cc._....................... 1,431 56.8
Samples With More Than 50,000
and Less Than 100,000
Bacteria per cc ........................ 365 14.5
Samples With Less Than 100,000
Bacteria per cc.......................... 1,796 71.3
Samples With More Than 100,000
and Less Than 300,000 per cc 431 17.1
Samples With More Than 300,000
Bacteria per cc and Less Than
1,000,000.................................... 228 9.0
Samples With More Than 1,000,000
Bacteria per cc.......................... 64 2.6
Samples Not Meeting the
Requirements of the Standard
Indicated Above................... 410 16.3
Table No. XI
Showing Comparative Number of Illegal Samples of Milk With Percentages
For the Years 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914
Fat, Standard 3.5 %..............
Total Solids, Standard 12.0% ......
Solids Not Fat, Standard 8.6% .....
Bacteria, Per Cubic Centimeter
Within the Limits of the Standard
(See Table No. X)
Total Number of Samples
Examined
1910
3,544
3,443
3,443
3,442
1911
3,288
3,286
3,280
3,279
1912
2,663
2,661
2,661
2,657
1913
2,232
2,232
2,232
2,228
1914
2,520
2,519
2,519
2,519
Number of Illegal
Samples
1910
212
486
1,092
741
1911
100
94
229
567
1912
93
48
58
453
1913
55
26
39
303
1914
64
15
8
410
Per Cent of Illegal
Samples
6.0
14.1
31.4
22.9
3.2
2.9
7.2
17.3
1912
3.6
1.8
2.2
17.0
1913
2.5
1.1
1.8
13.6
1914
2.5
0.6
0.3
16.3
2 > <
o
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 399
Cream
One hundred and seventy-one (171) samples of cream
were examined for butter fat, with the result that only nine
(9) samples were found to be illegal. The fat standard for
cream is 18% of butter fat.
One hundred and seventy-two (172) samples of cream
were examined bacteriologically, with the result that thirtytwo (32) samples, or 18%, were illegal. The bacteriological
standard is not more than 500,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter for the period from November 1st to April 1st, and not
more than 1,000,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter for the
period from April 1st to November 1st.
Ice Cream
Four hundred and forty-four (444) samples of ice cream
were examined for butter fat, with the result that sixty-eight
(68) samples were legal, and three hundred and seventy-six
(376) samples were illegal. The fat standard for ice cream is
not less than eight per cent (8%) of butter fat.
Seven hundred and twenty-four (724) samples of ice cream
were examined bacteriologically. The results of the examinations are given in Table No. XII:
Table No. XII
Showing the results of the bacteriological examination of
seven hundred and twenty-four (724) samples of ice cream.
BACTERIA PER CC Number of Percentage
Samples of Total
Samples With Bacteria Less
Than 750,000............................ 126 17.3
Samples With Bacteria Less
Than 1,500,000 and
More Than 750,000................ 74 10.4
400_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ________
Samples With Bacteria Less
Than 2,000,000 and
More Than 1,500,000.__......... 59 8.1
Samples With Less Than 6,000,000
Bacteria and More Than
2,000,000.................................... 273 37.7
Samples With More Than
6,000,000 Bacteria.................... 192 26.5
A special report on the chemical and bacteriological
examination of ice cream is in preparation.
.
Special Examinations
One hundred and eighty-one (181) special examinations,
covering a wide field of work, were made during the year.
Examinations of this kind are made on the order of the Health
Officer.
Examinations of Samples of Coal
Eleven (11) samples of coal were analyzed during the year,
for the accomodation of the Board of Purchase.
Haemorrhagic Septicaemia
One of the dairy herds from which the supply of milk consumed in the city comes, developed an epidemic of an infectious disease, characterized by high fever, swelling of the
glands, and bleeding from the mouth, nose, and bowels. About
a dozen animals, most of which died, were affected, a few of
the animals recovering. The post mortem appearances
showed swelling and haemorrhages into the lymph glands,
especially those of the neck, haemorrhages into the serous and
mucus surfaces, and cloudy swelling of the organs. Cultures
from the organs post mortem, and from blood taken from
the jugular vein during life yielded pure cultures of an
organism which morphologically and culturally was identica
___MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________401
with the bacillus of bovine septicaemia. It is considered,
therefore, .that the infection was bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia. The disease is fortunately not communicable to
man. A more complete report will be made on this epidemic,
in co-operation with the Chief Food Inspector, Dr. Gillis.
Public Health Exhibit
An exhibit was held at the 1914 meeting of the American
Public Health Association Meeting, in which the following
exhibits were shown:
Series of photographs, charts and cartoons, showing laboratory equipment and work.
Series of outfits for collection of specimens, data
bl nks, etc.
Series of charts, showing vital statistics, with especial
reference to the colored population of Savannah.
Series of photographs and posters showing restaurant
and bakery inspection.
Series of photographs and cartoons showing dairy
inspection.
Series of photographs and charts showing garbage
disposal and incinerator.
Series of photographs and maps showing park system.
Model illustrating the work of the tuberculosis nurse.
Miscellaneous models, charts and photographs.
The exhibit attracted much favorable attention, and was
useful in demonstrating to the health officials and people of
the United States the work of the Savannah Health Department. The material could be used to advantage in connection
with other available material for a local exhibit.
Library
The Department has a good reference library on the subjects of bacteriology, pathology, chemistry, public health and
402_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
sanitation, approximately 1,500 volumes, and received about
twenty journals; in addition, a large number of public health
and bulletins and reports, the latter in return for the yearly
report issued from the Department. In addition, there is
available for reference, the large collection of the Georgia
Medical Society, now housed in the Hall of the Georgia Medical
Society.
Inventory
An inventory of apparatus, supplies, furniture and books,
is made yearly. This has been done yearly since the establishment of the Laboratory. This inventory is entered in a
card index. The inventory taken January 1, 1914, shows the
following items:
Items
Furniture and Fixtures...$ 3,687.62
Apparatus..................................................... 4,255.57
Supplies, Stationery, Chemicals
Glassware, Miscellaneous.......... 1,631.42
Books and Journals..................................... 2,704.82
Total........-..--.....-.....................* 12,279.43
Financial Statement
The Budget for the year was $7,500. The following
amounts were expended:
1. Outfits for Specimens .......................... $ 114.20
2. Printing............................--..... 52.80
3. Chemicals and Glassware .................... 212.26
4. Gas.......................................................... 132.13
5. Laundry...... 17.79
6. Postage............................................. 80.00
7. Stationery...................................... 21.70
8. Drugs and Drug Supplies.-...-.. 87.12
________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________403
9. Animals-............ 1.00
10. Ice........................................................ 82.06
11. Miscellaneous Expenses ...................... 346.98
12. Fixed Equipment ......-.........-........ 271.35
13. Telephone.............................................. 48.00
14. LibraryBooks, Journals, Binding.... 505.02
15. Salaries................................................... 5,340.00
Total...................................................... 7,312.41
Special Public Health Exhibit.................... 292.20
Totals............................................. 7,604.61
In conclusion, the Bacteriologist desires to express his
indebtedness to his Assistants, Miss Jane Van De Vrede and
Mr. Sidney Lanier, for assistance in the routine work and in
the preparation of the tables accompanying this report. It
is a pleasure to acknowledge the active interest taken by the
Health Officer, and by the members of the Board of Sanitary
Commissioners in the work of the Department.
Respectfully submitted,
V. H. BASSETT, M. D.
City Bacteriologist.
404 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF CHIEF FOOD INSPECTOR
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Dr. W. F. BRTJNNER, Health Officer
City of Savannah.
Dear Sir:
I herewith submit a Report of the Food Inspection
Division since my appointment in July.
The work, as a whole, has progressed favorably; considerable time has necessarily been spent in becoming acquainted
with conditions, and in instructing persons in the proper
methods of handling foodstuffs.
Restaurants
The inspection of restaurants during August, September
and October was carried on much the same as it has been for
the past two years. On November 1st, rating in the form of a
score card was placed in each white restaurant in such a position as to be plainly visible from the street. This was followed by an immediate improvement in the sanitary condition
of practically all of these places. The above rating places
each of these restaurants in one of four classes; that is, bad,
fair, good and excellent. There are no restaurants rated as
bad, ten are fair, fifteen good, and nineteen excellent. These
scores are made out and posted each month.
The restaurants and cook shops catering to the colored
trade are, for the most part, kept in good sanitary condition.
A few of these were run in buildings of such construction that
thorough cleaning was practically impossible. Persons running these places were given notice that unless satisfactory
changes were made, new permits would not be issued at the
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________406
first of the year. In each case the changes insisted on were
made or the places were vacated.
Bakeries
Inspection of bakeries have been made two or three times
each month, and, with but few exceptions, these bakeries are
maintained and their products handled in good sanitary condition.
Meat Inspection
The meat supply of Savannah comes from many points,
and at all hours of the day and night, which renders inspection
at its source out of the question, and thorough inspection after
its arrival very difficult. No attempt so far has been made to
concentrate this meat after its arrival to any one point for the
purpose of inspection, but an effort has been made to see as
much of this meat as possible at cold storage plants, the market,
green groceries, on the streets, and so on.
Green Groceries
An inspection of the green groceries was made twice a
week in the sections where inspection was most needed, and
once a week in other sections. The sanitary condition of the
green groceries is, for the most part, good, considerable improvement having been made during the past five months.
One feature of this work has been the installation of screens.
In August, only about one-half of the green groceries were
screened. Those not screened were made to put up screens
and new shops have been compelled to screen immediately.
Slaughter Pens
Inspection of slaughter pens have been made at irregular
intervals and these have been found, as a rule, to be in as good
sanitary condition as is possible for country slaughter pens to
406 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
be where modern appliances are practically impossible. At
the best, however, these places are primitive, and even with
the greatest care, they leave much to be desired in the way of
proper slaughtering facilities.
Fish Houses
Inspections of the fish houses have been made at very
frequent intervals, especially during the summer months.
Both the wholesale and retail fish houses have been maintained
in a sanitary condition, and the fish handled are, as a rule,
good.
Specials
Immediately after my arrival on July 18th, I was taken
by the Health Officer to see an outbreak of a rather peculiar
disease at one of the dairy farms. This outbreak had been
suspected of being anthrax, but, after hearing the history, seeing the symptoms and, later, the autopsy on the animal then
sick, this seemed improbable, but, owing to lack of symptoms
and lesions, diagnosis was reserved. Later, other animals became
ill and it was suspected that the outbreak was one of haemorrhagic septicaemia. At this stage, blood samples were taken
by Dr. Bassett, and, later, one of the animals died. An autopsy was performed and the findings were those of haemorrhagic septicaemia, and the blood samples when examined in
the Laboratory showed the organism of this disease, thus confirming the diagnosis.
Proposed Plans
There are in Savannah several bottling works, manufacturing various forms of soft drinks. The sanitary inspection
of these places has been postponed because of the press of
other work, but this will be taken up in the near future.
Recommendations
1. On September 5, 1914, I handed you a report of the
meat situation in Savannah, together with certain recommen-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________407
dations which, in my opinion, would tend towards its betterment. At that time I recommended an abattoir to be built
and operated by the city, and that regulations be made compelling the slaughter therein of all animals supplying meat to
Savannah, excepting only those slaughtered under government and state inspection. After studying the present method
of handling meat for a period of five months, the installation
of such a plant is, in my opinion, not only desirable, but imperative, if a really satisfactory meat supply is to be obtained.
Proper sanitation at the slaughter pens owned by local butchers
is a very important step towards betterment of our meat supply as far as it goes, but when it is considered that fullly onehalf of our meat supply is killed in uninspected slaughter pens
or on farms, under trees, in barns, and so on, and that these
places constitute a much larger number of killing places than
those operated by the local butchers, it is easily understood
that the sanitary inspection of slaughter pens is very limited.
The inspection of dressed meats provided for in the new
ordinance will also tend towards the improvemnet of the meat
supply, but inspection of this kind is very inferior to that made
at a modern abattoir where inspection immediately before
and after slaughter is possible. Taken as a whole, the enforcement of the present meat ordinance would tend towards
an improvement of the meat supply, but, at the best, it is only
a half-way measure, and will never cure the worst features of
the present meat supply; that is, insanitary surroundings at
the time of slaughter, crude and unsatisfactory transportation
facilities, improper cooling of meat after slaughter and during
transporattion and, finally, a system of inspection which can
never be as thorough as that at a properly equipped abattoir.
Savannah will never have a thoroughly satisfactory and up-todate meat supply until the entrance of dressed meat from the
country is absolutely prohibited, and a modern abattoir is installed. When it is considered that more than ten thousand
cattle, twenty thousand hogs and many calves, sheep and
goats are consumed each year in Savannah, exclusive of the
meats sold by the Western packing establishments, it will be
408_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
seen that only a moderate fee for each animal killed will be
necessary to return a substantial revenue to the city. In
addition to this, an amount equally as great would be derived
from the sale of by-products. This revenue should, at least,
be sufficient to maintain the plant on a self-supporting basis.
2. After studying the green groceries for a period of five
months, the need of more restrictions by the Health Department is more than ever apparent. In September I recommended that all green groceries be required to obtain a permit
from the Health Officer before conducting business. At this
time, I would again urgently recommend this, as, in the past,
meat shops have been run in buildings of poor construction
and provided with fixtures which were far from being satisfactory. During the past two months, over thirty new places
have opened, some of which are probably only temporary and,
as soon as the supply of pork frotn the country stops in the
early spring, these places will close. Several green groceries
are being conducted by persons who are indifferent to cleanliness and have to be continually forced to maintain their places
in a sanitary manner, or by persons who do not know the
meaning of cleanliness. The above conditions have been a
severe handicap to the Food Inspection Division, and much
valuable time has been spent in overseeing the remodeling of
shops, dealing with persons not capable of maintaining their
establishments in a satiafsctory condition and so on, which
time should have been spent in the maintenance of sanitation
and the proper control of the meat supply.
3. I am again forced to the unpleasant duty of recommending the retirement of the present Assistant Food Inspector and
the filling of the vacancy thus made by another man. This
retirement I feel to be essential for the good of the sen-vine, as
the present Assistant, while being unusually faithful to his
duties and untiring in his efforts, is so handicapped by failing
eyesight and advancing years, as .to render his efficiency below
the standard required for the proper fulfillment of the duties
of Assistant Food Inspector. I am certain that my recommendation that he be rewarded by a pension for years of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 409
faithful service to the city is unnecessary. In September I
recommended that the Assistant be either a veterinarian or a
trained meat inspector, but after more study of the situation
I think the better plan would be to appoint a man who has
had experience in the handling of meats, and postpone the
appointment of the veterinarian until such time as a municipal
abattoir is established.
4. Another problem which faces this Department is that
of wrapping the bread by the bakeries. At the present time,
less than half of the bread is wrapped. I would recommend
that this be taken up some time in the future, but I do not consider this to be advisable at present owing to the high price of
flour and the resulting increased expenses of the bakers.
In conclusion, I wish to express my thanks to you for
advice given me and for the hearty support of the work of the
Food Inspection Division. Many thanks are also due to the
members of the Inspection Force for their efforts in carrying
out the work of this Division, and to Dr. Bassett and his
Assistant for assistance for certain phases of food inspection.
410 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Monthly Inspections
MONTH
July 18 to 31
August.........
September....
October........
November....
December....
Total........
.
m o
2
oc
174
3rc*
363
531
598
619
2,588
c
a
%
$
Pi
152
245
489
323
369
399
1,972
"SS

20
34
55
48
52
37
246
S>
4A
GO
0
26
52
51
57
52
63
301

K
S
fc.
24
43
62
102
59
43
333
I
i
i
GO
4
3
3
5
2
2
19
5
S.
02
6
20
18
31
75
"
5E-*
400
680
1,029
1,086
1,145
1,194
5,534
Condemnations
MONTH
July..................
August..............
September........
October............
November........
December. .......
Total Pounds..
1
n
915
744
3,004
429
307
379
5,778
1
250
348
270
385
1,253
1
90
90
Mutton
162
162
jsta
S
35
7,112
1,400
798
6,983
1,000
17,328

i
09
GO
125
319
13
50
507
X

1
798
230
11
1,039
I Miscellaneous
Meat
||Products
355
290
308
113
1,066
|j Fruits and|Vegetables
300
90
100
200
690
Very respectfully,
D. C. GILLIS, D. V. M., Chief Food Inspector.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 411
REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIANS
Northern District
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAY ANT, Mayor
City of Savannah.
Sir:
I herewith submit my Annual Report as City Physician
of the Northern District for the year 1914:
Total Number Patients:..................................... 2,345
Total Number Colored Patients........................ 263
Total Number House Visits............................... 1,754
Total Number Office Visits................................ 1,826
Total Number Policemen Treated.................... 145
Total Number Prisoners Treated...................... 157
Patients Sent to Savannah Hospital................ 80
Patients Sent to St. Joseph's Hospital.............. 118
Patients Sent to Park View Sanitarium............ 81
Patients Sent to Georgia Infirmary.................. 28
Patients Sent to Charity Hospital.................... 8
Respectfully submitted,
JAMES E. MORRISON, M. D.
City Physician, Northern District
412_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Southern District
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen,
Savannah, Ga.
Gentlemen:
year
I beg to submit to you this, my Annual Report, for the
1914:
Total Number of Office Calls._........................... 1,539
Total Number of House Calls............................ 2,381
Total Number of Patients Treated .................. 2,484
Patients Sent to Savannah Hospital................ 25
Patients Sent to St. Joseph's Hospital.............. 28
Patients Sent to Park View Sanitarium.__...._. 23 .
Patients Sent to Georgia Infirmary.................. 10
Patients Sent to Charity Hospital.................... 3
Very truly yours,
L. J. CHEDEL,
City Physician Southern District.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________413
Eastern District
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor
City of Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I beg to present herewith my Report as City Physician
for the Eastern District of the City of Savannah, for the year
ending December 31, 1914:
O. C. H. V. P. T. C. H. G. I.
January......
February....
March........
May............
June............
July
August.-..
SeptemberOctober......
November..
December..
161
107
171
160
186
218
176
238
208
148
136
115
138
121
166
164
172
183
152
194
129
136
109
88
253
195
276
247
299
338
279
329
272
234
195
169
8
6
11
6
12
13
12
15
4
8
20
5
17
10
16
13
13
12
16
12
9
11
13
8
Total ............2,024 1,752 3,086 120 150
Respectfully submitted,
C. C. MIDDLETON, M. D.
City Physician (Colored) Eastern District.
414 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SAVANNAH HOSPITAL
FOR 1914
Dr. THOMAS J. CHARLTON, Superintendent
Number of Patientsin Hospital Dec. 31,1913 46
Number of Patients Admitted During 1914 1,171
Number of Patients in Hospital During 1914 1,217
Number of Patients Discharged During 1914 1,200
Number of Patients Remaining Jan. 1,1915 17
Number of Patients Died During 1914.__..... 65
Number of Patients Moribund...................... 23
Number of Patients Born............................... 53
Mortality, Total Deaths........................... 05%
Mortality, Less Moribund 1^4% -.........
Number of Hospital Days Pay Patients... 10,961
Number of Hospital Days City Patients... 4,441
Number of Hospital Days County Patients.. 2,066
Number of Hospital Days Savannah Benevolent Association from Oct. 31, 1914.... 138
Total Number of Hospital Days............... 17,606
Average Daily Number of Patients...... 48
Number of Pay Patients............................ 841
Number of City Patients................................ 313
Number of County Patients..................- 63
Number of Surgical Operations................... 536
Operating Room Expense............................. $3,808.18
Average Cost Per Operation.......................
Number of Hospital and Employe Days...... 33,364
Average Daily Cost of Raw Food.................. .32%
Cost to City and County Per Patient._......... 13.29K
Expense Per Capita Per Diem........................ 1.66s
Total Expense..........................__........$29,253.97
________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________415
Savannah Hospital (continued)
Income from Pay Patients $20,219.79
Income from City......... 3,000.00
Income from County .......... 2,000.00
Income from Savannah
Benevolent Ass'n.... 250.00
Deficit............................. 3,784.18
$29,253.97$29,253.97
416 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT OF ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL
1914
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
To Hon. R. J, DAVANT, Mayor
Dear Sir:
I have the honor of submitting to you the Report of our
Hospital from January 1 to December 31, 1914, hoping it will
prove satisfactory:
Number of Patients in Hospital Dec. 31,1913.. 46
Number of Patients Admitted During 1914 .... 1,357
Number of Patients in Hospital During 1914.. 1,403
Number of Pay Patients.-............................. 829
Number of City and County Patients.............. 528
Number of Hospital Days for Pay Patients.-... 7,010
Hospital Days for City and County Patients .. 6,917
Total Number of Hospital Days........................ 13,927
Number of Births._........................................... 46
Number of Surgical Operations.................... 397
Number of Deaths, Including 6 Moribund...... 46
Number of Patients Discharged........................ 1,271
Number of Patients Remaining in Hospital
December 31,1914._................................. 40
Respectfully submitted,
SISTER MARY DOMINICA.
,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 417
REPORT OF PARK VIEW SANITARIUM.
1914
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor
Sir:
The Directors of the Park View Sanitarium have the
honor to submit to the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, the Annual Report for the year ending December
31, 1914.
The care of the Sanitarium includes: Treatment, lodging,
nourishment, medicine, surgical.appliances, surgical operations
and care of obstetrical cases.
The Sanitarium has received without limitation, all
patients sent in by physicians of Savannah, the Police Department, in fact, all deserving patients living in Savannah.
The following table shows the record of the city patients,
the appended list of the total work done by the Sanitarium
for the year:
14
41S MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Park View Sanitarium (continued)
YEAR AND
MONTH
1914
January. ... ....................
February.. ......................
March............................
April..... .........................
May........... ....................
June....... . . ....................
July............................
August...... ....................
September......... .............
October..........................
November......................
December......................
Total......................
"3
* '2-5
3%
KQ
393
355
350
276
416
259
298
276
274
328
370
412
4,007
Admitted
38
32
38
32
34
34
39
31
27
36
37
41
419
Female
24
17
18
15
21
23
25
15
11
14
17
18
218
0) 3
S
14
15
?0
17
13
11
14
16
16
?,?,
m
?3
201
1
5
1
1
1
2
5
m
4
5
3
1
2
1
1
17
Total Number of Patients Admitted
During Year 1914........................................ 1,226
Total Number of Hospital Days
During Year 1914........................................ 12,666
Total Number of Surgical Operations
During Year 1914........................................ 588
Total Number of Births During Year 1914...... 35
Total Number of Deaths During Year 1914 .... 47
Number of Patients Moribund When
Admitted During the Year 1914................ 25
Mortality.............................................................. 3.8%
Mortality, Less Moribund...................._...,... 1.7%
Total Cost Per Patient Per Day........................ $ 1.94
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________419
Park View Sanitarium (continued)
It is impossible to compute separately the cost of private
and city patients. Mr. Charles Neville, Public Accountant,
finds the average total cost per patient per day to the Park
View Sanitarium to be $1.94.
L. C. SAVILLE, R. N.,
Superintendent,
420 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF GEORGIA INFIRMARY
FOR THE YEAR 1914
Statistical Report
Number of Patients in Infirmary January 1, 1914 .... 56
Number of Patients Admitted During 1914................ 965
Number of Patients Cared for During 1914................ 1,021
Number of Patients Discharged During 1914.............. 791
Number of Patients Died During 1914........................ 184
Number of Patients Remaining January 1, 1915........ 46
Births in Infirmary During 1914._................................. 18
Number Moribund Patients Carried to Infirmary
During 1914.............................................................. 24
Mortality.......................................................................... 18-2
Corrected Mortality........................................................ 16
Tubercular Admissions, 1914........................................ 37
Operations, 1914.............................................................. 307
Surgical Deaths, 1914..................................................... 18
Medical Deaths, 1914.................................................... 166
Total Number Hospital Days All Patients, 1914 ...... 22,901
Total Number Hospital Days City Patients, 1914.... 19,165
Total Number Hospital Days Other Patients, 1914.. 3,736
Daily Average Number of Patients, 1914.................... 63
Largest Number of Patients Any One Day, 1914...... 78
Smallest Number Patients Any One Day, 1914.......... 34
Daily Average Cost Per Patient.................................... .63
Expenses for Year................................................ $14,538.67
Appropriation from City of Savannah and Chatham
County Averages for Charity Patients Per Day .41
Number of Attendants, Including 3 White Nurses.... 25
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 421
Georgia Infirmary (continued)
Receipts
Balance January 1, 1914....................$ 1,271.90
City of Savannah.................................. 4,500.00
Chatham County.................... ......... 3,500.00
Pay Patients._....................................... 3,622.71
Received from Interest on
Investments.................................. 713.78
Donations from Savannah
Benevolent Association............... 250.00
Deficit.................................................... 680.28$ 14,538-67
Disbursements
Salaries..................................................$ 4,489.71
Provisions....................................... 4,242.76
Drug and Surgical Supplies...... 2,196.24
Repasrs, Plumbing, Etc...... 1,591.90
Housiehold Supplies.............................. 497.06
Electric Lights and Gas.. 475.92
Coal and Wood...... 625.00
Undertakers Account........ 160.50
Telephone.-....-..-. 43.25
Insurance-..........-.. 50.84
Interest and Collections..- 165.49$ 14,538.67
HENRY C. CUNNINGHAM,
Attest: President.
M. S. BAKER, Secretary and Treasurer.
422 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT OF CHARITY HOSPITAL
FOR THE YEAR 1914
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor
Sir:
The Directors of Charity Hospital have the honor to submit to the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, the
Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1914:
Patients Left Over January 1, 1914 Total
(City 11, Pay 11)...................................... 22
Patients Cared for During 1914
(City 365, Pay 525)..........................:....... 890
Hospital Days, (City 4,188; Pay 4,621) ...... 8,809
Surgical Cases (City 178, Pay 439).............. 617
Births (City 10, Pay 6).................................... 16
Deaths (City 39, Pay 36)................................ 75
Moribund (City 8, Pay 8)............................... 16
Left in Hospital December 31, 1914
(City 16, Pay 4)........................................ . 20
Receipts
Cash on Hand January 1, 1914..................^...$ 88.11
Private Donations.............................;........... 79.58
Donation from City........................................ 900.00
From Pay Patients.......................................... 3,743.29
Interest.............................................................. 6.95
Total..........................................................$4,817.93
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 423
Charity Hospital (continued)
Disbursements
Undertaker.-..............:....-................. .............$ 20.00
Insurance, Phone and Printing..._................ 95.18
Medical Supplies......................................... 324.19
Surgical Supplies.............................................. 571.04
House Supplies.................................................. 206.05
Repairs and Improvements............................... 745.22
Bread, Milk and Groceries......................... 1,201.71
Fuel....--.....-...................................... 478.81
Salaries............'.................................................. 474.00
Meats and Vegetables.-............... 664.85
Total........................................... $4,781-05
Unpaid Bills December 31,1914........-...... 1,275.06
Average cost to city per diem .21 plus.
Respectfully submitted,
I. D. WILLIAMS, M. D.,
Treasurer.
424 . MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF CITY DISPENSARY
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT. Mayor,
City.
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit herewith my Report ending December
31, 1914:
Number of Prescriptions Filled Is As Follows
MONTH White Colored Total
January.............................................. 534 820 1,354
February............................................ 379 764 1,148
March................................................ 459 934 1,443
April.................................................. 454 951 1,405
May................................................... 486 1,119 1,605
June.................................................... 408 1,017 1,425
July.................................................... 388 1,058 1,446
August............................................... 424 1,158 1,582
September......................................... 425 1,210 1,635
October.............................................. 482 1,125 1,607
November.......................................... 453 854 1,307
December.......................................... 554 905 1,459
Total. ........................................ 5,446 11,970 17,416
An Increase of 1,073 Prescriptions Over Last Year.
Number of Prescriptions Prescribed by the Following Physicians:
WHITE
Morrison, J. F. ..........
Chedel............. ..........
Iseman.............. ..........
Usher, S......................
Lee, L............... ...........
Heriot.. ........... ...........
Stothart, W. L... .......
Carter........................
Morrison, A. A... .......
Martin, R. V..............
Gibson....... .................
Corson. .......................
Wahl............. ............
frcl
1
252
114
GO
43
28
25
35
1fi
?4
21
15
fi
23
February
153
79
41
43
21
915
36
33
31
19
38
7
9
1
S
224
100
63
59
44
43
21
29
31
29
35
12
7
1
<
214
106
61
52
44
22
12
38
21
13
15
8
13
5"
S
281
117
58
53
45
25
22
31
10
15
15
20
8
i
5
ion
-in*
59
55
35
23
7
17
28
15
22
10
5
j>
a >
159
124
59
54
97
20
29
21
5
10
Q
20
5
1
223
102
64
44
31
18
10
29
19
25
26
18
9
September
267
97
58
51
28
32
15
29
16
11
23
16
12
October
217
116
51
57
47
39
28
9
13
28
11
9
12
November
251
75
54
45
51
9
30
5
20
15
2
15
14
December
258
102
50
79
29
13
39
5
26
30
7
18
13
I
2,689
1,230
687
632
430
294
293
262
244
231
218
159
130
s
00
53
I
53
Number of Prescriptions Prescribed (continued)
WHITE
(continued)
Stothart, J. A... ....... . Wilson.................. .....
Winders.....................
Adams........... ...........
Brannen. .....................
Thomas......................
DeCaradeuc.. ............
Reid............................
Orear. ............. ............
Edwards.. ..................
Baker..........................
Farmer........................
Myers.. .....................
January

