Third annual report of Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, mayor, together with the reports of the city officers of the city of Savannah, Ga. for the year ending December 31, 1909 to which are added the commercial statistics of the port, reports of public institutions and ordinances passed during the year 1909

Collection:
Annual Reports of the Mayor of Savannah, Georgia, 1855-1923
Title:
Third annual report of Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, mayor, together with the reports of the city officers of the city of Savannah, Ga. for the year ending December 31, 1909 to which are added the commercial statistics of the port, reports of public institutions and ordinances passed during the year 1909
Creator:
Savannah (Ga.). Mayor
Contributor to Resource:
Tiedeman, George W., b. 1861
Date of Original:
1909
Subject:
Savannah (Ga.)--Politics and government--Periodicals
Savannah (Ga.). Mayor
Location:
United States, Georgia, Chatham County, Savannah, 32.08354, -81.09983
Medium:
annual reports
Type:
Text
Format:
application/pdf
Metadata URL:
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/id:dlg_zmos_1909
Digital Object URL:
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/savannahmayor/pdf/1909.pdf
Holding Institution:
University of Georgia. Libraries
Rights:
Rights Statement information

THIRD
ANNUAL REPORT
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HON. GEO. W. TIEDEMAN
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MAYOR AND ALDERMEN FOR 1909 AND 1910
Mayor
GEORGE W. TIEDEMAN
Chairman of Council
ABE S. GUCKENHEIMER
Vice-Chairman of Council
W. F. McCAULEY .
CRAIG BARROW
F. C. BATTEY
J. H. H. ENTELMAN
J. B. GAUDRY
G. A. GORDON
A. S. GUCKENHEIMER
Aldermen
R. M. HULL
M. J. KAVANAUGH
W. F. McCAULEY
H. S. MEINHARD
A. VETSBURG
C. G. WILKINSON
H. E. WILSON
COMMISSIONERS, 1909 AND 1910
Park and Tree
P. D. Baffin, Chairman
T. H. McMillan
S. E. Theus
Sinking Fund
Geo. J. Mills, Chairman
Chas. G. Bell, Secretary
L. Adler
Chas. S. Etlis
I. A. Solomons
E. W. Bell
John Lyons
Pilotage
Jas. M. Barnard, Chairman
Geo. P. Walker
Van B. A very
J. Florance Minis
W. W. Williamson
Joseph Hull
J. Cooper Harris. Secretary
Massie School
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman
Alderman \\. F. McCaulev Dr. H. W. Hesse
CITY OFFICERS, 1909 AND 1910
Mayor ___:George W. Tiedeman
Secretary to the MayorNeyle Colquitt
Clerk of Council___:_______________N. P. Corish
Assistant Clerk of CouncilChas. V. Hernandez
Bacteriologist____Dr. V. H. Bassett
Chief of Police___________W. G. Austin
First Lieutenant of PoliceS. N. Harris
Second Lieutenant of PoliceJoseph McCool
Third Lieutenant of Police____________T. C. Murphy
City Treasurer-_____________C. S. Hardee
City Engineer J. W. Howard
City Engineer (Assistant)_-________W. O'D. Rockwell
City Attorney_______i_______S. B. Adams
City Marshal1Fred Wessels, Jr.
Deputy City Marshal_____Wilkie Brown
Cfty Physicians (2 white)_B. H. Gibson and R. V. Harris
City Physicians (2 colored)__C. P. Tyson and P. E. Love
Clerk of the Market___________ ____T. B. Gracen
Clerk of the Market (Assistant)_____G. B. Whatley
Director of Public Works____________Harry Willink
Harbor Master__L-______John Carr
Health Officer___________________W. F. Brunner
Chief Sanitary InspectorHenry G. Greene
Food Inspector______Simon A. Weil
Inspectors of Naval StoresLewis Bliss, R. B. Jewett,
W. R. Powell, J. E. Register, J. C. Register, J. F. Bliss,
Jas. T. Wells, and Nat. Harrison.
Inspector of Buildings_______H. Bartlett
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery__A. B. La Roche
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery (colored)__Henry Willis
Keeper City Dispensary___J. D. Harms
Port Warden _______________________Fred Hull
Plumbing Inspector _____________A. Robider
Recorder -John E. Schwarz
Superintendent Scavenger Department-_Thomas Cooley
City Officer*, 1909 and 1910Conttaned
Superintendent Fire Department Thomas Ballantyne
Assistant Superintendent Fire DepartmentJ. J. Connally
Superintendent Waterworks J. P. Figg
Consulting Engineer Waterworks________H. S. Jaudon
Tax Assessors, Chairman H. S. Dreese
Tax Assessors (2)A. B. Palmer and C. K. Konemann
Custodian City Hall ______________R. W. Ferguson
BUDGET FOR 1910
Ordinance read in Council for the first time December
1, 1909, read a second time December 29, 1909, amended,
placed upon its passage, adopted and approved.
BUDGET FOR THE YEAR 1910
Fixed Expenses for the Year 1910
Interest on bonded debt _'_____________$ 123,000.00
Sinking fund ___________________ 33,250.00
Total __________________$ 156,250.00
Maintenance of Regular City Departments
Departments Appropriations
Bacteriological Laboratory _$ 7,500.00
Evergreen Cemetery 5,000.00
Laurel Grove Cemetery . 5,000.00
Parks and Squares __________ 12,000.00
Board of Health __________________ 20,000.00
Charity ______________________ 5,000.00
City clocks ____________________ 400.00
City Hall and insurance 6,000.00
City lighting _____________________ 27,000.00
Dispensary ______________________ 4,500.00
Drainage and dry culture _-__ 10,000.00
Fire Department and uniforms __-- 116,700.00
Harbor and wharves _____ 5,000.00
Hospitals, white, including Georgia Infirmary 13,500.00
Hospitals, colored, trustees appointed by city 900.00
House drainage 6,000.00
Incidentals, including office charity 5,000.00
Law Department incidentals ___ 600.00
Market ____________-________ 6,000.00
Notes, opening streets _______ 24,861.69
Notes, resurfacing asphalt streets 42,817.92
Notes, park purposes ______________ 17,855.00
Notes, waterworks extension _____ 1,462.40
Notes, paving streets 23,723.58
Opening streets, new__________ 1,000 00
Pensions, police and firemen __ 6,200.00
Police _________________________ 131,000.00
Police reserves ___________________ 3,250.00
Budget for 1910Continued
Printing and stationery _. _____________$ 5,000.00
Public Library, white _______________ 5,100.00
Public Library, colored ______________ 360.00
Plumbing Inspector ________ 1,750.00
Storm sewers _'.______________________ 2,500.00
Salaries ________________________ 51,200.00
Scavenger Department _______________ 50,000.00
Scavenger Department, Electric Railway contract ________________________ 8,000.00
Sink Department, O. E. M.____________ 5,500.00
Streets and lanes ___i_ 82,500.00
Resurfacing gravel and shell _________ 6,000.00
Waterworks, new and old ___________ 60.000.00
Total_____________________$ 786,680.59
New Improvements to be Made in 1910. to be Passed on by
Council Before Expenditure
New engine house ____$ 7,000.00
Auto fire engine 6,500.00
Grading new streets _ 2,000.00
Gamewell system _________________ 6,500.00
Paving streets ___________________ 55,000.00
Waterworks, extension and improvements__ 5,000.00
Tree planting ____________ 2,000.00
Daffin Park _____________________ 2,000.00
Storm sewers _______________________ 1,000.00
Grass plats, East and West Broad Streets __ 1.000.00
Improvements of The Strand ___________ 3,000.00
Evergreen Cemetery ______________ 10,000.00
Sidewalks ___!________________ 5,000.00
Market ____________ 10,000.00
Henry Street subway _______________ 17,000.00
Total _____________$ 133,000.00
Total Budget for Year 1910____________81,075,930.59
INDEX
Page
Assessments for Taxation for Fifteen Years _________ 428
Bacteriological Laboratory, Four Views of___-___.294-295
Bank Clearings at Savannah for Fourteen Years______416-417
Board of Sanitary Commissioners--__.._________247-291
Board of Tax Assessors___-__________________ 41. 42
Bonaventure Cemetery._ __.___________ 346
Budget for 1910 ___________________________ 7, 8
Building Inspector __________________1______ 39
Charity Hospital ________________________363-365
Chief of Police _____--_________________ 43-80
City Attorney _______________________353-358
City Bacteriologist -_____-____________293-312
City Dispensary .__._.___315-320
City Engineer _-____________187-246
City Marshal __:___ 35-38
City Officers __-_________ 5, 6
City Physicians _____________ 313
City Treasurer .__...____1__141-155
Clerk of the Market --__________347, 348
Commissioners 4
Communications and Reports to Council in 1909 ______589-615
Comparative Railway Distances 422
Director of Public Works __-_________________169-186
Electric Inspector 117
Exports of Lumber ._____-426-427
Exports of Rosin* -.________.422-423
Exports of Spirits of Turpentine_________________424-425
Exports of Upland Cotton .420-421
Exports of Sea Island Cotton, etc. _-__-_________ 426
Fire Inspector .135, 136
Georgia Infirmary 371, 372
Harbor Master ___________349-351
Health Officer ___________________________247-291
Kate Baldwin Free Kindergarten Association .401-414
Laurel Grove Cemetery 345
Mayor and Aldermen 3
Mayor's Annual Message 13-31
Ordinances Passed in 1909 __._..._____.431-554
Park and Tree Commission 323-346
Park View Sanitarium _..-367. 368
INDEXContinued
Page
Plumbing Inspector _____________321, 322
Public Institutions ______.______359-372
Public Library ____________________________373-394
Public Library (colored) .____________.__395-400
Recorder of Police Court ___.__-___________ 81-86
Report of Special Agent -119-134
Resolutions Adopted in 1909___-_______-_____555-588
Savannah Bank Clearings Compared with Ten Other Cities.418-419
Savannah Hospital _____ 369
Savannah's Climate ____-___-___________ 429
Savannah's Traffic and Transportation Facilities _____418, 420
Sinking Fund Commissioners _ 33, 34
Statistics of the City of Savannah ___4I5-429
St. Joseph's Hospital -__.___361. 362
Superintendent Fire Alarm system _,____137-13y
Superintendent Fire Department _ 87-116
Superintendent Water Works Department _157-168
Total Value Imports and Exports for Fiscal Year 424
THIRD
ANNUAL REPORT
OF
HON. GEO. W. TIEDEMAN
MAYOR
OF
SAVANNAH, GA.

Third Annual Message
of
GEO. W. TIEDEMAN
Mayor of Savannah
Savannah, Ga., January 12, 1910
To the Board of Aldermen, City of Savannah
Gentlemen:I have the honor to submit this, my third
annual report, dealing with the operations of this administration during the year 1909, and embodying such policies
as I deem it advisable to pursue.
In my two previous annual messages I epitomized the
more important accomplishments of the administration
during the first two years of its existence.
Pursuing that policy in the present instance, I would
mention, among the most important acts of this administration during the year just past, the following:
The acquisition by the city, under the policy first
inaugurated by this administration, of nearly five million
square feet of land, for streets, lanes, and parks, free of cost;
The making of a contract with the Atlantic Coast Line
Railroad Company, providing for the opening of streets at
grade, and the construction of another subway and an overhead bridge over the Atlantic Coast Line tracks in the
southern section of the city, and the removal of the coal
chute which blocks Waldburg Street;
14 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The making of a contract with the Street Railway Company for the free transportation of policemen and firemen
for the ensuing ten years;
The opening and improvement of the Granger and Lattimore Tracts in the southern section of the city, under
conditions most favorable to the citythe contract in the
latter instance providing for the removal of a negro settlement, known as Sunnyside, which has long retarded the
growth of the city in that section, and the broadening of
Bull Street along the western boundaries of that tract to
seventy-five feet; the contract in the Granger case providing
for the widening of Estill Avenue to the width of one hun -
dred feet, with a parkway planted with palmettos down the
center;
The refunding of the public debt by the payment and
canceling of $2,610,000.00 of 5 per cent, bonds and the issuing of $2,483,000.00 of 4j^ per cent, bonds, representing a
saving of $127,000.00 to the city without the outlay of a
penny, and an incident reduction of interest from 5 to 4/l 2
per cent.;
The making of a ten-year contract for the city lighting
which provides for the institution of a system of modern
magnetite street lights, and a largely increased number of
lights, which contract was made on terms decidedly
advantageous to the city;
The regulation of street car transfers, embodying the
inauguration of the continuous transfer service;
The inauguration of a fire patrol boat in the Savannah
harbor;
The appropriation of funds for the construction, institution, and maintenance of the Children's Department of
the Public Library;
The adoption of an ordinance making pulmonary tuberculosis a reportable disease, and providing preventative
measures;
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________15
The rehabilitation of the police and fire alarm telegraph
system;
The adoption of an ordinance regulating the keeping of
cows and the sale of milk, and providing for the appointment of a Milk Inspector;
The institution of a camp for charity tubercular
patients, and the appropriation of funds for, and active participation in, a tubercular exhibit in Savannah;
The eradication by the Health Officer, in conjunction
with the Solicitor-General, of the pernicious traffic in
cocaine;
The addition of important equipment and laboratory
apparatus in the Bacteriological Department, and the consequent widening of its sphere of influence;
The paving of many miles of the city's principal
streets, and the appropriation of funds for continuance of
the work in 1910.
Other Forward Steps
The acquisition of an automobile for the Superintendent
of the Fire Department, the purchase of additional equipment, the opening of the new engine house on the East
Side, and the appropriation of funds for another engine
house on the West Side, and the purchase of an automobile
fire engine;
The appropriation of a fund of $15,000.00, which makes
possible the erection of a monument to General Oglethorpe
during the present year;
The completion of the improvements in the Water
Department, and the final classification of Savannah in Class
A by the Southeastern Underwriters' Association, representing an annual saving to the citizens of Savannah of
between $50,000.00 and $100,000.00;
M. B. C. 8.Z
16_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
The institution of a system of thorough inspection of
the water connections of the city, resulting in the stoppage
of many thousands of leaks, the total number of inspections
being over 125,000, resulting in a saving in pumpage of
about five million gallons daily, and a corresponding saving
to the city;
The organization of an Associated Charities, with headquarters in the City Hall;
The adoption and enforcement of an ordinance resulting in the removal of an unsightly network of overhead
wires in many of the most prominent business sections of
the city;
The appropriation of funds for the remodeling, renovation, and improvement of the City Market;
The improvement and beautification of Bonaventure
Cemetery and The Strand.
Enlarging on some of these matters, I would say that
I believe the acquisition of street areas during this administration to be one of its most important accomplishments.
In the past, it has been the policy to purchase land for the
opening of streets, and large sums have been paid from
the city treasury for this purpose. By adopting the policy
outlined in my first message to Council, the city has,
during this administration, acquired without any expense
other than improving same, the following areas for streets,
lanes, and parks:
Granger TractStreets and lanes, 2,500 square feet;
Ardsley Park (The Lattimores)Street and lanes,
1,160,365 square feet; parks, 222,000 square feet; making
together, 1,382,365 square feet;
Villa HeightsStreets and lanes, 445,332 square feet;
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Cann Subdivision, Springfield Streets and lanes,
156,866 square feet;
Lattimore Fortieth and other streets, 122,760 square
feet;
Shreck Subdivision, Springfield Streets, 57,102
square feet ;
Simpkins & Bell Streets, 29,100 square feet;
Falligant Estate Streets, 6,300 square feet ;
Park Place Streets and lanes, 276,200 square feet;
The above make a total area of 4,976,025 square feet,
which at seven cents per square foot, amounts to
$348,321.75 ; or at five cents, while I deem a very conservative estimate, $248,801.25. Reduce the above area in square
feet to acres, and we have 144.02 acres. If divided into lots
(allowing for streets and lanes), at the rate of ten lots per
acre, we would have 1,142 lots. Said lots, at a conservative
value of $300.00 per lot, would amount to $342,600.00.
I have not included any park area acquired by the city
in the Granger Tract, as the old park formerly owned by
the city in this tract of land before the new plan was
adopted, will practically offset the new park area acquired.
The area of streets acquired in the Granger Tract as
here stated, does not, of course, include the land previously
purchased by the Myers administration.
Terms of the Contract
By the terms of the contract with the Chatham Land
and Hotel Company, the company is to convey to the City
of Savannah all the area necessary for streets, lanes, and
parks; the company will pay all bills for any and all work
for which the city is obligated under the contract, for which
payments the company is reimbursed by the city's notes,
running from two to six years from the date of the notes,
18_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
without interest; the company contracts to donate to the
city a suitable site and payment to the city for the cost
of erecting a pumping station, up to the sum of seven thousand dollars, at such time and in the event the city may
determine to establish a house drainage system over the
property involved; the company contracts to deed to the
city the hotel site shown on the plan, with the understanding that if same is not used by the company within five
years for a hotel costing not less than $250,000.00, then the
city is to turn the same into a park, and if at the end of
twenty years no hotel is built, the company will relinquish
all claim thereto.
Under the contract, the city adopts the plan of subdivision of this property as prepared by the City Engineer,
opens Estili Avenue to the full width of one hundred feet,
from Bull Street to Waters Road, laying out a double
roadway, and parking the center. Under the terms of a
former instrument, the city was obligated to the widening
of this avenue anyway, and the present plan will transform
it into one of our most beautiful streets, and make of it one
of the city's show places. The city will also open Fortyseventh Street in the same manner, curbing the center parkway; as well as open up Atlantic Avenue. The city obligated itself to grade the entire tract, and open up all streets,
the work of grading having just been completed. The laying of the storm sewerage system through the property,
with water mains on Estili Avenue from the western boundary of the Granger Tract to the center of Atlantic Avenue
and to Waters Avenue, and from Estili Avenue to Fortyseventh Street, and from the center of Estili Avenue to the
center of Fortieth Street, completes the city's obligations
under the contract.
/
The company deeds to the city its entire street holdings, amounting approximately to 443,000 square feet in the
Estili Tract, 1,387,000 square feet in the Goerz and Barstow
Tracts, about 250,000 square feet in the excess streets in the
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________19
Granger Subdivision, with necessary lanes of 500,000 square
feet, making in all 2,580,000 square feet. The total work to
be done by the city was estimated at $56,835.70, though it
will go somewhat in excess of this, but the city receives in
street rights, lanes, and parks, about $129,000.00. The work
done in this section is of first importance. It is my belief
that the city drove a splendid bargain. I would only add
that the city stands ready under the same terms and conditions to do similar work in any other section. The Chamber
of Commerce endorsed the project, and the contract was not
entered into until after the fullest consideration, and numerous conferences, extending over the period of one year.
The Lattimore proposition was also a very attractive
one, from the city's standpoint. In consideration of the
removal of the negro tenement houses in the section known
as Sunnyside, and the conveyance to the city in fee simple
of the streets, lanes, and parks, aggregating 1,382,365 square
feet, the city adopted a plan of the property, and agreed to
grade the streets and lanes through the tract, and curb
with granite the parks and parkways through the center of
Forty-seventh Street, and extend its water mains and house
drainage through the tracts; Messrs. Lattimore & Lattimore to finance the city's expenditures for said improvements by taking the city's notes for same, running from
two to five years, at 2j4 per cent, interest. The purchase
by the city of a roadway through the Lawton property,
connecting the White Bluff Road and Estill Avenue, obviates the necessity of persons in that section having to twice
cross the Atlantic Coast Line tracks in order to get from one
of these streets to the other. It will not be necessary to
cross the tracks at all, and when the bridge is built by the
city and the Coast Line over their tracks at Habersham
Street, this property to the south of the Coast Line tracks
will be accessible from the city without having to go on the
tracks of the railroad company. Under the terms of the
Lattimore proposition, the White Bluff Road, which is but
an extension of Bull Street, will be widened to seventy-five
20________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
feet, with resultant benefit both to the city and the property
owner.
Coast Line Crossings
Of great importance to the city, and to the development
of the southeastern section particularly, was the making of
a contract with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad providing
for the opening of streets and the construction of bridges
over its tracks. This contract was the fruit of a year's
endeavor, the culmination of numerous conferences.' At first
the outlook was not encouraging, and the prospect for complications was imminent; but at length the city and the
railroad company met on mutual grounds, with the result
that the railroad company acceded to all the requests of
the city. They agreed to open Waldburg, East Broad,
Price, and Lincoln Streets at grade, and to construct a subway at Henry Street within six months from January 1,
1910, and a subway or elevated bridge at Habersham Street,
within six months from January 1,1911, and to remove their
coal chute, the chute to be removed at the railroad's
expense, the railroad and the city to bear equally other
expenses. The city could not, from a practical standpoint,
have insisted upon the opening of any other streets across
the tracks of the Atlantic Coast Line, inasmuch as it did not
own sufficient street area in the other instances to make
the opening up of these streets advisable. Under the specifications for the subway at Henry Street, the tracks are to
be raised several feet, so that the grade will be a very
gradual one, of only two per cent. This will insure a good
sewerage system in the new subway.
Under the terms of the new electric lighting contract,
the city will, within the next four years, have a completely
new and modern electric light system, the total number of
lights being increased from 558 to 700. On Bull, Liberty,
West Broad, Broughton, and other main streets, 200 of the
new lights will be installed this year, the number increasing
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 21
each year until all of the old lights have been replaced by
lights of the magnetite type. Bull Street, from the City
Hall to Forsyth Park, will have a very much greater number of lights of the magnetite variety, on ornamental poles,
making the street a scene of beauty.
The Gamewell System
The rehabilitation of the police and"1ire alarm telegraph
system has been one of the most important improvements
during the year. Twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00)
was expended on this work, which is now nearly completed, and the new system will go in operation this week.
This improvement was an absolute necessity, as the old
system was almost out of commission. Special Agent A. H.
Knott, of the Gamewell System, after a careful investigation, made a report to me on April 6, 1909, in which he
stated that the condition of both the fire and police alarm
system was marked by such gross neglect and incompetence
as to amount to criminality in jeopardizing life and property
by the reckless and careless manner in which the wires were
run and maintained through the streets. The condition of
the batteries, -switchboard, repeater lines and boxes, was
such that immediate action toward extended and permanent
improvement was imperative. The Special Agent filed a
very long and comprehensive report, covering some fifteen
pages, giving in detail the condition of the system. Among
other things, he said that an indiscriminate lot of boxes had
been installed, some of them dating back to the sixties,
which boxes should be replaced by the non-interfering type.
The value of this can be appreciated when.it is known that
with the succession box, when two or more are pulled at
the same instant, one box takes the right of way, and gives
its alarm, and when it is through, it is followed by the others in succession, insuring the alarm always coming in,
while if two interfering boxes are pulled at the same time
both alarms are lost, a point thoroughly understood and
appreciated by superintendents of departments. The police
22_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
alarm system was found to be in even worse condition than
the fire alarm, making a complete new system necessary.
Referring to the fire alarm system, the Special Agent
said: "The switchboard, originally of eight-circuit capacity,
is a most deplorable wreck. The 500-volt charging wires
are brought in direct from the street, without a fuse or any
means of opening the circuit, up to the switchboard. The
charging resistances have been removed from the board,
and the batteries are now charging all in series through a
bank of lamps, no provision existing for changing the
amount of current for any battery, but all charging alike,
irrespective of the amount of work they may be called upon
to do. The line resistances on the discharging side of the
batteries are, with the exception of one or two, useless, and
the batteries cannot be controlled on the discharge. One
test is gone from the board entirely, and another disconnected. The test plug is found open in the cord in such a
manner that when placed in a certain position partial reading could be had. As ordinarily used, it would open the
circuit and strike a blow on all gongs and tower bells. One
line circuit was found open behind the switchboard, the
broken end making partial contact, with the result that any
vibration of the building would tap the bells. All fuses on
the main line on the switchboard have been removed, and
their places supplied with solid wire. No ground wire is
attached to the line circuit test, a temporary arrangement
having been connected with the gas pipe. The wiring is
a disgrace to anyone having charge of such apparatus.
One circuit is out of commission entirely, and the instrument WdS found very dirty and gummed up, so much so,
that it refused to revolve on test, the second day after Mr.
Sandiford took charge. The line circuit No. 5 on the
switchboard was found to be connected to No. 8 oh the
repeater, giving a false reading to the circuit."
I merely call your attention to these matters, to impress
the necessity for the installation of a practically new system.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT________ 23
Health Regulations
This administration has been particularly active in
adopting and enforcing legislation looking to the preservation of the health of the community. Ranking in importance
is the Milk Ordinance. For years such an ordinance has
been greatly needed, investigation of conditions showing
that the health of the community was imperiled from a lack
of proper supervision over the care of cows and the sale of
milk. While agitation has been frequent in the past, I am
glad to note that acting upon the courage of your convictions you have adopted this ordinance; \jut of far more
importance than the adoption of the ordinance is its effective
enforcement. Your Health Officer has been charged with
the arduous and important duties of conducting inspections.
This insures an intelligent application of the provisions of
the ordinance and the education of the dairymen of our
city. I can only urge upon you the necessity of holding
up the Health Officer's hands in this work, and co-operating
with him in every way, to the end that the new ordinance
may be fearlessly and effectively enforced.
The Health Officer, with the assistance of the SolicitorGeneral, conducted an investigation some months ago into
the cocaine traffic. It was found that the traffic was in its
infancy, and confined almost exclusively to the negroes, but
was growing very rapidly; that it was not only prescribed
and sold by druggists, but middlemen peddled it around the
Market and in Yamacraw. The Health Officer examined
personally fourteen thousand prescriptions in eighteen drug
stores. As a result of the .investigation, a large number of
persons were indicted, among them physicians, and several
of the pa'rties have pleaded guilty, while one physician was
found guilty and sentenced to pay a fine of $1,000.00. Other
cases are yet to be tried, and it is quite certain that as a
result of the investigation the pernicious practice has, for
some time at least, been broken up.
24_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
I am glad to report that the records of the Health
Department for the year just past show the lowest death
rate in the history of the city. There has not been a case
of smallpox for years. The inauguration of the steam
chamber for the disinfection of clothes in cases of infectious
diseases saved the city over $1,000.00, only $10.00 having
been spent during the year in payment of damaged property;
whereas, during the previous year, $1,016.00 was paid. The
steam chamber will, within a short time, have paid for
itself.
The Bacteriological Laboratory has proven a valuable
adjunct to the Health Department, and an important auxiliary to the medical profession. As an instance, I would
state that whereas, heretofore, the physicians of the city
were required to pay $7.50 for five thousand units of antitoxin, the Health Department sells citizens and physicians
the same quantity for $2.50. When it is considered that a
very large amount of antitoxin is used, and that more liberal
doses result in a decrease in mortality from diphtheria, the
importance of this matter can be realized. During the year
1908, there were ninety-two cases of diphtheria, with eleven
deaths. During 1909, there were one hundred and thirtyseven cases, with six deaths. It is but fair to attribute this
decrease in the death rate from diphtheria to the increased
accessibility of antitoxin.
During the year, Randolph Street, Broughton Street
from East Broad to Randolph Street, and all short streets
and most of the lanes on the east and west of Bull Street
have .been paved; Barnard and West Broad Streets surveyed and paving now under way; Thirty-sixth Street
paved; blocks placed on Thirty-seventh Street; the paving
of The Strand on the east side completed; and the material
on the ground for finishing the work on the west side. The
main sections of the city are now provided with street
paving and I am glad to say the work will be continued on
a large scale during the present year.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The City Market
A substantial appropriation has been made for the
improvement of the City Market. This is an important
matter, and if the funds are available I trust this appropriation will be increased during the present year, so as to admit
of the adoption, in part at least, of the plans contemplated
by the Market Committee.
Improvements have been carried on at Bonaventure on
a large scale, and those who have not visited there during
the, past year are not in a position to realize the extent of
the improvement which has been accomplished. The new
sections of the cemetery have been laid out and beautified,
and provision has been made for a burial place for Savannahians for a century and more to come.
Other matters less general in their nature, but marking
forward steps, might also be mentioned.
In November, the City of Savannah entertained President Taft and his party. During the visit, he was afforded
ample opportunity of seeing our harbor, and was impressed
with the necessity for increased appropriations for improvements. He was elaborately entertained, and left Savannah
with the pleasantest remembrances. The entertainment of
the late Mr. Harriman, and afterwards of President Harahan and directors of the Illinois Central, will, I believe,
prove very beneficial to the city.
Other matters which I might mention in connection
with the improvements and changes during the past year,
are the removal of numerous encroachments on city property; the curtailment of the force at the waterworks, with
the resultant saving of $1,460.00 annually; the increase of
the police force, and the correspondingly increased efficiency
thereof; the laying of water mains in the Norwood Tract,
Villa Heights, the Granger Tract, and other large extensions ; the regulation of the moving picture shows, and the
26_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
consequent safeguarding of the patrons thereof; the adoption of an ordinance by the terms of which corporations
may pay quarterly their taxes, instead of annually, the taxes
for the first quarter being based on the previous year's
assessment; the making of plans for the establishment of a
State Experiment Farm in Chatham County, and the
securing of State aid for the enterprise; the keeping in touch
with the leading automobile officials and with the automobile racing situation, thus insuring for Savannah the next
international automobile race; the election of a Consulting
Engineer for the water works; the appointment of a committee charged with the consideration of applications for nearbeer licenses; and numerous other improvements of like
character.
House Drainage
Of more paramount importance, however, than any
matter yet reviewed, do I consider the question of completing the city's house drainage system. This matter was
submitted to a vote of the people in June last, the proposition being to issue $350,000.00 in bonds. While the proposal
failed of ratification at the polls, because the necessary number of qualified voters did not cast their ballots, it is gratifying to note that out of a total of 2,445 votes 2,298 were in
favor of the issue. There were 1,000 persons qualified to
vote who failed to do so, few of them realizing that their
failure to cast a ballot was equivalent to a vote against the
issue. The trade bodies, the merchants, and the citizens
generally have endorsed this proposition; the Health Officer
and the Health Committee and the physicians of the city
have stressed the imperative need of a completion of the
house drainage system. The difficulty is in the law, which
provides that two-thirds of the registered qualified voters
shall cast a favorable ballot before bonds may be legally
issued. Even in a contested election it is difficult to get out
two-thirds of the registered vote, and it is therefore necessary, if we expect to issue bonds, to thoroughly arouse and
,______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________27
enlist the aid of the public in this enterprise. You have
expressed yourselves as favorable to this issue, and I would
only ask that you give your untiring co-operation to the end
that the necessary vote is gotten out.
Apart from the standpoint of self-preservation, the
improvement of the health of any city is desirable and
necessary from a purely commercial motive. The health of
any city is its best asset. The more protection from sickness and disease that we provide, the more rapidly will we
induce a new and acceptable class of strangers to cast their
lot with us.
It is estimated that the cost of extending the sewerage
over the entire city to its limits, including the extension of
water mains that would be necessary in connection therewith, would cost at least $350,000.00. The bonds should
provide that they are issued solely for this purpose, and all
precautions taken that the funds derived therefrom shall be
spent only for that work. I favor a bond issue, because the
expenditure for a permanent improvement of this character
should be gradually liquidated through a period of thirty
years, and should not be saddled on the city's budget in
installments payable in four or five years, thus decreasing
the funds available during these years for operating
expenses, maintenance of your properties, and improvements
that will become necessary in many directions. Another
controlling reason for the issuance of bonds is that, inasmuch as posterity will reap the fruitst it should share the
expense. Another reason is that if you let your contract on
a cash basis you can save considerable from the price asked
by a contractor who has to finance the city's notes running
four or five years.
In this connection, I would state that it is important
that it be understood and clearly denominated in the bond
that the funds derived from the issue shall be used exclusively for the purpose for which it was voted, viz.: the
extension of the house drainage system of the City of
Z8_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Savannah. Should there be any surplus left over after the
work has been done, it should be clearly understood that
such surplus should be used only for the retirement of outstanding bonds of the City of Savannah of an amount equal
to such surplus.
Cover Bilbo Canal
The amount necessary annually for interest and sinking fund in the retirement of thirty-year bonds could be
graduated in such a way as not to cause any increase in the
tax rate of the city. It is practically conceded that the
Bilbo Canal would be used in any plan of complete sewerage
for the city, and that would mean the covering up and
removal forever of that eyesore and menace to health. This
is but one of numerous attractive features to be found in
the proposition, and is one that will appeal to those who
have the health and future welfare of Savannah at heart.
This city cannot expect to retain people who move here
from other cities where these sanitary provisions are supplied, when they find the new sections of our city, where
most newcomers are now seeking residences, without such
provision. The growth of the city demands such an
improvement, and it is something that we should all give
prompt attention to. The need increases and daily becomes
more apparent.
Based upon the value of property as assessed for taxation, the city may legally have bonds outstanding to the
amount of $3,371,620.00, and, as the total amount now outstanding is $2,716,650.00 (or slightly less since the last
purchase of the Sinking Fund Commission), there can be
legally issued an additional amount up to about $650,000.00.
The last issue of bonds reduced the interest charge of the
city $18,765.00 per annum, which is almost as much as the
annual appropriation necessary to pay the interest and
sinking fund on the proposed $350,000.00.
I think the facts will bear me out when I say that this
administration, probably more than any of its predecessors,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 29
has given matters of health and sanitation the attention
which they deserve. It is lamentable, but true, that most
cities do not appropriate one-fiftieth for the preservation cf
health that they do for the preservation of property and
peace. The preservation of property, peace, and health are
the three great functions of any municipal government.
While the Police and Fire Departments are given liberal
appropriations, it is too often true that the Health Department is not as generously dealt with. I think that it has
been demonstrated beyond a doubt that the funds appropriated for the Bacteriological Department, for a steam
chamber, and for other important adjuncts to the Health
Department have been intelligently invested, and that every
dollar spent brings its reward, and the city will in a short
time be over and again reimbursed for these expenditures.
City's Sidewalks
Another matter which should be given serious consideration at your hands is that of the sidewalks of our city.
Many of them are in great need of attention. Before the
city, howeyer, attempts to make property owners pave in
front of their doors, it should put in condition the sidewalks which it owns. The walks which are being laid
around Forsyth Park and the Park Extension should be
completed, and those in poor condition on the city's property in other sections repaired, before the work of having
owners generally to improve their sidewalks commences.
There should be passed an ordinance also providing for
the keeping in perpetuity of lots in Evergreen and Laurel
Grove Cemeteries, which ordinance should provide particularly for the investment of funds derived from this source.
The Park and Tree Commission has already made some
plans in this connection, and I would urge that your Board
provide the necessary legislation.
There is also much need of the introduction in the Legislature of two bills. The first of these should provide that
30_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _______
all railways (including railroads) shall be liable for paving
assessments for paving laid between and beyond their
tracks. As the law now exists, only street railways are
liable, and there is no legal warrant for making railroads
pay such an assessment.
The other bill to which I refer should be one providing
for registrations for Savannah elections, such a bill prescribing that for any election to be held in Savannah on any
measure of a local character there shall be registration of
voters. Under such a law, the voters of the city would
register for each election, and the qualification of voters
for an election of one kind would not be based upon the
registration for ari election of another kind.
The city has just passed through one of the most prosperous years in its history. This prosperity will be reflected
in the reports from the various departments. The report of
the Harbor Master, which has already been filed, shows the
record of vessels entering the port has been broken; and our
city's bank clearings show the greatest increase in their history. Development is being made in all sections, our population is increasing, and I confidently believe that the coming year and those immediately following will witness
unparalleled prosperity for our city.
During the year this Board has lost two of its members, Alderman J. F. Perritt having resigned on March 24,
1909, and Alderman Abram Vetsburg having died on January 3, 1910. Alderman Perritt's resignation was occasioned
by his removal from the city. Both were faithful and representative servants of the people, and their loss is deeply
deplored. The vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr.
Perritt was filled by the election of Dr. Craig Barrow; and
Mr. H. S. Meinhard took the place of Mr. Vetsburg. I
congratulate you upon the choice of two such excellent men
for places on this Board.
I desire to thank you for the faithful and conscientious
discharge of your duties, and for the co-operation you have
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________31
given me. You have accomplished much for the people of
your city, who are indebted to you for your unswerving
devotion to duty. This spirit of co-operation has been manifested in all of the departments of the city, and to it is
attributable, in large degree, the success which has crowned
your efforts.
With the earnest hope that you may be spared to the
service of your city for many years to come, I am,
Yours very truly
GEO. W. TIEDEMAN, Mayor
M. R. C. 8.3

Report of
Sinking Fund Commissioners
Savannah, Ga., December 31, 1909
To His Honor, George W. Tiedeman, Mayor City of
Savannah:
' Sir:The Sinking Fund Commissioners respectfully
submit this Thirty-First Annual Report.
With funds at our disposal, we have purchased bonds
of the issue of 1883 as follows:
1909
February, 5, $2,000.00 @ 103J4____._$ 2,065.00
June 30, 3,500.00 @ 104 ______ 3,640.00.
Prev. purchased, 140,150.00 143,892.25
$145,650.00 $149,597.25
Issue of 1883
Signed and made available for Exchange ___$390,000.00
Issued in exchange as per last report ______ 388,700.00
Leaving available in the hands of the City Treasurer for Exchange _________$ 1,300.00
34_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Of these bonds issued, $160,550.00 have been canceled,
as follows:
Special purchases _____________$ 14,900.00
Purchased out of Sinking Fund _________ 145,650.00
$160,550.00
Which leaves outstanding of this issue ____$228,150.00
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. J. MILLS
JOHN LYONS
CHARLES G. BELL
EDWARD W. BELL
LEOPOLD ADLER
Report of City Marshal
Hon. George W. Tiedeman, Mayor, Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:I have the honor to submit my annual
report for the year 1909, same being my third report under
your administration.
The collections in this office from all sources amounted
to $54,885.42, as per itemized statement attached.
Ground RentsAll lots reported to this office by the
City Treasurer have been re-entered for arrears of rent as
required by ordinance.
Real Estate ExecutionsThis item again contributes
the largest amount in our schedule of collections for this
year, showing a total of $26,952.49. In this are executions
which date back to 1897.
Specific TaxThe ^returns from this tax during the
year amount to $8,849.50.
Personal PropertyAs indicated in our previous reports, this constitutes one of the hardest and most unsatisfactory items with which the office has to deal. We are,
however, pleased to advise that signs of improvement are
noted, as payments are coming in more consistently than
heretofore, and this tax seems to be better understood by
the citizens; the returns from this source amount to
$3,665.83.
City Market)ur collections from the rental of market
vaults and stalls ampqnt^p ,$2,304.00.
36_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Pending the proposed renovation of this property, the
Committee on Market have decided to let the Market Clerk
collect the rents, until the improvements are completed,
when this office will advertise and offer the stalls for rent.
During the year we have installed a modern system of
bookkeeping. All executions are now entered into ledgers,
which makes it possible for any citizen to come in and locate
at a glance any charge against property. This installation
is a forward step and a decided addition to the clerical work
in the office.
Before closing this report, I wish to direct your attention to a matter which is of real importance, and amounts
to an absolute necessity, that is the need of a city map
showing the lot numbers of property in the extended limits
of the city. We now hold a number of executions against
property in that section.
We are unable to legally serve notice on the proper
persons, as we cannot locate the property or the owners,
many of whom are still unaware that their property is
subject to city taxes.
Respectfully submitted
FRED WESSELS, JR.
City Marshal
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 37
Itemized Statement of Collections From This Office for the
Year Ending December 31, 1909
Real Estate:
1897 ____________$ 2.90
1898 __.,_________ 2.90
1899 ___________ 8.70
1900 ___________ 8.70
1901 ___________ 8.70
1902 ___________ 8.70
1903 ___________ 12.72
1904 ___________ 370.80
1905 ___________ 547.86
1906 ___________ 1,179.46
1907 ___________ 2,926.56
1908 ____________ 21,866.95
1909 ____________ 7.54$26,952.49
Personal Property:
1908 ___________.$ 904.41
1909 ___________ 2,761.42 3,665.83
Specific Tax:
1908 ___________$ 306.00
1909 ____________ 8,543.50 8,849.50
Paving Streets:
Fahm Street _______ 1904______$182.48
Harmon Street ______ 1905_____1- 18.02
Whitaker Street _____ 1905__:___ 56.00
Price Street ________ 1906______ 418.00
Gwinnett Street _____ 1906______ 123.74
Bull Street ________ 1907______ 305.22
West Broad Street ___ 1907______ 298.33
Abercorn Street ^____ 1908______ 886.40
Fortieth Street, West __ 1908______ 834.02
McDonough Street ___ 1908______ 200.00
Ogeechee Avenue ____ 1909______ 876.30
Thirty-sixth Street, West 1909______ 744.25 4,942.76
J
38 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Sidewalks:
1905 ____________$ 4.40
1906 ___________ 27.75
1907 __________ 139.83
1908 ___________ 328.79
1909 _____.____..__ 153.47$ 654.24
Privy Vaults:
1907 ____________$ 42.50
1908 __.____.___. 99.50-. 142.00
Rents:
Fees:
Market Vaults _________$ 2,259.00
Market Stalls __________ 45.00
Houses ______________ 102.00 2,406.00
Executions _________$ 1,106.73
Electric _____________ 86.25 1,192.98
Advertising _________ 69.00
Interest _______________ 762.23
City Lots _________________ 4,029.00
Opening Streets .______ 1,162.00
Incidentals _________________ 13.34
Cutting Weeds, 1900 __________ .30
$54,841.67
Bonaventure Cemetery _________ 43.75
$54,885.42
Respectfully submitted
FRED WESSELS, JR.
City Marshal
Report of Building Inspector
Savannah, Ga., January 10, 1910
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor:
Sir:I beg to make my report for the year 1909.
Number of permits issued in 1909 _____________ 421
Number of permits brought over from 1908 _______ 38
Total number of permits for building operations in 1909 459
Permits carried over from 1909 to 1910 _________ 31
Permits used in 1909 _____________________ 428
The building operations for the year were as follows:
Finished 4-story brick or cement block buildings ___ 1
Finished 3-story brick or cement block buildings __ 2
Finished 2-story brick or cement block buildings __ 7
Finished 1-story brick or cement block buildings ____ 5
Finished 3-story frame buildings ______________ 4
Finished 2-story frame buildings _____________ 139
Finished 1-story frame buildings ___________ 237
Number of buildings completed in 1909 _________ 395
Additions, alterations, sheds, etc., completed in 1909 _ 194
Additions, alterations, sheds, etc., carried over to 1910 _ 51
Value of buildings finished in 1909, additions,
. repairs, etc. ___________________$715,100.00
Respectfully
H. BARTLETT
Building Inspector