?,0
ft
13
11
6
1
11
fi
?,
7,
fi
February
11
10
fi
9
fi
1
8
7
fi
2
1
1
8
1ft
7
1?
fi
?
13
1
1?
7
8
C
I
?,
1ft
11
9
6
2
12
3
13
4
5?
5?
4
10
8
4
fi
3
7
7
11
4
?
3
I <->
9
8
17
7
K
3
4
5
1
*j
1?
7
x
1
3
fi
8
8
11
16
5
1
4
2
2
.*
<
1
8
4
4
fi
10
3
4
1
4
2
fi
September
i
10
2
12
4
9
15
1
1
3
5
fi
5
j
?4
13
8
7
4
fi
6
191
7
3
5
5
3
i
November
i
20
12
fi
fi
fi
3
2
4
fi
fi
?
3
d
1December
12
9
24
7
7
10
2
12
. 15
7
10
2
11
3

124
115
124
88
75
71
67
64
64
56
50
46
32
I

09
g
Number of Prescriptions Prescribed (continued)
WHITE
(continued)
Usher, J.A.. ..............
Usher, C....................
Stothart, E. J............
Clay, T. S..................
Corbin.......... ... ...........
Weinberg....................
Norton, W. A........ ...
Exley..........................
Fischer... .................... .
Barrow.............. ......... .
Crawford......... ...........
Causey........................
Redmond........... .........
1
11
?, 21?1
February
3811?143
.March
6341818
T3
ft
?,
9, 211352
S? S
34111
9.
1 *
91342
j>3
*
?1?
ts&1
137211
September
314541314
October
?, 6215
?, 3
November
.. 4
f,
?, 4
1
December
i
1
?, 45
I
28
28
in
18
16
14
12
10
10
10998
S
55i3
Number of Prescriptions Prescribed (continued)
WHITE
(eon&'ne</)
Underwood................
Lyle............................
Rogers.................. ....
Waring, A. J. ..........
Johnson, G. W.........
Jones...... ...................
Chisholm....... .............
Righton. ....................
McGee... ....................
Wnrinir T
P
Dudley... ....................
Charlton. ............ ......
Owens.......................
b
1 *
25
February
621
JS%
I21
I
?,11

231
i)
1-5
2113
_tj
3 1-9
2
<
11
September
11
9,12
October
i23
?!1?
November
i1
fl11
1
1
?, 8
1
8777765444322
2I*
92a
CJ
Number of Prescriptions Prescribed (continued)
WHITE
(continued)
Cleborne....................
Dancy.. ......................
Woods........................
Martin, H. H............
Hiers.... ......................
Graham....... ............ ...
Bray............................
Brunner....... .............
Rakestraw..................
Train..........................
Norton, G. M.... ........
Hesse..........................
1
1
...
February
?,
g Ss
9, !i
1
i
?,
4)
1-5
2
>
I-S
?,I
+2
00i < i
September October
1
November 1 1
1Decemb er
1
I
222222221111
3I
Number of Prescriptions Prescribed (continued)
COLORED
Middleton...... .... ........
Belcher......................
Daniels.... ..................
Tyson........... ...............
Love............................
"0* *\ rtlf rj p V
Harris, W. A............
Leftwich.... ................
Collier........................
Williams.. ..................
Johnson, G. W. P......
Brent..........................
Clayborn.... ................
January
1
289
257
20
1
7
1
7
1
February 1
223
271
24
2
1
1
1
1
a
?.
281
278
25
12
7
2
1
9
1
317
273
41
25
4
9
4
4
2
>,
S
361
375
24
38
12
2
5
1
I i-
307
359
12
25
6
2
4
23
2
jj,
3 "-
164
466
9
144
23
9
6
2
<
358
248
22
81
173
20
4
16
1
3
3
2
September
i
334
401
28
32
22
7
14
9
3
25
October
338
347
40
19
13
13
23
10
14
6
2
November
219
297
29
24
15
8
12
3
18
2
December
188
297
24
17
17
fi4
8
7
21
1
I
3,379
3,063
1,043
424
174
141
99
00
83
60
40
17
16
X
55
9)
B
s
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 431
Expenditures Are As Follows:
January
Rent._.........,...,.................................$ 40.00 . Wages.............................................. 160.00
Solomons' Co................................ 183.81
Columbia Drug Co.......................... 20.83
Shuptrine's...................................... 16.35
H. C. Frech...................................... 149.26
Gas.................................................... 1.75
Electricity........................................ 1.45
Harms' Grocery.............................. 3.50
Cleaning.......................................... 5.00
Eckstein's........................................ 1.08
Savannah Press.............................. 5.00
Directory.__................................. 6.00
Total........................................$ 594.03
February
Rent.............................................-....$ 40.00
Wages............................................. 160.00
Columbia Drug Co.......................... 69.30
Shuptrines._..................................... 1.50
Gas................................................. 2.25
Electricty........................................ 1.40
Harms' Grocery.............................. 3.95
Cleaning.......................................... 4.00
Laundry....................................... .35
Nichols'............................................ .75
Total......... ...............................$ 283.50
432 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
March
Rent.__..................................... ......$ 40.00
Wages.............................................. 160.00
Columbia Drug Co........................ 16.73
Shuptrine's...................................... 47.53
H. C. Frech...................................... 45.87
Gas._............................................. 2.00
Electricity ..................................... .85
Harms' Grocery.............................. 3.50
Cleaning.......................................... 4.00
Telephone....................................... 3.00
D. R. Thomas*Son...................... 7.25
H. F. Klug...................................:.... 2.50
Train & Merkle................................ 9.10
Total........................................$ 342.33
April
Rent.................................................$ 40.00
Wages.............................................. 160.00
Solomons'Co.................................. 88.24
H. C. Frech...................................... 184.55
Gas..._............................................ .75
Electricity ...................................... .60
Cleaning.......................................... 4.00
Total.......................................$ 478.14
May
Rent.................................................. 40.00
Wages............................................. 160.00
Columbia Drug Co......................... 156.59
H. C. Frech..................................... 1.55
Electricity...................................... .40
Harms' Grocery.............................. .40
Cleaning.......................................... 5.00
Total........................................$ 363.94
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________433
June
..........-........-.............$ 40.00
Wages............................................ 160.00
Solomons' Co................................ 13.14
Columbia Drug Co........................ 57.13
Wachtel's...................................... 1.50
Electricity...................................... .35
A. & P. Tea Co.............................. 2.65
Est. M. J. Poyle.......... 1.60
Cleaning........................................ 4.00
Laundry........................................ .33
Total........................................$ 280.70
July
Rent................................................I 40.00
Wages.............................................. 160.00
Columbia Drug Cd........................ 89.77
Solomons' Co.................................. 100.52
Electricity........................................ .30
C. D. Kenny Co.............................. 2.81
Cleaning........................................ 4.00
Telephone. .................................... 3.00
Total........................................! 400.40
August
Rent............ .....................................$ 40.00
Wages.............................................. 160.00
Solomons' Co.................................. 59.90
Columbia Drug Co........................ 68.16
H. C. Frech...................................... 3.22
Electricity...............................!........ .35
Est. M. J. Doyle............................ .50
Small's Cash Grocery.......... 1.50
Cleaning.................................- 5.00
Total..................................$ 338.63
434 ________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_____
September
Rent..................................................$ 40.00
Wages.............................................. 160.00
Solomons' Co.................................. 128.74
Gas._................................................. .75
Electricity........................................ .85
Ash-Bond Co.................................. 7.50
Cleaning.......................................... 4.00
Total.......................................*! 341.84
October
Rent-...........................! 40.00
Wages.............................................. 160.00
Columbia Drug Co._....................... 174.21
H. C. Frech...................................... 16.40
Gas.__............................................... .25
Electricity.........................*............. 1.00
Est. M. J. Doyle.............................. 3.75
Cleaning......................................... 5.00
Total..................$ 400.61
November
Rent._........................................ .......$ 40.00
Wages.............................................. 160.00
Solomons' Co................................ 184.94
H. C. Frech..................................... 2.58
Electricity....................................... 1.10
Cleaning.......................................... 4.00
Total.... ....................................$ 392.62
December
................................-.-........$ 40.00
Wages....................................... 160.00
Solomons' Co...... ..................... 6.85
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________435
Columbia Drug Co.......................... 44.06
Gas^.......,......................................... .25
Telephone........................................ 6.00
Small's Cash Grocery..........'............ 3.20
Stanton's.......................................... .69
Cleaning.......................................... 4.00
Electricity........................................ 1.45
Total........................................$ 266.50
Summary
January...................,........,,..............$ 594.03
February......................................... 283.50
March.............................................. 342.33
April.................................................. 478.14
May....................................:............. 363.94
June.................................................. 280.70
July.................................................. 400.40
August........................ ..................... 338.63
September........................................ 341.84
October............................................ 400.61
November....................................... 392.62
December........................................ 266.50
Total........................................S 4,483.24
The City Dispensary has also supplied the Tuberculosis
Nurse, the District Nurses, the Abraham's Home, the Home
for the Aged, the Police Barracks, the Pest House, the Fresh
Air Home, the Day Nursery, and the City Physicians, with
supplies.
Respectfully yours,
JNO. H. HARMS,
Keeper City Dispensary.
436 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF PLUMBING
Savannah, Ga., January 1,1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor,
City of Savannah, Ga.
Sir:
Herewith, I have the honor to submit my Report for the
year ending December 31, 1914:
Plumbing Inspections Made During the Year 1914:
Fixtures Amount
MONTH Inspected of Fees
January............................ 235 $ 117.50
February............................ 151 75.50
March................................ 283 141.50
April._............................. 274 137.00
May.................................... 315 157.50
June.................................... 309 154.50
July.................................... 322 161.00
August................................ 255 127.50
September.......................... 383 191.50
October.............................. 161 80.50
November.......................... 174 87.00
December.......................... 97 48.50
Total.......................... 2,959 $ 1,479.50
Despite the general disturbance of financial matters,
caused by the European war to a very great extent, plumbing
improvements held up well until October and even with the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 437
noticeable decrease in business for the last three months of the
year, the amount of fees was only $122.50 less than for the
preceding year.
Besides the above regular inspections, I also made the
following described inspections:
For Owners, Agents and Tenants............ 40
Storm Sewers........................................... 81
On Request of Health Officer.................... 45
House Drainage Sewers............................168
Inspection of Water Taps for Water
Department........................................235
For some months past a rough draft of a new plumbing
ordinance has been in the hands of the City Attorney in order
that he may look into the matter of preparing it in such form
as may be required to have it enacted into law by City Council
and I would earnestly recommend that this ordinance be
passed. It has been carefully considered and I am sure it
will be a decided improvement over the ordinance now in
force and which has not been amended in any respect since its
adoption in 1897. I would thank you to look into my recommendation along this line.
I would also call your attention to the fact that the work
of this Department at times is so great that the Inspector by
himself is unable to properly discharge all of the duties and
this is to recommend that an Assistant Inspector of Plumbing
be appointed to take charge of all of the work which is in excess
of the ability of the Inspector to handle with dispatch. In
this connection, I would ask that the house drainage sewer
system be placed under the care of this office for inspection,
both from the main city sewer to the property line and again
from the property line to the point of connection with house
fixtures. This function properly belongs .to the Plumbing Department and it should be supervised by a man of good train-
438 MAYOR'S ANNUAL' REPORT
ing and experience in plumbing and sewerage work. This
matter should be taken up for consideration. An investigation will show that an assistant to the Inspector is needed
for better service.
In conclusion, I wish to thank Your Honor, The Committee on Public Health and the Board of Plumbing Examiners
for co-operating with me in discharging the duties of my office.
Very respectfully,
C. W. TANNER,
Inspector of Plumbing.
ANNUAL REPORT
or THE
CITY ATTORNEY
AND
REPORTS
OF THE
SINKING FUND COMMISSION
BOARD OF TAX ASSESSORS
CITY MARSHAL
CLERK OF MARKET
BUILDING INSPECTOR
HARBOR MASTER
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31
1914

REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
To the Honorable RICHARD J. DAVANT, Mayor
I beg to submit to you herewith my Report as City Attorney for the year 1914.
As to the cases on hand at the date of my last report, I
beg to report upon each as follows:
1. The case of YOUNGLOVE & SIPPLE, to which reference was made in my last report, being a suit for the loss
of one mule, valued at $250.00, and which plaintiffs alleged
was hired from them by the city in 1910, and never returned,
was settled by authority of the Finance Committee for the
sum of $200.00, and the case was dismissed.
2. The case of J. V. DADEN, being a suit for damage for
personal injuries in the sum of $2,500.00, and which has been
pending for some time, has been dismissed by the plaintiff's
council.
3- The suit of T. D. JORDAN for $5,000.00 damages
for personal injuries alleged to have been received on the 10th
day of April, 1911, while driving a cart of the street and Lane
Department, engaged in the work of cleaning the streets, was
taken to the Supreme Court upon exceptions to a decision of
the Superior Court overruling the demurrer filed by the city.
The Supreme Court overruled the decision of the lower court
and sustained the demurrer, holding that the work of cleaning
the streets is one of the governmental duties of the city, and
that if any injury is inflicted in the pursuance of this duty the
city is not liable.
442_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________.
4. The appeal of T. B. GRACEN from the Superior
Court to the Supreme Court on the judgment validating
bonds for the purpose of purchasing a site for, and building a,
public Auditorium, has been decided by the Supereme Court
in favor of the city, the Supreme Court holding that the Registration Act for bond elections passed by the Legislature for
this city in 1910 is constitutional, and holding further that
none of the other grounds urged by Gracen as to the invalidity
of the election was good.
5. The suit of ABRAM HAZARD, which has been
pending for several years in the Superior Court, was settled
by authority of Council for $50.00, and has been dismissed.
6. The suit of GARMANY vs. McINTYRE, in which
the city is a claimant, is still pending in the City Court.
7. In the suit of Miss IDA FERRIS, in which the plaintiff
obtained a judgment for $150.00 during the year 1912, the
plaintiff moved for a new trial contending that the verdict was
too small. The judge of the City Court refused to grant the
plaintiff a new trial, and the judgment has been paid.
8. During the year 1913 the injunction filed by JOHN
NICHOLSON, et al., against the Park and Tree Commission
seeking to restrain the Commission from preventing the petitioners doing work in Bonaventure Cemetery contrary to the
rules of the Commission, was dismissed on demurrer by'the
Superior Court, but the plaintiffs appealed to the Supreme
Court, and that court sent the case back for trial. This case
has not yet been tried, and will probably be adjusted.
The Following New Cases Have Been Filed Against
the City During the Year 1914:
1. Quo Warranto of R. S. COPE, et al., vs. J. J. CUMMINGS, et al., Board of Drainage Commissioners, was filed
in the Superior Court July 2, 1914, seeking to oust the Cummings Board of Drainage Commissioners and reinstate the
Cope Board. Upon the hearing of this case the judge of the
Superior Court decided that under the present charter of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 443
the City of Savannah, the Mayor and Aldermen could not
delegate to a Drainage Board the power of awarding contracts
for drainage work and such other powers as has been given the
Drainage Boards by the City Council, and declared that
neither of the Boards was entitled to hold office. There was
no appeal from this decision, and it is now binding upon
all the parties.
2. On January 29, 1915, the STANDARD FUEL SUPPLY COMPANY brought suit against the city and the Central of Georgia Railway Company to enjoin the pavement on
River Street. The judge of the Superior Court granted a
temporary injunction. This case has been appealed to the
Supreme Court by the Railway Company. The city is not
directly involved in the case.
3. On June 12, 1914, F.C. DIETER filed an injunction
seeking to enjoin the city from grading the streets in Parkside
Place Subdivision, and in the Heriot Development Company
Subdivision, the city having agreed to grade these streets on
the condition that the owners of the subdivisions would deed
the streets to the city. On August 12, 1914, the injuction was
modified so that it did not affect the Parkside Place Subdivision; and on December 31, 1914, the judge of the Superior
Court sustained a demurer to the greater part of what remained of the petition. Subsequently the suit was dismissed
by the plaintiff.
4. On July 6, 1914, F. C. DIETER filed an injuction seeking to prohibit the city from extending its water mains to the
Twickenham and Avondale Subdivisions under contracts
with the owners of these subdivisions. This suijt was dismissed on July 30, 1914, by the plaintiff.
5. On July 6, 1914, F. C. DIETER filed a mandamus
seeking to compel the city to extend water mains on the
Waters Road. This suit was dismissed on July 30, 1914, by
the plaintiff.
6. On the 18th day of August, 1914, an injuction was filed
by H. T. SHORE seeking to enjoin the city from renting certain stalls in the City Market. This suit was dismissed by
the plaintiff on the 18th day of September, 1914.
444 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
7. A suit was filed by Mrs. MABEL WEBB against the
city, in the City Court of Savannah on October 23, 1914,
claiming damages in the sum of $20,000.00 for alleged personal injuries sustained by stepping in a hole in the sidewalk
and injuring herself. This suit is still pending.
8. Mrs. FANNIE D. GRIFFIN, on November 21, 1914,
filed a similar suit claiming $20,000.00 damages. This suit
is now pending.
9. During the year it became necessary in order to open
certain streets in the city, to condemn the following property:
Lot 37, Meldrim Ward, the property of Fannie M. Green;
Lots D and E, Norwood Ward, property of James Fleming;
and Lot 47, Norwood Ward, the property of Mary E. Butler.
In each of these cases the award was made the judgement of
the Supreme Court and was accepted by the defendant and
the case became closed.
The city also instituted condemnation proceedings against
JANE A. JONES, et. al., to condemn a street through the
Jones estate in East Savannah, principally for the purpose of
laying a sewer. During the pendency of the suit the plans
of the drainage work were changed, so that it was not necessary to use this property. At the direction of the Committees on Drainage and Opening Streets, I thereupon
dismissed these condemnation proceedings.
10. Two decisions of the Recorder's Court were appealed
by certiorari to the Superior Court during the year. These
are the cases of M. SHEVINSKI and J, F. KILEY. Each
was charged with violating a municipal ordinance. The
former was sent back to the Recorder's Court for retrial. -The
latter was dismissed in the Superior Court.
When the bonds for the house drainage and storm sewerage systems were sold, and the question arose with the two
largest purchasers as to whether the issue was a serial one and
not a straight thirty-year issue, a considerable question arose,
and I beg to have incorporated herewith the official statement
which I made, and which was given out for publication by
direction of the Finance Committee:
___ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 445
"I have refrained from giving out any interviews or
matter for publication before this time, as I did not think the
best interests of the city warranted such proceedings, but now
that the bond question is closed, and so many statements have
been made that are incorrect, I deem it right and proper that
the public should know the facts.
The $600,000.00 bond issue of the house drainage and
storm sewerage systems is the first incurred in Savannah under
the provisions of the present Constitution of Georgia. This
issue is based upon an entirely separate and distinct law from
all of the other issues of Savannah bonds. The issue of
$2,610,000.00 and the issue of $213,000.00, the only outstanding bonds of the citywere issued under the Act of the
General Assembly of Georgia of December 11, 1878 (Acts of
1878-79, page 85,) authorizing the municipalities of this State
to provide for the issue and exchange of new bonds for outstanding bonds and coupons, and to provide for the establishment and management of a sinking fund for the retirement of
such new bonds and coupons. Both of these issues last referred to were to redeem older issues of Savannah bonds and
it was unnecessary to have an election, whereas an original
indebtedness, such as the $600,000.00 one for drainage purposes, requires that it be submitted to a vote of the people.
It will thus be seen that questions affecting the drainage bonds
have' no effect whatever upon prior issues of Savannah bonds.
I desire to state at this time that no question, whatever,
has ever been raised as to the validity of the $600,000.00 issue
of drainage bonds, the only question being whether the original
resolution called for a serial bond issue, or a straight thirtyyear issue.
During the incumbency of the last administration, on
August 11,1911, a resolution was passed, calling for an election
by the people to authorize an issue of $600,000.00 face value
of bonds, to be used for the extension and completion of the
house drainage and storm sewerage systems. Under the Constitution of the State of Georgia, no municipal corporation can
incur an original bonded indebtendess (since the present Con-
446_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
stitution was adopted) for a longer period than thirty years,
and it is necessary, whatever period is adopted for the maturity of the bonds, for thirty years or any specified number
of years less than thirty years, that a sinking fund be
provided for, annually, which will be sufficient to pay the entire
bonded debt within thirty years from the time of the incurring
of the indebtedness. In other words, a sufficient amount must
be set aside each year to make up the total amount of the
principal and interest. 'The controlling idea is,' to use the
language of the Supreme Court 'that so far as the taxpayer is
concerned, he is to contribute his proportion annually, whether
it go direct to the creditor or whether it go into the hands of
the public officers to be held in trust for the creditor, to be
paid to him when the debt matures'. It was the endeavor of
the city official, no doubt, to comply with this provision of the
Constitution, when he inserted in the original resolution,
drawn and passed by Council in 1911, the language which has
given rise to the question as to whether a serial or a straight
bond was intended.
That it was the intention of the City Council to make
the issue a straight one, has been repeatedly declared, verbally, as well as over the signatures of officials authorized to
speak for the past administration. The present administration endeavored to follow out the purpose and intent of
the previous Council, by advertising a straight thirty-year
issue of bonds, especially in view of the fact that the bonds
could not be sold for less than their face value, and a straight
issue of bonds always commands a higher price than a serial
issue.
The bids of the New York Life Insurance Company and
the Security Trust Company, contained the condition that the
proceedings should be subject to the confirmation of their
counsel, which was but proper. In consonance with this, after
the respective allotment of bids were awarded to these companies, they requested that certified copies of the proceedings
should be sent to them. After the receipt of the copies of the
proceedings, the point was made by counsel of the New York
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________447
Life Insurance Company, as well as Story, Thorndike, Palmer
and Dodge, of Boston, counsel for the Security Trust Company, who are recognized to be among the leading lawyers of
the United States and give opinions upon millions of dollars
of bonds monthly, that the original resolution, passed in 1911,
called for a serial issue of bonds and that no subsequent proceedings could alter it. All of these attorneys stated to me,
personally, and have contended throughout, that it would
make no difference whether any additional ordinance, since
the election, was passed or not, that they were obliged to rely
upon the text of the original resolution, upon which the election was had, and which was incorporated in the validation
order,which was also passed before the present administration
went into office. It will thus be seen that the entire matter
was concerned with the resolution passed in 1911.
On this important matter it has been endeavored in every
way possible to follow out the purpose and intent of the prior
administration, but we have come to the point where we fully
realize that it would not only be illegal, but the best interests
of the city would not be subserved.
In view of all of this, and the fact that the original bidders were willing to take the bonds as serial ones, with a readjustment of price, which would still yield the city a considerable premium over the $600,000.00, it has been determined to
make the issue a serial one; paying the first year of their life
$5,500.00of the bonds at par; the second year,$6,500.00 of the
bonds at par; the third year $7,500.00 and so on, increasing
each and every year thereafter $1,000.00 face value of bonds,
over and above the previous amount retired. By this method
of redeeming the bonds serially, the city will be saved a tremendous amount of interest, and the Sinking Fund Commission will not be obliged to pay high premiums each year to
secure the bonds in open market, as heretofore has been the
case, as they will be redeemed at par. It would seem that the
question has happily arisen, as the city will be greatly benefitted by the change from a straight to a serial bond."
448_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
During the year a large number of titles have been examined by the city, and deeds, contracts, bonds and other papers
have been drawn. I have given to Your Honor, the Aldermen,
and a number of city officers, opinions upon questions which
have been submitted to me and I have attended the meetings
of Council and of the different Committees when requested,
drawn Resolutions and Ordinances, and performed such other
duties as have been required of me.
Mr. David S. Atkinson, Assistant City Attorney, has rendered valuable aid and assistance to me, has argued a number
of important matters in courts, and has rendered valuable
services to the Mayor and Aldermen, he having charge of the
title and condemnation matter which has largely increased in
volume on account of the drainage work, and has ably performed all other duties incident to his office.
Respectfully submitted,
JNO. ROURKE,.Jr.
City Attorney.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 449
REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSION
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor, City of Savannah,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
The Sinking Fund Commissioners respectfully submit
their thirty-fifth Annual Report.
We are unable to report the purchase of any of the bonds
of 1909; the ruling prices for this issue were too high, and none
were purchased.
We trust that we will be able to make a satisfactory disposition of the funds at our disposal in obtaining bonds of
this issue at a satisfactory price.
Amount on hand available for purchase, being the full
amount due by the city to dale, $55,000.00.
Total Debt 1909............................$ 2,403,000.00
Total Debt 1913.............................. 213,000.00
Total These Issues ................$ 2,616,000.00
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. J. MILLS
CHARLES G. BELL
LEOPOLD ADLER
J. F. PAULSEN
Commissioners of Sinking Fund.
450 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TAX ASSESSORS
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
To the Honorable May or and Aldermen of the City of Savannah.
Savannah, Ga.
Sirs:
The Board of Tax Assessors herewith, submit their Report
for the year 1914.
Assessment for Taxation
Real Estate................................................................ S 37,548,624
Personal Property.................................................... 18,033,216
Franchises (less exemptions).................................... 910,977
Total for 1914.................................................. $ 56,492,817
Total for 1913.................................................. $ 54,986,018
at
Increase for 1914.............................................. f 1,506,799
New Improvements Completed in 1914 Were
Assessed as Follows
Completed During First Quarter.......................... $ 184.362
Completed During Second Quarter...................... 192,815
Completed During Third Quarter.......................... 282.105
Completed During Fourth Quarter...................... 245,150
Total.................................................................. $ 904,432
Respectfully submitted,
G. NOBLE JONES, Chairman
JOSEPH M. DREYER
DANIEL T. ELLIOTT
Assessors.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 451
REPORT OF CITY MARSHAL
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I have the honor to submit herewith my Annual Report
for the year 1914, same being my second under your administration.
The collections from all sources amounted to $54,199.06,
as per itemized statement attached.
Ground RentsAll lots reported to this office by the
City Treasurer have been re-entered for arrears of rent, as required by ordinance.
Real EstateThis item shows a total collection of $16,-
612.69, being the largest amount collected from any specific
item during the year.
Paving StreetsThis item produced $7,912.03, a slight
increase over 1913.
Personal PropertyReceipts from this source amount
to $4,917.10, an increase of nearly $1,000.00, which I attribute
to the new system of "Personal Notices" served by the Deputy
Marshal instead of sending notice by mail, which not only
saves a large postage bill, but produces more results.
Specific TaxThis item, owing to the hard and efficient work of the Deputy Marshal, contributed the second
largest amount in our schedule$14,267.19, which is a large
increase (nearly $3,000.00) over 1913, which is a new record
from this source.
In addition to our usual work, this office served 1,084
sidewalk repair notices issued from the Chief Engineer's
office.
452_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Owing to the extension of the city limits, which now includes nearly all of West Savannah, and the increased number
of notices which this office has to serve, I respectfully recommend that you appoint an assistant to the Deputy Marshal.
In conclusion, I desire to express our thanks and appreciation to the Police Department, also the Recorder, for their
assistance and co-operation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. D. SEMKEN, City Marshal.
City Marshal's Office
Itemized Statement of Collections Year Ending
December 31, 1914:
Real Estate
1907.............................. $ 9.20
1908... ............................ 11.96
1909................................ 14.18
1910............................... 30.41
1911............................... 440.38
1912................................ 2,423.45
1913................................ 13,683.11$ 16,612.69
Personal Property
1908-.............................. $ 1.39
1912............................... 102.65
1913................................ 1,059.39
1914................................ 3,753.67$ 4,917.10
Specific
1912................................ $ 74.00
1913................................ 479.94
1914................................ 13,713.25$ 14,267.19
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 453
Near Beer
1914................................ $ 2,280.00$ 2,280.00
Paving Assessment
1906................................ $ 5.00
1909................................ 2,976.83
1910................................ 216-48
1911................................ 66-00
1912................................ 379.00
1913................................ 3,056.44
1914................................ 1,212.28$ 7,912.03
Sidewalk Charges
1912................................ $ 152.13
1913................................ 251.49
1914................................ 423.95$ 827.57
Sink Cleaning Charges
1910................................ $ 4.00
1912................................ 8.00
1913................................ 84.35
1914............................... 106.10$ 202.45
Market Rents
1913................................ $ 238.26
1914................................ 5,403.57$ 5,641.83
City Property Rent
1914................................ $ 148.25$ 148.25
Execution Fees
1907................................ $ 4.00
1908.............................. 6.00
1909................................ 10.00
1910................................ 15.00
1911................................ 14.00
1912................................ 40.86
1913................................ 517.00
1914................................ 475.00$ 1,081.86
454 ____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Interest.......................... $ 44.29$ 44.29
Advertising.................... 56.40 56.40
Overbid at City
Marshal's Sales........ 8.65 8.65
Electric Inspection......
Fees............................ 90.75 90.75
Total.......................... $ $54,091.06
Park and Tree Commission, Bonavenlure Cemetery
Bills.................................................... $ 108.00
Total.............................................. $ 54,199.06
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 455
REPORT OF CLERK OF CITY MARKET
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915-
Hon. R. J. DAY ANT, Mayor
Dear Sir:
I beg to submit following Financial Report for the City
Market for the year just closed:
Rents Collected Rents Collected by
MONTH by Clerk of Market City Marshal
January.......... $ 892.00 $ 1,191.59
February........
March............
April._.............
May.......... ...
June.......... ......
July................
August............
September......
October..........
November......
December ......
Total......
Discount.............
899.50
1,101.50
876.50
877.50
1,087.50
877.50
889.50
1,045-00
856.00
865.00
1,082.00
$ 11,349.50
444.93
564.76
354.76
382.76
372.76
354.76
392.76
382.76
354.76
380.01
535.51
$ 5,712.12
120.80
$ 5,591.32
456_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______
Summary of Receipts, Etc., for Two Years:
1914
Market Fees Collected by Clerk .. $ 3,679.20
Market Rents Collected by Clerk 11,349.50
Market Rents Collected by City
Marshal........................................ 5,591.32
Total Collections for 1914.............. $20,620.02
Total Collections for 1913.............. 19,948.13
Increase in Revenues ..................... $ 671.89
Expenses 1913.................................. 8,768.36
Expenses 1914.................................. 8,457.98
Decrease in Expenses 1914............ $ 310.38
Increase in Net Income for 1914.... $ 982.27
If the facilities of the Market were improved, there is
no reasonable doubt that the income would increase proportionately and the service to the public at the same time be
greatly bettered.
Special efforts were made during the year to maintain a
higher sanitary standard and it is no exaggeration to say that
conditions around the Market were better than for years.
Steps were taken to have improper measures destroyed,
with good results. Considerable quantities of unsanitary
food were destroyed.
The Clerk has had the continued aid of the Market Committee in all efforts to improve the conditions in and out of the
Market and in every step to bring about betterments the Committee has encouraged and assisted him.
Very respectfully,
GEORGE LEWIN,
Clerk of Market.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 457
BUILDING INSPECTOR'S REPORT
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. R. J. DAVANT, Mayor
City.
Dear Sir:
I beg to hand you Report for this office for the year 1914:
Number of Permits Issued in 1914........ 714
Number of Buildings Completed.......... 661
Number of Buildings Carried Over...... 25
Number of Buildings Not Built............ 68
282 Two-Story Frame Buildings (cost) ..................$ 588,800
429 One-Story Frame Buildings................................ 211,250
7 Two-Story Brick Veneered.-.............................. 49,450
8 Two-Story Brick Buildings................................ 34,800
86 Remodeled Two-Story Frame Buildings.......... 54,410
7 One-Story Frame Churches................................ 3,300
1 One-Story Frame (and basement) Church ...... 10,000
2 Brick One-Story Car Barns................................ 20,000
4 One-Story Brick Warehouses.............................. 3,450
3 One-Story Brick Dwellings................................ 1,650
2 One-Story Brick Machine Shops...................... 7,000
1 Two-Story Brick School House.......................... 50,000
1 One-Story Granite Bank.................................... 75,000
1 Two-Story Brick Library.................................... 12,000
1 Brick Artillery Armory........................................ 65,000
35 One-Story Frame Garages.................................. 5,050
13 One-Story Frame Stables.................................. 1,100
5 One-Story Frame Warehouses........................... 12,900
17 Buildings Moved................................................ 4,995
458 _____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ^____
1 Three-Story Brick Building Moved (35 feet).. $ 2,000
34 One-Story Frame Buildings Repaired.............. 5,215
10 Two-Story Frame Apartments.......................... 43,750
32 New Porches on Frame Buildings...................... 8,500
7 Three-Story Brick Remodeled............................ 16,200
3 New Three-Story Brick Buildings... ................ 78,000
18 Two-Story Brick Buildings Remodeled............ 19,860
Total............................................................. $1,383.680
40 Buildings Brought Over from 1910 to
December 31, 1914.............................................. $ 502,800
Very respectfully,
JOHN R. EASON,
Building Inspector.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 45ft
REPORT OP THE HARBOR MASTER
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1915.
Hon. RICHARD J. DAVANT, Mayor,
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:
I submit herewith Statements showing the number of
vessels arriving at this port during the year 1914, giving the
net tonnage of same, also amount collected for harbor fees.
The inland steamers and small craft plying local waters, of
which there are quite a number, are not included in the statements.
Included in the American steamers, there are five vessels
with a net tonnage of 10,996 tons that took cargoes to foreign
ports.
Respectfully submitted,
THOMAS H. LAIRD,
Harbor Master.
Coastwise sailing vessels and barges handling solid cargoes
in and out of the Port of Savannah during the year 1914.
Inward Cargoes
3 Vessels.......................... 2,715 Tons................Brick
59 Vessels.......................... 61,658 Tons...............Coal
8 Vessels......................... 6,152 Tons.........,......Cement
9 Vessels.......................... 4,597 Tons................Fertilizer
2 Vessels.......................... 1,210 Tons................Gravel
7 Vessels.......................... 5,653 Tons................Salt
7 Vessels.........-..-.-.-.- 11,016 Tons................Stone(crushed)
95 93,001
460 _______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Outward Cargoes
27 Vessels With 473,456 Cross Ties 21,055,606 Feet Lumber
1 Vessel With Piling...................... 400,000 Feet Lumber
54 Vessels With Lumber.................. 26,964,816 Feet Lumber
82 48,420,422
Vessels Arriving at Savannah During Year 1914
MONTH
1914
January... -----
April.. .........
May... ------- .
July...........
September.-.-..
October _ .-.-.
Totals.....
American
Steamera
No.
56
58
53
60
62
63
63
63
61
65
58
58
720
Tons
164.320
145467
156,636
145,129
151,543
149,100
148,336
149,225
142,822
157,924
147.306
142,773
1,800,581
American
Sail
No.
10
9
6
8
7
12
9
4
12
7
13
10
107
Tons
7,407
6,283
4,592
5,310
4,167
6,912
5,852
3,776
8,120
4,413
7,517
5,838
70,187
Foreign
Steamers
No.
35
30
29
21
22
27
20
14
15
15
25
30
283
Tona
89,357
68,342
67,567
48,153
59,507
61,335
47,103
33,578
26,782
30,135
49,643
58,905
640,407
Foreign
Sail
No
1
--
-
1
Ton
860
...
860
Tugs
No
1
1
1
1
2
1
7

Tona
269
246
269
269
592
269
1,914
Bargea
No
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
3
3
16
Tons
922
922
922
1,605
3,456
922
1,844
2,766
2,748
16,107
Harbor
Feea
$660,00
597.00
539.38
485.00
424.00
543.32
468.22
342.00
381.60
372,00
443.00
838.24
6,093.76
Foreign Veaaels
By Nationality
Austrian....... .
Belgian .........
British.-. .......
Dutch-.-.--....
Greek ........
Norwegian- _ ...
Spanish-..-.---.-
Total.........
No.
6
7
162
13
17
23
1
32
6
6
9
1
283
Net
Tana
18,912
15,845
387.906
19,615
39,527
49,984
1,736
62,607
13,289
11,408
16,604
2,974
640,407
3
I
Recapitulation1,003 Steamers, 2,440,988 Tona; 108 Sail Vessels, 71,047 Tons; 7 Tugs, 1,914 Tons; 16 Barges,
16,107 Tons. Making a Grand Total of 1,134 Vessels with 2,530,056 Net Tons.

ORDINANCES
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
TOGETHER WITH
IMPORTANT RESOLUTIONS, COMMUNICATIONS
AND REPORTS
ADOPTED DURING THE YEAR
1914
Compiled By
THOMAS HALLIGAN
ClcrJk of Council

ORDINANCES
Automobiles, Motorcycles and Other Vehicles
By Committee on Police:
An ordinance to amend "An ordinance to regulate automobiles, motorcycles and other vehicles in the city of Savannah, to provide for the registration of automobiles, motorcycles and similar vehicles; to prescribe rules regulating traffic
upon the streets and lanes of said city and for other purposes,"
approved September 17, 1913.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled,That "An ordinance
to regulate automobiles, motorcycles and other vehicles, in the
city of Savannah, to provide for the registration of automobiles, motorcycles and similar vehicles, to prescribe rules
regulating traffic upon the streets and lanes of said city, and
for other purposes," approved September 17, 1913, be, and
the same is hereby, amended by striking from the first section of said ordinance the words "31st day of January" and
inserting in lieu thereof the words "1st day of March;" so
that the first section of said ordinance when so amended
shall read as follows:
"Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That every person, firm or corporation owning, using or operating, within
the corporate limits of the city of Savannah, upon the streets
and lanes thereof, any automobile, motorcycle, or other vehicle or conveyance of like character, whether propelled by
gasoline, steam, electricity or other motive power, shall register
the state license number with the clerk of council of the city
466_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
of Savannah within sixty (60) days after the passage of this
ordinance and at the time of first operation and each year
thereafter, not later than the 1st day of March. Provided, that
the provisions of this section shall not apply to persons passing through the city of Savannah, or visiting said city for a
period of thirty (30) days or less.
"A special book shall be kept by the clerk of council for
the purpose of registration of said machines, which registry
shall show the name and street address of the owner and number assigned by the state, and the make, style and kind of
such automobile."
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and the
same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed in Council January 21, 1914.
Dealers in Motorcycles
By Committee on Finance:
An ordinance to amend the tax ordinance for the year
1914, as to dealers in motorcycles, or agents for the sale of
same, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, and it is hereby
ordained by authority of the same, That the clause having reference to fixing the sum to be paid as a license for "dealers in
locomobiles, automobiles, motorcycles, etc.," in the ordinance
to assess and levy taxes and raise revenue for the city of Savannah, etc., adopted December 24,1913, be, and the same is hereby, amended by striking from said clause the word "motorcycles," and adding at the end of said clause the following:
"Dealers in motorcycles and all other such vehicles, or agents
for the sale of same, $50," so that said clause when so amended
shall read as follows: "Dealers in locomobiles, automobiles
and all other such vehicles, or agents for the sale of same, $100.
_____ ____MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 467
Dealers in motorcycles and all other such vehicles, or agents
for the sale of same, $50."
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
the same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed in Council January 21, 1914.
Automobiles, Hacks, Etc.Rates
By Alderman Schroder:
An ordinance to prescribe fares and rates to be charged
by automobiles, hacks and all other passenger and baggage
vehicles in the city of Savannah; to provide a penalty for the
violation thereof and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That it shall
not be lawful for any person, or persons, engaged in driving a
public automobile, hack, omnibus, wagonette, or other vehicle for hire, within the limits of the city of Savannah, to
charge more than the following rates:
(a) Within the district bounded on the east by Randolph
street (including Tybee depot and yards); then to Liberty
street; west on Liberty street to East Broad street; East Broad
street south to Gwinnett street, east on Gwinnett street to
Atlantic avenue; then south to 40th street; then west to West
Boundary street (including the Brinson Railroad and Laurel
Grove cemetery) the rate of transporting passengers, by all
horse-drawn vehicles, from one point to another, within the
said boundaries, shall not exceed twenty-five cents for each
passenger, provided, however, that the rate for transporting
passengers from above named limits to the wharves of either
the Ocean Steamship Company, or the Merchants & Miners
Transportation Company, shall not exceed twenty-five cents
for each passenger.
468 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
(b) All public automobiles or other motor-driven vehicles
for hire, shall not charge in the said district in excess of fifty
cents for one or two passengers, and twenty-five cents for each
additional passenger carried.
(c) Within the corporate limits of the city, lying outside
of the district hereinbefore described, the rate for all horsedrawn vehicles shall not exceed fifty cents for one passenger,
with a charge not to exceed twenty-five cents for each additional passenger.
(d) Within the corporate limits of the city, lying outside
of the district hereinbefore described, the rate for all public
automobiles, or motor-driven vehicles shall not exceed seventyfive cents for one or two passengers, with a charge not to exceed twenty-five cents for each additional passenger carried.
(e) For five-seated automobiles used within the corporate
limits of the city of Savannah, the rate shall not exceed $3.00
per hour. For seven-seated automobiles, the rate shall not
exceed $4.00 per hour. For one-horse cabs, or hacks, the rate
shall not exceed $1.00 per hour. For two-horse hacks or cabs,
the rate shall not exceed $1.50 for the first hour and shall not
exceed $1.25 for each hour thereafter.
(f) Hourly charges shall apply from the time the vehicle
arrives at the place ordered until the passenger releases the
same.
(g) Within the district described in paragraph "a," the
rate for transferring, moving and delivering trunks and all
other baggage, with the exception of hand baggage, shall not
exceed twenty-five cents.
(h) Within the corporate limits of the city lying outside
of the district hereinbefore described the rate for moving, transferring and delivering all trunks and baggage, with the exception of hand baggage, shall not exceed fifty cents for each trunk.
(i) There shall be no extra charge for hand baggage taken
by any passenger or passengers in any of the public vehicles
for hire.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That any person or persons violating the provisions of this ordinance shall upon con-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 469
viction before a police court of the city of Savannah be subject
to a fine not to exceed twenty-five ($25.00) dollars, and imprisonment not to exceed ten (10) days, either or both, in the
discretion of the court.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed April 15, 1914.
Fares and Rates by Automobiles and Hacks
By Alderman Schroder:
An ordinance to amend an ordinance adopted by council
April 15, 1914, entitled "An ordinance to prescribe fares and
rates to be charged by automobiles, hacks and all other passenger and baggage vehicles in the city of Savannah; to provide a penalty for the violation thereof, and for other purposes."
Section 1. Be it ordained by the the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the ordinance adopted by council April 15, 1914, entitled "An ordinance to prescribe fares and rates to be charged by automobiles, hacks and all other passenger and baggage vehicles
in the city of Savannah; to provide a penalty for the violation
thereof, and for other purposes," be and the same is hereby,
amended by striking from said ordinance sub-section (a) of
section 1 and inserting in lieu thereof, the following:
(a) Within the district bounded as follows: Commencing at the foot or northern end of Randolph street and running
south on Randolph street to Liberty street (including Tybee
depot and yards) thence west on Liberty street to East Broad
street; thence south on East Broad street to Gwinnett street
thence east on Gwinnett street to Atlantic avenue; thence
south on Atlantic avenue to Fortieth street; thence west on
Fortieth street to West Boundary street; thence north along
the western line of West Boundary street (including the Brin-
470_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
son Railroad and Laurel Grove cemetery) to Bay street;
thence west along Bay street to Water street; thence north
along Water street to Savannah river; thence east along the
line of the Savannah river to the point of beginning; the rate
of transporting passengers, by all horse-drawn vehicles, from
one point to another, within said boundaries shall not exceed
twenty-five cents for each passenger.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 22, 1914.
Awards of Drainage Bonds Annulled
By Finance Committee:
Whereas, the resolution passed by council on August 9,1911,
calling for an issuance of $600,000.00 face value of bonds, to
be used for the extension and completion of the house drainage and storm sewerage system of the city of Savannah requires that a serial bond be issued, and,
Whereas, the finance committee did, on January 20, 1914,
award bonds in the principal amount above stated, to the respective successful bidders as straight thirty-year bonds, therefore,
Be it resolved, by the mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah, in council assembled, That the respective awards
of the finance committee, made January 20, 1914, to the respective successful bidders, which awards were submitted to
council on the 21st day of January, 1914, and approved, be,
and the same are hereby, vacated and declared null and void.
Adopted and Approved March 18, 1914.
To Destroy Annulled Drainage Bonds
By Finance Committee:
Whereas, the resolution passed in council on August 9,
1911, calling for an election by the people for the issuance of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 471
$600,000.00 face value of bonds, to be used for the extension of
and completion of the house drainage and storm sewerage
systems of the city of Savannah, called for a serial issue of
bonds, and,
Whereas, bonds to the amount above stated have been
issued as straight thirty-year bonds, therefore,
Be it resolved, by the mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah, in council assembled, That the finance committee
and the city treasurer be, and they are hereby, authorized
and directed to destroy 750 bonds, dated February 1, 1914,
divided into 300 bonds of $500.00 each, face value, and 450
bonds of $1,000.00 each, face value, aggregating $600,000.00
issued for house drainage and storm sewerage system under the resolution of council of August 9, 1911, calling
for an election by the people to authorize the issuance of $600,-
000.00, the proceeds of the sale of said bonds to be used and
applied to the extension and completion of the house drainage
and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah.
Be it further resolved, That the finance committee is
hereby clothed with full power and authority to carry out the
provisions in regard to the destruction of the bonds above referred to, and if any of said bonds are outstanding, the said
finance committee is authorized and directed to pay the face
value of same to the holder, with interest to date of delivery
to the city.
Adopted and Approved March 18, 1914.
House Drainage Plans
By Alderman Kayton:
Resolved, by the mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah, in council assembled, That the plans and specifications for the extensions of the house drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah be, and they are hereby,
referred to the committee of the whole for consideration.
Adopted and Approved.
Passed August 5, 1914.
472_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Drainage CommissionRepealing All
Ordinances Referring To
By the Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to repeal all ordinances referring to the
drainage commissioners of the city of Savannah, and for
other purposes.
Whereas, the Honorable Walter G. Charlton, judge of the
superior court of Chatham county, has decided that the board
of drainage commissioners of the city of Savannah was created without authority of law, and,
Whereas, a writ of ouster has been signed by the Honorable Walter G. Charlton, directed to the board of drainage
commissioners, and,
Whereas certain ordinances have been passed, adopted
and approved by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, in reference to the creation, organization, jurisdiction, duties and powers of the said board
of drainage commissioners, therefore,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That an ordinance
adopted and approved on the 18th day of October, 1911, entitled "An ordinance to create and organize a board of drainage commissioners for the city of Savannah, to define its
jurisdiction, duties and powers, and for other purposes," be,
and the same is hereby, repealed.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That an ordinance
adopted and approved on the 15th day of November, 1911,
and entitled "An ordinance to amend section 3 of an ordinance entitled 'An ordinance to create and organize a board
of drainage commissioners for the city of Savannah, to define
its jurisdiction, duties and powers, and for other purposes,
adopted and approved October 18, 1911, by adding after the
word 'adopted' where it occurs in the tenth line of section 3
of said ordinance the words 'provided that the plan or system
adopted shall provide for trunk sewers sufficient to serve the
entire city limits and so constructed that they can be extended
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 473
when required, beyond the present corporate limits, and provided, further, that it shall provide for laterals over the entire city
limits, except unpopulated districts or where tracts are unsub divided, or are lacking streets and lanes for the location
of sewers, and for other purposes," be, and the same is hereby,
repealed.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That an ordinance
adopted and approved the 17th day of December, 1912, entitled "An ordinance to approve the plan for the completion
of the house drainage and storm sewerage system of the city
of Savannah, adopted by the board of drainage commissioners for the city of Savannah, and this day submitted by
said board to the mayor and aldermen of the said city for their
approval, and for other purposes," be, and the same is hereby,
repealed.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That an ordinance adopted and approved on May 13, 1914, entitled "An ordinance to
authorize and direct the drainage commission to reject all bids
received for the extension and completion of the house drainage and storm sewerage system of the city of Savannah; to
prepare plans, profiles and specifications to submit to council
for its approval, showing the work most necessary to be done
within the limits of funds available under the bond issue
for said work, and the material to be used in the construction
of said house drainage and storm sewerage system; to advertise for a period of thirty (30) days for bids upon the plans and
specifications, after approval by council; to transmit to council all bids received with a recommendation for the awarding
of contract or contracts; to authorize and direct the mayor to
execute contracts to the successful bidder or bidders; and for
other purposes," be, and the same is hereby, repealed.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That an ordinance
adopted and approved on the 27th day of May, 1914, entitled
"An ordinance to terminate the tenure of office and term of
service ofc the members of the board of drainage commissioners of the city of Savannah, to provide for the appointment
of their successors, and for other purposes," be, and the same
is hereby, repealed.
474 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Section 6. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances,
rules and regulations referring to the board of drainage commissioners of the city of Savannah be, and the same are hereby,
repealed and declared of no effect, null and void.
Section 7. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Passed August 14, 1914.
Approving Drainage Plans and Specifications
The committee of the whole, to which was referred by
your honorable body the plans and specifications for the extension of the house drainage and storm sewerage systems of
the city of Savannah, respectfully report and recommend as
follows:
Your committee had made a thorough investigation of
the plans and specifications and are convinced that the work
provided for therein is the most necessary to be done and your
committee respectfully recommends the passage of an ordinance approving said plans and specifications and directing
that bids be advertised for, for a period of thirty (30) days.
Your committee further recommends the passage of a
resolution authorizing and empowering His Honor, the Mayor,
to appoint a committee to be known as the committee for
the extension and completion of the house drainage and
storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah.
R. J. DAVANT
Chairman Committee of the Whole.