Report of Board of Tax Assessors
Savannah, Ga.. December 31, 1909
Hon. George W. Tiedeman, Mayor:
Sir:We present herewith the report of the Board of Tax
Assessors for the year 1909.
Returns of Personal Property
Stock in trade ______________________$2.146,885
Goods on consignment ____ 11,125
Furniture, etc. _____________________ 987,895
Jewelry, silver, etc. _________________ 108,063
Musical instruments _______ 51,455
Libraries, paintings, etc. _________ 51,278
Horses, mules, live stock ________ 1015,870
Vehicles, automobiles _____________ 157,782
Money and solvent accounts ______ 2,471,700
Stocks and bonds ___________________ 699,394
Promissory notes ____________________ 103,985
Mortgages on real estate ______ 239,875
Mortgages on notes ________________ 18,250
Bonds for titles _____________________ 7,430
Shipping ________________________ 181,875
'Machinery and fixtures ________________ 163,192
Banks __________________________ 3,974,651
Other personal property _______________ 18,080
Corporations ______________________ 1.6*8,230
$13,188,015
_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
During the year, there were 421 building permits issued,
the improvements amounting to $430,875.00.
The books containing the new improvements and assessments are now open, in our office, for inspection. ,
The taxable property of the City of Savannah is as
follows:
Real estate ____________________$35,501,860.00
Personal property _________________$13,188,015.00
$48,689,875.00
1908 1909
Real estate ______.___$34,736,799 $35,501,860
Personal property _______$12,806,028 $13,188,015
$47,542,827 $48,689,875
Total for 1909, $48,689,875 at $1.39 _______$676,789.26
Total for 1908, $47,542,827 at $1.39 _______$660,845.29
Respectfully submitted,
HARRY S. DREESE, Chairman
A. B. PALMER
C. H. KONEMANN
ANNUAL REPORT
OP THE
CHIEF OF POLICE
FOR THE YEAR
1909
W. G. AUSTIN
CHIEF OF POLICE
Mayor
GEORGE W. TIEDEMAN
Police Committee
G. Arthur Gordon, Chairman
Frank C. Battey
Julius B. Gaudry
Chief of Police
William G. Austin
Lieutenants of Police
Joseph McCool
Thomas C. Murphy
Marvin L. Meldrim
Chief Detective
John J. Murphy
Report of the Chief of Police
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
To the Hqnorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah:
Gentlemen:I have the honor to submit herewith the
Annual Report of the Police Department, for the year ending December 31, 1909, together with such suggestions and
recommendations as, in my judgment, would benefit the
Department.
Arrests
During the year 1909, the total arrests were 259 more
than the preceding year. This increase is due to the fact
that more patrolmen have been added to the force and
greater territory has been patrolled than heretofore. There
were 290 more arrests for drunk and disorderly during the
past year than during 1908.
Disturbances
The community has been entirely free from any serious
outbreak during the past year. The holiday season,
especially the usual Christmas Eve celebration, was far more
quiet than during former years, even more so than in 1908.
Injuries
I take pleasure in reporting that no member of the force
suffered any serious injury during the past year, although
several minor accidents occurred. One horse fell on a paved
street, and was so badly injured that it had to be shot.
46 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Assaults
Only a few minor assaults were made on patrolmen,
principally by prisoners resisting arrest.
Deaths
I regret to report the death of Retired Sergeant J. A.
Christian, which took place on the thirtieth of September.
A page in this report is dedicated to the memory of
Sergeant Christian. *
Statistics
The tabulated statistics included in this rej>ort, give to
those interested in the subject a comprehensive idea of existing conditions during the past year.
Roster
A roster of the entire department as of December 31,
1909, is attached. The elections, promotions, appointments,
resignations, retirements, and dismissals are also shown.
This report shows only 84 patrolmen; there were at times
during the year as many as 95 patrolmen on the rolls.
Finances
The financial statement of this Department shows an
increase in expenditures for the year 1909 of $10,783.84, as
compared with the preceding year. Of this increase,
$9,503.70 was paid out for salaries. As information, and for
the purpose of comparison, an itemized statement for the
year 1908 is embodied with the statement of expeditures for
the past year.
New Equipment
No large expenditure was required, as the entire equipment, including revolvers, saddles, blankets, bridles, etc.,
is in good condition.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________47
Hones
During 1907, $3,240.00 was expended on horses;
$1,595.00 was the total expended during 1908; a decrease of
$1,645.00. $1,325.00 was expended on horses during 1909; a
decrease of $270.00 as compared with 1908.
General Improvements and Repairs
There was expended for this purpose $305.53 only, all of
the buildings except the stables having been thoroughly
repaired and partly painted during 1907. They are now in
fairly good condition.
Feed Bills
The feed bill for the year was $665.06 less than that of
the preceding year. The total expenditure was $4,781.78,
less than $9.50 per head per month.
Promotions and Appointments
Four promotions were made during the year: Thos. C.
Murphy from Sergeant to Third Lieutenant; M. L. Meldrim
from Sergeant to First Sergeant; J. H. Lange from Patrolman to Sergeant, and J. C. Bell from Patrolman to Sergeant.
Dismissals
There were nine dismissals during the year. Of these,
three were for drunkenness; the other six were for the good
of the service.
Resignations
Eight patrolmen of the Department resigned during
the year.
Assistance of Mayor, Police Committee, and Council
I desire to express my appreciation of the ever courteous
treatment and personal assistance rendered me by His
Honor, the Mayor, in the conduct of the Department.
M. B. o. s.4
48_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
I am indebted to the Police Committee for many valuable suggestions, and for the ready assistance rendered me
at all times in the performance of my various duties.
My thanks are extended to the members of Council for
their valuable assistance, and for the trust and confidence
reposed in me during the past year, a confidence which I
trust the future will strengthen.
Recorder
To the Recorder is due special recognition for his
co-operation, and for the valuable assistance rendered to this
Department and to the general public.
His handling of the numerous and complex matters
presented to his Court has strengthened the hands of the
police. I take this opportunity of expressing my sincere
appreciation.
Public Gaming Houses
It gives me great pleasure to repeat the statement contained in my report of last year, viz.: There is not a single
public gaming establishment running in this city.
Attitude of the Public
It is extremely gratifying to note the attitude of the
general public toward this Department, and to observe the
high respect in which it is held. This is especially true of
those of our citizens who are in close touch with the Department. This sentiment exists because of the fact that all of
the members of the force continue to perform their duties in
such a conscientious manner as to reflect credit upon themselves individually, as well as upon the Department as a
whole.
I take this opportunity of complimenting the various
members of the force, and of assuring them of my apprecia-
I
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________*
tion of their zealous performance of their duties and efficient
services, and I also desire to commend them for many hours
of extra duty, during the Holidays, and whenever called
upon.
Discipline
The discipline of the force has been excellent. A large
percentage of the members of the Department have performed their arduous and trying duties in a highly creditable
manner. Infractions of the rules and regulations have been
infrequentthese infractions, with one or two exceptions,
being unimportant. I am quite sure there will be no backward step in this direction.
Every member of this Department is made to understand that his first thought should be the performance of his
police duty, without fear or favor, and regardless of consequences.
With regard to the members of the force as a whole, I
can say that they have met the requirements with a spirit of
loyalty to the Department that has been highly pleasing to
me, and ought to gratify all fair-minded citizens of this community. Harmony prevails amongst the men, and they
respect their superior officers, and endeavor to cooperate
with them in the general work of the Department.
Patrolling
During the year, the force was further increased; this
increase permitted the extension of the dismounted patrol as
far as Anderson Street, instead of Gaston Street as heretofore.
The mounted patrol was extended further into the outlying resident sections of the city, two men being placed in
Collinsville. This increase of force has permitted the
Department to respond to the various requests from all
sources for special service.
50_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Detective Department
Five men, under the direction of Chief Detective John
J. Murphy, compose this Department. Each-member has
performed his duty in a highly satisfactory manner. The
arrests, as compared to last year, were fewer, and I regret
to report that the number of convictions in the higher courts
were fewer.
Mounted Force
The value of a mounted force cannot be overestimated.
I consider this branch of the service a most important one.
The mounted men are drilled regularly, and are proficient in
horsemanship. The drills are continued as heretofore, but
at longer intervals.
Dismounted Force
The drills have been discontinued, as most of the men
are quite proficient in both the marching and the manual.
On Labor Day, the entire force paraded. Their appearance
and drill was favorably commented on by numbers of citizens. This Labor Day parade will be an annual event.
Gamewell System
For three years past, I have called attention to the fact
that the Gamewell System was in a deplorable condition. It
now affords me great pleasure to report that, upon my
recommendation, approved by the Police and Fire Committees, Council appropriated $25,000.00 to be expended for
the purpose of installing new equipment, and placing a large
percentage of both systems underground. For the Police
Department, I have to report that the Gamewell System is
now in excellent working condition. A new desk, new
batteries, forty-five new boxes and appurtenances thereto
have been installed, and a large percentage of the wire is
now underground. This work was done under the direction
of Mr. T. P. Sandiford, Superintendent of Fire and Police
___________MAYOR'S ANKUAL REPORT_________51
Telegraph, to whom great credit is due for his conscientious
and efficient performance of the duties connected with this
work.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Increase of Force
For the past two years, I have recommended that the
force be increased; this recommendation has been approved
by the Committee on Police, and each year Council has
appropriated a sufficient sum to permit an increase of from
six to nine men.
The force now numbers ninety-five patrolmen. In
January, 1907, when I assumed the duties of this office,
there were but seventy-six patrolmen on the rolls. This
number, in my judgment, was entirely inadequatehence
the recommendation for an increase. Some years a'go an
ordinance was passed making one hundred men the number of patrolmen to compose the force. Inasmuch as the
population of this city shows a steady increase from year to
year, and the limits of the city are being extended from time
to time to take care of this increase in population, causing
the outlying sections to be rapidly built up, I feel it incumbent upon me to recommend that a further increase of fiVe
men in this force be provided for in the Budget of 1911.
Modern Stables
In my report of 1907, and again in 1908,1 recommended
that a modern stable be erected. The need is more urgent
now than ever before, as the building is inadequate for present requirements, and is not only unsanitary but peculiarly
unsafe in.case of fire. Only a very small amount has been
expended on this building during the past three years, for
such slight repairs as were absolutely necessary; within a
very short time, quite a large amount will have to be
52_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
expended to put it in serviceable condition. I urgently
recommend that Council appropriate a sum sufficient to
erect a modern stable, that will properly house the various
ambulances, patrol wagons, vehicles, and horses of this
Department. Of all the public buildings of this city, I am
quite sure that this stable is the most unsightly, unsafe, and
unsanitary. This stable was erected in 1859, over fifty years
ago. It will therefore be readily understood that it has
entirely outlived its usefulness.
Summer Uniforms
During the three summers that I have filled the position
of Chief of Police, it has been often brought to my attention
that the present uniform, consisting of a helmet, heavy blue
trousers, and closely buttoned blouse, with linen collars, is
not the proper uniform for police officers in this climate. I
therefore earnestly recommend that a change in the uniform
of the policemen of this city be made, and I respectfully
suggest that the summer uniform be composed of lightweight flannel trousers, olive drab in color, and that a lightweight flannel shirt of the same material be worn instead of
the closely buttoned blouse. I am quite sure that this combination would look business-like, and would most certainly
make the men of this Department far more comfortable
during the long hot period.
Plan for Change in Salaries
While serving as Chief of Police during the past three
years, I have been impressed with the fact that the present
pay of the members of the police force is inadequate. The
prevailing high prices of foodstuffs, cloth, rentals, and the
actual necessities of life, make it clear to -even- the casual
observer that the members of the Police Department are
not paid a salary sufficient to enable them to provide a
proper livelihood for themselves and their families. Some
_______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________53
members of the Department have been forced into debt, and
others have resigned in order to take positions paying better
salaries.
Of the 113 members of the Police Department, 89 are
married men, some having large families dependent upon
them. I believe that every member of the Department tries
to meet his just indebtedness, but, in spite of this fact,
merchants are sometimes compelled to request the
assistance of the Police Committee in collecting outstanding
accounts.
Many members of the Police Department have rendered
to the City of Savannah faithful and efficient service for a
number of years. It is a well-establi'shed custom of successful employers to recognize faithful service by a substantial
increase of salary from year to year, and employees who
have conscientiously and efficiently discharged the duties
assigned them expect such an increase.
After giving the matter careful thought, I have decided
to recommend that the following plan be put into effect in
the Police Department:
1. That new appointees on the force be put on probation for six months, and be paid a salary of sixty dollars
per month while on probation. If, at the end of six months,
these probationers have, in the judgment of the Police Committee and the Chief of Police, proved capable of filling a
position on the force, they shall be assigned to a position as
regular patrolmen, at the present pay of seventy-five dollars per month. Based on fifteen new appointments per
year, this would effect a total saving to the city of approximately $1,350.00.
(The above estimate is based upon the statistics for the
past five years, the vacancies caused by deaths, resignations,
dismissals, and retirements requiring the appointment of
about fifteen men each year.)
54_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
2. That all members now on the Police Force, who
have served faithfully, efficiently, and continuously for a
period of five years, shall receive an increase of fifty dollars
a year, and shall receive an increase of fifty dollars for each
additional five years of faithful, efficient, and continuous
service.
(a). That all members now on the Police Force, who
have served faithfully, efficiently, and continuously for a
period of ten years, shall receive an increase of one hundred
dollars a year, and shall receive an increase of fifty dollars
for each additional five years of faithful, efficient, and continuous service.
(b). That all members now on the Police Force, who
have served faithfully, efficiently, and continuously for a
period of fifteen years, shall receive an increase of one hundred and fifty dollars a year, and shall receive an increase
of fifty dollars for each additional five years of faithful,
efficient, and continuous service.
(c). That all members now on the Police Force, who
have served faithfully, efficiently, and continuously for a
period of twenty years, shall receive an increase of two
hundred dollars a year, and shall receive an increase of fifty
dollars for each additional five years of faithful, efficient,
and continuous service.
(d). That all members now on the Police Force, who
have served faithfully, efficiently, and continuously for a
period .of twenty-five years, shall receive an increase of two
hundred and fifty dollars a year, and shall receive an
increase of fifty dollars for each additional five years of
faithful, efficient, and continuous service.
(e). That all members now on the Police Force, who
have served faithfully, efficiently, and continuously for a
period of thirty years, shall receive an increase of three
_______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________55
hundred dollars a year, and shall receive an increase of fifty
dollars for each additional five years of faithful, efficient,
and continuous service.
At the age of sixty-five, retirement shall be compulsory,
upon the then one-half pay that the patrolman is receiving.
If, in the judgment of the Police Committee and the Chief
of Police, any member is deserving of retirement for cause
before the age of sixty-five has been reached, he shall, at
their discretion, be retired on pay to be determined at that
time by Council.
By reference to the actual records of the Department,
it is found that:
Thirteen members of the Department would profit by
an increase of pay under the 5 years' provision.
Twelve members of the Department would profit by an
increase of pay under the 10 years' provision.
Seven members of the Department would profit by an
increase of pay under the 15 years' provision.
Six members of the Department would profit by an
increase of pay under the twenty years' provision.
Three members of the Department would profit by an
increase of pay under the 25 years'-provision.
The total cost of these increases -would aggregate
$4,850.00, from which must be deducted the $1,350.00 saving
from the suggested probation feature as above, making the
net cost of the plan to the city approximately $3,500.00.
It is hardly necessary to point out that such a recognition of faithful, efficient, and continuous service would be
of inestimable benefit in affording inducements to capable
56_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
and intelligent young men to seek positions on the Police
Force; and the increased pay and recognition of services
would serve as a strong incentive to the members on the
force to perform their duties in the most capable manner
possible.
Very respectfully,
W. G. AUSTIN
Chief of Police
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________57
Number of Officers, Sergeants, Detectives, Patrolmen, and
Attaches of-the Police Department, December
31, 1909, and Salaries of Each
1 Chief ____________,__________$2,600.00
1 First Lieutenant _____*__________ 1,500.00
1 Second Lieutenant _________________ 1,400.00
1 Third Lieutenant ________________ 1,400.00
1 Chief Detective ___________________ 1,500.00
5 Detectives, each __________________ 1,100.00
1 First Sergeant ___________________ 1,200.00
8 Sergeants, each 1__________________ 1,120.00
1 Quartermaster ___________________ 1,000.00
84 Patrolmen, each ________________ 900.00
1 Clerk Police Court ________________ 1,200.00
1 Clerk Police Department ____________ 1,200.00
1 Electrician (one-half salary) __________ 750.00
2 Patrol Drivers, each ________________ 840.00
1 Ambulance Driver ________________ 840.00
1 Stable Keeper ___________________ 960.00
1 Night Stable Keeper __.______i______ 600.00
1 Porter ________________________ 300.00
113 Total
Retired
1 Chief _______________________$ 666.66
2 Sergeants, each __________________ 746.66
4 Sergeants, each ___________________ 560.00
1 Private ____________________'_____ 180.00
58 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Roster of the ForceDecember 31, 1909
NAME
W. G. Austin
S. N*. Harris __ _
J. McCool ______
T. C. Murphy
J. J. Murphy ____
T. P. Sandiford
J, E. Maguire _
T. R. HeffernanM. L. MeldrimH. W. Baughn _-
D. J. Cronin_ _ _
J. S. Hallford _
J. J. Deionan __ -
J D. Semken
J. H. Lange __ -
J. C. Bell . __ -
J. Farrell __. __ _
P. T. Eivers __
J. H. W. Umbach
C. T. Christie
E. D. Fallen _
C. S. Cowart _
P. J. Kelly ___
Akin. J. M. _____
Alexander, E. D.
Airs, H. S. __ -
Bryant. B. S. __
Becker. W. L.
Beach. J. K. __
Beach, G. E. __
Bell, C. L _ -
Best. C. D. _ __
Bentley, J. F. _
Brennan. T. __
Brooks, W. B. __'
Blumberg, L.
Burns, C. ______
Brant. R. F. __
Byrd. E. L. ___
Cantey, O. P. __
Collins, M. N. __
Cleary, T. F. __.
Cohen, M. G.
Cordray, J. A
Counihan. M. J_
Clancy. J'. J. __
Crosby. W. F. __
Davis, E. F.
Davis. R. T. ____
DeLeon, J. P.
RANK
Chief _
1st Lieut.
-d Lieut
3d Lie-L
Chief Det.__
Electrician -
Clerk __
Clerk _ __
1st Serge
Sergeant
Sergeant
Sergeant
Sergeant
Sergeant
Sergeant
Sergeant
Sergeant
Detective
Detective
Detective
Detective
Detective
Qr. Mster.
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
NATIVITY
Texas _____
Georgia
Ireland
Georgia
England
Georgia
So. Carolina
Georgia
Georgia
So. Carolina
[Ireland
So. Carolina
Ireland
Germany
Germany
Georgia
England
Ireland
Germany
Georgia __
Georgia __
Georgia
Georgia __
Ohio -
So. Carolina
Georgia
So. Carolina
So. Carolina
So. Carolina
Georgia
No. Carolina
Georgia
Georgia
Georgia
Poland
Georgia
So. Carolina
Georgia
So. Carolina
Georgia
Georgia
New York _
So. Carolina
Georgia
Georgia
Georgia
Ireland
So. Carolina
Ireland
Age
42
33
47
42
45
39
1 SO
1 24
37
1 56
49
i 42
41
36
40
30
40
47
35
52
30
44
44
38
32
28
34
50
37
32
31
37
26
43
29
50
42
33
25
29
37
43
32
34
36
32
37
68
55
37
Mar.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes 1
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Date App'nt.
Jan. 22, 1907
Jan. 30, 1907
Sep. 24, 1891
Aug. 22, 1890
Nov. 20, 1897
Mar. 29, 1909
Nov. 28, 1908
Feb. 4, 1907
Feb. 14, 1896
Sep. 29, 1881
Dec. 10, 1887
Sep. 13, 1894
Feb. 6, 1894
Feb. 4, 1896
Oct. 9, 1897
Jan. 31, 1907
Jan. 3, 1895
June 27, 1890
Jan. 31, 1907
Oct. 1, 1890
Aug. 10. 1906
Oct. 9, 1900
Jan. 26. 1891
Dec. 18, 1907
Feb. 8, 1907
July 21. 1909
July 23. 1902
July 24, 1891
Feb. 28, 1902
Feb 27, 1909
April 12. 1907
Nov. 3, 1899
Jan. 31, 1907
Fan. 31. 1907
Dec. 2, 1908
Feb. 4, 1896
Fuly 23, 1903
Fuly 5, 1907
Tune 17. 1908
Tuly 22, 1909
Dec. 11, 1904
Aug. 3. 1902
Tuly 23, 1902
Tuly 5. 1907
March 8. 1907
Oct. 8, 1900
Feb. 8. 1907
Aug. 18. 1881
Jan. 10, 1890
Aug. 7, 1909
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 59
Roster of the ForceDecember 31, 1909
NAME
Dominick, A. M.
Flaherty, T. E
Fleming, W. H._
Forehsfnd, R. A._
Flynn, C. J. ____
Gallaher. M. C
Garrard. W. E._-
Goslee, M. ______
Guilfoyle, J. __
Grubbs, C. B. _
Harley. H. E. ___
Harley. R. H. _
Harper, J. G. _
Hutson, H. C. __
Hutto. P. S. ___-
Hansen, F. V.
Ivey. A. ________
Jones. H. _______
Keller, C. W. _
Kearney, F. J. 1_
Keane. T. ___
Kelly. C. H. __
Kemp. H. H. ___
Kilian, J. G. __
Leech, C. F. ____
Lovett. R. F. _
Lively, G. P. _
Lysaught. D. ___
McCarthy. J. C._
McAlpin. T E.
McGrath, J. __
Mitehell. W. R.__
Morgan. L. P.-.
Morse. W. J. _
Malphus, C. M.._
Moehrke, P. H.._
Nantz, L. H. _
Newton E L
RANK NATIVITY Age
Patrolman _|Austria 39
Patrolman _ Georgia
Patrolman -'Georgia
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Georgia
Ireland ____
Florida
Georgia ___
Maryland __
Georgia
So. Carolina
So. Carolina
33
44
37
37
Mar.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Date App'nt.
Feb. 27, 1909
July 22, 1909
July 3. 1906
July 5. 1907
Yes ITurie 7. 1908
28 I Yes IDec. 2. 1908
26 Yes iTulv 22, 1909
41 VPC Unr!! 1? lOn?
36
25
37
So. Carolinal 30
Georgia ~9
So. Carolina! 29
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
So. Carolinal 34 | Yes
Nov. 4. 1896
Nov. 7. 19C8
Mar. 29, 1905
Oct. 15, 1907
lan 16, 1000
Dec. 2. 1908
Dec. 8, 1907
New York - 25 1 Yes !Fcb. 27. 1909
Patrolman -1 Florida __ ? Wn.
Patrolman -IGeorgia
Patrolman -(Georgia _
31
48
Patrolman -IGeorgia 48
Patrolman *-lTria^^ .__ .14.
Patrolman .
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman _
Georgia 26
Georgia I 38
Germany 1 29
Georgia _
Georgia _
Georgia
Patrolman Jlreland _
Patrolman -(Georgia
Patrolman JCanada _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman -
Patrolman .
Georgia
So. Carolina
Georgia
29
30
34
56
33
38
30
31
31
Georgia 1 29
So. Carolinal 49
Patrolman -{Georgia
Patrolman -INo. Carolina
Patrolman lM-in<
O'Neil. T. G. _ IPatrolman JGeorsria
O'Reilly. T J. _
Price, H. L. __
Quarterman, T.A.
Remley. W. E.
Retnley. D. D.
Reilly, J. J. .....
Reisen, H. __ _
Rowse, J. A.
Sheehan. Wm. __.
Stewart, W. T.__
Stewart, W. H...
Patrolman -I New York _
Patrolman .
Patrolman -
Patrolman .
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
So. Carolina
Georgia
30
37
31
32
27
32
37
So. Carolinal 28
So. Carolina! 33
Georgia _._ 31
Germany
Georgia
43
30
Ireland .I 53
Scotland _ 39
Georgia 25
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes * CO
Yes
Oct. 1. 1906
Feb. 27, 1906
Apr-1 12, 1907
Sep. 7. 1898
Feb. 8. 1907
July 22. 1909
April 12. 10117
Nov. 20, 1908
Feb 27. 1909
Dec. 3, 1906
Jan. 31. 1907
Feb. 8. 1907
July 2. 1900
Mar 13, 1902
July 21. 1902
Dec. 19, 1907
Tan. 31. 1907
Feb. 27, 1909
Nov. 29, 19^2
Oct. 28. 1905
Feb. 19. 1907
April 12. 1907
Dec. 5. 1907
Nov. 19. 1908
Sept. 25, 1907
Oct. 9. 1907
June 11. 1904
April 12. 1907
Oct. 25, 1901
Mar. 16, 1901
Dec. 2. 1908
Yes IDec. 1, 182
Yes INov. 3. 1908
No |Oct 9, 1907
60 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Roster of the ForceDecember 31, 1909
NAME
Sherrod, M. H._.
Sivers, Wm.
Swift, F. S. ___
Tullis, B. L. __
Ungar. B. ____
Weber. J. A. L
Winn,W. S. __
Kelly, John _ -
BarthelmessJ. B.
Fogarty, T. J. __
McGinley, J. J.~
Hennessy, J. W._
Fraser. W. C. (c)
RANK
Patrolman _
Patrolman -
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Patrolman _
Stable Kpr._
Amb. Drvr.-
Patrol Drvr.
Patrol Drvr.
Nt. Stbl. Kp.
Porter
NATIVITY
Georgia _
Virginia _ -
Georgia
Bulgaria
So. Carolina
Georgia
Ireland
Georgia
Georgia
Georgia
Ireland
Georgia
J.
34
37
38
46
49
26
37
63
33
41
31
50
25
I Mar.
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Ye's
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Date App'nt.
Oct. 18, 1907
Dec. 12, 1907
Aug. 19. 1908
Feb. .6. 1895
April 1. 1889
Feb. 27, 1909
Dec. 8, 1896
Aug. 31, 1907
Feb. 9, 1907
Nov. 1,. 1907
Sept. 23, 1909
Sept. 1, 1909
July 3, 1907
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 61
OBITUARY
IN MEMORY OF
SERGEANT JOHN A. CHRISTIAN
Appointed to the Force October 1, 1890
Retired November 7, 1906
Died September 30, 1909
62 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CHANGES IN DEPARTMENT DURING 1909
Promoted
Thos. C. Murphy ____ Third Lieutenant
M. L. Meldrhn _____ First Sergeant
J. H. Lange Sergeant
J. C. Bel! _________________________ Sergeant
Appointed
John Farrell Sergeant
J. A. L. Weber __________ Patrolman
JFrank V. Hansen __________________ "
G. E. Beach _________________________________
\V. S. Pounder ______________________________
C. F. Leech _________________________
\Vm. J. Morse _______________________________
C. E. Brockett _______________________________
A. M. Dominick _____________________________
Thos. E. Flaherty ____________________________
Oliver P. Canty ______________________________
\Vm. E. Garrard __________________
Clarence H. Kelly _________________
Henry S. Airs _____________________ "
J. J. McGinley _ Patrol Wagon Driver
Resigned
F. D. Cowart _ Patrolman
H. Miller ___________________________________
D. J. Keane ______________________
W. S. Pounder _________________________
W. M. Lenehan _____________________________
G. L. Smith _________________________________
C. E. Brockett ______________________________
R. E. Redman ____________________ "
___________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________63
Retired
W. H. Smith _,________ Sergeant
R. E. Davis _______________________
Dismissed
W. E. Hicks ____________________ Patrolman
R. F. Kennedy _____________________
E. J. Coffee ______________________
J. N. Griffin _____________________
R. S. Harrison _______________________________
M. B. Fleming ____________________
C. H. Showalter ____________-_________
W. W. Warner Patrol Wagon Driver
B. P. Lockwood ___________._ "
Died
J. A. Christian ______________Retired Sergeant
M. It. 0. H.r,
64 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of Days Lost by Each Member of the Department
on Account Sickness, Injured on Duty, Sickness in
Family, Special Leave, Vacation, or
Suspended, During 1909
11 tf.
\ 0
NAME j
X
3 *;
in i .5 S
>.
||
K.S
"rt 0
'0 >
O EC
W.J
C
_o
"re
o
>
e
c
a
tn
S
cn
^
o fI
\V. G. Austin ___ j
S. X. Harris ____ 1
J. McCool _____ 1 2
T. C. Murphy ___ !
J. T. Murphy ____ 1
T. R. Heffernan I
M. L. Meldrim __ 1 5
H. W. Baughn __ I 3
D. J. Cronin __ ' I
T. S. Hallford _ -i
T. T. Deignan ___ 1 8
J. D. Semken __ 1
J. H. Lange J 3
J. C. Bell _____ I
J. Farrell _____ '
P. T. Eivers ___ i 1
J. H. W. Umbach .J 1
C. T Christie _ _ ' E. D. Fallen ____ 1 19
C. S. Cowart _ --_( 16
P. J. Kellv ____ 1 1
Akin, J. M. ___ ._! 2
Alexander. E. D. __'
Airs, H. S. _____ ! 6
Bryant. E. S. '
Becker, W. L. ___ 1 2
Beach, T. K. ____ ' 48
Beach. G. E. ._._!
Bell. C. L _____ ' 7
Best. C. D. _ _ -_! 1
Bentley, J. F. ___ 1 3
Brennan. T. _._ !
Brooks. W. B. ....J 4
Blumberg, L. __ ' 2
Burn*. C. ______ I 9
Brant. R F. ... _ '
Byrd. E. L. ____ I 21
Cantey, O. P. !
Collins. M. X. ___ 1 4
1
i
!
i
1
3
2
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
10
6
6
1
11
2
2
2
2
1
1
4
4
IS
3
2
5
11
1
1
22
3
2
11
t
79
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10 *[
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10to
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
1
*4
16
131111
23
2
18
IS
13
11
18
11
17
14
10
13
16
13 '21
27
19
12
2\
18
11
12
61
11
20
12
13
34
15
16
19
11
33
11
26
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 65
Number of Days Lost by Each Member of the Department
on Account Sickness, Injured on Duty, Sickness in
Family, Special Leave, Vacation, or
Suspended, During 1909
NAME
Cleary, T. F. ___ _
Cohen, M. G. ___
Counihan, M. J.
Clancy, J. J. .......
Crosby, W. F. .- _
Davis, E. F. _ ....
Davis, R. T. _ __ __
DeLeon, J. P.
Dominick, A. M. ...
Flaherty, T. E.
Fleming, W. H.
Forehand, R. A. Flynn, C. J. -
Gallaher, M. C. __
Garrard, W. E. -
Goslee, M. ________
Guilfoyle. J. _______
Grubbs. C. B. ______
Harley, H. E.
Harley, R. H. _
Harper, J. G. ______
Hutson. H. C. _
Hutto, P. S. _______
Hansen, F. V. __
Ivey, A. ___________
Jones, H. __________
Keane. T. - _ .
Kemp; H. H. _____
Keller, C. W. ______
Killian, J. G. ______
Kelly, C. H. .____
Leech. C. F. ______
Lovett, R. F. __. _
Lively, G. P. _
Lysaught, D. ______
McCarthy.!. C.
McAlpin. T. E. -
McGrath, J. ___ .
Mitchell. W. R. _
Sickness
1
S
2
1
4
20
6
3
13
16
6
1
1
7
9
6
13
1
3
I
2
1
4
3
5
sf
SO.
5
i
3
Sickness Family in
5
1
1
3
2
4
2
6
3
3
2
3
9
1
2
6
2
1
Sg
U >
v a
O.V
Wi4
S
1
1

1
7
5
2
4
2
4
7
2
1
Vacation
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
1011
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Suspended
1
1
2
5
"3
1
10
20
12
11
191?
10
16
10
3
17
11
14
40
10
23
IS
29
29
16
18
14
11
7
31
16
23
11
20
13
13
20
10
16
18
11
14
IS
66 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of Days Lost by Each Member of the Department
on Account Sickness, Injured on Duty, Sickness in
Family, Special Leave, Vacation, or
Suspended, During 1909
NAME
Morgan. L. P.
Morse, W. J. ......
Malphus. C. M. __
Moehrke. P. H. _
Nantz. L. H. ___
Newton, E. L.
O'Neil, T. G. ___
O'Reilly. J. J. .... -
Price, H. L. ____
Quarterman. T. A._
Remley. W. E. __ Remley. D. D __
Reilly, J. J. ........
Reisen. H. ________
Rowse. ]. A. ______
Sheehan, Win. _____
Stewart, W. H. __
Stewart, W. T.
Sherrod. M. H. ___.
Sho waiter. C. H.
Sivers. Wm. . _ _._
Swift, F. S. __
Tullis. B. L. _______
Ungar, B. __________
Weber. J. A. L. _
Winn, W. S. _______
Sandiford, T. P. ___
Kelly. Jno. ________
Barthelmess, J. B. __
|?ruy*|_f-fr f* T
McGinley. J. J. ....
Hennessy, J. W.
Sickness
1
5
6
S
3
1
5
14
2
3
1
61
3
8
8
6
5
5
22
7
2
a*
V 3
S I
1
1
Sickness Family in
2
1
7
13
3
2
.5
o >
a a &
r/3 tJ
2
7
6
1
1
2
4
6
1
Vacation
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Suspended
7
1
1
"3
1
12
13
22
29
10
15
13
11
16
25
19
26
10
11
11
61
16
22
18
10
17
15
10
: 10
13
30
10
18
2
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 67
Number of Arrests Made by Each Member of the
Department During 1909
NAME
W. G. Austin
S. N. Harris __ T. McCool _
T, C. Murphy _
J. J. Murphy __
M. L. Meldrim _.
H. W. Baughn _.
D. T. Cronin __ _
J. S. Hallford _
J. J. Deignan
J. D. Semken _
J. H. Lange
J. C. Bell ______
T. Farrell _______
P. J. Eivers ___
J. H. W. Umbach
C. T. Christie __.
E. D. Fallen ____
C. S. Cowart ____
P. J. Kelly ______
Airs. H. S. ______
Akin. J. M. _____
Alexander, E. D._
Bryant, B. S.
Becker, W. L.
Beach, J. K. _____
Beach, G. E. - _
Bell. C. L. -___-_
Best. C. D. ____
Bentley, J. F. ___
Brooks, W. B.
Blumberg, L. ___
Burns, C. _______
Brant. R. F. . ___ Byrd. E. L. -
Cantey, O. P. ___
Collins, M. N. ___
Cleary, T. F. ____
Cohen, M. G.
Cordray. J. A. ___
Counihan, M. J. -
Clancy, J. J.
Crosby, W. F. _.
Davis. E. F.
RANK
Chief ___. ___ .
1st Lieutenant
2d Lieutenant ___
3d Lieutenant
Chief Detective
1st Sergeant ____
Sergeant ___
Sergeant - _ __
Sergeant ________
Sergeant ___
Sergeant _ ___ -
Sergeant ________
Sergeant _
Detective ___ _
Detective __ ____
Detective _______
Detective - ______
g
uartermaster _
atrolman ______
Patrolman ______
Patrolman ______
Patrolman _ ___
Patrolman ______
Patrolman __ __
Patrolman ______
Patrolman __ _ _
Patrolman __ _ _
Patrolman ___ -
Patrolman ______
Patrolman ______
Patrolman ______
Patrolman __ -
Patrolman ______
Patrolman ______
To
June 30
24
38
39
78
139
2
1
47
27
28
2
28
52
13
120
132
109
98
100
22
35
29
10
35
37
7
38
79
64
57
91
45
7
31
54
13
20
16
87
30
60
To
Dec. 31
4
20
42
62
167
1
1
38
14
17
18
43
7
123
121
115
158
91
6
26
24
26
30
20
12
52
13
25
37
54
64
57
42
16
40
- 9
30
15
13
27
81
47
18
Total
28
58
81
138
306
3
2
85
41
45
2
43
95
20
243
253
224
256
191
6
26
46
61
59
30
47
89
20
63
116
118
121
148
87
23
71
9
84
28
33
43
168
77
78
68 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of Arrests Made by Each Member of the
Department During 1909
NAME RANK
Davis, R. T. ..Patrolman ______
DeLeon, J. P. _ _ Patrolman ______
Dominick, A. M._ Patrolman _
Flaherty, T. E. --Patrolman _
Fleming, W. H Patrolman ______
Flynn, C. T. ____ Patrolman ______
Gallaher. M. C Patrolman _ __
Goslee. ^f. ..-.- Patrolman .. . ____
Guilfoyle, J. Patrolman ____
Grnbbs, C. B. ___ Patrolman ______
Harlcy, H. E. ___ Patrolman .
arley, R. H. _ 'Patrolman ______
Harper, J. G. ___. Patrolman ______
Hutson. H. C. __ Patrolman _ __
Hutto. P. S. Patrolman ______
Hansen, F. V. Patrolman ______
Ivey, A. Patrolman ______
Kearney. F. J. __<Patrolman ______
Keane. T. __ Patrolman ______
Kemp, H. H _ Patrolman _____
Keller, C. W. _ Patrolman ______
Kelly. C. H. __ Patrolman _ ___
Kilian. J. G. Patrolman _____
Leech, C. F. Patrolman ______
Lovett. R. F. Patrolman ______
Lively. G. P. ____ Patrolman ______
McCarthy,!. C Patrolman _
McAIpin. T. E.__ Patrolman __ ._
McGrath. J. ___ Patrolman ______
Mitchcll. W. R _ Patrolman __
Morgan. L. P. __ Patrolman __ _
Morse. W. J. _ Patrolman __ ____
Malphns. C. M.__ Patrolman __ __
>foehrfce, P. H. Patrolman ______
Xantz. L. H. Patrolman __ _
Newton. E. L. Patrolman ______
O'VeJI. T. G. Patrolman ______
O'Reilly. T. T. _ Patrolman __ -
Price. H. L. __ _ Patrolman ______
Ouarterman. T.A. Patrolman ______
Remlev. W. E _ 'Patrolman __ _
Remley, D. D. Patrolman ______
To
June 30
4
SO
62
25
26
30
75
16
13
39
22
31
33
37
38
41
11
14
25
62
22
12
10
34
21
15
56
31
17
40
29
35
8
- 55
37
20
65
36
21
52
17
32
To
Dec. 31
13
40
R1
14
97
23
31
47
105
20an
36
15 'ti
23
21
70
59
21
22
35
51
15
4
17
28
30
35
21
55
32
22
24
17
41
3
37
34
24
78
25
12
52
30
41
Total
17
4ft
133
14
159
A&
57
77
1ftA
3643
75
37
62
eg
S8
108
100
v>
36
60
113
37
4
29
38
64
56
36
111
63
39
64
46
76
11
92
71
44
143
61
33
104
47
73
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 69
Number of Arrests Made by Each Member of the
Department During 1909
NAME
Reilly, J. J. .....
Rowse, J. A.
Sheehan. Win. __
Stewart. W. H
Stewart, W. T.
Sherrod, M. H. ..
Showalter. C. H.
Swift, F. S.
Tullis, B. L. -
Ungar, B. _______
Weber. J. A. L.~
Winn, W. S. _
RANK
Patrolman ______
Patrolman ______
Patrolman ______
Patrolman ______
To
June 30
14
16JO
4
33
27
48
31
15
46
101
S
15
72
To
Dee. 31
16
30
CO
3
20
474fi
46
21
2\
57
1Q
76
Total
50
46
97
7
53
74
00
77
1f\
69
153
9
"ii
148
Total Number of Arrests During 1909
White women _________________________ 184
White men __________________________2.772
Negro women __________________________1,451
Negro men ____________________3,959
Chinamen ____ 5
Minors _ 381
Total ________________________________8,752
70 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Arrests Each Month
MON'TH
January
March _____________
May
July ______- -
October _. - ____
November
Totals ___ _ ___ _
Negroes
390
322
527
386
339
433
413
795
689
330
378
408
5410
Whites
174
194
375
162
168
158
203
199
698
184
218
233
2956
Minors ,
43
10
27
23
72
37
51
25
30
26
in
37
JBl
Chinamen
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
"3
ct607
526
Q7O
571
K-1Q
633
667
1019
1417
540
626
678
8752
Disposition of Above Cases
Sentenced in Recorder's Court ____________4,425
Dismissed in Recorder's Court _____2,451
Sentenced and sentence suspended by Recorder ___ 294
Turned over to Superior Court _________ 195
Turned over to City Court ________________ 586
Turned over to Ordinary's Court __________ 86
Turned over to various County Sheriffs ________ 57
Turned over to United States Court __________ 5
Turned over to foreign vessels _________ 35
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________71
Suspicious characters _________________ 612
Turned over to Army and Navy __ 3
Turned over to Juvenile Court ___________ 28
Total _________________________8,720
Fines Collected in Police Court During the Year 19"09
January ______________________:_____$ 1,429.50
February ___________________ 1,745.60
March __________________________ 3,227.56
April ___________________________ 1,251.95
May ____________________________ 888.30
June __________________________ 1,371.70
July ___________________________ 1,602.55
August _________________________ 1,452.10
September _______________________ 1,882.45
October _________________________ 1,220.50
November _______________________ 1,475.75
December ________________________ 1,784.05
Total _______________._._____$19,332.01
Statement of Fines Collected in Police Court for Each
Year From 1902 to 1909, Inclusive
1902 ___________________________$ 6,242.95
1903 __________________________ 9,492.90
1904 ___________________________ 9,328.00
1905 ___________-________ 10,057.00
.1906 _________________________ 12,236.00
1907 _________________________ 18,255.25
1908 ___________________.____ 35,113.60
1909 _________.___________________. 19,332.01
Causes of Arrest
Arson ____________ 2
Abandonment of wife and children __________ 1
Adultery and fornication __________________ 13
Aiding a convict to escape ______;_______ 6
72_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Assault and battery _______ 34
Assault with intent to murder ___________ 62
Assault with intent to rape _ 3
Assaulting and stabbing 65
Attempting to wreck railroad train 1
Bigamy __: 1
Breaking and entering a railroad car __ 2
Burglary 81
Carrying concealed weapons ___- 25
Cheating and swindling ____ 30
Contempt of Court ________-____ 66
Cruelty to animals _ 42
Cruelty to children ______________ 8
Cow stealing 1
Deserters from the Army and Navy __ 13
Deserters from foreign vessels ___ 16
Disorderly conduct _______2,646
Drunk and disorderly _____________________1,949
Escaped convicts _ 44
Exposure of person __; 3
Fast and reckless driving ____________ 29
Forgery _ 13
Furnishing minors with intoxicating liquors 3
Gambling ___________1__^________ 151
Involuntary manslaughter ____'-- 8
Keeping a disorderly house __ 5
Kidnapping _________________ 1
Larceny after trust ___ 40
Larceny from the house __"_ 81
Larceny from the person _________ 14
Larceny, grand _. 2
Larceny, simple _____ 498
Lunacy _ 29
Malicious mischief _________________ 1
Murder _____________________________ 19
Perjury " 1
Pointing a pistol not in own defense ____ 11
_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________73
Rape ____________________________ 5
Receiving stolen goods 6
Robbery by force __. 36
Shooting at another not in his own defense 3
Shooting on public highway 1
Stealing a ride on a railroad train __ 11
Suspicious characters ____ 612
Selling cocaine 21
United States Court _____________________ 5
Vagrancy __________________ 48
Violating City Ordinances ;___________^__ 1,807
Violating automobile ordinance ___ 60
Violating prohibition law _ 51
Wife beating ______________ 7
Arrests upon requests of other counties and States 59
Total _'_______________-_________8,752
Ambulance Calls for Year 1909
( Month Whites. Negroes. Total.
January ____________ 34 25 59
February __________ 24 34 58
March ____________ 27 29 56
April _____________ 24 23 47
May _____________ 37 38 75
June ____________ 25 30 55
July ______________ 37 '40 77
August ____________ 46 42 88
September __________ 40 50 90
October ____________ 43 38 81
November __________ 36 38 74
December __________ 27 32 59
Totals ____________ 400 419 819
Patrol Wagon Calls
January ___________ 428
February ___________________________ 688
1/4_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
March _____________________________ 596
April ______________________________ 554
May ______________________________ 494
June ______________________________ 660
July ________________.____________1,052
August _________________________ 795
September _ 578
October _____________ 511
November _______ 625
December ______ 724
Total _________________________7,705
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 75
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES
OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR
1909, AS COMPARED WITH THE
EXPENSES FOR 1908
Receipts
Appropriation for 1909 .__$130,000.00
Union Station _______.___________ 1,800.00
Appropriation for purchase of automobile 1,200.00
Station House fees _______________ 172.50
Patrolmen's services (special) . 153.50
Sale of one horse; clothing, old *property,
empty sacks, etc. _____________ 375.83 $133,701.83
Expenditures
1908. 1909.
Salaries --..$105,491.59 $114,995.29
Horse feed ____________ 5,446.84 4,781.78
Horses ______________ 1,595.00 1,325.00
Horse-shoeing __________ 683.47 666.27
Veterinary services 154.75 257.75
Uniforms _____________ 3,007.05 3.981.40
Prisoners' rations ________ 922.13 1,233.83
General improvements and repairs _____________ 403.87 305.53
General supplies ___ 1,339.11 1,236.54
Property ______________ - 822.39 687.54
Lights _______________ 248.72 322.30
Fuel _______________ 260.00 146.50
Telephone rental _________ 352.44 323.11
Printing, stationery, etc. 249.03 304.55
Gamewell System ______ 640.89 49.95
Postage and telegrams 134.95 132.38
Insurance ___ 110.00 75.00
Expenses Chief, Convention 150.00
Incidentals ________ 279.24 158.34
Purchase of autompbile 1,100.00
Maintenance of automobile 692.25
Totals ____________$122,141.47 $132,925.31 $132,925.31
Balance turned in to City Treasurer $ 776.52
$133,701.83
76_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_____,
Expenses of Department for 1903 ________$ 90,866.13
Expenses of Department for 1904 _________ 89.399.88
Expenses of Department for 1905 ______________ 93,029.20
Expenses of Department for 1906 _ 106281.04
Expenses of Department for 1907 ______________ 121,350.47
Expenses of Department for 1908 _ 122,141.47
Expenses of Department for 1909 _.- 132,925.31
Amount appropriated for 1910 ___ 131,000.00
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________77
Inventory of Property
Police Department grounds __________$20,000.00
Police Headquarters building 25,000.00
Police outbuildings ______________ 12,000.00
Gamewell system _____________ 25,000.00
Inside telephone system 100.00
1 Automobile (Buick) _____________ 600.00
41 Horses _______________________ 6,200.00
2 Patrol wagons ________ 450.00
2 Ambulances __________________ 450.00
1 Buckboard ___________________ 75.00
1 Buggy _______________________ 100.00
1 Patrol wagon (unserviceable) 25.00
1 Supply wagon _____________ 100.00
1 Supply wagon (unserviceable) ___ 25.00
5 Sets single harness 125.00
2 Sets double harness ______________ 100.00
42 Springfield rifles ________________ 400.00
42 Winchester rifles ________________ "* 400.00
115 Revolvers ___________________ 1,150.00
32 Saddles, bridles, and blankets ________ 1,100.00
4 Roller top desks ________________ 300.00
4 Small desks ___________________ 80.00
1 Flat top desk, standing ___1________ 55.00
1 Steel filing cabinet _______________ 250.00
1 Wooden filing cabinet ______________ 40.00
1 Small filing cabinet ______________ 15.00
1 Prisoners' property cabinet ______ 60.00
110 Clothes lockers _________________ 440.00
92 Iron cots _____________________ 275.00
90 Mattresses ___________________ 150.00
30 Prisoners' blankets _______________ 60.00
3 Iron safes _____________________ 200.00
1 Large table __________________ 175.00
6 Small tables __________________ 80.00
7 Revolving desk chairs __________ 100.00
11 Leather-back chairs ______________ 120.00
78 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
45
7
1
3
1
1
5
I
S
3
52
1
1
1
20
1
2
3
2
12
34
50
100
25
100
100
100
1
4
27
2
Courtroom chairs _ _ _ ____ _.
Stoves for heating _____ .
Cooking stove and utensils __ _____ .
Clocks _____ _ _. _____ .
Steel clothes locker _ _ _ _ ____ . Medicine chest and contents _ _____ .
Electric fans __ _ __ _ _______ .
Art square _ _ _ ______ .
Rugs .
Foot mats _ _ _ _____ .
Cuspidors _ _ _ _ __ .
Lounge _ _ _ ____ .
Bookcase _ _____ .
Steel bookcase _ __ _ _ ______ .
Window shades __ __ .
Floor coverings __ _____ _.
Pictures, mirrors, etc. _ _ ________ .
Ice box _ .
Water coolers _ _ _____ .
Pairs handcuffs _ _ _ _____ .
Bicycles, equipped with speedometers _ .
Pairs pillows _ _ _ _ _ ______ .
Sabers _ _____ . Web cartridge belts _ _ _ _ ______ .
Wreaths __ _ _ ______ .
Club sockets _ _ _ ___ _.
Badges _
Clubs _ _ ______ .
Whistles _ _ __ __ _____ _ .
Letter press and copying outfit ______ .
Horse blankets _ ___ _ ______ .
Yale locks __ _ _ _ ____ _.
Wheelbarrows _ _ _ ______ .
100.00
155.00
20.00
50.00
50.00
25.00
120.00
40.00
30.00
10.00
50.00
30.00
40.00
75.00
40.00
._ 300.00
50.00
5.00
5.00
15.00
150.00
30.00
100.00
50.00
75.00
15.00
50.00
75.00
25.00
10.00
15.00
30.00
10.00
Total ____________________$97,745.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 79
Gamewell Boxes
12Bay and Habersham
13Bay and Randolph
1-1Bay and East Broad
15Bay and Dray ton
21Bay and Schwarz Avenue
22Broughton and'East Broad
23Oglethorpe Avenue and East Broad
24Congress and Bull
25President and Randolph
31York and Bull
32Anderson an.d Waters Road
33Liberty and Randolph
34Estill Avenue and Waters Road
35Park Avenue and East Broad
42Montgomery and Forty-second Streets
43Oglethorpe Avenue and Fahm
44River and Water
45Indian and Fahm
51Bay and West Broad
52Estill Avenue and Bull
53Broughton and West Broad
54Broughton and Fahm
121Oglethorpe Avenue and West Broad
122Louisville Road and Dooley Avenue
123Gwinnett and Stiles Avenue
124Gwinnett and Magnolia
125Liberty and West Broad
131Union Station
132Cohen and West Boundary
133Charlton and Jefferson
144City Market
152Gaston and West Broad
212Gaston and Whitaker
213Park Avenue and West Broad
214Anderson and West Broad
215Liberty and East Broad
(M.R.C.S.6)
80_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
221Gwinnett and West Broad
242Gwinnett and East Broad
243Jones and East Broad
312Gaston and Lincoln
313Hartridge and East Broad
314Wheaton and Waters Road
321Bolton and Atlantic Avenue
322Park Avenue and Abercorn
323Henry and Bull
331Anderson and East Broad
341East Broad and Thirty-eighth Streets
412Ogeechee Road and Thirty-sixth Street
413Bull and Thirty-sixth Streets
Report of the Recorder
To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
| Savannah:
Gentlemen:I have the honor to submit herewith my
annual report as Recorder, for the year ending December
31,1909, together with such recommendations as in my humble judgment would be of benefit to the city and the community in general.
A great part of the information herein contained will be
found in the report of the Chief of Police, and its recital in
this report is merely a repetition of information that you
already have in your possession.
Without going into details, I would respectfully direct
your attention to the fact that the fines collected in the
Police Court have steadily increased from the time of my
occupancy of office. It is true that in the year of 1908 a
larger amount of money was received, but as you know this
was due to the fact that practically all of the nearbeer dealers in the city had failed to procure a city license, and were
fined in the Police Court, thus augmenting the total fines
collected. Aside from this source, however, the fines from
other classes of violations exceed those of any previous
year, and since the fines which were collected in 1908 from
nearbeer dealers were paid direct to the city, and not through
the medium of the Police Court, it can readily be seen that
the increase is considerable.
In my last annual report, I requested the passage of an
Ordinance to prohibit loitering on the streets, but nothing
definite having been done in this connection I instructed the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Police Department to arrest this class of vagrants, and to
place against them the charge of "disorderly conduct,"
which, as your Honorable Body knows, can be construed
to cover a multitude of sins. My instructions were carried
out, and the result has been that we have forced a great
number of idlers to secure employment in the different factories within our limits, or have sent them to work for the
good of the county.
As much as I dislike to, I feel constrained to say that
in my opinion the Industrial Farm is a farce and humbug.
The average number of prisoners throughout the year at
this institution is about 50 per day. The total number of
acres of land over which the officials of the Industrial Farm
have jurisdiction is.26, out'of which probably 10 are under
cultivation. The total expense to the City of Savannah for
the maintenance and support of this luxury is $300.00 per
month. The city receives nothing in return. The Industrial Farm is not self-supporting, and consequently in my
opinion it is folly to further contribute towards its maintenance. As I have heretofore recited, in my last report, there
is no method to enforce the retention of the prisoners at
that institution, and they remain in durance vile solely
because of their moral fear. The Farm has been termed,
and justly so, "The Drunkards' Paradise," and to send the
ordinary offender to this institution, where no punishment
is inflicted, and where there are no ties to bind, is purely and
simply a vacation. If there were sufficient work to occupy
their time, or if the Farm even was self-sustaining, I would
not make the following suggestion; but in view of the circumstances, with the interest of the City at heart, I feel that
the agreement entered into between the City and County
should be discontinued, and the Farm under its present condition abolished.
The County or "Brown" Farm, as it is commonly known,
averages throughout the entire year about ISO prisoners a
day. These prisoners are required to till the soil, and have
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
under their constant care about 500 acres of cultivated land.
The Brown Farm is not only self-supporting, but in addition
thereto furnishes supplies to the Blue or Industrial Farm,
as well as to the different convict camps under the supervision of the County. Further than this, the prisoners are
required to work the roads, are. under armed guards, and
incarceration therein is generally looked upon as a serious
matter.
In view of these facts, I would respectfully recommend
that the city enter into arrangements with the County
Authorities, whereby the conduct of both the Blue and
Brown Farms would be under the same supervision, thereby
preventing the numerous and frequent escapes which occur
on the Industrial Farm, and at the same time securing from
the wards of the city a sufficient amount of work to offset
the expenditures made in clothing and feeding them. I am
frank to admit that the method by which this is to be arrived
at has not been solved by me, but I feel that the wiser and
more experienced men constituting the Board of Aldermen
of Savannah, as well as the County Commissioners, can
without a great deal of trouble arrive at a sane and safe solution of the problem.
Total Number of Arrests During 1909
White women _____________________ 184
White men ____________________2,772
Negro women ____________________1,451
Negro men _______ _3,959
Chinamen ___ 5
Minors ____ 381
Total _________________-_______8,752
Disposition of Above Cases
Sentenced in Recorder's Court_4,457
Dismissed in Recorder's Court ______________2,451
84_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Sentenced and sentence suspended by Recorder ______ 294
Turned over to Superior Court 195
Turned over to City Court ____________ 586
Turned over to Ordinary's Court ___________ 86
Turned over to various County Sheriffs ~_____ 57
Turned over to United States Court 5
Turned over to foreign vessels 35
Suspicious characters _____________ 612
Turned over to Army and Navy _____________ 3
Turned over to Juvenile Court ______________ 28
Total ________________________8,752
Pines Collected in Police Court During the Year 1909
January ________________________$ 1,429.50
February ________________________ 1,745.60
March __________________________ 3,227.56
April ___________________________ 1,251.95
May __________________________._ 888.30
June ___________________________ 1,371.70
July __________________________ 1,602.55
August ________________________ 1,452.10
September ____________________ 1,882.45
October _______________________ 1,220.50
November ________________________ 1,475.75
December ________________________ 1,784.05
Total ______________________$19,332.01
Statement of Fines Collected in Police Court for Each
Year From 1902 to 1909, Inclusive
1902 _______________________$ 6,242.95
1903 ___________________________ 9,492.90
1904 __._.____.______.__.________ 9,328.00
1905 _________-_.__.___.____ 10,057.00
1906 ______-____________________ 12,236.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 85
1907 ____________$18,255.25
1908 _____________ 35,113.60
1909 _______________________._ 19,332.01
Causes of Arrest
Arspn _________ 2
Abandonment of wife and children ___________ 1
Adultery and fornication __________________ 13
Aiding a convict to escape _________ 6
Assault and battery ___________ 34
Assault with intent to murder _____________ 62
Assault with intent to rape __ 3
Assaulting and stabbing 65
Attempting to wreck railroad train ____________ 1
Bigamy 1
Breaking and entering a railroad car _____.____ 2
Burglary 81
Carrying concealed weapons _____ 25
Cheating and swindling _____________ 30
Contempt of Court ___________ 66
Cruelty to animals . 42
Cruelty to children 8
Cow stealing 1
Deserters from the Army and Navy _______ 13
Deserters from foreign vessels ______________ 16
Disorderly conduct 2,646
Drunk and disorderly __1,949
Escaped convicts 44
Exposure of person 3
Fast and reckless driving _______ 29
Forgery 13
Furnishing minors with intoxicating liquors _______ 3
Gambling _______-,__________ 151
Involuntary manslaughter __________ 8
Keeping a disorderly house ____ 5
Kidnapping __ 1
Larceny after trust ______________ 40
86 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Larceny from the house __ 81
Larceny from the person 14
Larceny, grand _____ 2
Larceny, simple ___ 498
Lunacy 29
Malicious mischief _ 1
Murder _________________________' 19
Perjury 1
Pointing a pistol not in own defense ________ 11
Rape ____________________________ 5
Receiving stolen goods _____ 6
Robbery by force ____________ 36
Shooting at another not in his own defense ____ 3
Shooting on public highway _______________ 1
Stealing a ride on a railroad train __________ 11
Suspicious characters _,________ 612
Selling cocaine _________- _____________________ 21
United States Court _____________________ 5
Vagrancy ________________________ 48
Violating City Ordinances __________________1,807
Violating automobile ordinance ________ 60
Violating prohibition law __________________ 51
Wife beating ________________________ 7
Arrests upon requests of other counties and States _ 59
Total _______________________. .____ 752
Respectfully submitted,
JOHN E. SCHAVARZ,
Recorder
TWENTIETH
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THK
PAID FIRE DEPARTMENT
OF THK
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
FOR THE YEAR
ENDING
December 31, 19O9
THOMAS BALT.ANTYNB
SUPERINTENDENT
FIRE COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR 1909
M. J. Kavanaugh, Chairman
R. M. Hull Craig Barrow
C. G. Wilkinson H. E. Wilson
FIRE DEPARTMENT
Thomas Ballantyne Superintendent
J. J. Connolly Assistant Superintendent
P. F. Curry _______________ Clerk and Storekeeper
G. T. Johnston ____________ Electric Inspector
F. J. Kilroy Fire Inspector
D. S. O'Connor _________ Assistant Fire Inspector
T. P. Sandiford Superintendent Fire Alarm
\V. F. Carrick ________ Chauflfeur to Superintendent
J. P. Kavanaugh ________ Chauffeur to Superintendent
Superintendent's Report
Office of the Superintendent of the Fire Department
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah:
Gentlemen:I have the honor to submit my third
annual report of the operations and conditions of the Fire
Department of the city, for the year ending December 31,
1909, this report being the Twentieth Annual Report of the
Paid Fire Department.
The total force of the Department at the close of the
year was ninety-eight (98) men, as follows:
1 Superintendent.
1 Assistant Superintendent.
1 Clerk and Storekeeper.
1 Superintendent Fire Alarm.
1 Electric Inspector.
1 Fire Inspector.
1 Assistant Fire Inspector.
2 Chauffeurs.
7 Foremen of Engine Companies.
7 Assistant Foremen of Engine Companies.
1 Foreman of Truck Company.
1 Assistant Foreman of Truck Company.
1 Foreman of Chemical Company.
1 Assistant Foreman of Chemical Company.
90 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
7 Engineers of Steamers.
20 Drivers.
3 Tillermen.
41 Firemen.
During the year the following changes were made:
Truck Company No. 1 formed, with eight men.
Engine Company Xo. 7 succeeding Hose Company
Xo. 1.
1 Superintendent Fire Alarm dismissed.
1 Superintendent Fire Alarm appointed.
1 Assistant Foreman made Foreman.
2 Firemen made Assistant Foremen.
1 Engineer appointed.
3 Firemen resigned.
8 Firemen dismissed.
1 Fireman died from natural causes.
7 Firemen reinstated.
14 Firemen appointed, of which ten are new men.
Leaving the force ninety-eight (98) men, the number
authorized by city ordinance.
FORCE BY COMPANIES
Fire Station No. 1
518. 520, 522 Broughton Street, East
Name Capacity In Service
Thomas Fogerty __Foreman _______11 years
Jas. J. \Vhalen __--Assistant Foreman ___ 6 years
Jos. A. Goette ____Engineer _________ 5 years
Jos. A. McGrath _____Driver Engine ______ 9 years
Geo. F. Byrnes ______Driver Wagon ______ 2 years
F. Goritz __Hoseman _________ 8 years
T. Welsh _________Hoseman _________ 6 years
J. Higgins Hoseman __________ ?. jcars
R. J. O'Keefe ____Hoseman _________ 2 years
T. J. Ryan _____Hoseman __________ 1 year
Thos. P. Duffy __Hoseman _________ 2 mos.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 91
Fire Station No. 2
i
Indian and West Broad Streets
Name Capacity In Service
A. P. McFarland Foreman _23 years
M. J. Roach ______Assistant Foreman ___ 9 years
E. J. Burns ____Engineer __________ 9 mos.
G. F. Kilroy ______Driver Engine ______ 5 years
Louis F. Henderson Driver Wagon ______11 years
B. E. Sheppard _____Driver Truck ______ 5 years
M. F. Harvey Tillerman Truck ____ 3 years
J. Rottonburg _Hoseman _______ 6 years
V. S. Pacetti Hoseman _________ 5 years
J. C. Bailey _______Hoseman ________ 5 years
Jno. W. VVhalen _______Hoseman ____________ 3 years
J. S. O'Brien ______Hoseman _________ 3 years
R. J. Hayes ________Hoseman _________ 2 years
C. J. Campsen __.__Hoseman _________ 1 year
R. P. Shehan Hoseman _________ 4 mos.
J. C. Puder ______Hoseman _________ 4 mos.
Fire Station No. 3
Headquarters, Oglethorpe Avenue and Abercorn Street
Name Capacity In Service
C. V. Egense Foreman ___19 years
E. T. Morrissey __Assistant Foreman ___ 8 years
S. W. Peck Engineer 4 years
J. C. Sheahan Driver Engine ______ 6 years
T. G. KearneyDriver Wagon ______ 6 years
C. Christensen _Hoseman _____10 years
W. F. White _______Hoseman ________ 4 years
J. C. Hirt ____Hoseman __ 4 years
J. R. Wohanka______ Hoseman 3 years
J. Hunter _________Hoseman ________ 2 years
Jos. P. Harvey _____-Hoseman ___ 2 mos.
92 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Fire Station No. 4
606 Barnard Street
Name Capacity In Service
T. D. Brunson ____Foreman _________12 years
D. V. Whitaker -Assistant Foreman ___10 years
W. J. Futch Engineer _______11 years
C. W. Stein ______Driver Engine ______ 4 years
G. C. Donnelly _____-Driver Wagon ______19 years
W. H. Remley ______Driver Truck ______ 8 years.
J. H. Doerner ______Tillerman Truck _____ 9 mos.
J. P. Duffy _________Hoseman _______12 years
C. W. Ellis ________Hoseman _________ 7 years
J. Alien _________Hoseman __________ 4 years
W. J. Barrett ______Hoseman __________ 1 year
J. H. Bell _________Hoseman _________ 9 mos.
H. Center _________Hoseman _________ 9 mos.
Fire Station No. 5
11 Henry Street, East
Name Capacity In Service
A. M. Rogers ______Foreman _________13 years
H. F. Corley _______Assistant Foreman __19 years
C. A. Christians _____Engineer __________18 years
L. D. Walsh _______Driver Engine ______ 3 years
M. F. Sullivan ______Driver Wagon ______ 6 years
J. C. Henderson _____Hoseman ____ 5 years
J. E. McDonough ___Hoseman _ 2 years
J. N. Egense ______-Hoseman ____ 2 years
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 93
Fire Station No. 6
Thirty-Eighth and Barnard Streets
Name Capacity In Service
C. M. Burnham Foreman ___13 years
J. J. Hearn _Assistant Foreman __13 years
L. Trebony ______._Engineer _______20 years
J. H. Monsees ____Driver Engine __ 4 years
F. H. Thompson ___Driver Wagon _____13 years
W. J. Cleary __Hoseman __________25 years
G. J. Brind __-____Hoseman _________ 9 mos.
W. L. DuFour ______Hoseman _________ 6 mos.
Engine Company No. 7
Gwinnett and Patilsen Streets
Name Capacity In Service
J. O'Leary _____Foreman _________16 years
T. Hamilton __Assistant Foreman __16 years
D. P. Murphy ______Engineer __________11 years
J. J. Fitzpatrick ___.-Driver Engine _ 4 years
W. W. Pringle ___--Driver Wagon _13 years
B. Leddy _________Driver Truck _____11 years
H. J. Larkin ____Hoseman __23 years
P. E. Forehan Hoseman 2 years
J. J. Buttimer __________Hoseman 6 mos.
Chemical Company No. 1
Headquarters, Oglethorpe Avenue and Abercorn Street
Name Capacity In Service
J. Murphy ___-__-Foreman ____ 9 years
T. Flynn __________Assistant Foreman ___11 years
T. F. Lovett _______Driver _____________13 years
94 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
G. E. Johnson _____.Hoseman _ 9 years
R. B. Hearn ________Hoseman _________ 9 years
Truck Company No. 1
Headquarters, Oglethorpe Avenue and Abercorn Street
Xame Capacity In Service
A. J. Toshach ______Foreman ________23 years
M. F. Morehead _____Assistant Foreman ___11 years
Thos. Dillon _______Driver _____'8 years
F. F. Black ________Tillerman _________ 9 mos.
C. C. Edwards ______Driv. Asst. Supt's Buggy 3 years
C. Burke ____Ladderman 1 year
J. F. Hartnoll __-Ladderman __ 9 mos.
> W. S. Blanton ______Ladderman ________ 6 mos.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 95
APPROPRIATIONS, 1909
Fire Department and Uniforms __________$113,000.00
New Engine House, No. 7 ____________ 11,447.89
(This includes $3,947.89 brought over from
1908.)
New Apparatus ____________________ 7,000.00
Automobile for Superintendent __________ 2,950.00
Total _______________________$134,397.89
EXPENDITURES
1908 1909
Salaries _____-__________-.-$78,931.88 $86,744.10
Printing and Stationery _________ 108.15 152.20
Feed for Stock ________j____ 6,697.34 5,868.65
Horse-shoeing ______________ 885.23 989.52
Treatment of Sick Stock ________ 341.00 355.55
Additional Stock _____________ 1,250.00 1,750.00
Harness and Repairs to same _____ 236.88 243.85
Repairs to Apparatus ____ 1,523.71 1,743.54
Engine Coal and Wood _________ 49.50 91.75
Stove and Heater Coal and Wood __ 1,162.50 1.102.00
Gas and Illuminating __________ 542.17 744.32
Lubricating Oil and Waste ______ 53.77 102.32
Soda and Acid ______________ 103.59 280.28
Beds and Bedding for Men ______ 3.25
Miscellaneous Shop Tools _ 11.03
Furniture and Fixtures _________ 237.04 100.45
Implements of the Service _______ 127.51 244.73
Paints, Varnish, Etc. __________. 673.29 164.25
Repairs to Buildings __________ 1,479.28 729.04
Additional Hose _____________ 2,700.00 3,882.45
Boxes, Instruments, Wire, Tools, Etc. 6.95 19.43
(M. R. C. 8.7)
96 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Telephone Rent _____________ $ 79.92 $ 157.51
Cleaning Tools, Etc. __________ 296.33 470.26
Repairs to Heaters ____________ 18.67 31.66
Ice ___________________ 125.00 100.00
Surgeon's Fees _____________ 70.00 10.00
Rent of Houses ______________ 60.00 60.00
Incidentals ________________ 357.96 842.14
Pensions __________________ 870.00 1,092.50
Uniforms _________________ 4,080.45
Electric Inspector, Repairs, and HorseShoeing ________________ 66.95
New Engine House No. 7 _..______ 11,657.78
New Apparatus _ 6,999.80
Automobile for Superintendent ___ 2,950.00
Totals _______________$99,001.95 133,827.45
RECEIPTS, 1909
Electric Inspector's Fees _______________$1,204.00
Steamer Texas _____________________ 323.18
Sale of Hose Couplings ________________ 6.80
Refund from Dryfus, One Uniform _________ 10.10
Sale of Horses ______________________ 475.00
Sale of Sacks and Barrels _______________ 41.58
Sale of Old Hose ____________________ 38.80
Total _______________________$2,099.46
Total Appropriations, 1909 ____________$134,397.89
Total Expenditures, 1909 ______________ 133,827.48
Balance _________________________$ 570.41
Receipts _________________________ 2,099.46
Net Balance ______________________$ 2,669.87
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ESTIMATED VALUE OF DEPARTMENT PROPERTY
Fire Station No. 1 _ __ ___ ____$20,750.00
Fire Station No. 2 ___________________ 28,195.00
Fire Station No. 3 __________________ 20,750.00
Fire Station No. 4 _________________ 23,514.00
Fire Station No. 5 __________________ 14,820.00
Fire Station No. 6 __________________ 10,530.00
Fire Station No. 7 _____ . ____________ 26,000.00
Truck Company No. 1 ________________ 25,000.00
Chemical Company No. 1 ______________ 10,364.00
Fire Alarm System __________________ 40,446.00
Miscellaneous ______ ______ _ _ ________ 3,435.00
Total ______________________$223,804.00
EXPENSES BY STATIONS
Fire Station No. 1 __________________$12,072.47
Fire Station No. 2 __________________ 16,680.97
Fire Station No. 3 __________!___"______ 13,903.91
Fire Station No. 4 ___________________ 14,636.32
Fire Station No. 5 __________________ 8,332.89
Fire Station No. 6 ______________r__ 8,797.37
Fire Station No. 7 __________________ 8,893.90
Truck Company No. 1 ________________ 6,476.72
Chemical Company No. 1 _________-___ 5,929.89
Fire" Alarm _______________________ 743.32
Electric Fees _____________________ 66.95
General Expenses __________________ 15,685.19
Completing New Engine House __________ 11,657.78
New Apparatus _________ 6,999.80
Total _____________________$130,877.48
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
DESCRIPTION OF ROLLING STOCK
Engine No. 1.First Size Double Pump LaFrance.
Engine No. 2.Double Extra First Size Double Pump
LaFrance.
Engine No. 3.First Size Double Pump LaFrance.
Engine No. 4.Third Size Double Pump LaFrance.
Engine No. 5.Fifth Size Single Pump LaFrance.
Engine No. 6.Second Size Single Pump Amoskeag.
Engine No. 7.Second Size Single Pump Jeffers.
Reserve Engine No. 8.Second Size Double Pump
LaFrance.
Hose Tenders
No. 1.One two-horse wagon.
No. 2.One two-horse wagon.
No. 3.One two-horse wagon.
No. 4One two-horse wagon. (See Combination.)
No. 5.One two-horse wagon. (See Combination.)
No. 6.One two-horse wagon. (See Combination.)
No. 7.One two-horse wagon.
Reserve.One two-horse wagon.
Reserve.One one-horse reel.
Chemical Engines
*
Chemical Engine No.- 1One Holloway Double-tank,
85 gallons each. .
Hook and Ladder Trucks
No. 1.American LaFrance Aerial Extension, 75 feet.
No. 2.Hayes' Aerial Extension, 55 feet.
No. 3.-Leverich Wood Frame Tiller Truck, 52 feet
extension.
No. 4.Rurnsey and Co.'s Light Steel Frame City
Truck. (See Combination.)
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 99
Combinations
No. 2.Originally Holloway Combination, with double
tank, 35 gallons each. One tank taken off.
No. 4.One Seagrave 60-gallon tank under seat.
No. 5.Tank from Holloway Chemical Engine placed
under seat of wagon.
No. 6.Originally Holloway Chemical Engine, with
double tanks, 65 gallons each; remodeled in 1902, and
changed into a hose wagon, with one tank under seat.
Truck No. 4.Tank from Holloway Combination
hung under truck frame.
Supply and Coal Wagons
One two-horse large wagon.
Three one-horse small wagons.
Officers' Vehicles
One Stevens-Duryea Automobile, 24 H.-P.
One Superintendent's four-wheel buggy in reserve.
One Assistant Superintendent's four-wheel buggy.
Hose
On January 1, 1909, the Department owned 14,900 feet
of Hose, corrected.
Since that date 4,000 feet of 2^-inch Hose were
purchased; also 500 feet of Chemical Hose, 1-inch, were
purchased.
1,900 feet of condemned Hose were sold, or furnished
Street and Lane, Water, and Park and Tree Departments.
The inventory of Hose on December 31, 1909, shows
17,500 feet, classed as follows:
Very Good _____________________13,700
Poor ________________. ______._ ]/?5C
100________MAYOR'S ANNUAL RBPORT________
Condemned -. 600
ChemicalGood ___ 1,100
ChemicalPoor _________-_____ 150
Total ___________________17,500
On January 1, 1909, there were in service 46 horses.
During the year, four horses"Wilkinson," "Buck,"
"Sandy," and "Leo"were condemned and sold.
"Cyclone" and "Sonny," condemned, were exchanged
for horse "Craig B."
Seven new horses were purchased during the year.
We now have 48 horses in the Department.
Repairs to Apparatus
Engine No. 1.One new boiler plunger.
Engine No. 2.One bushing in wheel.
Wagon No. 2.Tires reset, two new felloes, and two
new wheels.
Engine No. 3.Rear tires reset, two new plungers, and
nests in boiler.
Wagon No. 3.Tires reset, and one new wagon pole.
Engine No. 4.Two new poles, minor repairs to boiler
during the year. This Engine needs a new boiler, which
will be put in the coming year.
Engine No. 6.Tires reset.
Wagon No. 6.Tires reset.
Truck No. 2.One new tiller rod, and repairs to running gear; also re-painted.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT________101
Truck No. 3.Re-painted.
Truck No. 4.Re-painted.
Chemical No. 1.General overhauling, and re-painted.
Assistant Superintendent's Buggy.One new shaft.
Superintendent's Automobile.One new tire, two inner
tubes, and two rear wheel chains.
Injuries to Employees.
January 31Driver C. W. Stein, Engine No. 4, while
responding to box 41, collided with street car at Whitaker
and Gaston Streets, severely injuring leg. Off duty 12 days
and 12 hours.
January 31Fireman W. J. Barrett, Engine Company
No. 4, while responding to box 41, was slightly injured
when Engine collided with street car, corner Whitaker and
Gaston Streets. No time lost.
June 12Fireman W. J. Cleary, Engine Company No.
6, bruised ankle while at work at Fire Box 62, Bolton and
Burroughs Streets. Off duty 6 days.
July 31Fireman F. Schwarz, Engine Company No.
2, while hauling bedding, horse stepped on foot, injuring
one toe. Off duty 8 days and 12 hours.
August 6Assistant Foreman M. F. Morehead, Truck
Company No. 1, kicked by Truck horse "Pat C," while box
13 was being tested at 12 o'clock noon. No time lost.
August 18Assistant Fire Inspector D. S. O'Connor,
while acting fireman at Engine Company No. 2, driving
Truck No. 2 on exercise, horses became unmanageable, and
running into iron post at Congress and Montgomery Streets
threw him out of seat, painfully bruising him on hip and
back. Off duty 3 months and 20 days.
102_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT'________
August 19Fireman J. S. O'Brien, Engine Company
Xo. 7. driving supply wagon from station No. 7 to No. 4,
horse ran away, he was thrown from seat, bruising side,
and cut over eye. Off duty 15 days and 13 hours.
September 30Foreman J. Murphy, Chemical Company No. 1, responding to a false alarm at Savannah Theater, was cut over eye. No time lost.
October 4Foreman J. 'Murphy, Chemical Company
No. 1. while responding to Box 21 (false alarm), horses
swerved into electric pole at Drayton Street and Oglethorpe
Avenue, throwing Foreman Murphy out of seat, and painfully bntising him. Off duty 22 days and 13 hours.
October 19Driver G. F. Kilroy. Engine Company No.
2. while attending to horse, was injured by horse stepping
on foot. Off duty 1 day and 20 hours.
December 4Fireman R. B. Hearn, Chemical Company
No. 1, while answering a telephone alarm, sprained knee
sliding down pole. Off duty 11 days.
Accidents to Horses
January 31"Leo," Engine No. 4, while responding to
Box 41, collided with street car at corner Whitaker and
Gaston Streets, cutting gash on right hind hip. Out of
service 6 months and 20 days.
October 4"Rob H," of Chemical Engine No. 1. while
answering Box 21 (false alarm), was killed at Oglethorpe
Avenue and Drayton Street: refusing to answer line, collided with electric pole.
Accidents to Apparatus
January 31No. 4's Engine, while answering Box 41,
collided with street car. corner Gaston and Whitaker
Streets, damaging front frame of engine, and breaking two
poles. Out of service 10 days and 15 hours.
________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ________103
April 16Truck No. 1, while entering quarters, jumped
curbing, striking tree, breaking clips on rear left spring;
also breaking 28-foot ladder. Out of service 7]/2 hours.
August 6No. 3's wagon, while responding to telephone alarm from Dixie Ink Factory, broke pole. Not out
of service.
August 18Truck No. 2, while out exercising, horses
became unmanageable, and ran into iron post at Congress
and Montgomery Streets, breaking tiller rod, and-damaging
running gear. Out of service one day.
October 4Chemical Engine No. 1, while responding
to false alarm, Box 21, horse "Bob H," refusing to answer
line, ran into electric pole at corner Oglethorpe Avenue and
Drayton Street, breaking front frame of Engine. Out of
service 12 days.
104_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
IN MEMORIAM
George Mouro
Assistant Superintendent; entered the Department
February 6, 1878; died December 20, 1906, from injuries
received at a fire December 19, 1906.
E. P. Daley
Hoseman of Engine Company No. 5; entered the
Department October 6, 1902; died December 20, 1906,
from injuries received at a fire December 19, 1906.
H. J. Eady
Hoseman of Engine Company No. 5; entered the
Department November 9, 1904; killed in the discharge of
his duty at a fire, December 19, 1906.
Robert J. Glass
Assistant Foreman of Chemical Company No. 1;
entered the Department October 1, 1884; died from natural
causes July 31, 1907.
John V. Bordnave
Engineer of Engine Company No. 2; entered the
Department January 1, 1870; died from natural causes June
8, 1908.
DIED DURING THE YEAR
Joseph M. Hanly
Hoseman of Engine Company No. 6; entered the
Department November 9, 1901; died from natural causes
May 22, 1909.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________105
William B. Jones
Hoseman of Engine Company No. 6; entered the
Department December 21, 1899; stricken with paralysis
while on theater detail, October 28, 1908; placed on pension
of half-pay; died December 29, 1909.
REPAIRS TO BUILDINGS
Outbuildings at Fire Stations Nos. 1, 2, and 4 were
overhauled and re-painted.
Fire Station No. 2, new front doors.
Engine Company No. 3, moved to west wing of Fire
Station No. 3, built three new stalls.
Truck Company No. 1, headquarters, Oglethorpe Avenue and Abercorn Street, repaired floor, and put on a new
rear door.
Fire Station No. 6, new front doors, and new sills in
rear of building.
During the year, Engine Company No. 7, Gwinnett and
Paulsen Streets, went into service. The complement of this
Company consists of Engine, Wagon, and Truck, with nine
men.
Truck Company No. 1, Fire Headquarters, Oglethorpe
Avenue and Abercorn Street, also went into service, with
a complement of eight men.
Hose Company No. 1, 515 Waldburg Street, East, was
abandoned, the Hose Wagon going in reserve.
FIRE ALARM SYSTEM
I am pleased to report that all interfering Fire Alarm
Boxes have been replaced with new and up-to-date non-
106________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
interfering boxes. Three new boxes have been installed
where they were most needed. The Fire Alarm System has
been placed underground where it was possible to do so.
A new switchboard has been purchased, and installed in the
City Hall in a fireproof room; the repeaters have been overhauled, and the system put in a first-class condition. All
Fire Alarm Boxes are now provided with a stationary key,
and any person can turn in an alarm by breaking the glass
in front door of the box. This should prove very beneficial in getting a quick response from this Department.
For a more extended report of this system, please refer to
Superintendent of Fire Alarm T. P. Sandiford's report.
RECOMMENDATIONS
I respectfully recommend that Fire Headquarters,
Engine Station No. 3's building, be overhauled and repainted. The roof is in very bad need of re-painting.
I also respectfully urge that Fire Hydrants be not used
for any other purpose than Fire Department service. If
other Departments need water hydrants, they should be
provided separately from Fire Hydrants. This in my estimation is a necessity.
I respectfully urge the necessity of continuing the putting of the Fire Alarm System underground until completed.
I would also recommend the passage of a Law or Ordinance compelling occupants of premises used for manufacturing purposes to forward to the Fire "Department, attest
by Notary statement, the total weights of all Merchandise,
Fixtures, Appliances. Machinery, etc., on each floor.
Also, a stricter supervision by the Building Inspector
to the requirements of the building code, relative to overloading floors.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT . 107
Alarms
The total number of alarms was 341, distributed as
follows:
From street boxes 88
By telephone _156
By local calls __ 79
By false alarms __-_ 18
Total ____.._________________341
The alarms were answered as follows:
Engine Company No. 1 _ 55
Engine Company No. 2 _____ 83
Engine Company No. 3 87
Engine Company No. 4 ____________ 71
Engine Company No. 5 ____ 62
Engine Company No. 6 ____ 35
Engine Company No. 7 _ 28
Truck Company No. 1 ______________ 51
Chemical Company No. 1 ____________ 74
Truck Company No. 2 ______________ 35
Truck Company No. 3 _______________ 47
Truck Company No. 4 ____________ 17
Alarms were divided as follows:
Between River and Jones Streets ________190 Calls
Between Jones and Anderson Streets ____100 Calls
Between Anderson Street and City Limits __ 36 Calls
Outside City Limits _________________ 15 Calls
Total ________________________341 Calls
The largest number of alarms came from street box
56a total of 6.
.The greatest number of alarms were received during the
month of December, a total of 71. February came next,
108________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
with 37. August, with 12, shows the lowest of any month
during the year. Saturday is credited with the greatest
number, 60; and Friday with the smallest, 41.
The largest number occurred between the hours of
6.00 p. m. and midnight130. The smallest number
between the hours of midnight and 6.00 a. m., a total of 38.
Causes
The causes, as ascertained, were as follows:
Smoke issuing _229
Explosions _______________ 36
Foul chimneys ___________________ 48
False and Test ___________ 18
Beyond City Limits _________________ 10
Total _____________________341
Of these, 85 occurred in brick or stone buildings, 206
in wooden buildings, and 50 in other than buildings. They
were brought about, in heating, 169; in illuminating, 108;
in other ways, 64. The fires were found, in dwellings, 167;
in business houses, 103; in other than buildings, 71.
The direct cause of fires were attributed to the following:
Careless children _________ 17
Electric wires ____ 16
Overheated stoves -__________ 14
Carelessness ___-___ 68
Defective construction 26
Defective flues _______________ 19
Incendiary and supposed incendiary ___ 8
Flying sparks 29
Unknown ________ 30
Explosions _________________..._ 22
Foul chimneys ___--._..___ 20
________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________109
False and Test ______ 19
Beyond City Limits ___ 11
Others _______1________________.42
Total __________________-___341
Two hundred and fifty-six were confined to points of
origin, or before they had made any headway.
Twenty-nine were confined to the floor on which they
originated.
Forty confined to the building in which they originated.
Sixteen extended to adjoining buildings.
Fires were extinguished as follows:
By Chemical streams _____139
By Hydrant streams _________-_-____ 39
By Engine streams ____ 43
By bucket of water ___ 64
Out when Department arrived __________ 56
Total _______________________341
Losses
The total loss for the year was $187,141.00, divided as
follows:
On Buildings _______________$ 72,228.00
On Contents ________________ 114,913.00
The greatest loss occurred during the month of February, and the smallest during the month of August.
The following comparative statement is respectfully
submitted:
1890 __________ 169 $139,486.84 13.2
1891 __________ 190 345,265.84 19.2
1}0 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
1892 __________.. 208 $166,837.46 11.8
1893 __________ 183 , 172,986.39 7.8
1894 .__________ 168 452,407.36 9.6
1895 ___________ 179 112,645.26 5.8
18% ______.___ 196 390,97023 11.2
1897 __________ 195 96,293.75 4.3
1898 __________ 293 440,630.78 10.2
1899 ___ ._.____ 238 153,599.83 6.4
1900 ___________ 225 41,837.00 3.3
1901 __________ 263 61,743.75 5.7
1902 ___________ 261 54,157.50 3.6
1903 ___________ 263 93,675.90 5.5
1904 __________ 286 183,420.50 10.2
1905 __________ 315 80,232.50 2.6
1906 ___________ 280 119,720.98 4.3
1907 __________ 259 291,107.00 8.9
1908 __________ 258 171.465.00 5.3
1909 ___________ 341 187,141.00 5.4
In conclusion, I beg to submit the attached tabulated
statement of alarms, fires, their causes, locations, etc.
I desire to extend my thanks to his Honor the Mayor,
to the Honorable City Council, and to the Committee on
Fire, for the prompt and favorable response to such requests
as I have made from time to time; to the Police Department
for their co-operation and assistance at fires; and to all the
city officials for the many favors and interest they have
manifested in the well-being of the Department.
To my Assistant, J. J. Connolly, I am under obligations
for assistance and courtesy shown. I also desire to thank
the Electrical and Fire Inspectors and my clerical force for
assistance rendered.
To the officers and men of the entire Department, I
have naught but words of praise. They have worked hard
and faithfully when required to do so. They have been
prompt and courteous at all times, and I would further
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________111
%
extend grateful acknowledgments for the assistance rendered and the faithful and efficient manner in which they
have performed all their duties.
To the press and public in general, I desire to return
my sincere thanks for compliments received for the good
and efficient work done by this Department.
Respectfully submitted,
THOMAS BALLANTYNE
Superintendent Fire Department
1C. R. 0. 8.8
112 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Value of Property and Loss by Fire
Percentage of loss of property involved, 5.4 per cent.
MONTHS
March ________
April - - ________
May __. ___ _ _ _.
June
July ___-___.___
August ___-_
September ___________
October _________
December ___________
Totals _____
Value of I
Property ;
Involved !
$ 205,493.00
335,212.00
132,219.00
199,085.00
258,275.00
43,470.00
118,100.00
44,000.00
324,185.00
594,355.00
108,951.00
1,126,382.00
$3,489,727.00
LOSS
Building* 1 Content* Total
$ 883.00
40,972.00
5.207.00
900.00
#773.00
5,055.00
927.00
53.00
567.00
1,345.00
1,575.00
10,971.00
$72,228.00
$ 1,559.00
35357.00
22,098.00
1,679.00
18,008.00
2,057.00
190.00
32.00
106.00
8,764.00
1,111.00
23,452.00
$114.913:00
$ 2,442.00
76329.00
27,305.00
2,579.00
21,781.00
7,112.00
1,117.00
85.00
673.00
10.109.00
2,686.00
34,423.00
$187,141.00
Fires Beyond City Limits
Value of
Property Involved
$1,614,000.00
LOSS
Buildings
$73,700.00
Contents ; Total
$53,500.00 $127,200.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT 113
Alarms, 1909, Manner of Receipt
MONTHS
March _________
April _________________
May ________ -
June _________________
July ._____
August _-. ______
September ____________
October ______________
December ____________
Totals _
COVg
n
4-1
V
u
u
4-1
Cft
1011
6
12
8
4
2
1
5
4
8
17
88 00 |
V
0
JZ
o.
V
$
13
15
8
10
13
7
9
5
6
19
IS
37
1
1
.4
5
8
8
4
4
4
2
5
8
8
6
16
79
(A
73fc
1
3
0
1
3
2
2
1
1
2
0
1
10
"3
+