Adopted and Approved.
Passed August 14, 1914.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 475
Approving Drainage Plans and Specifications
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to approve the plans and specifications for
the extension of the house drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the plans and
specifications this day submitted to the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah in council assembled, by the committee of the whole, be, and the same are hereby, approved.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the clerk of council be authorized and directed to advertise for bids for the work
to be done, under said plans and specifications this day submitted, for a period of thirty (30) days, said advertisement to
begin on the 21st day of August, 1914.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Passed August 14, 1914.
BondsHouse Drainage and Storm Sewerage
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to provide for the issuance of $600,000 face
value in bonds of the city of Savannah, the proceeds of
the sale of said bonds to be used for the extension
and completion of the house drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah, including such extensions of the
waterworks system of said city as are made necessary by the
plans of the said house drainage and storm sewerage systems;
and to provide for the assessment and colletion of an annual
tax to pay the interest on said bond issue of $600,000; to
provide for the annual maturity of bonds in consonance
with the resolution passed by the mayor and aldermen of the
476 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
city of Savannah, in council assembled, on the 9th day of
August, 1911, and for other purposes.
Whereas, on December 6, 1911, an election called by
the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council
assembled, by resolution adopted August 9, 1911, was held by
the qualified voters of the city of Savannah under the terms
and provisions of an act of the legislature of Georgia approved
October 14, 1879, to be found on pages 40 and 41 of the Georgia laws for the years 1878-79 and embodied in Article 1, Chapter 3, Volume 1 of the code of the state of Georgia (1911,) to
determine the question whether the city of Savannah would
incur a debt by the issuance of bonds to the amount of $600,-
000 face value, the proceeds of the sale of said bonds to be used
for the extension and completion of the house drainage and
storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah, including
such extensions of the waterworks system of said city as are
made necessary by the plans of the said house drainage and
storm sewerage systems, the said election having been held at
the court house in and for the county of Chatham and state of
Georgia, under rules and regulations governing elections of the
mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, and under provisions of law relating to municipal elections as amended by an
act of the legislature of Georgia, approved August 15, 1910,
entitled "An act to provide for the registration of voters prior
to any municipal election in the city of Savannah, Georgia,
touching the issuance of its municipal bonds; to make all
needful rules and regulations for the same, and to require that
no person be permitted to vote unless registered, and for other
purposes," notice of said election as required by law having
been given for the space of thirty days next preceding the day
of election in the Savannah Morning News, the newspaper in
which the sheriff's advertisements for the county of Chatham
are published; and whereas, the said resolution calling said
election provided that said issue of bonds should be divided
into three hundred bonds of five hundred ($500) each, and
four hundred and fifty bonds of one thousand dollars ($1,000)
each, face value, payable within thirty years from their date,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 477
and bearing interest, payable semi-annually, at the rate of
four and one-half per cent per annum, and whereas, the said
resolution provided that said bonds should be paid and retired
as follows: By the expiration of the first year of their life, five
thousand, five hundred dollars ($5,500.00) face value, of said
bonds should be paid and retired, and each and every year
thereafter an increase of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) face
value, of bonds over and above the previous amount of bonds
retired shall be paid and retired; that is to say, the second annual payment shall include and retire bonds of the face value
of six thousand, five hundred dollars ($6,500.00) and the third
annual payment shall include and retire bonds of the face value
of seven thousand, five hundred ($7,500.00) and so on, the payments adding each year one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) of
the face value of the bonds to the number last paid and retired,
thus retiring all of the bonds by their maturity; and whereas,
the said resolution further provided that a sinking fund should
be established for the purpose of carrying out said plan of payment and retirement of said bonds, and whereas the result of
said election was declared on December 13, 1911, by the said
the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council
assembled, the officers calling or ordering the election, in the presence of and together with the several managers, who brought
up the election returns; and whereas, the said election resulted
in favor of the issuance of said bonds, and whereas, the Honorable Walter G. Charlton, judge of the superior court of the
Eastern judicial circuit of Georgia, did, on January 10,1912,
as provided by law, render a judgment confirming and
validating the issuance of the said bonds; now therefore,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, under the authority aforesaid, That the said mayor and alderman of the city of
Savannah for the purpose of extending and completing the
house drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city
of Savannah, including such extensions of the waterworks
system of the said city as are made necessary by the plans of
the said house drainage and storm sewerage systems, shall
478 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
issue bonds of the city of Savannah to the principal amount of
$600,000.00 face value, and said issue is hereby fully authorized. The said issue of bonds shall be divided into three hundred bonds of five hundred dollars ($500.00) face value, and
four hundred and fifty bonds of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00)
face value, each. The said bonds shall bear date of issue,
April 15, 1914, and shall be payable in gold coin or its equivalent, shall bear interest at the rate of four and one-half (4J4)
per cent per annum, payable semi-annually, and this interest
shall be represented by coupons attached to said bonds. Said
coupons shall be lithographed or engraved with a fac-simile
of the signature of the city treasurer. Interest on said bonds
shall be payable in the cities of New York and Savannah at
the option of the holder. The proceeds from the sale of said
bonds shall be used by the city of Savannah for said extension
and completion of the house drainage and storm sewerage
systems of the city of Savannah, including such extensions of
the waterworks system of said city as are made necessary by
the plans of the said house drainage and storm sewerage systems.
Section 2. Be it further, ordained, That a tax shall be
levied, assessed and collected annually on all taxable property
in the city of Savannah, sufficient in amount to pay the
principal and interest at their respective maturities of the
said $600,000.00 house drainage and storm sewerage systems
bonds; the said bond shall mature, be paid and retired as follows: By the expiration of the first year of their life, $5,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on
the 15th day of April, 1915, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$5,500-00 face value shall show principal due one year from
date of issue, with coupons attached for one years' interest.
Each and every year thereafter, an increase of $1,000.00
face value of bonds, over and above the previous amount of
bonds retired, shall be paid and retired.
By the expiration of the second year of their life, $6,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of April, 1916, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $6,500
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________479
shell show principal due two year's from date of issue, with
coupons attached for two years' interest.
By the expiration of the third year of their life, $7,500,00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of April, 1917, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $7,
500.00 shall show principal due three years from date of issue,
with coupons attached for three years' interest.
By the expiration of the fourth year of their life, $8,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of April, 1918, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $8,500.
shall show principal due four years from date of issue, with
coupons attached for four years' interest.
By the expiration of the fifth year of their life, $9,500.00
face value of said bonds, shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of April, 1919, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $9,-
500.00, shall show principal due five years from date of issue,
with coupons attached for five years' interest.
By the expiration of the sixth year of their life, $10,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
of April, 1920, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $10,500.00
shall show principal due six years from date of issue, with
coupons attached for six years' interest.
By the expiration of the seventh year of their life, $11,500
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of April, 1921, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $11,500
shall show principal due seven years from date of issue,
with coupons attached for seven years' interest.
By the expiration of the eighth year of their life, $12,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of April, 1922, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $12,-
500.00, shall show principal due eight years from date of issue,
with coupons attached for eight years' interest.
By the expiration of the ninth year of their life, $13,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of April, 1923, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $13,-
500.00, shall show principal due nine years from date of issue,
with coupons attached for nine years' interest.
480 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
By the expiration of the tenth year of their life, $14,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired, on the
15th day of April, 1924, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$14,500.00 shall show principal due ten years from date of
issue, with coupons attached for ten years' interest.
By the expiration of the eleventh year of their life, $15,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired, on
the 15tb day of April, 1925, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$15,500.00 shall show principal due eleven years from date of
issue, with coupons attached for eleven years' interest.
By the expiration of the twelfth year of their life, $16,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the
15th day of April, 1926, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $16,-
500.00 shall show principal due twelve years from date of
issue, with coupons attached for twelve years' interest.
By the expiration of the thirteenth year of their life, $17,~
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on
the 15th day of April, 1927, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$17,500.00, shall show principal due thirteen years from date
of issue, with coupons attached for thirteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the fourteenth year of their life $18,-
500.00 face value of said vonds shall be paid and retired on the
15th day of April, 1928, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $18,-
500.00 shall show principal due fourteen years from date of
issue, with coupons attached for fourteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the fifteenth year of their life, $19,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the
15th day of April, 1929, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$19,500.00 shall show principal due fifteen years from date of
issue, with coupons attached for fifteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the sixteenth year of their life, $20,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the
15th day of April, 1930, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$20,500.00 shall show principal due sixteen years from date
of issue, with coupons attached for sixteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the seventeenth year of their life,
$21,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 481
on the 15th day of April, 1931, and said amount of bonds, towit: $21,500.00 shall show principal due seventeen years from
date of issue, with coupons attached for seventeen years' interest.
By the expiration of the eighteenth year of their life,
$22,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1932, and said amount of bonds, towit: $22,500.00, shall show principal due eighteen years from
date of issue, with coupons attached for eighteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the nineteenth year of their life, $23,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the
15th day of April, 1933, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$23,500.00 shall show principal due nineteen years from date
of issue, with coupons attached for nineteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the twentieth year of their life, $24,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the
15th day of April, 1934, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$24,500.00 shall show principal due twenty years from date
of issue, with coupons attached for twenty years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-first year of their life,
$25,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1935, and said amount of bonds, towit: $25,500.00, shall show principal due twenty-one years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-one
years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-second year of their life,
$26,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1936, and said amount of bonds, towit: $26,500.00 shall show principal due twenty-two years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-two
years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-third year of their life,
$27,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1937, and said amount of bonds, towit: $27,500.00 shall show principal due twenty-three years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty three
years' interest.
16
482 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
By the expiration of the twenty-fourth year of their life,
$28,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1938, andsaid amount of bonds, towit: $28,500.00 shall show principal due twenty-four years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-four
years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-fifth year of their life,
$29,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1939, and said amount of bonds, towit: $29,500.00, shall show principal due twenty-five years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-five years'
interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-sixth year of their life,
$30,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1940, and said amount of bonds, towit: $30,500.00 shall show principal due twenty-six years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-six years'
interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-seventh year of their life,
$31,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1941, and said amount of bonds, towit: $31,500.00 shall show principal due twenty-seven years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-seven
years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-eighth year of their life,
$32,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1942, and said amount of bonds, towit: $32,500.00, shall show principal due twenty-eight years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-eight
years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-ninth year of their life,
$33,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of April, 1943, and said amount of bonds, towit: $33,500.00, shall show principal due twenty-nine years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty-nine
years' interest.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 483
By the expiration of the thirtieth year of their life, $34,-
500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on
the 15th day of April, 1944, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$34,500.00, shall show principal due thirty years from date of
issue, with coupons attached for thirty years' interest.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That the mayor and
aldermen of the city of Savannah, and the finance committee
of said city, are hereby clothed with full power and authority
touching the sale and delivery of said bonds, either as a whole,
or in such amounts and from time to time, as they may deem
best; either at private or public sale, with or without advertisement, as in their judgment is in accord with the best interest of the-city; and they are further clothed with full power
and authority, touching all other matters appertaining to the
issuance, form and disposition of said bonds, not herein specifically provided.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That this ordinance and
the provisions hereof, relative to the expiration, retirement and
maturity of said indebtedness, shall be, and is hereby, made a
contract by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah,
with any and all persons holding any or all of said bonds, representing said indebtedness.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed April 1, 1914.
Report of Finance Committee Relative to
Sale of Bonds
Savannah, Ga., May 27, 1914.
The Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah,
Savannah, Ga.
Gentlemen:
The Finance Committee, after careful deliberation in regard to the awarding of the $600,000.00 bond issue, as serial
484 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
maturities, for the extension and completion of the house
drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah,
respectfully report that they have endeavored to preserve the
original status of the former successful bidders, when the bonds
were awarded as straight thirty-year bonds, which award has
been declared invalid by your honorable body, and with this
end in view, after considering the bids of the New York Life
Insurance Company and the Security Trust Company (the
two largest bidders on the straight issue,) respectfully recommend to council that the bid of the Security Trust Company,
of Spartanburg, S. C-, of $604,797.00 for the entire issue, be
accepted.
The Security Trust Company has agreed that they will
tender to all of the former successful purchasers the amount of
bonds formerly alotted to them on the same basis that each
formerly bid, giving them a pro rata amount of the serial maturities, and if the alottment can not be pro rated through each
maturity, that an average maturity will be tendered each
party.
We respectfully recommend that a resolution be passed,
formally awarding to the Security Trust Company, of' Spartanburg, S. C., the entire issue of $600,000.00 bonds for the
extension and completion of the house drainage and storm
sewerage systems of the city of Savannah, as serial maturities,
for the sum of $604,797.00.
Respectfully submitted,
W. J. PIERPONT, Chairman.
Adopted and Approved.
House Drainage
By Committee on Finance:
An ordinance to repeal section 3 of an ordinance adopted
and approved by council December 17,1912, entitled "An ordi-
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___ 485
nance to approve the plan for the completion of the house
drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah,
adopted by the board of drainage commissioners for the city
of Savannah, and this day submitted by said board to the
mayor and aldermen of said city for its approval, and for other
purposes."
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That section 3 of
the ordinance read in council for the first time on December 17,
1912, by consent placed upon its passage and adopted and approved on said date, said ordinance being entitled "An ordinance to approve the plan for the completion of the house
drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah,
adopted by the board of drainage commissioners for the city
of Savannah, and this day submitted by said board to the
mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah for its approval,
and for other purposes," be, and the same is hereby, repealed.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed May 13, 1914.
Drainage Commission
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to authorize and direct the drainage commission to reject all bids received for the extension and completion of the house drainage and storm sewerage systems of the
city of Savannah; to prepare plans, profiles and specifications
to submit to council for its approval, showing the work most
necessary to be done within the amount of funds available under
the bond issue for said work, and the material to be used in the
construction of said house drainage and storm sewerage systems; to advertise for a period of thirty (30) days for bids upon
the plans and specifications, after approval by council; to trans-
486_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
mit to council all bids received with a recommendation for the
awarding of contract or contracts; to authorize and direct the
mayor to execute contracts to the successful bidder or bidders,
and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the drainage
commission be, and they are hereby, authorized and directed
to reject all bids received for the construction of the extension
of the house drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city
of Savannah.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the drainage commission be, and they are hereby authorized and directed to
submit to council for its approval, at the next regular meeting
of council, to be held on the 27th day of May, 1914, plans and
profiles for such work as is most necessary to be done, for the
extension of the house drainage and storm sewerage systems
of the city of Savannah, which will come within the amount
of funds available under the bond issue for the construction of
such work.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That the said drainage
commission be, and they are hereby, authorized and directed
to submit to council, for its approval, at the next meeting of
council, to be held on the 27th day of May, 1914, detailed and
complete specifications, in which will be shown the amount
and character of each class of material which will be used in
the construction of said extension of house drainage and storm
sewerage systems.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That after the approval
and adoption by council of said plans, profiles and specifications, the drainage commission be, and they are hereby,
authorized and directed to advertise for bids upon such plans
and specifications for a period of thirty (30) days.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That after the receipt
and opening of bids for work to be done on said house drainage
and storm sewerage systems, the drainage commission be, and
they are hereby, authorized and directed to transmit to council all bids with their recommendation as to the awarding of
said work.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________487
Section 6. Be it further ordained, That after the adoption
and approval by council of the recommendation of the drainage commission, His Honor, the Mayor, be authorized and
directed to execute contract or contracts to the successful
bidder or bidders.
Section 7. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed May 13, 1914.
Drainage Commission
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to terminate the tenure of office and term
of service of the members of the board of drainage commissioners of the city of Savannah; to provide for the appointment of their successors, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the tenure of
office and term of service of the members of the board of drainage commissioners of the city of Savannah is hereby terminated, and the offices of the drainage commissioners are
hereby declared vacant and the present incumbency of said
board shall have no right or authority, after the passage of
this ordinance, to hold their respective offices, or to discharge
any of the duties thereof.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the mayor be,
and he is hereby, authorized and directed to appoint, subject
to the approval of council, the successors of said drainage
commissioners, who shall hold office during the continuance
of the board of drainage commissioners, which shall be until
the completion of the work for the extension of the house
drainage and storm sewerage systems of the city of Savannah.
The said commissioners shall have all the powers, rights and
duties of the commissioners created by an ordinance of the
18th day of October, 1911.
488_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed May 27, 1914.
Auditorium Bonds
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to provide for the issuance of $200,000.00
face value in bonds of the city of Savannah, the proceeds of
the sale of said bonds to be used for the purchase of a site for
and the erection of a public auditorium; to provide for the assessment and collection of an annual tax to pay the principal
and interest of said bond issue of $200,000.00; to provide for
the annual maturity of the bonds in consonance with a resolution passed by mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah
in council assembled on the 23rd day of May, 1913, and for
other purposes.
Whereas, on the 15th day of September, 1913, an election called by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah
in council assembled, by resolution adopted and approved on
the 28th day of May, 1913, was held by the qualified voters of
the city of Savannah under the terms and provisions of the
act of the legislature of Georgia approved October 14,1879, to
be found on pages 40 and 41 of the Georgia laws for the years
1878-9, and embodied in article 1, chapter 3, volume 1 of the
Code of the State of Georgia (1910), to determine the question
whether the city of Savannah would incur a debt by the issuance of bonds to the amount of $200,000.00 face value, the
proceeds of the sale of said bonds to be used for the purchase
of a site for and the erection of a public auditorium, the said election having been held at the court house in and for the county
of Chatham and state of Georgia, under the rules and regulations governing elections of the mayor and aldermen of the
city of Savannah, and under the provisions of law relating to
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 489
municipal elections as amended by an act of the legislature of
Georgia, approved August 15, 1910, entitled:
"An act to provide for the registration of voters prior to
any municipal election in the city of Savannah, Ga., touching
the issuance of its municipal bonds; to make all necessary rules
and regulations for the same, and to require that no person be
permitted to vote unless registered, and for other purposes."
Notice of said election, as required by law, having been
given for the space of thirty days next preceding the date of
the election in the Savannah Morning News, the newspaper in
which the sheriff's advertisements for the county of Chatham
are published; and
Whereas, the said resolution calling said election provided
that said issue of bonds should be divided into 400 bonds of
$500.00 each face value, payable within twenty-five years from
their date, and bearing interest, payable semi-annually, at the
rate of 4>4 per cent per annum; and,
Whereas, the said resolution provided that said bonds
should be paid and retired as follows:
By the expiration of the first year of their life $2,000.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired, and each and
every year thereafter an increase of $500.00 face value of bonds
over and above the previous amount of bonds retired shall be
paid and retired; that is to say, the second annual payment
shall include and retire bonds of the face value of $2,500.00;
the third annual payment shall include and retire bonds of the
face value of $3,000.00, and so on, the payments adding each
year $500.00 of the face value of bonds to the number retired
the preceding year, thus retiring all the bonds by their maturity; and,
Whereas, the said resolution further provided that a sinking fund should be established for the purpose of carrying out
said plan of payment and retirement of said bonds, and,
Whereas, the result of said election was declared on the
17th day of September, 1913, by the said mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, the officers calling or ordering the election, in the presence of and together
490 ___ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
with the several managers who brought up the election returns; and,
Whereas, the said election resulted in favor of the issuance
of said bonds; and,
Whereas, the judgment of the court validating said bonds
was appealed to the supreme court of the state of Georgia; and,
Whereas, the Honorable Walter G. Charlton, judge of the
superior court of Chatham county, E. J. C. of Georgia, did, on
the 3rd day of November, 1913, as provided by law, render a
judgment confirming and validating the issuance of said
bonds; and,
Whereas, the supreme court of the state of Georgia did
on the 17th day of July, 1914, affirm the judgment of the superior court in validating the said bonds and,
Whereas, the judgment of the supreme court was made
the judgment of the said superior court on the 30th day of
July, 1915. Now, therefore,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah in council assembled, under the authority
aforesaid, That the said mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah, for the purpose of the purchase of a site for and the
erection of a public auditorium, shall issue bonds of the city
of Savannah to the principal sum of $200,000.00 face value and
the said issue is hereby authorized. The said issue of bonds
shall be divided into 400 bonds of $500.00 each face value.
The said bonds shall bear date of issue October 15, 1914,
and shall be payable in gold coin or its equivalent, shall bear
interest at the rate of 4> per cent per annum, payable semiannually on the 15th day of October and April, and this interest shall be represented by coupons attached to said bonds.
Said coupons shall be lithographed or engraved with a facsimile of the signature of the city treasurer. Interest on the
said bonds shall be payable in the cities of New York and Savannah, at the option of the holder. The proceeds from the
sale of said bonds shall be used by the city of Savannah for
the purchase of a site for and the erection of a public auditorium.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 491
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That a tax shall be levied,
assessed and collected annually on all taxable property in the
city of Savannah, sufficient in amount to pay the principal and
interest at their respective maturities of the said $200,000.00
auditorium bonds. Said bonds shall mature, be paid and retired as follows:
By the expiration of the first year of their life $2,000.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1915, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $2,000
face value, shall show principal due one year from date of
issue, with coupons attached for one year's interest. Each
and every year thereafter an increase of $500.00 face value
of bonds over and above the previous amount of bonds retired
shall be paid and retired.
By the expiration of the second year of their life $2,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1916, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$2,500.00 face value, shall show principal due two years from
date of issue, with coupons attached for two years' interest.
By the expiration of the third year of their life $3,000.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1917, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $3,-
000.00 face value, shall show principal due three years from
date of issue, with coupons attached for three years' interest.
By the expiration of the fourth year of their life $3,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1918, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $3,-
500.00 face value, shall show principal due four years from
date of issue, with coupons attached for four years' interest.
By the expiration of the fifth year of their life $4,030.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1919, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $4,-
000.00 face value, shall show principal due five years from date
of issue, with coupons attached for five years' interest.
By the expiration of the sixth year of their life $4,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1920, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $4,-
492 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT .
500.00 face value, shall show principal due six years from date
of issue, with coupons attached for six years' interest.
By the expiration of the seventh year of their life $5,000.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1921, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$5,000.00 face value, shall show principal due seven years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for seven years'
interest.
By the expiration of the eighth year of their life $5,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1922, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $5,-
500.00 face value shall show principal due eight years from date
of issue, with coupons attached for eight years' interest.
By the expiration of the ninth year of their life $6,000.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1923, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $6,000
face value, shall show principal due nine years from date of
issue, with coupons attached for nine years' interest.
By the expiration of the tenth year of their life $6,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1924, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$6,500.00 face value, shall show principal due ten years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for ten years'
interest.
By the expiration of the eleventh year of their life $7,-
000.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the
15th day of October, 1925, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$7,000.00 face value, shall show principal due eleven years from
date of issue with coupons attached for eleven years' interest.
By the expiration of the twelfth year of their life $7,500.00
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1926, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$7,500.00 face value, shall show principal due twelve years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for twelve years'
interest.
By the expiration of the thirteenth year of their life $8,~
000.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 493
15th day of October, 1927, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
18,000.00 face value, shall show principal due thirteen
years from date of issue, with coupons attached for thirteen
years' interest.
By the expiration of the fourteenth year of their life
$8,500.00 face value, of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1928, and said amount of bonds,
to-wit: $8,500.00 face value, shall show principal due for fourteen years' from date of issue, with coupons attached for
fourteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the fifteenth year of their life $9,000