2997
22
27
28
18
15
12
20
33
29
71
141
Alarms, 1909, Cause of Same
MONTHS
January __________________
March ___________________
April ____________________
May _____________________
June ____ __ -
July _.__.________
August ________________
October ^ __________
Totals -____.__-______
Smoke Issuing
18
15
13
18
20
8
12
8
IS
24
22
56
229
tfl
J
en
J3"5.
t5
2
5
2
6
S
4
0
1
0
4
1
6
36
Foul Chimneys
6
12
7
2
0
2
1
1
4
1
5
7
48
4-*
V>
0> S-i
o
0)
_*
(A"n
te
1
3
0
1
3
4
2
1
1
2
0
0
18
^
0
M
o
4-*
a
O
2
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
' 0
2
1
2
10
".
5
29
37
22
27
29
IB
15
11
20^1
29
71
341
114 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Origin of Fires
In Heating | Illuminating [Miscellaneous
(A
t
MONTHS |
II
March _____ _.
April ___ . __ _
May _______
July __________
August _____________
September __________
October ___ - _
December _________
Totals _ -
6
4
6
5
4
5
4
4
9
6
25
82
Business
Others
5
5
2
5
4
4
3
3
6
5
5
5
52
3
5
5
2
2
4
2
0
.2
2
1
7
35
"3
o E-|
12
16
11
13
11
12
10
7
12
16
12
37
169
Dwellings Business Others |
6
8
3
2
4
0
3
2
1
6
5
15
55
3
2
2
4
3
4
0
3
3
6
0
3
33
1
4
3
3
1
2
0
0
2
0
2
2
20
ctf
O
10
14
8
9
8
6
3
5
6
12
7
20
108
Dwellings
2
4
0
2
4
0
1
0
0
2
5
10
30
Business
5
0
0
2
3
0
0
0
2
1
3
2
18
i
01 '
S * 0' ~ 0
0
3
3
1
2
0
1
0
0
2
2
2
16
7
7
3
5
9
0
2
0
2
5
10
14
64
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 115
Fire Statistics, 1909
MONTHS
February ______
March _
April __________
May ___________
Tune _
July ..
August ________
September _____
December
Totals _
Fire Originated in
tnbo
c
2
S
3?
** -*j
7
6
8
8
8
3
3
6
7
6
5
18
85
c bo
II
11
17
25
14
17
17
12
11
5
9
22
14
43
206
'c
|M
c
fe|
0<
5
6
0
2
4
3
1
0
4
5
10
10
50
oO
8
1
c *
c c
OPn
19
25
19
21
22
9
11
10
17
25
24
54
256
53 "5l

o
'SJ-S
|s
uE
2
7
0
2
3
4
0
0
0
4
2
5
29
I.a* , , IH l->
O ! <g.
2 2nS
S ! *
UPQ
6
3
0
2
4
4
3
1
3
3
2
' 9
40
*CJ >a
g.s *"* C
tS:
2
2
3
2
0
1
i
0
0
1
1
3
16
c
_o
be
a in
g
O
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Q
)
<
i
'
!
i
i
;
i
I
0
^
S3
fc
:
B
St-i
W
I1 N
&
&
&V.
N-
*V"
I
1
1
j
1
1
!

!
i
>
( D
!

i
o ; a s ! F ? J m
Q
Ul K>
N
K O
*> O
M> N.
_ O
trt 0
o >-
3,,_2 .,
>-* to
V| M
o to
ft s
a *a w c
r I i i
& i- 1 2. o ;
l 2 ;
*3
10 to N- <
w o
o *><->
H* 10 tn
to to o
4>fc O W
to o o
H> O
Hm* ^3 ^5
to *
O - f
-MO*
KO C? tCS
-i^ffini 3 B! H- Bi ( S- ui w '*E<<wt o w
><<*( Ssfj
S a.<4 A i d o
a. g5 g g g - ^- H".
3S g B 8 S
. i 1 i
1 I ! * r
O j
a '
i
i
!
!
^IMtO I-* O 00 O O Ki
K-
[O_tO 4kN-tO*.>-_
-toto otoo>ooo
- to o OMOoto>->o
j> *. O H- to vl o Ln O
w '- <=> w o to - o o
o o o tot->tA>>->too
0^-0 ^-^KJ^JOIeototo 4k to w to o i
WWlO WWtO>-WV
Ul0 O.fr.Ov.-.-*-
M00>- O 00 M3 * O 00
SSoo S^SKSv
1
1
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
i December
Total
O
B
S
2,
8
* i^
n
S
$o
$d
rt
i
3>
w
H
S

H
Electric Inspector's Report
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
Mr. Thomas Ballantyne, Superintendent
Savannah Fire Department
Dear Sir:I herewith respectfully submit my report,
from January 1, to December 31, 1909, inclusive:
Incandescent lights _______-__-_16,553
Fixtures for incandescent lights 2,658
Lights and fixtures __________:_____ 1,625
Electric fans _ 331
Arc lights _______________'______' 187
Electric signs 23
Electric motors ____________ ______ 99
Changing wires __________________ 324
Electric irons ________ 10
Picture machines _________________ 8
Electric pianos __ 4
Charging rheostats _______________ 3
Heaters ________________ 17
Massage machines ____-__________ 1
Rectifiers _______________________ 8
Generators ____________._ 1
Cash registers _____________ 1
A total of 3,018 inspections were made, and fees to the
amount of $1,204.00 to be collected.
The above includes inspections of wiring and other
electric services for temporary work. I am
Very respectfully
G. T. JOHNSTON
Electric Inspector

Report of Special Agent
Savannah, Ga., April 6, 1909
Honorable Geo. W. Tiedeman,
Mayor of Savannah,
City.
Dear Sir:Completing my inspection of the Fire and
Police System of the City of Savannah, I submit herewith
my report on the same.
The condition of both systems is marked by such gross
neglect and incompetence that it amounts to criminality, in
jeopardizing life and property, by the reckless, careless manner in which the wires have been run and maintained
throughout the streets.
The condition of the batteries, switchboard, repeater,
lines, and boxes is such that immediate action toward
extended and permanent improvements is imperative if the
safety of the city from fire is to be considered. No material
or permanent benefit in the operation of the systems is to be
obtained until the present obsolete apparatus is weeded out,
and uniformity restored throughout the systems.
I would urge the immediate rebuilding of the overhead
construction, and the carrying of the lines (which should be
No. 10 hard drawn copper, with triple braid insulation) on
iron extensions above all other wires on the poles, provision
being at the same time made for joint use of the extensions
by the Police Department where desirable.
The underground system should be gone over, the
grounds now upon several of the circuits removed, a new
120 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
switchboard of twelve-circuit capacity should be installed,
and the present eight-circuit repeater either thoroughly
overhauled or replaced by a new one of ten-circuit capacity.
New battery racks should be built, thoroughly insulated
in the most improved manner, and (as the underground
cable have all been installed with a view of using the basement or some room in the City Hall for an operating room)
I would suggest the entire central station might be moved
to that point to good advantage.
Referring to the outside stations, I find that an indiscriminate lot of boxes have been installed; some dating back
to the sixties. These boxes should be replaced by the noninterfering type, making them uniform throughout. The
value of this can be appreciated when it is known that with
the succession box, when two or more are pulled at the same
instant, one box takes the right of way, gives its alarm, and
when through is followed by the others in succession,
insuring the alarm always coming in; while if two interfering boxes are pulled at the same time both alarms are lost,
a point thoroughly understood and appreciated by Chiefs of
Departments. Under a detailed report, supplementing this,
you will find the boxes, their numbers, and condition speci-r
fied. Out of a total of ninety-two boxes, sixty-eight are of
good non-interfering type; the balance should be removed,
and replaced by boxes of the same non-interfering type. Of
these sixty-eight boxes, only forty-five have received the
necessary care and inspection to keep their non-interfering
features in good order. As far as observed, no connections
between the box lines and outside lines have been soldered,
and in only a few instances were key guards found. These
should be installed at every box, and the ordinance covering
false alarms be rigidly enforced against anyone tampering
with them or the overhead lines.
I would suggest the present hollow post key be recalled,
the locks changed throughout, and the solid post key that
cannot clog with dirt be substituted therefor.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 121
I would also suggest the installation of repeating boxes
at the different engine houses, arranged so that in case of an
alarm coming to an individual house by telephone, that company could transmit the location of the nearest box to headquarters over their own lines, keeping the Department
advised at all points of their movements.
The advisability of removing the tower bell from the
main circuits to a line of their own, to be used in connection
with a repeating box from headquarters, is well worth consideration, as it would permit of the speeding up of the
apparatus throughout the entire system, and add materially
to its efficiency.
Several old type gongs were found on the circuits still
doing duty. These should be removed at once, and replaced
by modern apparatus, as the amount of tattery required to
operate them is quite large, and adds unnecessary expense,
in addition to clogging the system.
The plans for the new police alarm system are so well
advanced that a detailed report on the condition of this
apparatus is hardly necessary, beyond stating it is in even
worse condition than the fire alarm, and the only cure is the
radical one about'to be applied of a complete new system.
In this connection, owing to the fire alarm cables having
been installed radiating from the City Hall, instead of No.
3 Engine House, as supposed, the extra wires in the cables
are not properly laid for use by the Police Department, as it
entails a roundabout and indirect method of reaching the
different stations; but, as the cables have been purchased
with a view to using both systems in one set as far as possible, no recourse is to be had in the premises but to carry
out the original plan. I would suggest, in view of these
facts, that the new police system be placed underground
throughout the present conduit system in so far as practicable, and the lines be thence brought out overhead, and
carried aerial with the same class of construction as for the
fire alarm. The entire separation of the two systems, both
122________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
wires and cables, undoubtedly gives the best operating conditions, and is much to be preferred when possible to do 'so
or the expense is not prohibitive.
Referring to the fire alarm system, the switchboard
(originally of eight-circuit capacity) is a most deplorable
wreck. The five-hundred-volt charging wires are brought
in direct from the street, without a fuse or any means of
opening the circuit up to the switchboard. The charging
resistances have been removed from the board, and the batteries are now charging all in series through a bank of
lamps, no provision existing for changing the amount of current for any battery, but all are charging alike, irrespective , of the amount of work they may be called upon to do.
The line resistances on the discharging side of the batteries are (with the exception of one or two) useless, and
the batteries cannot be controlled on the discharge, a condition that is ruinous to their life and the service.
One test jack is gone from the board entirely, and
another found disconnected. The test plug was found open
in the cord, in such a manner that when placed in a certain
position partial reading could be had. As ordinarily used, it
would open the circuit and strike a blow on all gongs and
tower bells. One line circuit was found open behind the
switchboard, the broken end making partial contact, with
the result that any vibration of the building would tap the
bells. All fuses on the main line on the switchboard have
been removed, and their places supplied with solid wire.
No ground wire is attached to the line circuit test, a
temporary arrangement having been connected to the gas
pipe, and used and removed as occasion required.
The slate of the board is very badly cracked by a fire
that has taken place back of the board at some time. It is
held together by the wood frame only, and is not in condition to be removed elsewhere. The charging bar has been
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 123
broken and patched with a piece of fiber. The original linetesting apparatus has been removed, and a substitute
installed that cannot be operated intelligently from the
front of the board, and is worse than useless. The wiring
is a disgrace to anyone having charge of such apparatus.
The wiring from the switchboard to the batteries is
very carelessly done, and is sure to be productive of trouble.
The batteries themselves are placed irregularly on their
shelving; no fuse blocks are in the circuit to prevent any
abnormal current from* entering the batteries, and the shelving is very defective in insulation. The battery jars are full
of sediment which has fallen from the plates, caused by
improper charging and discharging. The repeater has been
badly burned at some period, the repeating fingers on one
circuit being almost burned in two. One circuit is out of
commission entirely, and the instrument was found very
dirty and gummed up, so much so that it refused to revolve
on test the second day after Mr. Sandiford took charge.
The line circuit, No. 5 on the switchboard, was found to be
connected to No. 8 on the repeater, giving a false reading
of the circuit.
The overhead lines are bare in most sections, the
insulation being entirely gone, and are grounded through
trees and among wires of high potential with which they
are liable to come in contact at any moment and burn out
the apparatus. No attention has been paid to insulation,
and places have been noticed where no attempt has been
made to even place the wires on the cross-arms, and they
still remain tied up to the poles with pieces of wire. The
circuits should be sub-divided and balanced up, ten or
twelve boxes, never over fifteen, being allowed on one circuit. Wherever a box is installed on overhead lines, the
wires should be run in iron pipe to the top of the pole, and
leave as little wire exposed to injury as possible.
124 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Of the total number of ninety-two (92) boxes, there are:
50 Gardiner non-interfering type;
19 Gamewell P. N. I., successive type, which with the
care any good Superintendent would give them can be
brought up to first-class condition, at practically no expense
to the city;
15 obsolete interfering boxes, made by Chester & Co.,
of New York, and dating back to the sixties ;
2 interfering Crane type;
3 Star Electric Company type;
1 spring sector, interfering;
2 old-style Gardiner, non-interfering;
making a total of sixty-nine boxes of good type, and twentythree that should be removed and replaced by the succession
type of box at once.
I append herewith detailed report on the different boxes
throughout the circuit.
Respectfully
A. H. KNOTT
Special Agent
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 125
DETAILED REPORT OF BOXES AND EQUIPMENT
No. 5. Gardiner N. I.; on iron pedestal; circuit wire
continued from box overhead, through circular loom; line
connections not soldered; non-interference out of adjustment; no key guard.
No. 6. Gardiner N. I.; wiring underground; no key
guard; non-interference out of adjustment.
No. 7. Gardiner N. I.; cut-out from the door not working properly; no key guard; non-interference out of adjustment; no cut-out plug; wires underground.
No. 8. Gardiner N. I.; box in working order; has been
burned; is very dirty, and needs cleaning; non-interference
out of adjustment; wires underground; Smith key guard.
No. 9. P. N. I., Succession; wires underground; key
guard (Smith) ; box needs cleaning.
No. 12. Gardiner Non-Interfering; movement in working order; non-interference out of adjustment; wires underground ; outside door cracked and patched; Smith key guard.
No. 13. Gardiner N. I.; needs cleaning and oiling;
.wires underground; cut-out and non-interference out of
adjustment; Smith key guard.
No. 14. Gardiner N. I.; non-interference out of adjustment ; wires underground; Smith key guard.
No. 15. Gardiner N. I.; lightning arrester in switch
badly corroded, needs cleaning; wiring overhead; connections not soldered; no key guard.
No. 16. Gardiner N. I.; no key guard; overhead lines
not soldered; otherwise in good order.
Box 17. Made by Charles T. and J. N. Chester, New
York; dated 1870; interfering type; connections not
126 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
soldered; inside wiring of several different kinds of wire;
outside door badly broken; box does-not cut out, leaves the
bell in circuit all the time; no key guard; should be removed
at once.
Xo. 18. Gardiner X. I.; movement badly burned;
inside glass broken; ground plate on the lightning arrester
gone: non-interference out of adjustment; inside box loose;
needs new bezel; lines underground.
Xo. 19. Gardiner X. I.; has been badly burned; needs
cleaning and painting inside; new bezel on the glass; noninterference out of adjustment; outside door cracked and
patched ; has key guard.
Xo. 2l.< Old type Chester Interfering; date on box,
1871: box broken at pipe; loose on the back board; door
patched and broken : outside lines not soldered ; lock in poor
order: no key guard: should be removed at once.
Xo. 23. Old type Chester Interfering; dated 1870;
nothing but the movement left inside: no number on the
door; no bell: outside lines in bad order: no key guard; no
good.
Xo. 24. Gardiner X. I.: in good order; wires come
from underground: pass out overhead through hollow iron
pole: key guard f Smith).
Xo. 25. Gardiner X. I.: inside movement dirty; inside
box broken in one corner; no number plate on the door;
wires underground : Smith key guard.
Xo. 26. Gardiner X. I.: inside in good order; needs
re-wiring from pole line; connections not soldered; no key
guard.
Xo. 27. Chester Interfering type; dated 1870; wiring
inside in very bad order; no key guard; outside line not
soldered: should be removed, and new box substituted.
.'__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______ 127
No. 28. Gardiner N. I.; non-interference out of adjustment ; movement dirty; lines not soldered; no key guard.
No. 29. Gardiner N. I.; needs cleaning; outside line in
bad order, and grounded at the top of pipe; no key guard.
No. 31. Chester interfering type; wiring inside in bad
order; connections not soldered; should be removed at once.
No. 32. Chester Interfering Type; wiring in bad order;
lightning arrester in bad order; outside door cracked, and
riveted up with plate; no key guard; connections not
soldered; should be removed, and new box installed at once.
No. 34. Chester Interfering type; wiring in bad order;
shunt cut-out, not working; no key guard; overhead lines in
bad shape; connections not soldered; should be removed,
and new box installed.
No. 35. Chester Interfering type; dated 1866; weight
drive; wiring in bad order inside; no glass in the key guard;
overhead lines in bad order; close to railway feeders; connections not soldered; box should be removed at once.
No. 36. Chester Interfering type; dated 1870; weight
drive; inside box loose, holding by one screw; wiring in very
bad order; no connections soldered on the outside; has key
guard; should be removed at once, and new box installed.
No. 37. Chester Interfering Type; very bad order
inside; no key guard; door cracked and patched; connections not soldered; should be removed at once.
No. 38. Gardiner N. I.; in good order; wires underground, and pass out overhead through hollow pole; no
key guard.
No. 39. Gardiner Non-Interfering: no connections
soldered; no key guard; non-interference out of adjustment.
M. B. C. 8.9
128 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
No. 41. Chester Interfering Type; dated 1871; inside
wiring in bad order; no key guard; no connections soldered;
should be removed at once.
No. 42. Old Type Moses Crane Interfering Box; movement in good order; wires underground; should be removed
at once.
No. 43. Old Type Moses Crane Interfering Box;
cut-out not working; lock out of order; should be removed
at once.
No. 45. Old Type Gardiner N. I.; No. 3 size box;
lightning arrester badly corroded; cut-out not in working
order; no key guard; connections not soldered; should be
removed at once.
No. 46. Old Type Gardiner N. I.; No. 3 size; badly
burned inside; no key guard; connections not soldered; cutout not working: lock out of order; should be removed at
once.
No. 47. Gardiner N. I.; non-interference out of adjustment ; wires underground; iron pole on top for overhead
lines; no test plug; Smith key guard; terminals on back;
equipped with two 3104 D. & W. terminals; wiring in very
bad order.
No. 48. Star Electric Company Movement; locks not
same as other boxes; no key guard; connections not soldered : should be removed from circuit.
No. 51. Gardiner N. I.; has been burned out; in very
dirty condition; should be taken down and cleaned; noninterference out of adjustment; box slow; key guard broken;
no glass in the box.
No. 52. Gardiner N. I.; badly blackened by being
burned out; needs cleaning; has key guard; overhead wiring
in bad order; no connections soldered.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 199
No. 53. Gardiner N. I.; needs cleaning badly; has been
burned out; outside connections not soldered; is in bad location, should be moved across the street; no key guard.
No. 54. Gardiner N. I.; wires underground; outside
line through loom, to overhead pole; wiring in bad order.
No. 56. Gardiner N. I.; non-interference out of adjustment ; outside door badly broken, and riveted up with plate*;
no key guard; line connections not soldered.
No. 57. Gardiner N. I.; new movement inside; noninterference out of adjustment; outside and inside doors
badly broken; no key guard; outside lines not soldered.
No. 58. Gardiner N. I.; in good order; wires underground ; Smith key guard.
No. 59. P. N. I., Successive; in good order; key guard
on the wall; outside lines in bad shape; should be removed
from the top of shed, and piped underground on the wharf.
No. 61. Gardiner N. I.; has been badly burned, and
needs cleaning; inside glass broken; non-interference out of
adjustment; no key-guard; outside wire in bad shape.
No. 62. Gardiner N. I.; very dirty inside; non-interference out of adjustment; glass broken; no key guard; outside
door and case cracked and riveted; lines not soldered.
No. 63. Gardiner N. I.; dirty; needs cleaning and oiling; non-interference out of adjustment; no key guard; lock
in bad order; lines not soldered.
No. 64. Gardiner N. I.; has been very badly burned,
and very dirty; inside glass broken; non-interference and
cut-out out of adjustment; no key guard; outside line bad.
No. 65. Gardiner N. I.; very dirty; needs cleaning and
oiling; glass broken; non-interference out of adjustment; ntt
key guard; lock out of order; line in bad shape.
130_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ________
No. 66. P. N. I, Successive; good order; no key guard.
No. 67. Gardiner N. I.; dirty; needs cleaning; no key
guard; outside lines slack, and in poor order.
No. 68. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; no
key guard; lock in bad order; line in bad order, not soldered.
No. 69. Star Electric Company; inside in fair order;
box hanging loosely on the wall; lines not soldered; should
be removed from the circuit at once.
No. 71. Gardiner N. I.; inside in good.order; box loose
on the pole, held up only by a pipe and one screw; no key
guard; connections not soldered.
No. 72. Gardiner N. I.; inside dirty and rusty; needs
cleaning; wiring inside not in good order; no key guard;
connections not soldered.
No. 73. Gardiner N. I.; inside in good condition; no
key guard; line connections not soldered; in very bad position, between post and fence, and should be moved at once.
No. 74. Gardiner N. I.; dirty, needs cleaning and oiling; outside line close to electric light lines; should be
changed at once; no key guard; lock out of order.
No. 75. Chester Interfering Type; dated 1870; in very
bad order; no key guard; lock out of order; should be abandoned, and replaced with a new box at once.
No. 76. Star Electric Company make; inside in fair
condition; lock out of order; no key guard; had to break
key and take' off lock to remove it; overhead wiring not in
good shape.
No. 81. Gardiner N. I.; inside dirty, and needs clean-
'ihg; non-interference out of adjustment; wires underground;
Smith key guard.
_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________131
No. 82. Gardiner N. I.; dirty, and needs cleaning; noninterference and cut-out out of order; wires underground;
Smith key guard.
No. 83. P. N. I., Successive; folding key wind; wires
underground; no key guard; in good order.
No. 84. P. N. I., Successive; wires overhead; no key.
guard; in good order.
No 91. Gardiner N. I.; wires underground; non-interference out of adjustment; no key guard.
No. 112. P. N. I., Successive; folding key wind; no key
guard; in good order.
No. 113. Gardiner N. I.; no key guard; lines not soldered ; movement in good order.
No. 114. Gardiner N. I.; no key guard; lines not soldered ; movement in good order.
No. 115. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; no
key guard; lines in bad shape.
No. 116. P. N. I., Successive; folding key wind; inside
in very good order; no key guard; lines not soldered.
No. 121. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; lock
out of order; no key guard; outside line not soldered, and in
bad shape.
No. 123. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; no
key guard; connections not soldered; outside line in bad
order.
No. 124. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; no
key guard; connections not soldered. ;
No. 125. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; no
key guard; connections not soldered; outside line in poororder. '
132________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
No. 126. P. N. I., Successive; good order; no key
guard.
No. 131. P. N. I., Successive; good order; no key
guard; outside line in good order.
No. 132. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; no
key guard; line wire in poor order.
No. 134. *P. N. I., Successive; movement in good
order; wiring inside and outside in poor shape; bottom of
the outside box all broken out; no key guard; needs new
outside shell.
No. 135. P. N. I., Successive; folding key wind; no
key guard; connections not soldered.
No 141. Old Type Chester Make, Interfering; dated
1870; no key guard; in very bad order; should be removed
at once.
No. 142. Old Type Chester Make, Interfering; total
wreck; nothing left inside but the movement; no key guard;
lock in bad order; should be removed at once.
No. 143. P. N. I., Successive; has been burned, but is
in fair working condition; no key guard; outside line in bad
order.
' No. 212. Old Type Chester Interfering; dated 1870;
inside wiring in very bad order; no key guard; connections
not soldered; should be removed at once.
No. 213. P. N. I., Successive; in good order;'no key
guard.
No. 2l4. P. N. I., Successive; folding key wind; no key
guard; in good order.
No 313. Gardiner N. I.; self-starting keyless door; in
good order; overhead wires not soldered, and should be
removed from the sheds.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________133
No. 321. Gardiner N. I.; movement in good order; no
key guard; outside line connections not soldered.
No. 323. No. 4 Spring Sector; movement in good
order; interfering type, and should be changed to P. N. I.,
Successive.
No. 324. P. N. I., Successive; in first-class order.
No. 424. P. N. I., Successive; in good order; no glass
in the key guard.
No. 521. P. N. I., Successive; movement first-class
order; new key guard required; box should be moved from
inside of shed to pole on the outside.
No. 522. P. N. I., Successive; movement in good order;
box should be moved outside of shed, and lines removed
from the eaves of the shed and either placed underground
or erected on poles.
No. 523. P. N. I., Successive; first-class order inside;
no key guard; connections not soldered.
Engine-House Equipment
No. 1 Engine House:
One 15-inch Combined Gong and Irfdicator; one Gamewell Stall Trip; inside wiring of the house in poor order; one
D. & W. Cut-out protecting instruments.
No. 2 Engine House: :
One Plain Indicator; one 13-inch Gong and Indicator;
one Gaynor's Stall Release; one No. 3 Tower Striker; one
Gas-lighting attachment; Magnets in circuit-balance gone;
inside wiring in bad order.
No. 3 Engine House:
Two plain Indicators; one 18-inch Combined Gong and
Indicator; one 15-inch Old Type Moses Crane Gong; one
134 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Gamewell Stall Trip; one Shannon Stall Trip; one No. 3
Tower Striker.
No. 4 Engine House:
One 15-inch Gong and Indicator; one Shannon Stall
Trip; wiring in very poor order.
No. 5 Engine House:
One 15-inch Gong and Indicator; one Gamewell Stall
Trip; wiring in poor order; one Telephone Fuse Block Protector, bridged out of service.
No. 6 Engine House:
One 15-inch Combined Gong and Indicator; one Gamewell Stall Trip; wiring in bad order; no protector or fuse
block.
No. 7 Engine House:
One 18-inch Gong and Indicator, Combined; one
Gaynor Stall Trip; one Worcester Lightning Arrester out
in line; no fuse; wiring in the house exposed, and poorly
done.
Fireman Larkins' House:
One 15-inch Old Type Moses Crane Gong; should be
removed, and new bell installed.
Fire Inspectors* Report
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
Mr. Thomas Ballantyne, Superintendent
Savannah Fire Department
Dear Sir:We respectfully beg to submit our report of
inspections made during the year 1909.
There were a total of 4,058 inspections made, classed
as follows:
Inflammable material in buildings and yards 311
Fire hydrants and fire alarm boxes blocked ____ 31
Places that had fireworks stored on premises 130
Dynamite and other high explosives found in place __ 11
Defective wiring found, notified Electric Inspector __ 6
Bars ordered across windows, open elevator shaft
beneath them __________________ 33
Defective stoves, chimneys, and flues 875
Cellars and grating filled with inflammable material
and trash ___________ 224
Places O. K. on first inspection ________ 914
Broken window glasses, ordered fixed ________ 48
Places that had gasoline on hand _________ 457
Special duty performed, such as answering fire alarms,
etc. _____________________________ 125
Metal ordered placed under or around stoves and
ranges ___ 172
Second calls, to see if orders were carried out _____ 721
Total number inspections ________4,058
136________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______________
We also inspected every telephone, electric, and telegraph pole in the city in May and in October. We have
been very attentive and watchful of moving picture shows,
every night, from 8.00 p. m. to 12 midnight. We will continue to watch this class of business very closely. They
have conformed to every regulation we have asked of them,
and show us all courtesy possible.
In conclusion, we desire to thank you for the confidence you have shown in us, and for- the many favors
extended us during the past year. We also desire to thank
the Police and Health Departments for the great help they
have extended as during the past year.
Very respectfully
F. J. KILROY
D. S. O'CONNOR
Fire Inspectors
Report of Fire Alarm Telegraph
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
Mr. Thomas Ballantyne, Superintendent
Savannah Fire Department
Dear Sir:I have the pleasure to submit the following
report of the Fire Alarm Telegraph Service for the year
ending December 31, 1909:
During the year, 341 alarms were turned in over the
lines of the alarm system. Telephones are credited with
156; the alarm boxes with 88. In addition, there were 79
local alarms, and 18 false.
For fire ________________________341
For daily test _______-286
For false and test __________________ 18
Total _______________________64S
The Fire Alarm consists of the following:
1 12-circuit automatic charging board.
250 cells of chloride accumulators (5 ampere hour,
Type "B T").
1 8-circuit automatic repeater.
95 street boxes.
73 poles.
2 bell strikers.
7 combination gongs and indicators.
2 18-inch gongs.
40 miles insulated copper wire, Nos. 10 and 14.
138 ____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
63,600 feet of cable (Joint use Fire and Police).
5 indicators.
6 electric trips.
2 Shannon trips.
8 6-inch gongs.
During the year, 32 boxes were placed on underground
system. This makes a total of 54 on the underground and
41 on the overhead circuit. Three new boxes were installed
Nos. 85, 512, and 513; a total of 95 boxes.
The appropriation made by City Council for improvements of the Gamewell System was disbursed by the Police
Department for the joint account of the Fire and Police.
Expenses
Salary ______________________$706.24
Incidentals :: 12.58
Uniform _____________-___________ 24.50
Total __________________$743.32
Review
I was appointed to the position of Superintendent of
Fire and Police Telegraph, March 29 of the present year,
at which time preparations were being made for extensive
improvements to both systems, an appropriation of $25,000
having been made by City Council for this purpose.
During the latter part of the year, considerable progress
has been made with this work, which will be completed
early in 1910.
The improvements already made have resulted in a
much more reliable service, and when completed will be
classed with the best in the South.
The improvements made so far, for joint use of the
Fire and Police systems, consist of 'constructing 23 com-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 139
plete manholes and 8,000 feet of cable duct; laying 44,000
feet cable, of 3, 6, 10, and 15-pair conductors; stringing
approximately 40 miles of overhead wire; setting 43 iron
posts for signal boxes; attaching of all necessary crossarms, outlet boxes, conduits, etc.
For the Fire system alone, the present switchboard,
batteries, etc., have been abandoned, and a new charging
station installed at the City Hall, consisting of 1 12-circuit
automatic switchboard, 3 double battery racks, with all
necessary batteries, etc.
Old repeater overhauled and made practically new.
On the outside, 20 old alarm boxes replaced with latest
improved non-interfering, successive type.
i
All old boxes cleaned up and repaired.
All boxes, both old and new, provided with key guards.
It is the intention, on completion of the work, to speed
up the boxes, so that alarms will come in much faster than
at present.
In connection with the above improvements, there has
been installed in Fire Headquarters direct telephone service
with the Police Barracks, so that fires may be reported over
the police system at any time, should this become necessary.
Recommendations
I would respectfully recommend that the good work be
continued each year by gradual process, placing overhead
wires underground wherever practicable, and additional
boxes in the outlying districts not now covered. I am
Very respectfully
T. P. SANDIFORD
Superintendent Fire Alarm System