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1929, and said amount of bonds, to-wit: $9,-
000.00 face value, shall show principal due for fifteen years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for fifteen years'
interest.
By the expiration of the sixteenth year of their life $9,500
face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired on the 15th
day of October, 1930, and said amount of bonds, to-wit:
$9,500.00 face value, shall show principal due sixteen years
from date of issue, with coupons attached for sixteen years'
interest.
By the expiration of the seventeenth year of their life
$10,000.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1931, and said amount of bonds
to-wit: $10,000.00 face value, shall show principal due seventeen years from date of issue, with coupons attached for seventeen years' interest.
By the expiration of the eighteenth year of their life,
$10,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1932, and said amount of bonds
to-wit: $10,500.00 face value, shall show principal due eighteen years from date of issue, with coupons attached for eighteen
years' interest.
By the expiration of the nineteenth year of their life,
$11,000.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1933, and said amount of bonds
494__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
to-wit: $11,000.00 face value, shall show principal due
nineteen years from date of issue, with coupons attached for
nineteen years' interest.
By the expiration of the twentieth year of their life,
$11,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1934, and said amount of bonds
to-wit: $11,500.00 face value, shall show principal due twenty
years from date of issue, with coupons attached for twenty
years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-first year of their life,
$12,000.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1935, and said amount of bonds,
to-wit: $12,000.00 face value, shall show principal due twentyone years from date of issue, with coupons attached for twentyone yearsr interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-second year of their life,
$12,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1936, and said amount of bonds
to-wit: $12,500.00 face value, shall show principal due twentytwo years from date of issue, with coupons attached for twentytwo years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-third year of their life,
$13,000.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1937, and said amount of bonds,
to-wit: $13,000.00 face value, shall show principal due twentythree years from date of issue, with coupons attached for
twenty-three years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-fourth year of their life,
$13,500.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1938, and said amount of bonds,
to-wit: $13,500.00 face value, shall show principal due twentyfour years from date of issue, with coupons attached for
twenty-four years' interest.
By the expiration of the twenty-fifth year of their life,
$14,000.00 face value of said bonds shall be paid and retired
on the 15th day of October, 1939, and said amount of bonds,
to-wit: $14,000.00 face value, shall show principal due twenty-
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________495
five years from date of issue, with coupons attached for
twenty-five years' interest.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That said bonds shall
be sold at the highest and best prices obtainable from bidders
for same, but in no event, for less than their face value, and
the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah and the finance committee of said city are hereby clothed with full power
and authority touching the sale and delivery of said bonds,
either as a whole or in such amounts and from time to time as
they may deem best; and they are further clothed with full
power and authority touching all other matters pertaining to
the issuance, form and disposition of said bonds not herein
specifically provided.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That this ordinance and
the provisions thereof relative to the expiration, retirement
and maturity of said indebtedness, shall be, and is hereby, made
a contract by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah,
with any and all persons holding any or all of said bonds representing said indebtedness.
Section 5. Be it further ordained,That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Passed August 19, 1914.
Bonds RequiredElectrical Wiring, Etc.
By Committee on Fire:
An ordinance to require a bond from all persons conducting a business of electrical wiring, repairing or construction
within the corporate limits of the city of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That all persons
conducting a business of electrical wiring, repairing or construction within the corporate limits of the city of Savannah
shall within thirty days after the passage of this ordinance file
496______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___
with the clerk of council a bond payable to the mayor and
aldermen of the city of Savannah, with good security, to be
approved by the clerk of council in the sum of $200.00 conditioned that he shall discharge his duties in connection with
his said business in accordance with the ordinances of the city
of Savannah, and shall pay to the city of Savannah on demand
all inspection fees that may be lawfully charged against him
in connection with his said business.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That no permit shall be
issued to any person to do any electrical wiring, repairing, or
construction within the corporate limits of the city of Savannah as provided in section 653 of MacDonell's code of Savannah (1907) until the provisions of the foregoing section shall
be complied with, nor shall any such work be passed upon by
an electrical inspector of city of Savannah, nor certificate
given until provisions of said section 1 shall be complied with.
Section 3. Be it further ordained,That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and the
same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 22, 1914.
Reports in Council, May 27, 1915
Report of Mayor Relative to Conference in Regard to Fire Boat:
Savannah, Ga., May 27, 1914.
The Board of Aldermen, City:
Gentlemen:
Immediately after the recent fire on the wharves of the
Atlantic Coast Line, appreciating the advisability, if anywise
possible, of securing the co-operation of the several transportation companies having large interests on the river front in
the purchase of a powerful fire tug that would meet the requirements of the insurance companies and be the means not
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 497
only of providing greater safety from conflagarations, but
securing a reduction in the rates of insurance on all property
adjacent to the river, I broached the matter to them.
As a result, there will be held a conference in the near future of representatives of the city and the several transportation lines, viz: the Ocean Steamship Company, Merchants &
Miners Transportation Company, Seaboard Air Line, Central
of Georgia, and Atlantic Coast Line. I have proposed to them
and the proposition will be discussed at this conference, that
these transportation companies unite with the city in the purchase of a tug of the type approved by the insurance interests.
In order that the representatives of the city may be in
position to authoritatively present this proposition to the representatives of the transportation companies, and that the
approaching conference may be, if possible, fruitful of the desired result, I beg to recommend to your honorable body that
a special committee be appointed to represent the mayor and
aldermen at this conference.
Respectfully submitted,
R. J. DAVANT, Mayor.
Recommendations Adopted and Approved.
Electrical AppliancesInstallation Of
By Committee on Fire:
An ordinance to amend an ordinance adopted by council
May 17, 1911, and entitled, "An ordinance to provide how
electrical appliances shall be installed in public buildings and
within a designated area in the city of Savannah, to prescribe a
penalty for the violation thereof, and for other purposes."
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the ordinance
adopted by council May 17,1911, and entitled, "An ordinance
498_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
to provide how electrical appliances shall be installed in public
buildings and within a designated area in the city of Savannah,
to prescribe a penalty for the violation thereof, and for other
purposes," be, and the same is hereby, amended by striking
from said ordinance section 2 thereof, and inserting in lieu
thereof the following:
"Section 2. Be it further ordained, That from and after
the passage of this ordinance within the following area of the
city of Savannah, to-wit: Commencing at the junction of the
harbor line of the Savannah river with the west line of East
Broad street, and running thence along the west side of East
Broad street to a point 105 feet south of Liberty street, thence
along a line 105 feet south of the south side of Liberty street,
to a point 150 feet east of the east side of West Broad street,
thence south on a line 150 feet east of the east side of West
Broad street to the north side of Hall street, thence west along
the north side of Hall street to a point 150 feet west of the west
side of West Broad street, thence north along a line 150 feet
west of the west side of West Broad street to the north side of
Indian street, thence west along the north side of Indian street
to Water street, thence north along the east side of Water
street to the harbor line of the Savannah river, thence in an
easterly direction along the harbor line of the Savannah river
to the point of beginning; all installations of electric lights,
electric motors and other electric appliances shall be as provided
in section 1 of this ordinance, and all additions, alterations and
extensions to the present equipment in said limits shall be installed in approved conduits, armoured cable or metal moulding such as are approved by the "National Board of Fire Underwriters;" in no case shall additions, alterations or extensions be
connected with wiring not in the approved conduits, cable or
moulding above described, but in all additions, alterations or
extensions the entire wiring from the light to the main source
of supply shall be in said approved conduits, cable or moulding.
Provided, however, that all power houses and substations
within this district shall be excluded from the operation of
this ordinance. No permit shall be issued by the city govern-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 499
ment for electrical wiring within the said limits without the
use of such conduits, cable or moulding.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be,
and the same are hereby, repealed.
Passed September 30, 1914.
Report of Committee on Playgrounds
In accordance with the resolution creating it, the playground commission begs to report that it has practically completed arrangements under which, in a few days, four, and
probably five, playgrounds will be opened to the youth of the
city, furnishing them opportunity for out-of-door, healthful
recreation, under the supervision of an able director. These
playgrounds have been located where it is believed they will
best serve the interests of the mass of the children of the city.
Through the co-operation of the park and tree commission, two small squares in the northeastern and northwestern
sections have been assigned for this purpose, and are being
equipped with apparatus most adapted to those of immature
years. The old pound lot to the south of Colonial Park, and
the Park Extension are to be utilized tor baseball, lawn tennis
and other sports that appeal to boys and girls, without the
necessity of, in anywise, interfering with the legitimate use
of the latter by the military of the city for parades, drills or
other military purposes.
The advisability of setting aside and equipping other areas
will be considered after the playgrounds now provided for,
have been sufficiently used to guide the commission in its further steps in that direction.
The commission has been fortunate in securing the services, under a temporary agreement, of Mr. Montague Gammon, a native Georgian, well equipped by practical experience
500_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
and by temperament, for the work entrusted to him. Mr. Gammon will have the entire direction of the playgrounds, the commission giving to him the benefit of its co-operation in all
projected steps.
The director has already taken steps to secure the assistance of several local workers, who will be trained under his
supervision, so that each of the playgrounds will at all times
be under efficient management. The committee on rules and
regulations is drafting regulations to govern the grounds which
will later be submitted to council for its approval.
The sympathetic interest of the great mass of our people
in the playground movement is evident. The success of the
playgrounds already provided for will inevitably mean the extension of the system in accordance with the requirements of
the children of the entire city. This has been the invariable
rule elsewhere, and there is no reason to believe that Savannah
will prove any exception.
In every section of the country the playgrounds have
assumed an importance second only to the public schools.
In many cities they have been made an important feature of
the city's educational work. Their appeal to every parent,
to every lover of strong, healthful, sturdy manhood and womahood, is so great that opposition has always been found to disappear before the favoring weight of awakened public opinion.
While the arrangement made with Mr. Gammon covers a
period expiring September 15th, it is the hope of the commission that the playgrounds can be made an all-the-year-round
institution. This is a matter that will be discussed and probably decided within the next few weeks. Having a climate
that permits of outdoor recreation, practically during the entire year, it would appear that the interests of the children
would be promoted, the work of the playgrounds vastly enlarged, and their hold upon the public sentiment immeasurably
strengthened by their maintenance without interruption.
Having, as stated, selected a director for the four months
ending September 15th, secured the assistance of workers, and
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 501
provided plans for apparatus, the commission would respectfully request the approval of its actions by council.
Respectfully submitted,
R. J. DAVANT,
Mayor, and Chairman Playground Commission.
Adopted and Approved.
Playgrounds Committee Created
By Alderman Slater:
Resolved, by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the mayor be, and he hereby is, authorized to appoint a committee on playgrounds,
composed of the mayor, two aldermen and such number of
citizens as the mayor may deem advisable, such committee to
have full charge of the engagement of a director, purchase of
apparatus, and such other steps as are necessary for the in-'
stallation of the proposed playground system, the preparation
and enforcement of such regulations as may be necessary for
the proper conduct of such centers of recreation for the children and young men and women of Savannah, such regulations
to be effective when approved by council.
Be it further resolved, That the full charge of the playgrounds shall be vested in such committee, the members of
which shall serve for the term of one year, the entire committee
being subject to reappointment by the mayor on January 1st
of each succeeding year, and any vacancies occurring from any
cause to be filled by appointment by the mayor.
Adopted and Approved February 4, 1914.
502 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___
To Use Forsyth Park As Playground
By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
.An ordinance to provide for the use of the parade ground,
otherwise known as Forsyth Park extension, as a playground,
and to prescribe the limitations of said use.
Be it enacted by the mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah, in council assembled.
Section 1. That the use of the parade ground or Forsyth
Park extension, as a playground, shall not be a relinquishment of any right which the volunteer military companies
of Savannah may have in said parade ground, or in the use
thereof, the rights of the volunteer companies in and to the
said parade ground being hereby confirmed and preserved.
Section 2. That the use of the parade ground for a playground shall in nowise interfere with the use thereof by the
several volunteer companies, or any one of them, whenever
the same may be desired for the use of the said company or
companies, and that any part of the parade ground to be used
for playground purposes shall not be excavated or otherwise
utilized so as to prevent its proper use by the volunteer companies, or any one of them, for military purpose.
Section 3. Be it futher enacted, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 22, 1914.
Retiring W. W. Prlngle and F. H. Thompson
Fire Department
By the Committee on Fire:
An ordinance to retire with a pension W. W. Pringle and
F. H. Thompson of the Fire Department of the city of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah, That W. W. Pringle, who has served
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 603
faithfully as a member of the fire department of the city of
Savannah for more than twenty-two years, and F. H. Thompson, who has served faithfully as a member of said department
for more than seventeen years, both of whom are now incapacitated from further active work in said fire department, be,
and the same are, from and after the 15th day of February,
1914, retired with pensions to be paid during their lives; the
pension in each case to be equivalent to one-half of the salary
each of said firemen is receiving at the time he is retired, and
are to be paid as are the salaries of active firemen in the service of the city.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and the
same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed February 4, 1914.
Fire DepartmentLouis Trebony Pensioned
Ordinance by Committee on Fire to Retire Louis Trebony:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That Louis Trebony, a member of the Savannah Fire Department for a period
of twenty-five years, who is now incapacitated from further
service, on account of chronic ailment, as shown by the certificate of a practicing physician in the city of Savannah, be,
and he hereby is, pensioned upon one-half of the compensation
previously paid to the said Louis Trebony, said pension becoming effective on and after March 1, and the amounts due
shall be payable as are employes of the fire department.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
they are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed February 18, 1914.
604 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Chimney Sweeping
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to amend section 801 of MacDonelPs code
of the city of Savannah, 1907.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That section 801
of MacDonell's code of the city of Savannah, 1907, be, and
the same is hereby, amended by adding at the end of said section the following:
No chimney shall be swept unless application is first filed
with the chief clerk of the fire department, giving the names
of the occupant of building, street address and specifying the
number and kind of chimneys to be swept. A proper record
of these applications shall be kept and upon the work being
assigned to a sweeper, an order on a form approved for this
purpose shall be made out in triplicate by the chief clerk of
the fire department, who shall deliver the original thereof to
the chimney sweeper as his authority to perform such work
and shall send the duplicate to the comptroller of accounts
retaining the triplicate in his own files. The sweeper shall be
charged with the amount of the fees by the chief clerk of the
fire department, with whom he shall make settlement daily
for all work completed during that day. It shall further be
the duty of the chief clerk of the fire department to deposit
each day all moneys received by him with the city treasurer
and take the latter's receipt therefor.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed June, 1 1914.
Keeping of Calcium Carbide
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to amend Section 690 of MacDonell's code
of the city of Savannah of 1907.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 505
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That section 690
of MacDonell's code of the city of Savannah of 1907, be, and
the same is hereby, amended by striking from said section, in
the last sentence of said section, the following words, to-wit:
"Quantities of calcium carbide in excess of 500 pounds are not
allowed to be stored within the corporate limits of the city
and insert in lieu thereof, the following: "The chief
engineer shall, after approval of the premises and when all requirements of this code, in regard to the keeping of calcium
carbide are otherwise complied with, give a permit for the keeping of such calcium carbide."
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the words in the
fourth and fifth lines of said section, as follows, to-wit, "built
of brick or stone or other fireproof buildings," be stricken and
insert the following words in lieu thereof, "in such locations
and conditions as shall meet the approval of the chief engineer
of the fire department," so that said section, when amended,
as hitherto indicated, shall read as follows:
"If over 100 pounds to be kept in storage building. Calcium carbide, in hermetically sealed iron receptacles and in
quantities exceeding 100 pounds, must be stored in detached
buildings, in such locations and conditions as shall meet the
approval of the chief engineer of the fire department; at least
twenty-five feet from adjoining property, such building to be
well ventilated, waterproof and thoroughly drained, with floor
raised at least one foot above the grade upon which it stands.
In such buildings, artificial light or heat will not be permitted."
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed June 24, 1914.
Chimney Sweeping
Ordinance on its first reading and by unanimous consent
of council read a second time, pleacd upon its passage, adopted
and approved.
506 _____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
By Committee on Fire:
An ordinance to amend, revise and consolidate the several
ordinances of the city of Savannah, with reference to chimney
sweeping and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the mayor
of the city of Savannah shall appoint a chimney sweeper who
shall be attached to the office of the chief engineer of the fire
department and under his jurisdiction, at a salary of f 50.00 per
month, payable as are the salaries of other city employes.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the
duty of said chimney sweeper to make a thorough inspection
of each house within the city limits every twelve months, or
when directed by said chief engineer, for the purpose of determining whether the chimneys of such house need sweeping,
and if he finds that any chimney needs to be swept, it shall be
his duty to report the same to the chief engineer of the fire
department. It shall then become the duty of the chief engineer of the fire department to satisfy himself as to the coi
rectness of such report, and if he determines that the chimney
or chimneys mentioned in the report of the chimney sweeper
are foul with soot or other substances which can be removed by
sweeping the same, he shall give the owner or real estate agent
having control of the premises, written notice that the chimney
sweeper will call and sweep the chimney or chimneys at a given
time within the next succeeding 48 hours. This notice shall
be made in triplicate, the original shall be retained by the
chief engineer, the duplicate shall be served upon the owner
of the premises or the real estate agent in charge, and the triplicate shall be sent to the comptroller of accounts of the city of
Savannah.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That any tenant or
owner of premises wishing chimneys to be swept may make
application to the chief engineer of the fire department, giving
the name of the occupant of the building, the street address,
and the number and kind of chimneys to be swept, and the
chief engineer of the fire department may, in his discretion,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 607
direct the chimneys to be swept by the city's chimney sweeper,
at expense of the party making the application; in such cases,
the chief engineer shall make a report to the comptroller of accounts, as hereinbefore provided in cass of notices given to
owner or real estate agents.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That the charge for
chimney sweeping shall be as follows:
One-story houses, 10 cents per flue.
Two-story houses, 10 cents End 20 cents per fluu.
Three-story houses, 10 cents, 20 cents and 30 cents per
flue.
Four-story houses, 10 cents, 20 cents, 30 cents, and 40
cents per flue.
The charge -for chimney sweeping shall be payable by
the owner of the property, unless the work has been done at
the request of the tenant in possession of the building, in
which case the tenant shall be liable to the city, the same shall
be collected from the office of said chief engineer, and should
said owner or tenant, as the case may be, fail or refuse to pay
the sum assessed for such chimney sweeping for thirty days
after cleansing shall have been completed, then the city treasurer, upon the request of said chief engineer, shall issue executions therefor, and for the further sum of one dollar ($1.00)
for costs, and said executions shall be placed in the hands of
the city marshal, who shall proceed with such executions in the
same manner as a sheriff does under executions from a superior
court of this state.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the
duty of said chief engineer of the fire department to cause to
be deposited each day with the city treasurer all moneys received by him, and take the said treasurer's receipt therefor.
Section 6. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the
duty of the fire inspectors under the supervision of said chief
engineer, to make thorough inspection of all chimneys when
inspecting houses within the city limits, and when foul
chimneys are located report the same to the chief engineer on
508 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
a form provided for that purpose, which shall take the same
course as a report made by the chimney sweeper.
Section 7. Be it further ordained, That any person interfering with the chimney sweeper or fire inspectors while in
the performance of their duties under this ordinance, shall be
punished, on conviction in the police court of the city of
Savannah, by a fine of not exceeding fifty dollars, ($50.00)
and impr3onment not exceeding thirty (30) days, either or
both, in the discretion of the court.
Section 8. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be,
and the same are hereby, repealed.
Passed September 2, 1914.
Amend Section 999 of MacDoneU's Code
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to amend section 999 of MacDonell's code of
the city of Savannah (1907.)
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That section 999
of MacDonell's code of the city of Savannah (1907) be, and
the same is hereby, amended by adding at the end of the said
section the following:
Immediately upon the receipt of the daily report by the
contractor or other person or persons employed by the city for
such work of the vaults, dry wells, etc., cleaned that day, the
chief clerk of the board of health shall notify on a form designed for that special purpose, the persons, firm or corporation for whom said vaults, dry wells, etc., have been cleaned,
of the amount charged against them and demand that within
thirty days therefrom payment shall be made directly to the
city treasurer. Concurrently with this issuance of such notice
a copy thereof shall be delivered to the comptroller of accounts,
who shall immediately record the same as a charge to the city
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___ 509
treasurer and shall then deliver the copy to the city treasurer
for entry upon his record known as "Sink Assessment." Upon
receipt of this notice the city treasurer shall be held responsible for the charge until properly accounted for.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances or
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed JaniMry 7, 1914.
Savannah Electric Co. Franchise
Be it resolved by the mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah, in council assembled, That the Savannah Electric
Company, its successors and assigns, be, and the same are hereby, granted a franchise to lay, maintain and operate a single
track on Habersham street, from the present terminus of its
Habersham street line at Thirty-seventh street, southward on
Habersham street to forty-fourth street, connecting with the
line now operated by it in Chatham Crescent under franchise
granted October 20, 1911.
Be it further resolved, That the franchise here granted is
(1) unlimited as to time; (2) includes the right to lay, maintain
and operate a second or double track at any time in the future,
the business of the Savannah Electric Company, its successors
or assigns may require; (3) includes the right to construct and
maintain all overhead equipment necessary to the proper operation of the cars under this franchise.
Be it further resolved, That the franchise here granted
does not impair in any wise any of the rights of the Savannah
Electric Company, heretofore granted to it by the mayor and
aldermen of the city of Savannah by resolution passed
October 20, 1911.
Be it further resolved, That the franchise herein granted
has the condition attached and imposed that the Savannah
Electric Company, its successors and assigns, shall maintain
on Habersham street, the schedules set out in said resolution
of October 20, 1911.
510_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Be it further resolved, That upon the acceptance of this
franchise the Savannah Electric Company be, and the same
is hereby, required to remove its tracks on Forty-fourth streets
between Abercorn street and Habersham street.
Be it further resolved, That all resolutions and parts of
resolutions in conflict with this resolution be, and the same
are hereby, repealed.
Adopted and Approved.
Rates of Pilotage
By Committee on Finance and Harbors and Wharves:
An ordinance to prescribe rates of pilotage for Tybee bar
and the river Savannah and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That from and
after the passage of this ordinance the following shall be the
rates of pilotage for the Tybee bar and the river Savannah:
Draft Bar Cockqrar
of to to ToUl
Ship Coekapur Savannah
6 ............................ $ 11.75 $ 7.25 $ 19.00
7 ............................ 13.25 8.25 21.50
8 ......................... 15.00 9.00 24.00
9 ............................ 16.50 10.00 26.50
10 ............................ 19.75 12.25 32.00
11 ............................ 23.50 14.00 37.50
12 ............................ 26.00 15.50 41.50
13 ............................ 28.50 17.50 46.00
14 ............................ 34.25 20.75 55.00
15 ............................ 39.00 23.50 62.50
16 ............................ 43.50 26.00 69.50
17 ............................ 49.00 29.50 78.50
18 ............................ 54.00 33.00 87.00
19 ............................ 60.50 36.50 97.00
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 511
20 ....................
21 ....................
22 ....................
23 ....................
24 ....................
24#....................
25 ....................
25#..................
26 ....................
26^....................
27 ....................
28^....................
28 ....................
27K.~~-~.~~-
29 ....................
29K .
30 ....................
........ 62.50
........ 70.00
........ 80.00
........ 91.25
........ 105.00
........ 108.75
........ 112.50
........ 116.25
........ 120.00
........ 123.75
........ 127.50
........ 131.25
........ 135.00
........ 138.75
........ 142.50
........ 146.25
........ 150.00
37.50
42.00
48.00
54.75
63.00
65.25
67.50
69.75
72.00
74.25
76.50
78.75
81.00
83.25
85.50
87.75
90.00
100.00
112.00
128.00
146.00
168.00
174.00
180.00
186.00
192.00
198.00
204.00
210.00
216.00
222.00
228.00
234.00
240.00
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
the same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed April 1, 1914.
Undertakers To Secure Burial Order
By Committee on Health:
An ordinance to provide a penalty for undertakers who
shall bury or attempt to bury a deceased person within the city
limits, or within five miles thereof, without first obtaining a
burial order signed by the health officer, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That any undertaker who shall bury or attempt to bury a deceased person
within the limits of the city of Savannah, or within five miles
thereof, without first having obtained from the health officer
512 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
of the city of Savannah an order of burial, signed by the said
health officer, setting forth the names, sex, color, age, nationality, residence, day of death, cause of death and name of attending physician, as provided in sections 954, 955 and 1271
of the code of the city of Savannah of 1907, shall upon conviction before the police court of the city of Savannah be subject
to a fine of one hundred dollars, and imprisonment not exceeding thirty days, either or both, in the discretion of the court.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and the
same are hereby, repealed.
Passed October 28, 1914.
S. A. L. Schedule, Protest Against Changes
By Committee on Trade and Commerce:
Whereas, the Seaboard Air Line Railroad has requested
authority from the state railroad commission of Georgia to
make certain changes affecting the schedule of its trains operated between Savannah and Columbia, S. C., and from that
city to Savannah, and whereas, such changes are regarded
by the united commercial interests of the city as inimical to
the business interests of Savannah, calculated to disturb and
unsettle its established trade relations with the section of
country traversed by the trains whose operations it is proposed
to change and as generally detrimental to the welfare of this
community and of the communities which are brought into
communication with Savannah by these trains;
Therefore, be it resolved by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That this body,
representing the entire interests of Savannah, does hereby unite
with the trade bodies of this city in a determined protest to
the state railroad commission against granting the authority to
the Seaboard Air Line Railroad for the proposed changes, and,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 513
be it further resolved, that the mayor be, and he is hereby empowered to immediately telegraph this action of the city council to the state railroad commission, in order that it may be in
its hands at the hearing before that body tomorrow.
Adopted and Approved.
Passed November 11, 1914.
Keeping of Dogs
Ordinance read in council for the first time February 4,
1914, read a second time February 18, 1914, and laid on the
table.
By Alderman Livingston:
An ordinance to amend an ordinance adopted by the
mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, on June 25, 1913, entitled "An ordinance to provide
regulations for the keeping of dogs within the corporate limits
of the city of Savannah and for other purposes," to provide a
penalty for violations of this ordinance and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, and it is hereby
ordained by the authority of the same, That the ordinance
adopted by said council on the 25th day of June, 1913, entitled
"An ordinance to provide regulations for the keeping of dogs
within the corporate limits of the city of Savannah and for
other purposes," be, and the same is hereby, amended by
striking from said ordinance the eighth section thereof, and
inserting in lieu thereof the following:

Section 8. Be it further ordained that the dog impounded
under the provisions of this ordinance whose owner, possessor
or representative shall not come forward within three days
after the dog has been so impounded and pay the annual license tax and impounding fee, or if the owner or possessor refuses to pay the said tax and impounding fee, and the dog
17
514 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
shall remain in said pound for three days, the said dog catcher
shall on the Monday following the expiration of said three impounding days offer each dog so held for sale at public outcry
at the dog pound, and each of said dogs shall be separately
sold to the highest bidder, provided, that in no case shall a bid
be received unless it is more than the impounding fee, and the
purchaser shall be required to purchase for each dog, upon its
delivery to him, an annual license badge or tag. If there is no
bid for any dog offered for sale as above provided, the dog
catcher is authorized to give the said dog away to any person
who will take the dog away out of the city limits and keep
such dog outside of said city limits. All dogs impounded under
the provisions of this ordinance that are suffering from mange
or any other dog disease, except the rabies, or some other incurable disease, shall be treated until cured or sold as aforesaid.
Any dog diseased with the rabies, or an incurable disease,
shall be killed immediately upon discovery that it is so diseased."
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That any person given
a dog under the conditions provided in the first section of this
ordinance (the eighth section of the ordinance adopted June 25,
1913, as amended) who shall neglect or refuse to take said dog
beyond the city limits, or who shall allow said dog to return
within the city limits, shall, upon conviction in the police court
of the city of Savannah, be fined in a sum not exceeding $10
and imprisoned for not longer than ten days, either or both, in
the discretion of the court.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and the
same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed February 18, 1914.
Cows
By Committee on Health:
An amendment to ordinance entitled "An ordinance to
provide regulations touching the keeping of cows, stables for
cows, dairies, milk, and the sale of milk, and for other purposes
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 515
designated to secure purity in the milk consumed in the city of
Savannah," adopted by council on September 8, 1909.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That an ordinance
entitled "An ordinance to provide regulations touching the
keeping of cows, stables for cows, dairies, milk and the sale of
milk, and for other purposes designed to secure purity of
the milk consumed in the city of Savannah," adopted by council on September 8, 1909, be, and the same is hereby, amended
by striking out the words "such application shall be made on a
printed form to be furnished by the health officer," said words
being contained in the fifth and sixth lines of section 13 in the
printed pamphlet of said ordinance, commonly called "The
Milk Ordinance," and inserting in lieu of said words, the following:
If the health officer decides that the applicant is a suitable
person or corporation, then the applicant shall make application on a printed form to be furnished by the health officer.
By striking out from said section 13 of said ordinance,
the following words.
If such applicant is found to be a fit and proper person
contained in the twenty-first and twenty-second lines of the
printed pamphlet of said ordinance, by inserting the word "if"
after the word "and" in the twenty-second line of section 13
of the printed pamphlet of said ordinance, so that the said
section of said ordinance, when amended, shall read as follows:
Section 13. Be it further ordained, That every person or
corporation desiring to sell, offer for sale, expose for sale, dispose of, exchange, or deliver milk or cream in the city of Savannah, shall make application to the health officer for a permit so to do. If the health officer decides that the applicant
is a suitable person or corporation, then the applicant shall
make application on a printed form to be furnished by the
health officer, upon demand, and the applicant, if an individual, shall state therein his full name and residence, and if a
corporation, shall state therein full name and residence of each
of its officers. Such application shall also state the location of
516 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
the place at which it is proposed to carry on the business. It
shall also contain a statement of the number and character of
wagons or other vehicles to be used by the applicant in or about
his or its business; also the number of cows, if any, owned or
controlled by the applicant, and such other data concerning
the conduct of such business as the health officer may require.
The health officer, upon receipt of such application, shall cause
to be investigated the place of business described in such application, and the wagons and vehicles, if any, intended to be
used by such applicant, and if such places of business and such
wagons or other vehicles are found, upon such investigation to
be in a sanitary condition, and fit for the uses and purposes to
which they are intended to be put, said health officer shall
forthwith register such applicant in a proper record to be kept
for the purpose, and issue a permit authorizing such applicant
to carry on, engage in and conduct the business of venders of
milk in the city of Savannah, at the place designated in such
application; provided, that in every case where the application
may be rejected by the health officer, the applicant shall have
the right of appeal to the board of sanitary commissioners,
who shall accord the applicant a hearing and shall after such
hearing either grant or reject the application, as it may consider just and proper. All permits granted pursuant to this
ordinance may at any time be revoked by the health officer,
subject to the approval of the board of sanitary commissioners,
for the persistent, repeated or wilful violation of any law or
ordinance or of any regulation of the health officer governing
the sale of milk in the city of Savannah; provided, however,
that no such permit shall, at any time, be revoked, by the health
officer unless he shall first have given the holder of the same
not less than five days' notice in writing of his intention to
revoke such permit, and an opportunity to be heard by the
board of sanitary commissioners as to why such should not be
done; this proviso not to be taken to apply to cases where the
sale of milk or cream may be temporarily prohibited by the
health officer on account of disease on the premises, temporary unsanitary conditions, or similar causes, such permits
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 517
shall not be transferable, and no permit used hereunder shall
entitle or authorize the holders thereof to carry on, engage in,
or conduct the business of vendor of milk in any place or places
other than that designated and set out in such permit. If any
person having a permit to vend milk as aforesaid, shall change
the location of his or its place of business, notice of such proposed change shall be given to said health officer, and his consent
in writing received to conduct such business at such new location; and no business shall be conducted or carried on at
such new location until such consent has been received.
Section 14. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed June 10, 1914.
Sale Ice CreamAn Ordinance to Amend
An Ordinance
Passed June 14, 1911.
An ordinance to provide regulations for the sale of ice
cream and other frozen concoctions of milk, to provide for
the inspection of premises where the same are made or sold,
to provide a penalty for the violation of same, and for other
purposes.
To add to section 1 of said ordinance the words: "And
in case of the product being conveyed to the consumer, each
vendor shall place his name, permit number and name of product being sold in letters of readable size on each outer side of
all wagons or carts used in the conveyance of their product,"
the said section, when so amended, to read as follows:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That it shall not be
lawful for any person or corporation, within the corporate
limits of the city of Savannah, to operate a plant for the making of ice cream or any other frozen concoction of milk, or to
518 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
conduct a parlor, store, or other place for the sale of ice cream
or any other frozen concoction of milk, unless a permit shall
have first been obtained from the health officer of said city permitting the operation of said plant or the running of said parlor, store or other place for the purpose aforesaid; but in no
event shall such plant, parlor, store or other place for the purposes aforesaid be located in a dwelling house. The said permit must show the name of the owner and location of such
plant, parlor, store or other place where the said ice cream or
other frozen concoctions of milk are to be made or sold, and shall
state which of said articles are contained in the product made
or sold; and in case of the product being conveyed to the
consumer, each vendor shall place his name, permit number
and name of product being sold in letters of readable size on
each outer side of all wagons or carts used for the conveyance
of their products.
And to change the wording of section 6 of said ordinance
by substituting for the words "more than 750,000 bacteria per
cubic centimeter, and the same shall be entirely free from any
bacteria of transmissible diseases" the words "less than eight
per cent butter fat or more than two million bacteria per cubic
centimeter, and the same shall be entirely free from any bacteria of transmissible diseases," this said section as amended
to read as follows:
Section 6. Be it further ordained, That it shall be unlawful for any person or corporation to sell, barter or dispense ice
cream in which there shall be contained less than eight per
cent butter fat or more than two million bacteria per cubic
centimeter, and the same shall be entirely free from any bacteria of transmissible disease.
Ordinance Passed April 29, 1914.
Inspector and Weigher of Flour Hay, Etc.
By Committee on Trade and Commerce:
An ordiance to authorize His Honor, the Mayor, to appoint
an inspector and weigher of flour, hay, corn, oats, and other
________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 519
grain; to prescribe his duties; term of office and compensation
and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That His Honor, the
Mayor, be authorized to appoint an inspector and weigher of
flour, hay in bales, corn, oats, wheat and other grain in bags,
barrels, bulk, carload, or other quantities.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the duty
of said inspector, when requested by the owner or consignee
of any of the said articles, to inspect and weigh same and render
an official certificate of grade and weight.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That the compensation
of said inspector, for each inspection, shall be 1 cent per bag
or bale, or barrel, and that the minimum charge for each inspection shall be 50 cents for less than carload lots, and the maximum charge not to exceed 75 cents. The sum of 75 cents per
car shall be charged when in carload quantities. The said
fees to be paid by the owner or consignee of any of said articles,
who has requested inspection.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That the charge for
weighing shall be 1 cent per 100 pounds on hay and ^ cent
per sack or barrel on flour or grain. The said fees to be paid
by the owner or consignee of any of said articles, who has requested weighing.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That before entering on
the duties of his office, the said inspector shall enter into a
bond for the penal sum of $500.00 for the faithful performance
of his duties as prescribed by law, and shall, in addition, take
and subcribe an oath of affirmation before the clerk of council
of the city of Savannah, of which a minute shall be kept, that
he will faithfully perform the duties of his office and inspect
and weigh all of said articles offered to him for weight or inspection.
Section 6. Be it further ordained, That the term of office
of said inspector appointed shall be for the current year, provided, however that each and every year hereafter an inspector shall be appointed by the mayor at the last meeting of
520 ______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
council in December of each and every year, to serve during
the succeeding year.
Section 7. Be it further ordained, That it shall be unlawful
for any person to perform the duties of an inspector or weigher
of any of the articles mentioned in section 1 hereof, or to give
a certificate of the grade or weight thereof, without first being
thereunto appointed by the mayor and taking the oath and
giving the bond as herein provided.
Section 8. Be it further ordained, That any person violating
this ordinance shall be subject, upon conviction before the
police court of the city of Savannah, to a fine not to exceed
$100.00 and imprisonment not to exceed thirty (30) days,
either or both, in the discretion of the court.
Section 9. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed April 29, 1914.
Purchase of Wharf
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to authorize the purchase of wharf lots
numbered seven (7,) eight (8,) and nine (9,) from the Standard
Fuel Supply Company, to appropriate $55,000.00 for the payment of same, to direct the city treasurer to pay said sum to
the Standard Fuel Supply Company for said property, and for
other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, and it is hereby
ordained by authority of the same, That the purchase of
wharf lots numbered seven (7,) eight (8,) and nine (9,) from the
Standard Fuel Supply Company for the sum of $55,000.00,
said wharf property being bounded on the north by the Savannah river, on the east by Drayton street, on the south by
River street and on the west by Bull street, is hereby authorized.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 52
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the sum of $55,-
000.00 is hereby appropriated out of the moneys now in the
city treasury of Savannah for the purchase and payment of
said wharf property.
Section 3. Be t further ordained, That the city treasurer
of Savannah is hereby authorized and directed to pay to the
Standard Fuel Supply Company the sum of $55,000.00 for
the purchase of the said property.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed in Council January 21, 1914.
To Purchase Land Outside of City Limits
For Street Purposes
By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
An ordinance to authorize the purchase of certain pieces,
parcels and tracts of land, outside of the city limits, to be used
for street purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the purchase
of certain pieces, parcels and tracts of land, outside of the city
limits of the city of Savannah, to be used for street purposes,
as shown on map of the property of the Parkside Land Company, showing the proposed streets, lanes, etc., made by W.
O'D. Rockwell, assistant chief engineer, February 23, 1914,
said tracts to be purchased being all of streets and lanes of the
Parkside Land Company's subdivision, as shown on above
map, said map being recorded in the clerk's office of the Chatham superior court.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the consideration
of said purchase shall be the sum of one dollar ($1.00) and the
grading of all the streets and lanes to be purchased, to-wit:
All the streets and lanes as shown and indicated on the above
said map.
522 _______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That His Honor, the
Mayor, be authorized to enter into an agreement at any time
within ninety (90) days after the passage of this ordinance,
with the Parkside Land Company, for the purpose of carrying
out the purchase of all streets and lanes as indicated on the
map aforesaid.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 8, 1914.
To Purchase Land Outside of City Limits
For Street Purposes
By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
An ordinance to authorize the purchase of certain pieces,
parcels and tracts of land, outside of the city limits, to be used
for street purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the purchase
of certain pieces, parcels and tracts of land, outside of the city
limits of the city of Savannah, to be used for street purposes,
as shown and designated on the map, showing the proposed
layout of streets through the Anderson lots and enclosed in
red lines on said map made by W. O'D. Rockwell, assistant
chief engineer, February 6, 1914. More particularly Fiftyninth street from a point on the White Bluff road to a point
east of Abercorn street and that portion of Aliercorn street
and those portions of the lanes, all a-, shown within the
red lines upon the map above indicated and hereto attached.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the consideration
of said purchase shall be the sum of one ($1.00) dollar and the
grading of Fifty-ninth street, Abercorn street, and the lanes,
all above indicated.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That His Honor, the
Mayor, be authorized to enter into an agreement at any time
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 523
within ninety (90) days after the passage of this ordinance with
the Heriot Development Company for the purpose of carrying
out the purchase of all streets and lanes as indicated on the
map aforesaid.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 22, 1914,
Wharf Lots Conveyed to Standard Fuel Supply Co.
A Communication from His Honor, the Mayor Was Read
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1914.
Honorable Board of Aldermen of the City of Savannah:
Gentlemen: I beg to advise you that I have, to comply
with certain technicalities, this day executed a deed conveying
to the Standard Fuel Supply Company wharf lots 7, 8 and 9,
for the sum of $55,000.00, said lots being bounded on the north
by the Savannah river, east by Drayton street, south by Eiver
street and west by Bull street, and I respectfully request that
action be taken confirming and ratifying the deed from the
city to the said company.
Respectfully,
R. J. DAVANT, Mayor.
Received as Information.
Board of Purchase
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to provide for a board of purchase, to prescribe the duties of said board, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That a board of
524 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
purchase be, and the same is hereby, created, consisting of the
mayor, chief engineer and two members of city council, to be
appointed by the mayor. The mayor shall be chairman of
said board and shall designate one of the members of the board
to act as the purchasing officer. A secretary to said board
shall be appointed and designated by the mayor from one of
the present city employes.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the said board
shall be charged with the sole and exclusive purchase of all
supplies and materials of whatsoever nature needed or required
by any department of the city government, and shall see that
all advertisements are properly inserted by the purchasing
officers for all bids for materials and supplies and that
the payment of bills for materials and supplies purchased
are in accordance with the bids accepted. No vouchers for
the payment of bills for materials and supplies purchased shall
be issued unless approved by the chairman of the finance committee and the chairman of committee on accounts.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That the said board of
purchase shall have full power and authority to establish rules
and regulations relative to the purchase, distribution and
storage of supplies and materials in accordance with the report on the accounting system rendered on the 29th day of
September, 1913.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed January 21, 1914.
Reward for Damaging Public Property
Resolutions by Finance Committee:
Be it resolved, by the mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah, in council assembled, That a standing reward of
fifty dollars be, and the same is hereby, offered for the arrest,
with proofs to convict, of any person or persons guilty of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 525
damaging any tree, bush, or other shrubbery, or any bench
or playground apparatus, in any square or park or playground
of this city, or of damaging any public building, or public
property of any character whatsoever, such reward, however,
not to be payable to any city employe, it being the duty of
such city employes to co-operate with the police department
in the detection of any persons guilty of damaging public property in any way.
Adopted and Approved.
Passed August 5, 1914.
Invitation to Atlantic Deeper Waterways
Association
By Committee on Finance:
Whereas, the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Association,
embracing in its membership representatives of all the states
along the Atlantic coast, and having for its purpose the stimulating of public interest in the improvement of the waterways
of the Eastern section of the country, and the securing of the
necessary appropriations from congress, met in the South in
1913 and in the North this year, and it is proper that its sessions of 1915 should be held at a Southern port, and
Whereas, the city of Savannah is deeply interested in the
work undertaken by this association, in thorough sympathy
with its objects, and desires to extend to it the courtesies
that are permissible on the part of a host; therefore, be it
Resolved, by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That in behalf of the municipality and the people of Savannah, Georgia, a most cordial
invitation be extended to the Atlantic Deeper Waterways
Association to hold its annual meeting for 1915 in this city,
with the assurance that every possible arrangement will be
made for the work of the convention under conditions that
will be gratifying to its members.
526_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Be it further resolved, That the clerk of council transmit
an official copy of this resolution to the president of the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Association for presentation at its
meeting in New York City.
Adopted and Approved.
Passed September 16, 1914.
Sidewalks
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That all sidewalks
in that section of the city of Savannah, bounded on the north
by Water and River streets, on the east by West Broad street,
on the south by Hull street and on the west by West Boundary
street, shall be of the width and made of the material as follows:
Ann street, width of sidewalk, 4 feet; material, brick.
Laurel street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Walnut street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
St. Gaul street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Poplar street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Fahm street, width of sidewalk, 10 feet; material, cement.
Lumber street (Bryan to Joachim) 6 feet; material, brick.
Lumber street (Bryan to Hull) width 6 feet; material,
cement.
West Boundary street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Water street (Indian to River) width of sidewalk, 10 feet;
material, brick.
Hull street, width of sidewalk, 10 feet; material, brick.
Oglethorpe avenue, width of sidewalk, 10 feet; material,
brick.
York street, width of sidewalk, 10 feet; material, brick.
President street, width of sidewalk, 4 feet; material, brick.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______ 527
Zubly street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Congress street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Bryan street, width of sidewalk, 9.5 feet; material, brick.
Olive street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Bay street (West Broad to Fahm) width of sidewalk, 8
feet; material, brick.
Bay street (Fahm to Ogeeehee canal) width of sidewalk,
10 feet; material, brick.
Joachim street, width of sidewalk,.. feet; material, brick.
Mill street, width of sidewalk, 6 feet; material, brick.
Indian street, width of sidewalk, 13 feet; material, brick.
River street (north side) east of Fahm, width of sidewalk,
5 feet; material, brick.
River street (south side only) west of Fahm, 9.5 feet; material, brick.
River street (south side) east of Fahm, 10 feet; material,
brick.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all persons owning
property on either side of that portion of those streets specified
in the foregoing section, shall immediately after the passage of
this ordinance lay a pavement on the sidewalk opposite their
property, of the material specified in said section, and said
pavement shall be of the width there specified. The pavement shall be laid on the level or grade directed by the chief
engineer of the city of Savannah.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That the property
owners aforesaid, shall also lay curbing and do other things
incident to the construction of said sidewalk pavement.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That if any of the
owner or owners, of any of the property on either side of
those portions of the streets above specified shall fail to lay
the sidewalk pavement and curbing in front of their property as herein required, then the city shall proceed to do so,
after a lapse of thirty (30) days from the time notice of the
requirements of this ordinance shall have been given to such
owner or owners, which notice shall be served by the marshal
of the city of Savannah.
528 ______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That in the event the
city shall proceed to do the work as provided in the preceding
section, said work shall be done at the expense and cost of such
owner or owners, and in the event the bill thereof shall remain
unpaid for a period of ten days after its presentation to such
owner or owners, then said bill for said cost and expenses
shall be turned over to the city treasurer, who shall issue an
execution for its collection, together with all costs against
said owner or owners, and the abutting property, which execution shall be levied and made in the manner pointed out by
law for the levy and making of the tax executions issued for
taxes due the city of Savannah.
Section 6. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
the same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed March 4, 1914.
Paving
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to amend an ordinance adopted by council
November 25,1914, and entitled "An ordinance for the improvement of Forty-second street from the west property line of
Montgomery street to the east property line of Florence
street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the
Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887, and for
other purposes.
Ordinance Passed December 9, 1914.
Paving
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Florence street in
the city of Savannah from the south property line of Thirty-
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 529
sixth street to the north property line of Thirty-seventh street,
under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of
Georgia approved October 1, 1887, and for other purposes.
Ordinance Passed December 23, 1914.
To Close and Abolish River Street, West of Wadley
Resolution by Mayor and Aldermen:
Resolved, by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the members of the legislature from Chatham county be, and they are hereby requested
to introduce at the next session of the legislature, and the next
session of the legislature of Georgia be, and they are hereby,
requested to pass a special act authorizing and empowering
the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah to close and
and abolish River street west of Wadley street, in the city of
Savannah, and to authorize and empower the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah to vest the title to said street when
so closed and abolished in the Ocean Steamship Company of
Savannah and its assigns.
Be it further resolved, That when, and if the said act
shall be passed by the legislature, and the said title to said
portion of River street shall be vested in the Ocean Steamship
Company of Savannah and its assigens, the said Ocean Steamship Co. shall contemporaneously therewith and in consideration thereof, grant to the mayor and aldermen of the city of
Savannah the necessary land to relocate and reopen River
street west of Wadley street, along the general lines shown on
the map attached to the petition of the Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah, which map is marked ''exhibit B," and the
steamship company shall pave that portion of River street
which is relocated and reopened.
Be it further resolved, That in the meantime the Ocean
Steamship Company and the contractors under it be, and they
are hereby authorized to cross, intersect and use such portions
of River street west of Wadley street as may be necessary for
530 ______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
tracks and constructions of said terminals, all of which shall
be done under the general supervision the chief engineer of
the city, the work to be done in such a manner as to inconvenience the public as little as practicable.
Be it further resolved, That a certified copy of this resolution shall be furnished the members of the legislature from
Chatham county and that notice of the intention to apply for
the passage of such special act of the legislature shall be published in accordance with law.
Adopted and Approved April 1, 1914.
Alderman Wright was excused from voting on the above
resolution.
Musgrove Greek and Savannah and Ogeechee Canal
ContractAuthorizing Mayor to Sign
By Committee on Drainage:
An ordinance to authorize the mayor of the city of Savannah to enter into a contract with the Central of Georgia Railway Company with regard to Musgrove creek, the Savannah
and Ogeechee canal and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, and it is hereby
ordained by authority of the same, That the mayor of the city
of Savannah be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered
to enter into the attached contract with the Central of Georgia
Railway Company, with regard to Musgrove creek, the
Savannah and Ogeechee canal, and other properties relating
thereto; and he is further authorized and empowered to make
and to execute under the corporate seal, all other contracts,
deeds and writings necessary to carry into effect all of the
terms of the said attached contract.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
the same are hereby, repealed,
Passed September 16,1914.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________531
Musgrove Creek and Savannnh and Ogeechee Canal
Contract With Central of Georgia
Railway Company
By Committee on Drainage:
An ordinance to authorize the mayor of the city of Savannah to enter into a contract with the Central of Georgia
Railway Company with regard to Musgrove creek, the Savannah and Ogeechee canal, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, and it is hereby
ordained by authority of the same, That the mayor of the city
of Savannah be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered
to enter into the attached contract with the Central of Georgia
Railway Company, with regard to Musgrove creek, the Savannah and Ogeechee canal, and other properties relating
thereto; and he is further authorized and empowered to make
and to execute under the corporate seal, all other contracts,
deeds and writings necessary to carry into effect all of the
terms of the said attached contract.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
the same are hereby, repealed.
GEORGIA, Chatham County:
This agreement, made and entered into this.........day
of....................................1914, by and between the Central of
Georgia Railway Company, a railway corporation of the state
of Georgia, and the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, a municipal corporation of said state, hereinafter
called the "city." The railway company acts for itself, the
Savannah and Ogeechee Canal Company, and the Ocean
Steamship Company of Savannah, and all obligations, acquiquisitions and reservations in behalf of the railway company
are to be carried out by and with the railway company, the
canal company and the steamship company, according to
their respective interests; the railway company, however, is
532_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
primarily liable to the city, and will have all the provisions of
this agreement carried out, whether relating to itself, the canal
company or the steamship company.
WITNESSETH
The railway company and city agree that appropriate
deeds, conveyances and contracts are to be entered into between the city, the Savannah and Ogeechee Canal Company,
Central of Georgia Railway Company and the Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah to carry out the following agreements, the consideration being the mutual benefit to accure to
each corporation.
1st. The. city will, at its own expense, divert into the
Ogeechee canal all waters from the water shed south of the
railway company's right-of-way now flowing into Center ditch
and Musgrove creek, and will permanently relinquish all right
of drainage through Musgrove creek and Center ditch, and all
other rights therein.
2nd. The canal company will, when permitted by
appropriate legislative action, surrender its charter and convey
to the city fee simple title to its right-of-way as herein set forth.
The railway company and city will mutually co-operate to
procure the necessary legislation to accomplish this purpose
and such other legislation, if any, as may be necessary to carry
out other features of this agreement.
3rd. Drainage of the property of the railway company
and steamship company north of Louisville road now flowing
into Musgrove creek and Center ditch will be cared for by
those companies respectively, but they may hereafter divert
such drainage into Ogeechee canal under such reasonable restrictions and regulations as may be prescribed by the city.
4th. The following portions of the existing right-ofway of the Ogeechee canal shall be conveyed to the city as
shown on the attached map.
(a) The entire right-of-way from the northeast corner of
canal lot No. 4 west to the western terminus of the canal of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 533
the Ogeechee river, reserving to the railway company the
right to maintain, to renew, or to replace its two bridges between New street and Louisville road.
(b) From the northeast corner of canal lot No.4 to the south
line of Bay street all of the right of way lying east of the present
bulkhead wall on the west side of the canal.
(c) From the south line of Bay street to the north line
of River street all of the right-of-way lying east of the line
showing on the accompanying map from the face of the western abutment of the Bay street bridge to the face of the western abutment of the River street bridge.
(d) from the north line of River street to Savannah river
a right of way (taken in part from property of the Ocean Steamship Company) 70 feet wide, the western line of which shall
coincide with the face of the present western brick wall from
River street to tracks leading to the Merchants and Miners
Transportation Company's wharf and from these tracks in a
straight line in prolongation of the wall line to Savannah river.
(e) This present western brick wall shall be permanently
maintained by the railway company. The east wall opposite
shall be maintained by the railway company until it shall be
removed. The city may at its own expense widen the channel
north of River street to 70 feet and move the eastern wall
correspondingly, with the right to use such land in addition
to the 70 feet on the eastern side of the canal right-of-way
as may be necessary for the construction and repair of this,
wall. The railway company may, at its own expense
widen the channel to not less than 70 feet and move the east
wall correspondingly. Any new east wall which may be constructed shall be thereafter maintained by the party moving
it. The railway company will convey or have conveyed to
the city all land not now owned by the city, necessary to widen
the canal 70 feet as above provided.
5th. The railway company may at any time hereafter
construct and shall thereafter maintain two or more crossings
for tracks or vehicles over the right-of-way conveyed to the
534 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
city between the northeast corner of canal lot No. 4 and River
street, the spans to be not less than 40 feet in the clear.
6th. All right-of-way of the canal company not conveyed
to the city hereunder and all other assets of the canal company
to be conveyed to the railway company.
7th. The city shall, at its own expense, do all the work
necessary to make the canal suitable for the drainage herein
contemplated. Notwithstanding the limitations of the rightof-way granted to it, it may now follow the present bed of the
canal between Bay street and River street so far as this can
be done without interference with the foundations of the compress property on the west side of the canal, but whenever the
railway company shall desire to use or occupy any portion of
the right-of-way not conveyed to the city, the city will move
its channel to its own right-of-way.
8th. No portion of the right-of-way north of canal lot
No. 4 acquired by the city shall without the written consent
of the railway company be used either: (1) for any drainage
except surface drainage; or (2) for any railway track.
9tb. The railway company shall have the right to occupy
and use the canal and its waters north of River street for the
floating of barges and other vessels so far as it shall not interfere with its use for drainage purpose, or with its use for water
traffic by the city or on equal terms by other parties. Water
traffic on said canal, shall at no time be blocked by said railway company or steamship company and the city shall have
authority to pass all necessary ordinances to keep the canal
open for public purposes.
10th. The railway company will pay to the city $2,000.00
as a contribution to the cost of building a new bridge over the
canal at the Louisville road crossing, and will pay to the city
$25,000.00 toward the cost of diverting the water from Musgrove creek and Center ditch and digging the channel of the
canal to proper depth.
llth. The city will construct modern concrete and steel
flood gates of the proper capacity and plan at or near the dividing line at the northeast corner of canal lot No. 4; these flood
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 535
gates to be thereafter maintained and operated by the city.
The railway company will pay the city the sum of $12,000.00
towards the cost of this work.
12th. The diversion of the waters and the preparation
of the canal and the excution of appropriate agreements and
other documents, to proceed at once with all practicable dispatch without awaiting legislative action, and the steamship
company to be permitted to at once construct its new terminal
without reference to the present drainage flowing through
Musgrove creek.
13th. The entire capital stock of the canal company,
which the railway owns, is pledged under the railway's consolidated mortgage, which permits the sale of the property of
the canal company on terms to be approved by the trustee.
The railway will with all practicable despatch procure such
approval and the cancellation of the stock by the trust company. In order to facilitate and to insure the ultimate vesting
in the city and the railway respectively of all titles, rights
and privileges to be ultimately acquired by them and the carrying out of all the provisions herein set forth, the railway company will meanwhile promptly procure such resignations and
elections of directors and officers and furnish such proxies as
will give to the city the present control of the canal corporations and its organization, and lend its assistance to the city, in
every way, to securely vest the title of the property of said
canal company in the city. At the same time the city and
the railway company will enter into actual possession
of the properties and rights to be ultimately acquired hereunder by them respectively, subject only to such use of any
particular position as may be necessary to prevent interference
with the present system of drainage pending, its diversions.
In witness whereof, each of said corporations, to-wit: The
Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, and the Central
of Georgia Railway Company have caused these presents to
be executed under their respective corporate seals by their duly
536 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
authorized officers. Done in duplicate this the day and year
first above written.
Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah.
By:
Attest:
Central of Georgia Railway Company.
By:
Attest:
Witness:
Water Mains for Urban Development Go.
By Committee on Water:
Whereas, the Urban Development Company, by M. 8.
Baker, president, and the Oglethorpe Realty Company, by
A. Shulhafer, secretary, have filed their respective petitions to
council requesting that certain water mains be laid in tracts
owned respectively by said companies, agreeing that if the
said water mains are laid that they will deed to the city all
streets owned by said companies in the tracts in question,
Therefore, be it resolved by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah in council assembled, That the petitions
of the Urban Development Company and the Oglethorpe
Realty Company are hereby granted to the following extent:
The city agrees to lay a six-inch water main in Richards
street from Eagle avenue to Chapman avenue, now known as
Millen street, thence south on Millen street to the Augusta
road, thence east on the Augusta road to Eagle avenue, thence
north on Eagle avenue to York street, and that water service
will be placed on Cummings avenue from the Augusta road
to York street lane, provided, however, that the said companies
shall deed to the city all streets in the tracts of the Urban Development Company and the Oglethorpe Realty Company,
more particularly Bay avenue 24 ft. by 964 ft.; Richards street
50 ft. by 1,076 ft.; Jenckens avenue 40 ft. by 1,220 ft.; Baker
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________537
avenue 50 ft. by 1,220 ft.; Fell avenue 70 ft. by 1,290 ft.; Sugden avenue 50 ft. by 650 ft. from Richards street to Augusta
road; Mercer avenue 45 ft. by l,290_ft.; Chapman avenue 45
ft. by 1,310 ft.; Lane avenue 24 ft. by 1,310 ft.; all as shown
by a plat attached to the petition of the Urban Development
Company and made by Percy Sugden, civil engineer. Also
Cummings avenue from the Augusta road to a lane 735 ft.
north of said Augusta road, and the eastern 25 ft. of Eagle
avenue the same length and all streets in that tract and parcel
of land known as Oglethorpe Heights, as shown by a plat made
by Percy Sugden, civil engineer, and attached to the petition
of the Oglethorpe Realty Company.
Be it further resolved, That the water committee be, and
they are hereby authorized, to purchase all pipe and do all work
necessary to lay water mains in said tracts as above indicated;
provided, however, all streets as above shown and as indicated
on said plats are deeded to the city.
Be it further resolved, That His Honor, the Mayor, be
authorized and empowered to excute an agreement on behalf
of the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah with said
companies to put into full effect and force the above provisions,
and in addition thereto the said agreement to contain a clause
that the city will lay additional water mains in and through
said tracts or such parts of said tracts when necessary for the
benefit and convenience of the residents therein.
Adopted and Approved.
Passed August 5, 1914.
City MarketRules and Regulation of
By Committee on Market:
An ordinance to amend section 570 of MacDonell's code
of the city of Savannah, adopted in 1907, prescribing rules
and regulations for the city market:
Section 1. Be it enacted, by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, that rule No. 1,
538_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
of the market rules and regulations, prescribed in section 570
of MacDonell's code of 1907 be, and the same is hereby, amended by striking therefrom the words, "Country carts and
wagons shall be stationed on the west side of the market, commencing at the southwest corner and extending around to the
main entrance on Bryan street; vegetable and other market
vehicles on the east, extending around to the main entrance
on Bryan street," and that there be substituted therefor the
words, "The clerk of the market may make stands or stalls for
fruit and vegetable hucksters outside and adjacent to the market."
Section 2. Be it further enacted, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 22, 1914.
Market
By Committee on Market'.
An ordinance to rescind the ordinance adopted October
21, 1885, providing that hucksters shall sell inside the city
market and farmers outside:
Section 1. Be it enacted by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the ordinance
adopted October 21, 1885, forming sections 561 and 562, of
MacDonell's code of the city of Savannah, adopted in 1907,
providing that hucksters shall sell inside of the city market
and farmers selling their own produce shall sell outside of the
market, with penalties for violation thereof, be, and the same
is hereby, rescinded.
Section 2. Be it further enacted, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 22, 1914.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________539
Market StallsRent Of
Ordinance on its first reading and by unanimous consent
of council read a second time, placed upon its passage, adopted
and approved.
By Committee on City Market:
An ordinance to repeal section 533 of the code of the city
of Savannah, (MacDonell, 1907) having reference to the renting of stalls in the city market, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, and it is hereby
ordained by authority of the same, That section 533 of the code
of the city of Savannah (MacDonell, 1907), having reference
to the renting of stalls in the city market be, and the same is
hereby, repealed. The said section so repealed is as follows:
"533. Renting of StallsOn the first Wednesday in
December, 1872, and the first Wednesday of every succeeding
December, as to stalls not rented or reserved, or then under
rent for the succeeding year, every stall in said market shall
be rented for one year or more, not exceeding two years, at
public outcry at the market house, under assessment to be
fixed by the market committee; and the person making the
highest bid over such assessment shall be the lessee of such
stall for the term of one year or more years as aforesaid, and
the sum so bid shall always be paid in advance of the taking
effect of such letting: and no bid under or below such assessment shall be received except in the discretion of the market
committee. Provided, always, that no person or association of
persons shall rent more than two stalls and no person shall sublet any stall without the authority of the market committee;
and any sub-letting without authority as aforesaid, shall
work a forfeiture of the lease to the city. And, provided
further, that on a second conviction before the police court of
the violation by any lessee of any rules, regulation or regulations, of said market, the lease of such offender shall be declared void, and it shall then utterly cease and determine. Any
540 ______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
person renting any stall may, with the consent of the market
committee, retain the same for another term, at the same or
an advanced price to be agreed on; but in every such case the
lessee shall give at least ten days' notice of his desire to retain
and the terms proposed. Every stall in the market shall be
numbered. All stalls not rented as aforesaid shall be assessed
and let on such terms and at such prices as shall be fixed by
the chairman of the market committee.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
the same are hereby, repealed.
Passed September 2, 1914.
Renting of Market Stalls
Ordinance on its first reading and by unanimous consent
of council read a second time, placed upon its passage adopted
and approved.
By Committee on Market:
An ordinance, to provide for the renting of space in the
city market, and for other purposes,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, and it is hereby
ordained by authority of the same, That from and after the
! passage of this ordinance the committee of council known as
* the market committee shall have charge of the renting of all
spaces in the city market, and said committee shall make rules
and regulations governing the same, which shall become binding on all parties as are the ordinances of the city of Savannah,
when said rules are approved by the council of the said city.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be and the
same are hereby repealed.
Passed Setpember 2, 1914.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___ 541
Reportof Public Library Commission Relative to
Selecting An Architect for the Public Library.
Savannah, Ga., June 10, 1914.
The Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah:
Gentlemen:The commission appointed under the resolution adopted by your honorable body, charged with the duty
of selecting an architect for the public library building, to be
erected with the $75,000.00 appropriated by the Carnegie
Corporation for that purpose, begs to report that after a very
careful consideration of the problems involved in the designing
of a library building to meet the varied requirements to which
such a structure is now subjected, and with an earnest desire
to secure for the people of Savannah such a building as will
best meet their needs and encourage the widespread use of the
facilities provided, it has, by a unanimous vote, confirmed the
decision of its subcommittee of five members recommending
the selection of Mr. H. W. Witcover of this city, who associates
with him Mr. Beverly S. King of New York, and begs to herewith report such selection to your honorable body with the
request that a resolution be adopted authorizing the mayor,
as chairman of this commission, to enter into a contract with
Mr. Witcover.
Your library commission believes that the association of
a Savannah architect, thoroughly acquainted with local conditions, and who has been actively affiliated with the library
work in Savannah since the inauguration of the public library,
with another architect who has had considerable experience
in the designing of satisfactory modern library buildings in
various sections of the country, cannot fail to secure the very
best results for Savannah in the shape of a library building
adapted to our climate, to the needs of a rapidly growing community, and to the practical work that it is designed to do.
In reaching this conclusion we have been assisted by the advice and experience of leading library authorities.
542 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
We are advised by the Carnegie Corporation that the
$75,000.00 appropriated will be available for construction expenses as soon as the plans have been prepared and approved
by it. It is the hope of your commission that the plans may
be in readiness and approved within sixty days and the work
of construction begin in the early fall.
Respectfully submitted,
THE LIBRARY COMMISSION,
By R. J. Davant, Chairman.
Read in Council Meeting June 10, 1914.
1 Employment of Savannah Labor on City
Contracts
By Committee on Trade and Commerce:
An ordinance to provide for the employment of Savannah
labor, by all parties contracting with the mayor and aldermen
of the city of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That from and after
the passage of this ordinance in all contracts made by the city
of Savannah, or its duly authorized officers, there shall be inserted a provision to the following effect: "It is mutually
understood and agreed, and a part of the consideration to the
mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannt-h for the making
of the contract, that in the carrying out of this contract, citizens of the city of Savannah shall be given the preference
for employment to perform all labor required by this contract
to be performed; that the rate of wages to be paid shall not be
less than the ruling rate of wages paid within the city of Savannah for the performance of work of the character specified,
and that in the purchase of materials to be used in the carrying
out of this contract, all materials practicable to be obtained
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 543
in the city of Savannah, shall be purchased in the city of Savannah."
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all advertisements
for the bids on public works or work of whatsoever kind for the
city of Savannah, shall contain a notice that all bids must be
made and all work must be done under the conditions and
provisions of this ordinance.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That the bonds of any
contractor doing work for the mayor and aldermen of the city
of Savannah shall contain a provision binding him to the observance of this ordinance.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed July 8, 1914.
Duties of City Treasurer
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to prescribe the duties of the city treasurer.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That (a) The city
treasurer shall be responsible for the collection of all taxes,
licenses, water rents, proceeds from the sale of badges, ground
rents, paving and other assessments, sums due for repair and
construction of sidewalk, sink cleaning fees, and all other revenues and accounts of the city of whatever nature which
are now or may hereafter be entrusted to him for collection,
and the said city treasurer shall give receipts therefor on forms
approved by the city council or finance committee.
(b) The said city treasurer shall receive and provide for
the safe-keeping of all funds belonging to the city and of all
monies held on deposit in whatever banks may be selected as
depositaries; it shall be his duty to deposit in such bank or
banks each day all monies of the city he may receive.
544 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
: (c) The said city treasurer shall make a return each day to
the comptroller of accounts of the total amount of his collec-
, tions in such form as to specify sums collected from each source.
(d) The said city treasurer shall keep such books as may
be approved for this purpose in such a manner as to show
a
'i proper and intelligible record of revenue collected by him from
j each source and of the revenue remaining uncollected, and
U shall furnish monthly to the comptroller of accounts a state-
, j ment showing the balance of the revenue uncollected.
i (e) The said city treasurer shall collect the exact amount
shown on the rolls or accounts given to him for collections,
j and under no circumstances shall he make adjustments of
|' any kind on his books and accept in settlement less sums than
i: are shown on such rolls or accounts unless so authorized by
j: the city council,
I ' (f) The said city treasurer shall keep in suitable books, the i 1 form of which shall be approved by the city council or finance
committee, a record of all cash received and disbursed, specifyj ing the funds to which the receipts have been credited, and
from which fund monies have been disbursed, his books shall
at all times be subject to inspection by the city council or any
member thereof and by the comptroller of accounts.
(g) The said city treasurer shall make all payments of
funds upon vouchers properly issued and audited by the comptroller of accounts and approved for payments by the mayor
he shall carefully preserve the vouchers for all payments made
by him, and no allowance shall be made to the city treasurer
I for any funds disbursed by him unless he shall produce the
f receipt or voucher showing to whom and out of what fund
the payment was made, or account, to the satisfaction of the
city council for failure to produce such voucher.
(h) The said city treasurer shall be the custodian of all
bonds and coupons cancelled and shall report each day to the
comptroller of accounts the amount of the bonds and coupons
paid by him. He shall receive from the purchasers of all
bonds the purchase price thereof and advise the comptroller of
accounts of the amount so received.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 545
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed January 7, 1914.
Police Court Fines Deposited With Treasurer
Same Day
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to amend section 113 of MacDonell's code
of the city of Savannah, 1907:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That section 113 of
MacDonell's code of the city of Savannah, 1907, be, and the
same is hereby, amended by adding at the end of said section
the following:
All fines and costs imposed shall be paid to the clerk of
the police court, who shall deposit with the city treasurer each
day all fines and costs collected, taking the said city treasurer's
receipt therefor. At the end of each month the clerk of the
police court shall make a report in duplicate on all convictions
to the comptroller of accounts on the form to be provided for
that purpose, and thereupon the comptroller of accounts shall
audit such report by reference to the court docket.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed January 7, 1914.
Tax on Marine Insurance Companies
By Committee on Finance:
An ordinance to amend the tax ordinance for the year
1914, passed by council December 24, 1913, in regard to the
license tax on marine insurance companies or associations.
18
546_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the paragraph
in the tax ordinance for the city of Savannah for the year 1914,
passed by council December 24,1913, in regard to the tax on
fire, marine and life insurance companies or associations be,
and the same is hereby, amended, by striking therefrom the
word "marine" and adding at the end of the said paragraph
the following:
"Every such marine insurance company, $100.00 for every
agency or broker," so that said paragraph of said ordinance
when so amended shall read as follows:
"Every fire or life insurance company or association doing
business, whether directly or through an agency or through a
broker, $200.00 for each and every agency or broker."
"Every fire or life insurance company or association doing
business, whether directly or through an agency or through a
broker, $200.00 for each and every agency or broker. Every
such marine insurance company, $100.00 for every agency or
broker."
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That any marine insurance company or association paying said tax within ten days
of the passage of this ordinance shall be allowed the usual discount.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and the
same are, repealed.
Ordinance Passed February 18, 1914:
Assessors to Prepare for Rolls
An ordinance to amend section 1567 of MacDonell'a code
of the city of Savannah, 1907.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That section 1567
of MacDonelPs code of the city of Savannah, 1907, be, and
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL JtEPORT 647
the same is hereby, amended, by adding at the end of said section the following:
Immediately after said board of assessors shall have completed the assessment roll of real estate and improvements and
personal property, it shall be its duty to prepare two tax rolls,
one of which shall be known as the original and the other as
the duplicate. These tax rolls shall be prepared in a book, or
on sheets, appropriately ruled and arranged alphabetically, to
show under each name the total amount of the assessment and
taxes.
On the final completion of said tax rolls by the board of
assessors it shall forthwith prepare a certificate and swear to
the same before any officer authorized to administer oaths,
embracing the facts shown and referred to in the following
form:
We............................................. chairman and........................
....................................................................comprising the board
of tax assessors of the city of Savannah, Georgia, do solemnly
swear that the tax roll for the year..................to which is attached this certificate, contains a full and correct list of all the
real and personal property, subject to taxation in the city of
Savannah, Georgia, so far as we have been able to ascertain
the same; that the assessed value set down in the proper column opposite each name, aggregating $............................is the
true and correct valuation thereof, as ascertained by us, and
that the footings of the several columns in said tax roll and
the amount of taxes shown as collectible is correct as we verily
believe.
............................................................ Chairman.
The certificate of the said board of assessors, referred to
above, after having been approved by the mayor, shall be
read at the meeting of the council following. The spreading
of the certificate upon the minutes shall be deemed an approval of the tax rolls by the city council, unless action to the
contrary by the council be taken at this meeting.
548_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
After the tax rolls shall have been approved by the city
council in the manner described above, the original shall be
delivered to the city treasurer and the duplicate remain in
the vault of the clerk of council. It shall further be the duty
of the comptroller of accounts to charge to the account of the
city treasurer the total amount of taxes due to the city of
Savannah for the current year as shown on the tax rolls and
by the certificate of the board of assessors, which amount shall
be a valid claim against the city treasurer and the sureties on
his official bond until the same shall be properly accounted for.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
i parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
i repealed.
Ordinance Passed January 7, 1914.
Specific Tax on Packing Houses, Etc.
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to reduce the specific tax on packing houses
and upon dealers in packing house goods and products, provided for on page 25 of the printed pamphlet of the tax ordinance for the year 1914.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That the specific
tax to be required of packing houses and upon all dealers in
packing house goods and products having a place of business
or a stock of merchandise in the city of Savannah, and selling
therefrom to customers in said city, shall be $100.00 instead
of $200.00 and that part of the ordinance referred to in the
title of this ordinance is hereby changed accordingly.
A party paying this tax within fifteen days after the passage of this ordinance shall be entitled to the usual discount.
Section 2. Be it further ordained by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That all
ordinances and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and the same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed April 29, 1914
________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________540
Assessment of Specific Taxes
By Finance Committee:
An ordinance to provide for the assessment of specific
taxes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That it shall be the
duty of the city marshal to prepare two specific tax registers
each year, one of which shall be known as the original and the
other as the duplicate. This register shall be prepared in a
book or on sheets appropriately ruled and arranged alphabetically to show under each name the nature of the business
or businesses carried on by the persons or corporations assessed
and the total amount of specific taxes collectible.
On the final completion of the specific city tax register by
the city marshal he shall forthwith prepare a certificate and
swear to the same before any officer authorized to administer
oaths, embracing the facts shown and referred to in the following form:
I............................................................................................city
marshal of the city of Savannah, Georgia, do solemnly swear
that the specific tax register for the year....................................
to which is attached this certificate, contains a full and correct
list of all the individuals, firms and corporations pursuing
occupations subject to payment of specific taxes in the city
of Savannah, Georgia, so far as I have been able to ascertain
the same; that the assessment set down in the proper column
opposite each name, aggregating the amount of $...................,..
is true and correct, as ascertained by me, and that the footings
of the several columns in said specific tax register and the
amount of taxes shown as collectible is correct as I verily believe.
City Marshal.
The certificate of the city marshal, referred to above, after
having been approved by the mayor, shall be read at the meeting of the council following. The spreading of the certificate
upon the minutes shall be deemed an approval of the specific
550_______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
tax register by the city council, unless action to the contrary
by the council be taken at this meeting.
After the specific tax register shall have been approved
by the city council in the manner described above, the original
shall be delivered to the city treasurer and the duplicate remain in the vault of the clerk of council. It shall further be
the duty of the comptroller of accounts to charge to the account of the city treasurer the total amount of taxes due to the
city of Savannah, Georgia, for the current year as shown on
the specific tax register and by the certificate of the city marshal, which amount shall be a valid claim against the city treasurer and the sureties on his official bond until the same shall
* be properly accounted for.
Any additions to the specific tax register after the original
has been delivered to the city treasurer under provisions
described above shall be prepared by the city marshal on a
form for that particular purpose known as the supplement to
specific tax register, year........................; after being approved
by the mayor and chairman of the finance committee the total
of such supplemental taxes shall be charged by the comptroller
of accounts to the city treasurer and entered by the city treasurer in the supplemental section of the specific tax register.
All these supplemental amounts shall be valid claims against
the city treasurer and the sureties on his official bond until the
same shall be properly accounted for.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance Passed January 27, 1914.
Deeds for Lots Laurel Grove CemeteryColored
By Committee on Finance:
An ordinance to authorize His Honor, the Mayor, to sign
certain deeds to lots in a tract in Laurel Grove cemetery, set
apart for the interment of the remains of deceased persons of
color.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________551
Whereas, it has been the general custom, up to October
15, 1913, for the municipal authorities to sell to persons of
color lots in the above entitled tract for the sum of ten dollars
($10.00) and,
Whereas, certain parties hereinafter named, having paid
prior to that date into the city treasury of Savannah the sum
of ten dollars ($10.00) each for lots in said tract; therefore,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah, in council assembled, That His Honor,
the Mayor, be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to
sign deeds to the following named parties for lots in above
stated tract, viz: George Houston, Flora Jenkins, Annie
Middleton and Lucus Wylie.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
the same are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance Passed March 4, 1914.
:
ACTS
OF THE
GEORGIA LEGISLATURE
1913-1914
RELATIVE TO
CITY OF SAVANNAH
h4
Amending Charter for Various Purposes
(No. 505)
An act to amend the several acts relating to and incorporating the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah,
and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
state of Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of
same, That from and after the passage of this act the corporate limits of the city of Savannah shall be so extended as to
embrace Baffin Park and the Parkside Land Company subdivision, and the streets, lanes and roads included therein and
adjacent thereto, bounded as follows: Commencing at the
present corporate limits of the city of Savannah, on the corner
of Ash street and Dale avenue, running thence south across
Dale avenue to the north property line of Baffin Park, thence
east along the north property line of Daffin Park to the
eastern property line of Bee Road; thence south along the
eastern property line of Bee Road and Bee Road extension, as
shown on the map of said Parkside Land Company subdivision
to an unnamed street 30 feet in width separating said subdivision from the McClesky lands; thence westwardly along the
northern side of said unnamed street to the western side of
Waters avenue; thence north along the western side of Waters
avenue to the northern side of Dale avenue, thence east along
the northern side of Dale avenue to the point beginning.
Section 2. Be it further enacted, That no tract of land
lying within the corporate limits of the city of Savannah, as
they now are, or hereafter may be denned, or within two miles
of such corporate limits, shall be laid off into lots and streets
or lanes, or subdivided in any manner, until a map or plan of
such subdivision shall have first been submitted to and ap-
It- t 556 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ij proved by the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah.
! I A copy of the map or plan of such subdivision, when so ap-
\ . proved, shall be recorded by the parties making such subi * division in the office of the clerk of the superior court of Chatham county, Georgia, and copies deposited with the board of
commissioners of roads and revenues of Chatham county,
and with the chief engineer of the city of Savannah before
offering any such lots for sale, and the filing of such map or
11 plan shall constitute a dedication for public purposes of all
streets, lanes or other highways thereon delineated.
.1 Section 3. Be it further enacted, That the mayor and
aldermen of the city of Savannah shall have authority to pass
* all necessary ordinances, not conflicting with the provisions of
this act, regulating the laying off and sale of lots of land within
the corporate limits of said city, and within two miles thereof,
and providing punishment for violations of such ordinances
' and the preceding section of this act. \ t . Section 4. Be it further enacted, That when any street or
lane, or other highway in the city of Savannah is to be paved,
notice shall be served by the city marshal upon the owners,
! agents of owners of the adjoining property, that all gas, water,
f sewerage, conduits, and other underground connections must
i be made to the curb line before said paving is laid, and in the
4. | event of the refusal or failure of any such property owner to
make such connections, he may be prohibited from making
any underground connections which would require the tearing up of street paving for a period of five years, except under such penalties as the city by ordinance may impose.
Section 5. Be it further enacted, That the owner of any
lot or tract of land within the corporate limits of the city of
Savannah shall be primarily liable to any person injured by
reason of any defect in or obstruction on the sidewalk bordering his property whenever the defect or obstruction is caused
by the owner or person in possession, or whenever the defect
is not caused by the owner or person in possession, but such
defect has been previously brought to the attention of the
owner, his agent, or the person in possession of said property
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________687
or where such defect remains unrepaired for such a period
of time as would make the city liable and whenever the mayor
and aldermen of the city of Savannah are sued in such cases
they shall vouch into court the owner of such property, and
said owner shall be liable to the city for the amount of judgment obtained in such suit against the city.
Section 6. Be it further enacted, That the mayor and
aldermen of the city of Savannah shall have authority to pass
such ordinances as may be necessary to require all transfers
of city real estste to be recorded with the board of tax assessors,
or some person it may designate, and to require the grantee
in the deed to pay all taxes up to the end of the last quarter
before such transfer.
Section 7. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the salary of the recorder of the police court of the
city of Savannah, beginning with the term of said official
elected at the regular municipal election to be held in said
city in January, 1915, shall not be less than twenty-five hundred (12,500.00) dollars per year.
Section 8. Be it further enacted, That all laws and parts
of laws in conflict with this act be, and the same are hereby,
repealed.
Approved August 17, 1914.
Amending Act for Primary Elections
(No. 411)
An act to amend an act approved August 19, 1913, entitled, "An act to provide for the holding of primary elections
in the city of Savannah, Georgia, for the election of mayor
and aldermen of said city; to fix the rules and regulations
under which such primaries shall be held, the qualification of
voters therein, and for other purposes."
Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the state of
Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of same,
558_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
That the act entitled, "An act to provide for the holding of
primary elections in the city of Savannah, Georgia, for the
selection of mayor and aldermen of said city; to fix the rules
and regulations under which said primaries shall be held, the
qualification of voters therein, and for other purposes," approved August 19, 1913, be, and the same is hereby, amended
as follows:
Section 1. By striking from the third and fourth lines of
section one of said act the words "That on the first Wednesday
in January, 1915, and upon the same day in each alternate
year thereafter," and inserting in lieu thereof the words,
"That on the second Tuesday in December, 1914, and thereafter upon the second Tuesday in December of each year immediately preceding the regular municipal election for mayor
and aldermen and recorder of the city of Savannah," and
further by striking from the seventh and eighth lines of
said section 1, the words, "in the general election for
mayor and aldermen to be held during such year," and insert11 ing in lieu thereof the following words, "for mayor and alder-
' men and recorder in the next ensuing general municipal elecI tion fixed by law for said city," so that when said section 1
'. is so amended it will read as follows:
. Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
{ State of Georgia, and it is hereby .enacted by the authority of
" J same, That on the second Tuesday in December, 1914, and
thereafter upon the second Tuesday in December of each year
immediately preceding the regular municipal election for