ANNUAL REPORT
OP THE
CITY TREASURER
FOR THB TEAR
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 19O9
C. S. H AR D BE
TREASURER
Dr.
Annual Report of the City Treasurer
Statement of Cash Received and Disbursed from January 1, 1909, to December 31, 1909 Cr.
BOARD OF HEALTH
Received from sale of Antitoxin. 419,80 >
BOARD OF HEALTH
Salaries of Health Officer, City
Physicians, time of Inspectors,
etc. ________-__.$ 17,629.71 g
Expense of pest house 1,049.29 ~ 05
Pauper burials 52.25 >
Clothing destroyed __ 558.00 ! Z
Incidentals -.. 2.729.42 *,
Disinfecting chamber __- 1,794.12 $ 23,812.79 >
BACTERIOLOGICAL LABORATORY
Salaries ...____.___ 4,815.00
Apparati __ 1,238.27
Furniture, fixtures, and incidentals 1,061.82 7,115.09
BAY STREET STRAND
Labor and material I 6,352.05
BOND ISSUE OF 1909
Received from sale of $2,483.000
average of
g Difference
bonds, at an
$1.05.10 ___ - _ 2,609,736.00
of amount between
redemption of 1879 bonds and
proceeds of sale of 1909 bonds 264.00 2,610,OIK).00
CHATHAM LAND AND HOTEL COMPANY
Received for amounts advanced by
city, as per agreement, for
grading, draining, etc., of
Granger Tract
CHIMNEY SWEEPING
Received through office of Department of Public Works
49,720.92
217.25
BONDS, OF ISSUE 1879
Bonds redeemed and canceled _ 2,590,200.00
CHARITY
Clerk of Council: dispensing, order
of Mayor _________ 1,716.09
Kings' Daughters ___ 520.00
Savannah Female Orphan Asylum 480.00
Female Benevolent Asylum ___ 520.00
Salvation Army __.___ 600.00
Mary MacLean Circle _______ 325.00
Monthly pensioners _ 1,264.00 5,425.09
CHATHAM LAND AND HOTEL COMPANYExtension of water mains, sewers,
grading, etc.
. CHIMNEY SWEEPING
Payrolls _____________
49,720.92
506.84
Dr-. .. Statement of Cash Received and Dilburaed from January J, 1909, to December 31, 1909
CITY LOTS
Received from sale of Lot No. 7,
Old Water Works Tract .....$ 4,029.06
Received from sale of strip Mo. 69,
Solomons Ward - 6.00
CUTTING WEEDS
Received for cutting weeds
$4,035.00
DISPENSARY
Received for sale of bottles, etc..
ELECTRIC FEES
Received from inspections
6.10
CITY CLOCKS
Salary of keeper, and repairs
CITY ,H ALL
Salaries, and time of help ........$ 3,336.48 Fuel, lights, and incidentals ___ 3,058.26
CITY LIGHTS
Savannah Electric Company, on
account street lighting
Cr.
$ 424.96
6,394.74
19,747.40
DAFFIN PARK
Labor and improvements 1,555.37
DISPENSARY
1.60 Salaries ...____-___-___-- 2,300.83
Medicines and supplies 1,734.54
Rent, lights, and incidentals _ 898.94 4,934.31
DRY CULTURE AND DRAINAGE
on, 7 e Salaries and payrolls 8.S77.11
Material and hauling .... 503.82 9,080.93
as
>
><
o
f
w
3
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
Received through Park and Tree
Commission, collections for
care of lots, etc. ____ 3,801.13
Received through Park and Tree
Commission, collections for
sale of lots .-__ 4,286.49
Received through Park and Tree
Commission, for burial fees 495.50
FEES
Received from City Marshal
EVERGREEN CEMETERY
Payrolls and salaries _
Tools, seed, plants, and incidentals
9,323.74
7,726.05
I
FIRE DEPARTMENT
Received from S. S. Texas for
extra labor ___.____
Received from sale of horse, hose,
etc.
GROUND RENTS"
Received from office collections
GROUND RENT LOTS
Received from balances due for
sale in fee simple
8,583.12
1,190.98
323.18
574.03 897.21
5,685.92
2,228.04
FIRE DEPARTMENTPayrolls
Feed, and care of stock
Fuel and repairs
Tools, paints, oil, and incidentals
Pensions _-
Hose
Uniforms
New Engine House, No. 7
Apparati _
86,744.10
9,210.57
4,064.21
5,760.87
I,092.50
5,882.45
4,080.45
II,657.78
6,999.80
17,049.79

25
o
;j
135,492.73
Dr. Statement of Cash Received and DUburted from January 1, 1909, to December 31, J909 Cr.
GRADING STREETS
Received from unclaimed pay
envelope -........
HARBOR FEES
Received from Harbor Masters'
fees
$ 4.50
6,144.98
HARBOR AND WHARVES IMPROVEMENT
AND ADDITIONS
Received for sale of pamphlets ... 13.50
HOUSE DRAINAGE
Received from unclaimed [i:iy
envelopes -- 4.38
GRADING STREETS (NEW)
Payrolls and material
HARBOR AND WHARVES
Salaries ._-$ 1,400.00
644.45
75.00
$ 4,773.48
Repairs and incidentals
Commissioners of Pilotage
HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS
Pamphlets, conventions, and incidentals
HOSPITALS
Savannah Hospital _. 3,000.00
St. Josephs' Hospital 3,250.00
Georgia Infirmary 4,875.00
Park View Sanitarium __ 3,000.00
Charitv Hospital ______ 975.00
HOUSE DRAINAGE
Payrolls and material
2,119,45
310.47
I
ae
I
15,100.00
5,532.99
INTEREST
Received "for interest on daily
balances ________.___._$ 3,480.45
Received for interest on bond
money deposits 1,489.39
Received for City Marshal ____ 774.69 5,744.53
INCIDENTALS
Received from Clerk of Council, for
permits ___________ 797.00
Received from Treasurer, for
survey, etc. ____-______ 594.66 2,391.66
INSPECTION FEES
Received from plumbing inspections ____________- 600.00
LAUREL GROVE
Received for burial fees 1,465.50
Received for sale of lots __.... 1,341.00 2,806.50
INTEREST
Coupons of city bonds, issue of
1879 ________._.___ 43,953.74
Coupons of city bonds, issue of
1883 _.__-._ 11,113.70
Coupons of city bonds, issue of
1909 ___-___________ 55,282.50 110,349.94
INCIDENTALS
Election expenses 940.00
Printing bonds, 1909 issue __ 1,933.00
Official bonds, judgments, etc. __ 4,936.51
Treasurer's petty cash, postage,
telegrams, insurance, etc. 2.489.39 10,298.90
LAUREL GROVE
Salaries and time rolls
Material, tools, and incidentals
LAW DEPARTMENT
Incidentals
5,602.72
829.97 6,432.69
650.00
Dr._ _ Statement of_Caah Received a_nd Disbursed from January 1, 1909. to December 31,1909 _Cr.
MARKET
Received from Clerk, for fees $ 11,840.28
Received from City Marshal, for
rents of vaults and stalls __ 2,384.00 $ 14,224.28
OPENING STREETS
Received for sale of house, Barnard
and Forty-second Streets
PARKS AND SQUARES
Received from unclaimed pay
envelopes' __
1,162.00
3.00
MARKET
Salaries _________-___$ 3,791.00
Repairs, lights, insurance, and incidentals ...................... 747.44 $ 4,538.44
OPENING STREETS
Deferred payments, notes, and
interest ..
PARKS AND SQUARES
Payroll
Tools, lumber, feed, and forage
Plants and seed
I
35,104.13
152.50
3,354.67
726.54 4,233.71
PARKS AND SQUARES, TREE PLANTING
Payrolls .._.._.___ 11,240.33
1 rees, hauling, and incidentals 577.53 11,817.86
:S
PARKS PURPOSES
Deferred payments, notes, and
interest 13,778.65
PAVING STREETS
Received from office collections 18,768.78
Received from City Marshal __1 4,842.76
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Received from Union Station _ 1,850.00
Received from station fees 172.50
Received from special services 153.50
Received from sale of horse, old
property, sacks, etc. _- 375.83
POLICE COURT
Received from Clerk, fines
forfeitures collected __.
and
23,611.54
2,551.83
19,332.01
PAVING STREETS *
Payrolls _______-______ 21,131.28
Asphalt blocks, bricks, curbing 56,657.54
Hauling and team hire - 11,798.39
Pipes, lumber, and tools 5,362.77
PLUMBING INSPECTION
Salaries __
Horse board and incidentals
1,440.00
295.05
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Salaries and payrolls 114,995.29
Horses, forage, and shoeing .
Fuel, lights, and incidentals .
Prisoners' rations
Property, account repairs
General supplies
Uniforms
Gamewell Fire Alarm and Police
Telegraph
POLICE COURT
7,030.80
1,654.39
1,233.83
1,106.19
2,915.79
3,981.40
Fines remitted
Stationery and incidentals
189.33
462.45
94,949.98
1,735.05
132,917.69
13,817.80
I
I
651.78
Dr. Statement of Cain Received and Disbursed front January 1, 1909, to December 31,1909
PRINTING AND STATIONERY
Received from City Marshal, for
ads., etc. _..._ 69.00
PERPETUAL CARE OF LOT NO. 86-
hvergreen Cemtery (for estate J.
H. H. Osborne), Section H. __ 300.00
POLICE RESERVES '
Appropriations for military and
naval reserves
PUBLIC LIBRARIES
J. M. Thomas, Secretary and
Treasurer ______$ 6,834.93
E. E. DesVerney, Secretary and
Treasurer _________ -360.00
PRINTING AND STATIONERY
City printing, circulars, stationery,
proceedings of Council, etc. ..
PREMIUMS ON BONDS
Returned to bond purchaser, forfeits
deposited '-
Cr.
3,250.00
7.194.93
5
8
8
5.231.05
18.620.06
RENTS
Received from office collections,
for rent of wharves $
Received from City Marshal, for
rent of houses, etc.
RESURFACING STREETS
Received from unclaimed pay
envelopes
410.00
102.00
SCAVENGERS
Received from Chatham County,
for percentage of garbage
contract ___________ 3,000.00
Received from sale of empty sacks,
etc. -___________- 139.36
512.00
RESURFACING ASPHALT STRKETSNotes, deferred payments, payrolls, >>
3'30 and material -_________ 51,343.89
RESURFACING GRAVEL STREETS >
Payrolls _______________ 1,151.14
Material and hauling _________ 3,315.91 4,467.05
F
SALARIES
Salaries of Mayor, Aldermen, city
officers, and clerks ___ 50.576.96 ] 99
SCAVENGERS . |
Payrolls __________.______ 25,554.06
Mules, carts, harness, and forage 10,772.86 . Account of garbage contract 7,900.00
Lumber, tools, and incidentals __ 4,247.15 48,474.07 . ,_,
3,139.361 I
Dr. Statement of Cash Received and Disbursed from January 1, 1909, to December 31, 1909 Pr :
: K
SEWERS
SIDEWALKS
Received from office collections,
Received from City Marshal .. __ 654.16 $ 6,767.69
SINKS
Received from office collections 2,854.10
STREETS AND LANES
Received from sale of condemned
horses, empty sacks, etc. ...... 461.50
Payrolls __...._.._ . .$
Materials and tools ... .
SIDEWALKS
Payrolls -
Bricks, hauling, and curbing
SINKS
Contractor's account
Superintendent's salary and incidentals .
SINKING FUND
Sinking Fund Commissioners, for
redemption of
Bonds of 1879
Bonds of 1883 .
2,400.30
832.52 $ 3,232.82
K
> ><
O
S7S4.11 $
3,795.31 9,549.42
1
3,676.55 g
1,501.78 5,178.33
S
18,540.00
5705.00 24,245.00 i
TAXES, 1905
Received through City Marshal
TAXES, 1906
Received through City Marshal
TAXES, 1907
Received through City Marshal
TAXES, 1908
Received from Central of Georgia
Railway on account back taxes 114,133.34
Received from office collections 114,384.61
Received from City Marshal ____ 22,771.36
TAXES 1909
Received from office collections 464,242.72
Received from City Marshal ___-- 2,768.96
TAXES, 1909, SPECIFIC
Received from office collections 109,254.26
Received from City Marshal .___ 8,848.50
Received from Near Beer licenses
980.83
1,170.76
2,962.41
251,289.31
467,011.68
118,102.76
41,208.75
SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS
Silver service for "Yamacraw" 400.00
Expenses to conventions, industrial
farm, and carnival week 5.550.61
STREETS AND LANES
Payrolls . 54,249.35
Mules, carts, harness, and forage.- 9,662.15
Materials, tools, freight, and incidentals ____ 5,495.69
STORM DAMAGE
Extra labor incident to cleaning up
THOMAS PARK
Asphalt walks _.___._
TAXES REFUNDED
Amounts donated to corporations,
individuals.'and charitable and
religious institutions, by resolutions
5,950.61
69,407.19
443.30
921.76
5,653.18
Dr. Stttement of Cash Receive^and Disbursed from January _1, 1909, to December 31,1909
I A
Cr.
TAXES, 1909, BADGES
Received from sale of badges .
WATER WORKS
$ 11.911.20
Received from office collections $ 119,173.48
Received from owners, for meters 1,149.02
Received for extensions on Norwood Tract ...-...- 2,658.91 122,981.41
Total receipts -
Cash balance from December, 1908
$3,794,252.46
9,915.84
Grand total, 1909 $3,804.168.30
WATER WORKS
Salaries and time rolls ______$ 8,400.65
Fuel, oil, and repairs to engines
and pumps ...__ 5,512.11
Lights, insurance, and incidentals. 1,463.82 $ 15,376.58
_ WATER WORKS (NEW)
Payrolls 2S.181.SJ*
Fuel, oil, and repairs to engines
and pumps 19,045.18
Meters and incidentals _.____ 4,159.70 48,386.46
WATER WORKS, IMPROVEMENT AND
EXTENSION
Balance commission to H. S.
Jaudon ____ 3,000.00
Payrolls ._.._ 2,435.70
Hydrants, pipes, and incidentals 19,868.62 25,304.32
Total disbursements, 1909 __ $3,749733.66
Cash balance carried to January, 1910 .......__._.. 54,435.30
________ $3,804,16816
C. S. HARDEE, City Treasurer
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 155
Certificate
We, the undersigned Committee on Finance, having
examined the accounts of the City Treasurer for the months
from January 1, 1909, to and including December 31, 1909,
find the same correct and with proper vouchers, and showing cash balance of $5.4,435.3Q carried to January, 1910.
(Signed)
W. F. McCAULEY, Chairman
M. T. KAVANAUGII
J. H. H. ENTELMAN
Savannah. March 24, 1910.