mayor and aldermen and recorder of the city of Savannah,
primary elections shall be held in the city of Savannah by all
political parties which have a state or national organization
and which desire to have candidates for mayor and aldermen
and recorder in the next ensuing general municipal election
fixed by law for said city.
Section 2. By adding after the word "mayor" in the third
line of section 2 of said act the words "and recorder," so that
when said section 2 is so amended it will read as follows:
|. "Section 2. Be it further enacted by the authority f
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT____ 559
aforesaid, That at such primary elections each candidate for
mayor and recorder shall be entitled to name one manager and
one clerk at each voting box".
Section 3. By striking from section 3 of said act the
words "and who is further qualified under the rules of his
party" in the fourth line of section 3, and by inserting in
lieu thereof the following words "and who is further qualified
under the rules of the state executive committee of his respective party," and further by adding at the end of said
section 3, the following words: "The list of qualified registered voters of Chatham county, residing within the corporate
limits of the city of Savannah, prepared by the duly appointed
registrars of Chatham county, under the provisions of the
general registration laws of this state, shall be used as the list
of registered and qualified voters entitled to vote in such primary elections subject to the restrictions of the first paragraph
of this section, and said list shall be certified and furnished by
the said registrars of Chatham county to the managers of such
primary elections at the time and in the manner required by
law for the furnishing of the list of voters at the regular general
election for mayor and aldermen qf the city of Savannah, so
that when said section is amended it will read as follows:
Section 3. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That at such primary elections every person qualified to
vote in the next succeeding regular municipal election and who
is f urither qualified under the r\iles of the state executive committee of his respective party, shall be entitled to vote. The
list of qualified registered voters of Chatham county residing
within the corporate limits of the city of Savannah prepared
by the duly appointed registrars of Chatham county under
the provisions of the general registration law of this state shall
be used as the list of registered and qualified voters entitled
to vote in such primary elections subject to the restrictions of
the first paragraph of this section, and said list shall be certified and furnished by the said registrars of Chatham county
to the managers of such primary elections at the time and in
the manner required by law for the furnishing of list of voters
560 _______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
at the regular general election for mayor and aldermen of the
city of Savannah.
Section 4. By striking from said act, section 4 and substituting in place thereof another section to be numbered and
reading as follows: "Section 4. Be it further enacted by the
authority aforesaid. That at all such primary elections there
shall be the same number of boxes, the same hours of voting and
the same place of voting, that is, at the courthouse of Chatham
county as provided by law for the regular election for mayor
and aldermen of the city of Savannah in an act of the General
Assembly of 1914, entitled 'An act to provide for the registration of voters to vote at the municipal elections in the city
of Savannah, and to fix, regulate and determine the time,
place and manner in which such elections shall be held, and
prescribe qualification of voters at such elections and to prescribe suitable penalties for all violations thereof and for other
purposes.' The chairman of each political party shall in such
primary elections perform the duties prescribed for the clerk
of council in said last mentioned act."
Section 5. By striking from said act section 5 and substituting in place thereof another section to be numbered five
and reading as follows: "Section 5. Be it further enacted by
the authority aforesaid, That the first election provided for
under this act shall be conducted and held under the jurisdiction and authority of the judge of the superior court of
Chatham county, the judge of the city court of Savannah and
the ordinary of Chatham county, who shall arrange and provide for all the rules and regulations and details of the primary
not herein provided for and not inconsistent with anything
provided for in this act. And at said first election and at
each election thereafter, held under this act, each political
party of the description aforesaid which may have candidates
for mayor and aldermen or recorder in such election shall submit for election an executive committee to be known as the
city executive committee, such committee to be composed of
twenty-four citizens of the city of Savannah and qualified
voters. And at all future elections held under this act the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 661
city executive committee of each political party of the description aforesaid shall have the authority to arrange and provide
for all rules and regulations and details of the primary of their
respective parties not herein provided for and not inconsistent
with anything provided for in this act."
Section 6. By striking from the third and fourth lines of
section 6, of said act, the words "in the regular general election
in said city for mayor and aldermen," and inserting in lieu
thereof the following words: "In the next succeeding regular
municipal election in said city for mayor and aldermen or
recorder," and further by striking from the sixth line of said
section 6, the words "in said regular election as an independent
candidate," and inserting in lieu thereof the following words:
"In said next succeeding regular municipal election as an
independent candidate for mayor or aldermen or recorder,"
and further by striking from the twelfth line of said section
6, of said act, the words "succeeding general election," and
inserting in lieu thereof the following words "succeeding regular municipal elections;" and further by adding at the end
of section 6, of said act, the following words: "And if it should
appear at any time that the petition of any independent candidate does not contain the names of at least one-third of the
registered voters fully qualified by law, said candidate shall be
ineligible and the election of any such candidate shall be null
and void," so that when said section 6 is so amended it shall
read as follows:' 'Section 6. Be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no person shall be entitled to become a candidate
in the next succeeding regular municipal election in said city
for mayor and aldermen, or recorder who has not been nominated by a political party of the description aforesaid at a
primary election held under the terms of this act, unless any
person desiring to enter in said next succeeding municipal
election as an independent candidate for mayor or aldermen
or recorder shall within five days before said general election
in said city file with the clerk of council of said city a petition
endorsing his candidacy, signed by not less than one-third of
the persons registered and qualified to vote in the next sue-
562_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
ceeding regular municipal election. No votes shall be counted
for any person who has not been so nominated by said party
or for any independent candidate who has not filed the petition
aforesaid. And if it should appear at any time that the petition of any independent candidate does not contain the names
of at least one-third of the registered voters fully qualified by
law, said candidate shall be ineligible and the election of any
such candidate shall be null and void."
Section 7. By adding at the end of section 7, of said act,
the following words: "And the candidate for recorder receiving
the highest number of votes in his party shall be declared the
nominee of his party," so that when said section is so amended
it shall read as follows: "Section 7. Be it further enacted by the
authority aforesaid, That the candidate for mayor receiving
the highest number of votes in his party shall be declared the
nominee of bis party, and the twelve aldermen receiving the
highest number of votes in their party sbaU be declared the
nominee of their party, and the candidate for recorder receiving the highest number of votes of his party shall be declared
the nominee of his party."
Section 8. By adding after section 7, of said act, another
section to be known as section 8, reading as follows: "Section
8. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the
provisions of section 17,18,19,20 and 21, of the act of the General Assembly of Georgia of 1914, entitled 'An act to provide for
the registration of voters to vote at the municipal elections in
the city of Savannah and to fix, regulate and determine the
time, place and manner in which such elections shall be held,
and prescribe qualifications of voters at all such elections, and
to prescribe suitable penalties for all violations thereof, and
for other purposes, 'shall apply to and be of force in all elections held under the terms of this act and said sections are
hereby incorporated and made a part of this act."
Section 9. By adding after section 8, as thus amended
another section to said act to be known as section 9, and reading as follows: Section 9. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That each political party of the description afore-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 63
said desiring to enter candidates for mayor and aldermen or
recorder in said elections under this act, shall have separate
ballots prepared and furnished under the supervision of the
authorities in charge of the election under the terms of this act.
The official ballot of each political party of the description
aforesaid shall contain in separate columns the names of the
candidates for mayor and aldermen and recorder of such party.
There shall be as many columns on each ticket or ballots as
there shall be respective candidates in such party or parties
and the voter shall scratch thereon all candidates against whom
he proposes to vote. Each political party or the description
aforesaid entering candidates in said elections under this act
shall have colored ballots, and no two political parties shall
have ballots of the same color, but all the ballots or tickets of
any particular party must be of the same color and uniform in
size and furnished as hereinbefore provided for. No vote
cast on any ballot other than those herein provided for shall be
received by the managers of the election, and if received by
error or otherwise it shall not be counted. It shall be unlawful for any manager of the election or any clerk to examine the
ballot offered by any voter except for the purpose of counting
the ballot after the polls have closed, and any manager or clerk
violating this provision shall be guilty of a misdemeanor under
the laws of the state of Georgia and shall be punished as provided in section 1065, of the penal code of the state of Georgia.
Section 10. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all laws and part of laws in conflict with this act
be, and the same are hereby, repealed.
Approved August 12, 1914.
Abolishing Justice Courts in Savannah
(No. 316)
An act to amend paragraph 1, of section 7, of the eonstitution of the state of Georgia, providing for one justice of the
564_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___
peace in each militia district of the state, and for the General
Assembly in its discretion to abolish justice courts and the
office of the justice of the peace and of notary public, ex-officio
justice of the peace in any city of this state having a population
of over twenty thousand, except the city of Savannah, and
to establish in lieu thereof such court or courts as the General
Assembly may in its discretion deem necessary by striking
therefrom the portion of the proviso of said paragraph, which
excepts the city of Savannah from the privilege of having the
General Assembly abolish justice courts in said city and
establish such other court or courts or system of courts as the
General Assembly may in its discretion deem necessary, and
for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
state of Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of
same, That paragraph one(l) of section seven(7) of article six (6)
of the constitution of the state of Georgia, as amended by the
act of the General-Assembly, approved July 30, 1912, and duly
ratified by the people according to law be, and the same is
hereby, amended by striking from the proviso contained in
said amendment the words "except the city of Savananh,"
where they immediately follow the words "having a population of over twenty thousand," so that said proviso so amended
by this amendment shall read as follows: "Provided, however,
that the General Assembly may in its discretion abolish justice
courts, and the office of justice of the peace and of notary public, ex-officio justices of the peace in any city in this state
having a population of over twenty thousand, and establish in
lieu thereof such court or courts or system of courts as the
General Assembly may, in its discretion deem necessary,
conferring upon such new court or courts or system of courts,
when so established, the jurisdiction as to subject matter now
exercised by justice courts and by justices of the peace and
notaries public ex-officio justices of the peace, together with
such additional jurisdiction, either as to amount or to subject
matter, as may be provided by law, whereof some other court
has not exclusive jurisdiction under this constitution, together
__ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 665
also with provisions as to rules and procedure in such courts
and as to new trials and the correction of errors in and by said
courts and with such further provisions for the correction of
errors by the superior court, or the court of apeals or the supreme court as the General Assembly may from time to time
in its discretion, provide or authorize. Any court so established shall not be subject to the rules of uniformity laid down
in paragraph 1, of section 9, of article 6, of the constitution
of Georgia."
Section 2. Be it further enacted, That if this constitutional amendment shall be agreed .to by two-thirds of the
members of the General Assembly, the same shall be entered
on each journal, with the ayes and nays taken thereon, and
the governor shall cause the amendment to be published in one
or more of the newspapers in each congressional district
for two months immediately preceding the next general election, and the voters thereat shall have written or printed on
their tickets "For ratification of amendment to paragraph 1,
section 7, of article 6, of the constitution (for striking the words
"except in the city of Savannah" from paragraph 1. of said
section and article, so as to bring Savannah within the
provisions of general law relative to General Assembly abolishing justice courts in cities having over twenty thousand and
establishing other courts in lieu thereof,") or "Against ratification of amendment to paragraph 1, of section 7, article 6, of
the constitution (against striking the words "except in the city
of Savannah" from paragraph 1, of said section and article,
bringing the city of Savannah within the provisions of the
general relative to General Assembly abolishing justice courts
in cities having over twenty thousand and establishing other
courts in lieu thereof.") as they may choose, and if a majority
of the electors qualified to vote for members of the next General Assembly, voting, shall vote in favor of ratification, then
said amendment shall become a part of paragraph 1, section
7, of article 6, of the constitution of this state, and the governor
shall make proclamation thereof.
Section 3. Be it further enacted, That all laws and parts
566_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ____
of laws in conflict with this act be, and the same are hereby,
repealed.
Approved July 29, 1914.
Closing of River Street
(No. 285.)
An act to authorize the mayor and aldermen of the city
of Savannah to' close and abolish that certain portion of River
street, in the city of Savannah, lying between the western line
of Wadley street extended, and the western terminus of said
River street; and to authorize and empower the mayor and
aldermen of the city of Savannah to vest the title to said portion of River street in the Ocean Steamship Company of
Savannah and its assigns.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
state of Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of
same, That the mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah
are hereby authorized and empowered to close and abolish that
certain portion of River street in the city of Savannah, lying
between the western line of Wadley street and the western terminus of said River street; and to authorize and empower the
mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah to vest the title to
said portion of River street in the Ocean Steamship Company
of Savannah and its assigns.
. Section 2. Be it further enacted, That all laws and parts
of laws in conflict with this act be, and the same are hereby,
repealed.
Approved July 18, 1914.
Regulating Municipal Elections
(No. 419)
An act to provide for the registration of voters to vote at
the municipal elections in the city of Savannah,and to fix, regulate and determine the time, place and manner in which such
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 567
elections shall be held, and prescribe the qualifications of
voters at all such elections and to prescribe penalties for all
violations thereof, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the
state of Georgia, and it is hereby enacted by authority of the
same, That hereafter the elections for mayor and aldermen of
the city of Savannah shall be held on the second Tuesday in
January of each fourth year, beginning with the year 1915;
that is to say, the next municipal election shall be held on the
second Tuesday in January 1915; that the next municipal
election thereafter shall be held on the second Tuesday in January, 1919, and so on each succeeding fourth year thereafter.
Section 2. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the qualification of voters at elections for mayor and
aldermen and recorder of the city of Savannah, shall be those
required by this act and the constitution of the state of Georgia for elections in state elections, except that the time of residence of voters within the corporate limits of the city of
Savannah shall be six months immediately preceding such
election.
Section 3. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all electors who are residents of the city of Savannah
and are now entitled to vote in state elections in Chatham
county, and all electors qualifying under this act, shall be
permanently registered and entitled to vote in said municipal
elections; provided, that they shall be disqualified from voting
for removal of residence from the city of Savannah and for any
other reasons set forth in the permanent registration act of
the state of Georgia approved August 19th, 1913 (acts 1913,
pages 115-117,) and any amendments which may be made
thereto.
Section 4. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the list of qualified registered voters of Chatham
county residing within the corporate limits of the city of
Savannah prepared by the duly appointed registrars of Chatham county, under the provisions of the general registration
law of the state of Georgia, shall be used as the list of registered
I
t 568 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
and qualified voters entitled to vote in said elections for mayor
and aldermen and recorder.
Section 5. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That, the tax collector of Chatham county shall close the
registration book for such municipal election six months before
the date of the next succeeding election.
Section 6. Be it further enacted by the authority aforei said, That the said registrars of Chatham county shall prepare
the said list of qualified registered voters of Chatham county,
residing within the corporate limits of the city of Savannah,
who have registered and paid all taxes due by them to the state [
of Georgia and Chatham county, six months before said municipal elections, as required by the provisions of the general
registration law of the state of Georgia. The registrars in
preparing said list will divide the voters in the first and second
districts into three lists each and the third and fourth districts
into four lists, each alphabetically arranged, upon each of
which lists shall appear as far as practicable one-third or onefourth respectively of the names of the voters of Chatham
county residing within each of the said militia districts, it being
the duty of said registrars, as far as possible, to equally divide
said names on said lists without dividing the names commencing with the particular letter of the alphabet between two
lists.
Section 7. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the morning of the election for mayor and aldermen
and recorder of said city, and before the boxes for the receiving
of votes are opened, said registrars of Chatham county shall
furnish the managers of each and every box a list made up as
hereinbefore prescribed, of the voters in the respective militia
districts, or portions thereof; the persons whose name appear
upon said lists shall be entitled to vote at such election, they
being in all other respects qualified.
Section 8. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That for rendering of services hereinbefore provided for
the registrars of Chatham county, they shall receive the sum
of four cents for each name upon the lists so furnished by them,
to be paid out of the public treasury of the city of Savannah.
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 669
Section 9. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, It shall be the duty of the clerk of council of the city of
Savannah to locate the position of the ballot boxes for the respective militia districts and the divisions thereof at the court
house of Chatham county three (3) days before the election,
to prepare and furnish the form of oath to be taken by the
election managers and clerks, and the certificate of returns to
be signed by said managers, consolidated returns and all other
forms and papers to be used in said elections; except such as
are herein otherwise provided for; furnished stationery to the
clerks, ballot boxes to the managers and make all necessary
arrangements for the election; and all expenses incident to the
preparation of said papers, obtaining said stationery and ballot
boxes and making said arrangements shall be borne by the
city of Savannah, and paid from its treasury.
Section 10. Be it further enacted by authority aforesaid,
That five days preceding the election for mayor and aldermen
and recorder of the city of Savannah, the judge of the superior
court of Chatham county, the judge of the city court of Savannah, and the ordinary of Chatham county, shall appoint six
election managers for the first and second militia districts
each, and eight managers each for the third and fourth militia
districts of Chatham county, said militia districts, for the purposes of said election, being divided as nearly as possible into
thirds and quarters, as provided in the sixth section of this act,
so as to conform to the division of electors as made by the
registrars, two of said managers to preside at each of the boxes
in the said districts, and at the particular box to which they
may be appointed by said judges. Such managers shall have
been for the six months immediately preceding the election for
which they are appointed, residents of the city of Savannah.
In the event of a contest for the office of mayor and aldermen,
it shall not be lawful to appoint both managers at one box who
are known to be adherents to any one ticket or candidate for
office, but all persons contesting for office shall, as far as possible, have representation at each box.
Section 11. Be it further enacted by the authority afore-
570_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
said, That the hours, of voting at said elections shall be from
eight o'clock in the morning until five o'clock in the afternoon,
city time, the polls being kept open eight full hours. The
managers above provided for shall have exclusive charge of all
details in the arrangements and conduct of said elections, and
shall allow not more than two representatives of each contending party or faction to be present when they count the ballots
and certify the result of the election, and each manager before
undertaking and entering upon the performance of his duties
under this act, shall take an oath before the clerk of the superior court of Chatham county, to be filed in said clerk's office,
that he will truly perform the duties of his position.
Section 12. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That each of the managers so appointed shall appoint a
clerk or list keeper, whose duties shall be to enter upon a list
prepared for that purpose the names of those voters of the
division of the district who vote at such election, such names
to be regularly numbered according to the order in which the
votes are cast, and the ballots voted by each voter shall bear
the number that appears opposite the name of said voter on
said list. Each clerk or list keeper shall, before entering upon
' the discharge of his duties, take and subscribe an oath before
the clerk of the superior court of Chatham county to faithfully
perform the same, and each clerk or list keeper shall receive as
compensation the sum of five dollars, to be paid from the
treasury of the city of Savannah.
Section 13. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if any election manager shall become disqualified or
unable to perform his duties, his place shall be immediately
filled by another, appointed as prescribed in the tenth section
of this act, and each manager shall receive for his services the
sum of ten ($10.00) dollars to be paid from the treasury of the
city of Savannah.
Section 14. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the election of mayor and aldermen and recorder of
the city of Savannah shall be held at the court house of Chatham county, in said city, at the times hereinbefore prescribed
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 571
for same, and it shall be the duty of said district managers and
clerks to attend said court house at the time appointed for the
election, each voter shall vote in the box assigned to the district, or division of the district, in which he resides and not
elsewhere, and when the right of any person to vote is challenged, one of said managers shall swear him, touching his right
to vote, and propound to him the questions answered by him
at his registration, and if his answers do not satisfactorily
identify him as the person whose name he offers to vote, he
shall not be allowed to vote. Upon receiving any vote, the
name of the voter shall be immediately checked off the list
furnished the managers as hereinbefore provided for.
Section 15. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That upon the conclusion of the counting of the votes
of each box, the managers of each box shall immediately
make out and sign certificates of returns under oaths of the
election, said certificate to give the name of each candidate
voted for at such box and the number of votes received by
him for the position for which he is a candidate. One copy of
such certificates, the ballots voted, the lists furnished by the
registrars, and all other papers used in such election shall be
delivered under seal by the election managers to the clerk of
the superior court of Chatham county, and another copy of
the certified returns shall be delivered to the judges who appoint the managers for said election, before twelve o'clock of
the day following the election. The election manager* shall
also at the conclusion of the counting of the ballots publicly
announce the result of the election at each box, and the judges
shall immediately upon receipt of the certified returns of each
box publicly consolidate the same, and publicly announce the
result of the election, and the candidate for mayor receiving
the highest number of votes shall be deemed elected and declared mayor, and the candidates so receiving the highest
number of votes for aldermen shall be deemed elected and declared aldermen, and the candidate so receiving the highest
number of votes for recorder shall be deemed elected and declared recorder and the consolidated returns as made by the
572_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___
said judges shall be filed in the office of the clerk of council,
as an official paper of the city of Savannah.
Section 16. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all ballots and papers deposited with the clerk of
the superior court of Chatham county, shall be kept by him
unopened for the space of thirty days after such elections;
provided, however, that no contest is had. In the event of a
contest it shall be his duty to keep all papers until he is called
on to produce them in court having jurisdiction of said contest.
After any such contest is decided he shall destroy all papers
without further examination.
Section 17. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid. That upon election day the police force of the city of
Savannah shall be under the direction and control of the
mayor of the city of Savannah, for the purpose of preserving
order at and around the court house of said county; there
shall be no interference on the part of said force or any member
thereof with any voter who is in good faith attempting to deposit his ballot, and who is not violating any provisions of
this act, any law of the state of Georgia, or municipal ordinance of the city of Savannah, and any member or officer of
said force so interfering shall be held and deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor under the laws of the state of Georgia, and shall
be punished as provided in section 1065, of the penal code of
the state of Georgia.
Section 18. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That any election manager who shall use or attempt to
use his position for the purpose of aiding any candidate for
office, or who in any manner attempts to secure a partisan
advantage for any such candidate, or who shall allow any
person to vote who is not a qualified elector under the pro visions
of this act, shall be held and deemed guilty of a misdemeanor
under the laws of the state of Georgia, and shall be punished as
provided in section 1065, of the penal code of the state of
Georgia.
Section 19. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That any person, who without being legally and properly
i
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 673
entitled to do so, votes or attempts to vote at any election
for mayor and aldermen or recorder, for the city of Savannah,
or who in any way interferes with the orderly and peaceful
conduct and management of the same, shall be held and deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, under the laws of the state of
Georgia; and punished as provided in section 1065, of the
penal code of the state of Georgia.
Section 20. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no person whosoever shall be permitted upon the
curb or sidewalk in front af any ballot box, except persons
who are regular employees about the court house of Chatham
county, and whose duties may require them, by reason of the
location of the ballot boxes in the several offices of the court
house to be closer to the same, members of the police force of
the city of Savannah who are charged with the enforcement of
law and order around the polls, and the electors approaching
to vote, who shall form in as many lines as there are contending
candidates for mayor, and who shall vote alternately from
each line; no elector, however, shall be nearer than ten feet to
the ballot box except the one in the act of voting, and it shall
not be lawful for said clerks about the court house, persons
having business about the court house, or members of the police
force above excepted, to speak to any manager or clerk of the
election or elector, either directly or indirectly, about the
election. Any one violating the provisions of this section
shall be held guilty of a misdemeanor under the laws of the
state of Georgia, and shall pe punished as provided in section
1065, of the penal code of the state of Georgia.
Section 21. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no elector shall speak to or consent to bespoken to by
any other person than the election managers while at the polling place or within fifteen feet thereof, and then only in the
pursuance of official duty. No election manager or clerk shall
be permitted to speak to an elector for the purpose of influencing his vote in any manner whatever. Any one violating the
provisions of this section shall be held guilty of a misdemeanor
under the laws of the state of Georgia and shall be punished as
574_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
provided in section 1065, of the penal code of the state of
Georgia.
Section 22. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That in all elections for mayor and aldermen and recorder;
of the city of Savannah there shall be provided for use in said
elections official ballots containing in separate columns the
names of the candidates for mayor and aldermen and recorder
there shall be as many columns as there shall be respective
tickets or independent candidates and the voter shall scratch
thereon the names of all candidates against whom he proposes
to vote. The ballots shall be printed upon thick blue paper
and all ballots shall be of uniform size and color. The ballots
shall be prepared by the clerk of council at the expense of the
city, and shall contain at least two inches margin on every
side of the printed matter. On the morning of the election the
clerk of council shall deliver to the representatives of each of
the tickets not less than 15,000 of said ballots. The representatives of each of said tickets may on the day before the
election procure from the clerk not more than 15,000 of said
ballots, but said ballots shall be delivered at the expense of
the parties requesting same and it shall be the duty of the clerk
to deliver said ballots to said applicants not later than twelve
o'clock on the day preceding the election. No vote cast on
any other ballot shall be received by the managers of the election; if received by error or otherwise it shall not be counted.
It shall be unlawful for any manager of the election or
any clerk to examine any ballot offered by any voter except
for the purpose of counting the ballot after the polls have
closed, and any manager or clerk violating this provision
shall be held guilty of a misdemeanor under the laws of the
state of Georgia, and shall be punished as provided in section 1065, of the penal code of the state of Georgia.
Section 23. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all candidates for mayor and aldermen and for
recorder who may have been nominated by any political party
at the primary election provided for by law for the city of
Savannah, shall file with the clerk of council of said city five
days before the election provided for in this act, notice of their
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 575
nomination by their respective political parties, and in case there
should be any, independent candidates or candidate for such
offices such declaration of an intention to become a candidate
for mayor or alderman or recorder, must likewise be filed with
said clerk of council five days before the election provided for
in this act, which declaration must be accompanied by the
petition described in this act regulating primary elections for
mayor and aldermen and recorder, in the city of Savannah.
Section 25. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the newly elected mayor and aldermen shall meet
on the second Monday after their election for organization and
each alderman shall take the following oath :"I do solemnly swear
(or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the duties of an alderman of the city of Savannah according to the laws of the state
and the ordinances of the city of Savannah to the best of my
ability and understanding." The same oath shall be taken by
the mayor, substituting the word for "mayor" "alderman."
The newly elected recorder shall on the same day enter into
office and take the oath prescribed for other city officers of the
city of Savannah.
Section 26. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That nothing in this act shall in anywise affect the existing laws now in force with reference to the board of mayor and
aldermen of said city being composed of a mayor and twelve
aldermen, or with reference to the eligibility for mayor and
aldermen of said city as set forth in paragraph 4830, of the code
of 1882, of the state of Georgia; nor shall the provisions of this
act in any wise affect the provisions of sections 4823, 4824,
4825,4827, 4828 and 4829, of the said code of Georgia of 1882,
as set forth in paragraphs 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8, of MacDonnell's
code of Savannah of 1907, and the provisions of the acts of the
General Assembly of Georgia of 1903, pages 665, as set out in
section 2 of paragraph 8, of the said MacDonnell's code of the
city of Savannah of 1907.
Section 27. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all laws and parts of laws in conflict with this act
be, and they are hereby, repealed.
Approved August 12, 1914.

Locations