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH
FOR THE YEAR
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 19O9
J. P. FIGG
SUPBRINTEMDBHT AND ENGINEER
WATER DEPARTMENT
H. E. WILSON, Chairman
G. A. GORDON R. M. HULL
CRAIG BARROW C. G. WILKINSON
Committee on Water
H. S. Jaudon ________________ Consulting Engineer
J. P. Figg ____________ Superintendent and Engineer
T. J. Sheftall ______________________ Chief Clerk
W. P. Bailey ________ Chief Water Inspector
W, P. Ridle _____ Foreman Extension and Repair Work
R. T. RussellAss't Foreman Extension and Repair Work
J. L. Mallette }
T. J. Reid VEngineers Gwinnett Street Station
F. B. Quarterman J
S. F. Cook ) c T>- o* * H. B. Heller j -Engineers River Station
G. R. Small ___________ Meter Reader and Repairer
J. P. McDonough _______ Plumber and Gas Inspector
Morris Schur _______________________ Florist
W. J. Kelley \
W. J. Leonard )-____________Compresser Oilers
B. M. Cooper
B. F. Horton
H. H. S. Riley }- _______Oilers Gwinnett Street Station
G. L. Kemfp
T C Lvon ') *
" " ,,, . I ___________Oilers River Station T. E. White j
C. B. Patterson
R. t
T.J
J. F. Wiehrs
7
}
Report of Water Works Department
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
Hon. George W. Tiedeman, Mayor
Sir:I herewith submit my annual report for the
Water Works Department, for the year ending December
31, 1909.
I would take this opportunity to call His Honor's attention to the fact of this report embodying the effect of
improvements made in the Department during the preceding
year, these improvements resulting in an increase of
pressure from twenty pounds to fifty pounds throughout the
entire city, thereby in part meeting the requirement of the
Southeastern Tariff Association relative to a re-rating of
insurance values. To accomplish this result, the River
Station was placed in operation on January 15, 1909, and
operated in conjunction with Gwinnett Street Station, and
during this period, and subsequent period, consistent search
has been made for leaks; and the above results have been
obtained only after the most earnest efforts. We are now
able to maintain the required pressure by the use of Gwinnett Street Station only, and operate the River plant as an
auxiliary in cases of emergency. The co-operation of the
official and private life of the city is manifest in the
accomplishment of these results, which can be made permanent by the display of a reasonable amount of vigilance.
The disposition of appropriation for the department,
and the work performed, we submit in detail as follows:
M. R. c. s.11
160 MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT
The amount appropriated for maintenance and repairs:
Gwinnett Street Station ________________$44,000.00
River Station ______________________ 10,000.00
Extensions and improvements ____-___ 14,000.00
Total _________________________$68,000.00
From which the following disbursements have been
made:
Expenses, Maintenance, and Repairs
Gwinnett Street Station:
Salary- Account _____________________$26,879,89
Running Account ____________________ 19,408.01
Repair Account ___ 1,271.30
Incidental Account ______-_ 785.99
Stable Account __________________ 579.80
Printing and Stationery Account ____ 560.28
Total _______________________.$49,485.27
River Station:
Salary Account ______________________S 6,227.24-
Running Account __________ 4,556.71
Incidental Account ___ 228.75
Repair Account ____________________ 139.18
Total -____-*___*._____________$11.151.88
Extensions
Extension Account _____$ 8,896.15
Improvements
Improvement Account ________$ 6.227.24
Meters
Meter Account __________'_. ._______$ 975.25
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 161
Notes
Principal ____-________$11,000.73
Interest _________________________ 314.89
Total ______________________$11,315.62
Total Expenditures __________________$87,852.12
Appropriations and Expenditures
Total disbursements __________________$87,852.12
Amount appropriated for all purposes ______ 68,000.00
Collected back by City Treasurer on meter
account __________ 975.25
Excess of expenditures over appropriation ____ 18,876.37
Receipts and Expenditures
Receipts for year 1909 _______________$122,981.41
Total expenditures __________________ 87,852.12
Leaving a balance of _________________$ 35,129.29
The amount of $6,227.24, charged to expenditures, represenfs a balance due on improvements, and brought forward from previous year, including $3,000.00 for expert
service.
No appropriation having been made for water meters
necessitated the taking of amounts from appropriation.
From that sum, the amount of $975.25 has been taken, for
which credit has been given above.
The amount of $11,315.62 (which forms a part of expenditures) represents notes made on account of improvements
during preceding year, and becoming due in the year 1909
necessitated the taking of the amounts from our appropriation for that year.
1<52________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Pumpage
The total pumpage (Gwinnett Street Station) for the
year was 3,498,984,335 gallons, a daily average of 9,586,258
gallons.
The River Station was put in service January 15, 1909,
and operated a total of 127 days, distributed throughout the
entire year. The total amount of water pumped by this
station was 364,920,646 gallons.
Pumpage Gwinnett Street Station _______3,498,984,335
River Station ____________________ 364,920,646
Total _____________________3,863;904,981
The heavy pumpage by both stations was caused by
enormous waste, which has been overcome, and we are now
working on basis of daily average as recorded in report of
Gwinnett Street Station.
Monthly Statement of Pumpage
Gwinnett Street Station:
January _______________________ 303,968,472
February _______________________ 294,472,888
March _________________________ 290,707,674
April ________________________ 260,212,525
May __________________________ 295,592,575
June __________________________ 293,505,820
July ______________.______-__ 300,733,575
August _________________________ 294,403,280
September _______________________ 285,015,195
October _______________________ 298,549,245
November _____________________ 286,030,110
December ________1______________ 295,792,976
Total _____________________3,498,984,335
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 163
River Station:
January __________________ 70,061,246
February _____________________ 65,323,663
March _________________________ 18,543,426
April ________________________ 8,406,745
May ________________________ 26,463,633
June __________________________ 37,864,604
July __________________________ 40,898,923
August _______________________ 29,748,497
September _____________________ 29,730,855
October _____________________ 18,706,931
November ____________________ 9,583,266
December ___________________*___ 9,588,857
Total ______________________364,920,646
Coal Consumption
Total consumption for the year:
Gwinnett Street Station ____________ 4,886.7 Tons
Daily average ___________________ 13.38 Tons
River Station ___________ 1,027.8 Tons
Daily average ___________ 2.8 Tons
Total, consumption _______________ 5,914.5 Tons
Daily consumption both stations __ 16.18 Tons
Extension of Mains
New mains were laid during the year as follows:
Size
Location Feet . in Inches
Abercorn Street to Estill Avenue 48 16
Estill Avenue, from Abercorn Street to
Atlantic Avenue ___________ 2,520 10
Waters Road, between Gwinnett Street
and Wheaton Street __________ 816 8
164_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT___________
Estill Avenue, from Atlantic Avenue to
Waters Road _____________ 2,064 8
Atlantic Avenue, from Estill Avenue to
Forty-Seventh Street _________ 1,248 8
Waters Road, from Anderson Street to
Thirty-Second Street ________ 564 8
Park Avenue, between Paulsen and Harmon Streets _______________ 408 6
Forty-Second Street, between Montgomery and Florence Streets _______ 1,404 6
Forty-Third Street, between West Broad
and Florence Streets __________ 1,080 6
Forty-Fourth Street, between West Broad
and Florence Streets __________ 1,080 6
Florence Streets, between Forty-Second
and Forty-Fourth Streets ______ 528 6
Atlantic Avenue, from Estill Avenue to
Fortieth Street _____________ 840 . 6
Louisville Road, from Stiles Avenue to
Muscove Creek ____________ 852 6
Thirty-Second Street, from Waters Road
to Cedar Street _________ _____ 1,212 6
Total ___________________14,664
Making a grand total of seventy-one miles and 1,073
feet.
Size
Location Feet in Inches
Prichard Street, south of Louisville Road 350 2
South of Augusta Road __________ 1,300 2
Cathedral Cemetery ____________ 195
Total _________________ 1,845
New hydrants and valves have been placed conveniently on all of the above extensions, and old hydrants
_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________165
removed and replaced by new services at the following
locations:
Fire Hydrants
OneBroughton and East Boundary Streets.
OneBroughton and Arnold Streets.
OneBroughton and Randolph Streets.
OneRandolph Street, near St. Julian Street.
OneJefferson and St. Julian Streets.
OneBarnard and State Streets.
OneWest Broad and McDonough Streets.
OneGwinnett and Burroughs Streets.
OneHenry and Burroughs Streets.
OneHenry and Magnolia Streets.
OneHenry and Lincoln Streets.
OneThirty-Sixth Street, East of Florence Street.
Making a total to date of 639 in service.
New Valves
Size
Location in Inches
Broughton and East Broad Streets ___ 6
Broughton and Reynolds Streets --_- 6
Broughton and Arnold Streets __________ 6
Broughton and East Broad Streets __________ 6
*
Water Mains Lowered
Size
Location Feet in Inches
Paulsen Street, from Gwinnett to Bolton _._360 6
Bolton Street, west of Paulsen _______100 6
Cohen Street, from Guerard to Lumber __310 6
Broughton Street, from East Broad to
Randolph _________________700 6
166 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Broken Mains Repaired
Size
Location in Inches
Hull and Price Streets 4
York and West Broad Streets _ 3
Bryan Street, west of Ann ____ 4
Andersbn and Paulsen Streets 10
Broughton Street and Walnut Lane 4
West Broad Street and Perry Lane ____ 6
Huntingdon Street, west of West Broad 6
Atlantic Avenue and Forty-Fifth Street _____ 8
Broughton Street, near Whitaker 6
St. Julian Street, east of Randolph ___ 4
Broughton and East Boundary Streets 6
River Station, Savannah Water Works 6
New Fire Connections
OneFour-inch, American Can Company, old Water
Works Tract.
OneThree-inch, Bijou Theater, Congress Street, near
Drayton.
OneFour-inch, Young Men's Christian Association,
Bull and Charlton Streets.
OneThree-inch, Thomas Park, Thirty-Fifth and Bull
Streets.
Water Meters
Fifty-five new meters have been placed during the year,
making a total in service of one hundred and forty-seven.
Taps
Number of taps placed ____________________180
__________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________167
Miscellaneous
Fire hydrant moved, Gwinnett and Harmon Streets 1
Fire hydrant moved, Huntingdon Street, west of
West Broad __'__________ 1
Fire hydrant moved, Thirty-Fourth and Lincoln
Streets ____ 1
Fire hydrants cleaned, oiled, and packed ____ 600
Valves packed _____________________ 100
Valves cleaned and oiled ________________ 360
New valve boxes _____________________ 100
Water shut off for leaks __________________ 500
Water shirt off for city taxes ______________ 126
Water meters repaired :-_ 46
Leaks reported _______________ 11,357
Inspections made __-_________100,352
Re-inspections _____________________ 23,214
Cesspools repaired _____________ 507
Gas meters inspected 7
Leaky mains caulked ____-____________ 32
New stem put in six-inch main, Mutual Fertilizer
Company ________ 1
New stem put in six-inch main, Hilton-Dodge
Lumber Company __ 1
Pipe used to connect fire hydrant ____204 feet
New pipe replacing old pipe, Thirty-Sixth Street,
between Burroughs and Florence Streets _-672 feet
Pumps, Compressors, and Boilers
I am pleased to report the pumps, compressers, and
boilers in good condition.
Buildings and Grounds
The buildings and grounds have received proper attention, and incidental repairs have been made when necessary.
168 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Recommendations
I would recommend a continued policy of removal of
four-inch mains in congested portions of city, or if not
removed would recommend that same be cleaned.
I would recommend that enlarged storage be provided
at Gwinnett Street Station for coal, as the present arrangement is inadequate and very expensive.
In conclusion, I wish to thank your Honor, the Board
of Aldermen, and the employees of the Department for their
co-operation in the successful management of the Department for the past year.
Very respectfully
J. P. FIGG
Superintendent and Engineer
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC
WORKS
Of THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
FOR THE YEAR
ENDING
December 31, 19O9
HARRY WILL INK
DIRECTOR
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
Director of Public Works
HARRY WILLINK
Chief Clerk to Director of Public Works
LEE MASTERS
Clerks to Director of Public Works
W. J. HAYES
W. G. GEFFCKEN
J. R. HAYM
Superintendent Scavenger Department
THOS. COOLEY
Superintendent Construction of Streets and Lanes
GEO. W. ALLEN
Superintendent Maintenance of Streets and Lanes
F. M. CORNWELL
Foreman City Lot
C. J. MELVIN
Superintendent O. E. M. and Sidewalks
J. H. GRADY
Foreman Dry Culture, East
HENRY F. LUBS
Foreman Dry Culture, West
S. L. PARKER
Annual Report of the Director
Savannah, Ga., December 31, 1909
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor
Sir:I have the honor to submit herewith the Annual
Report of the Department of Public Works for the year
1909. Full information is given under the department headings of the volume of regular work done, as well as that of
unusual character which was placed in charge of this office.
The appropriations made by the budget for 1909, together
with the expenditures during the year and balance of the
appropriation or excess of the budget over the appropriation
follows. The excess in paving streets is of course only
apparent, the city receiving back from the property owners
and railroads about 60 per cent, of all moneys expended on
such improvements. The excess in house drainage was
caused by the large number of breaks in this system, it being
practically impossible to estimate against such contingencies.
Condition of the City's Paved Streets
As practically the entire area of the asphalt streets was
resurfaced about two years ago, they are in good condition.
It will be necessary before the expiration of the guarantee
on a portion of the vitrified brick pavements that same be
relayed. The majority of them, though, are in good condition. The asphalt block area laid about four years ago is
in good condition.
The city's policy of substituting substantial material for
gravel and shell pavements is appreciated both by persons
who have the use of these streets, and particularly by those
who reside upon them.
172 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
I desire to again impress upon you the desirability of
keeping these streets in proper condition of cleanliness. It
is impossible to keep them in a sightly condition as long as
waste paper is allowed to be scattered promiscuously. As
in the past, ashes have been thrown in the lanes to such an
extent that the grades are entirely changed, and I again
earnestly recommend that the Police Department make
docket cases against such offenders.
House Drainage Department
The failure of citizens to take proper interest in the
bond election was a blow to the city's sanitary condition.
On the east, west, and southern portions of the city, the sewage in residences is either taken care of by unsanitary and
poorly laid storm sewers or by privy vaults. Some citizens
who have perfect house drainage do not appear to realize the
inconvenience of those who have not. Some means should
be taken by which citizens may understand the conditions
fully, and remedy them.
Telephone and Telegraph Poles
I would respectfully call your attention to the unsightly
condition of our streets occasioned by the vast number of
telephone and telegraph poles, and again recommend that
appropriate action be taken by City Council, compelling a
yearly increase in the underground area now in use.
Streets Resurfacing, Notes, and Work Department
The amount expended during the year for resurfacing
asphalt streets, in cash, notes, and interest, was $51,343.89.
The work of resurfacing these streets was completed during
the month of March, 1908.
Catch-Basins
There were 1,368 catch-basins in the city at the close of
1909, this being a net increase of forty-six. The expenditures
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 173
for cleaning same and eleven fountains during the year
amounted to $4,941.25.
In all, 16,487 catch-basins were cleansed, an average of
1-.374 times monthly. The eleven fountains were cleansed
500 times during the year.
Sidewalk Department
There were 1,423 sidewalk repairs made during the year,
including crossings and portions of paved streets, at a cost
of $3,084.22. The amount of curbing laid was 4,217 feet.
There were laid during the year, under the supervision of
this office, 48,787 square feet of artificial stone sidewalk, at a
cost of $5,854.46.
The total expenditures for sidewalks during the year
was $9,483.09.
Street Crossings
Twelve new street crossings, using 17,000 vitrified brick
for centers, were laid, at a cost of $342.25, during the year.
Storm Sewers Department
Owing to the fact that a number of storm sewers were
almost filled with sand, thus affecting the drainage, it became
necessary to thoroughly clean them. The expenditures for
this purpose were large; particularly was this the case on
the western slope of the city. There were seventy-one breaks
during the year, which cost for repairs $1,247.46. The total
amount expended in this department in 1909 was $3,259.22.
There are now in the city 26 miles of storm sewers. The
new additions to storm sewers for the year were as follows:
174 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Storm Sewers, 1909
Park Avenue Lane, from Paulsen to Harmon
Street _ _ __ _ __
Henry Street Lane, from Atlantic Avenue
West _________ - __ . _________
Waldburg Street Lane, from Paulsen to
Hamilton Street, A. C. L. track to east of
Brinson Railway Yard _
Waldburg Street, from Styles Avenue to
Woife Street, from Ott to Waters Avenue _
House drainage extension on Wheaton Street,
Size of
Sewer
8 inch
8 inch
8 inch
24 inch
24 inch
8 inch
8 inch
Length
of Sewer
425 feet
530 feet
425 feet
710 feet
425 feet
725 feet
375 feet
746 feet
4361 feet
Paving Streets Department
There were 6,988.1 square yards of vitrified brick pavements laid during the year; 38,892.44 square yards of asphalt
block; 6,745.1 square yards of granite block; and 2,333.3
square yards of gravel.
STREETS
Ogeechee Road ______
Thirty-sixth, West _
Strand ___ ._ _
East Broad
Jones
Macon
Charlton ___ __________
Harris __ _ ____
Gordon
Perry
Wayne _
President
Broughton
Taylor -
Cohen
West Boundary
Hull Street (new)

Material
|Vit Brick
tf

Asp. Block
tt
ti
H
tt
H
tt
u
4*
tt
U
tt
Gran. Block

M
Gravel
N#
2,892.1
2,373.00
1,723.00
10,365.50
9,371.86
9,120.90
1,213.35
1,211.13
602.00
1,205.30
587.90
657.20
758.20
2,589.30
1,209.80
2,200.69
152.77
4,391.64
2,333.3
rt *
*J C/I O O
t<U
$ 5,473.99
3,520.08
3,187.55
17,700.95
18,641.08
13317.72
1340.04
1,934.53
999.85
1,999.38
963.42
1,062.63
1,220.62
6,389.96
1,957.54
4,759.47
328.36
7,167.48
978.10
0
+*
0&OO
$ 1,821.33
1,173.36
4,318.10
4,689.31
4,420.48
613.35
644.84
333.28
666.46
321.14
354.21
406.87
2,129.99
652.51
1,586.49
2,389.16
326.04
Cost to
Owners Property
$ 3,642.
2,346.72
8,636.19
9,378.61
8,840.95
1,226.69
1,289.69
666.57
1,332.92
642.28
708.42
813.75
4,259.97
1,305.03
3,172.98
4,778.32
652.06
-3
I.
OS 3 ->
al &E
<->__ : *- a
rs ' tu s
O : O tr 00! Otn
$ 4,746.66
4.573.16
556.29
$ 1.70.768
1.98.904
1.51.495
o
u 0
u{x, a,,
* c
<K O
O kc
Ote
$ 1.52,521
1.86.388
1.96.458
3.00.415
2.37.871
1.69.07
1.77.13
1.84.85
1.84.308
1.32.743
1.94.62
2.21.428
3.22.37
1.80.352
2.iain
2.43.791
0.31.05
of Width Roadway i
30
32
40
22 (2
40
30
30
30
30
22
30
37
32
30
30
25
40
20
(If. K. 0. 8.12. 174-176)
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 175
The total amount expended was $114,936.81.
On the preceding insert page you will find full information regarding the streets paved, together with amounts
charged against the city, property owner?, and railroads.
Scavenger Department
The tabulated statement below shows the work accomplished during the year in this department.
j
March ___________
May __________
June ____________
July _-
August
October
Totals ___ _
Hauled Loads by Sea encer
City Wagons to Dump
2190
2119
2447
2279
2296
2292
2399
2321
| 2204
2326
2291
2308
27472
and Loads Hauled by Street
City Dump Lane Crts to
1658
1412
1475
1539
1612
1528
1424
1479
| 1362
1633
[ 1880
1695
18761
Hauled Paper Wag Loads by
city Dump to ons
150
142
162
154
i!56
156
1 157
154
I 150
156
| 209
156
1902
Garbage Hauled Number Cars
Railway Farm by County to
167
156
171
i 163
164
1.7.
| 181
i 171
| 168
180
| 179
169
2040
1
DEADSTOCK REMOVED
i
"3
S
8
7
7
12
11
14
[ 12
11
9
1 7
9
1115
E

B
17
17
23
18
10
23
1 21
32
15
33
121
23
10
__
5
7
1 9
5
111
13
3
;:
7
1
253184

'*
8
5
4
6
2
4
2 '.:
1 4
56
1
o
7i
2
9
3
4
4
2
1
4
lie
2
SO
1
2
."
__
-
-
2
4
O
87
76
102
11;
141
144
109
87
88
72
91
65
1179
4
1
::
i
*
I
1
2
1
5! 4
M. R. C. S.12
176 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Dry Culture Department
A statement of the regular work of this department is
given below:
i
March ____ .
April _____
May . _____
July _...
Seotembcr ....
S
"
S.
[Ill C ti
3-t:*! ZCo
!
______ i 94.777
____ ..: 79,285
. _____ ! 116.650
___ _ ! 87.050
______ ' 34.000
1 ___ . _ ' 37.775
______ 35.450
i _____ .' 83.570
_____ :J 119.225
Tu
4>
A
J*l III
?5OO
10.900
12 )
15.950
32,050
17.650
6.250
.09 S
o-o
^eo n a
Ilil
1550
2,550
l^K)
1.120
5,600
1.200
4-*
4> 4*
PH
l-s
5
SIS
30.350
80.700
43,450
65.050
35.150
9.000
Number
Days Worked
WS
295.
241.
357.
332.
347.
353.
343.
October
November _________I 97.550, 16.650]
129,350;_____! 4.325.____| 346.
346.
I I I I I
December __....-j_ 110.312 8.700,-...-|_____' 354.
Ill
Totals_________!1,015.044J 120,450 16.555
I
263,700 4,121.5
The expenditures in the above department for keeping
ditches clean and clear of weeds was $8,958.6^.
Sink Department (O. E. M.)
The expenses of this department were $5,156.33, of
which $3,805.30 was paid to the contractor for cleaning
privy vaults, etc. The deta-'ls of the work of this department appear in the following statement.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 177
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178 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Harbor and Wharves
During the coming year, it will be necessary to practically rebuild the slips owned by the city. The expenditures
in this department, which has a fixed charge of $1,500.00,
were $1,925.70; the appropriation was $2,500.00.
City Lighting Department
At the beginning of the year 1909 there were 554 arc
lights and three fifty-candle power lamps in the city, since
which time four additional arc lights have been added, making a total of 558 arc lights.
The expenditures in this department for the year were
$18,163.65.
Streets Resurfacing (Gravel and Shell) Department
In addition to resurfacing and repairing the gravel and
shell streets of the city, a portion of this appropriation was
expended on heavy sand streets, where persons owning vehicles found it difficult to travel.
The total expenditures in this department were $3,-
539.08.
Streets and Lanes Department
The addition to the paved streets of the city during the
year amounted to 12,077 lineal feet, or 2.28 miles; the city
now has 44.96 miles of paved streets. The increase in the
superficial area of such paved thoroughfares in 1909 was
23.610.05 square yards, making a total at present of 867.-
897.91 square yards, divided as follows:
Square Yards
Broughton ________-_Asphalt.____ 17,950
Bryan _____ " ___ 619
Bull _-__ " 32,831
Congress " 6.S39
Drayton " 22,522
Harris ___-_____-_ " -' 1-675
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT- 179
Liberty __
Oglethorpe Avenue
President _____
St. Julian __________
York _________ .
Abercorn .
Bay _ __________
Rear of City Hall _ .
Barnard . .
Congress Lane ____.
Cuyler ________ .
Gwinnett -
Habersham __ ______
Park Avenue ______.
President -
Wheaton _ - _ ____.
Ogeechee Road ______
Jefferson _____
Thirty-Eighth _
Thirty-Sixth, West
Montgomery _________
Forty-Second, West
West Broad ___ __
Jones, West _______
Berrien ______________
Fortieth
Tattnall __ _ ___ __.
Strand. East ___
Stewart
Price -_. _
Henry
Perry Lane __________
Brcughton Lane
East Broad ____
Macon -
Thirty-Sixth .
Roberts _____________
Whitaker _ _ ___ __.
Thirty-First ___
Drayton _____________
State -
Hall . _ -
Wayne ______________
Harmon _..
Asphalt ______
it
"

tt
_ Vitrified Brick ___
tt
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<
**
tt
4-
tt
(t
it
tt
**
tt
tt
tt
ft
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
ft
tl
tt
tt
tt
tt
ft
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
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tt
tt
**
**
30,430
25,933
780
1,088
39,640.7
9,381.9
227.7
3,005
2,086
1221.8
31,695.4
19.956.48
14208
3,961
7256
11,026.87
17228
3,875
9,100.1
405
1,165.4
43,120.9
5,682
2,351.1
6,573.53
1231.6
3,399.47
4,663.9
16.585.2
12,917.16
749.3
1,917.3
10,408.3
211
6,456
689.7
18295.7
11.934.6
1,033.2
2362.35
4,960
595.7
5.534
140,814
180 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Gaston __Vitrified
Lincoln __- "
Bay Lane, east of Lincoln "
Emmett Park _____________
Louisville Road Chert
Bay Street Extension "
President ________________
Bay _Cobble
Factors Walk _____________
Lanes "
Pine ____________________
Xew _______________
Street Slip Xorth Bay __
Reynolds ___ "
Barnard __________________
East Broad "
West Broad ______________
West Boundary, at Dump _ "
Whitaker ___________
Orange ___________________
Williams _______
Williamson "
Zubly ____.____
Margaret -_____________
Sycamore "
Bay Granite
Barnard _____ "
Bryan ______i_________
Cohen ______.___
East Broad _____ "
Fahm _________________
Jefferson _____________
Indian "
Railroad ______________
Wadley -_____.___
Wheaton ._____
West Boundary " 152.71
Brick___ 1.SS0.5
______. 689.6
______ 122.26
______ 2.453.4 342,519.33
______ 4,377
______ 9.255
______ 1,280 14,912
-___ 25,663.1
______ 8.800
______ 11.786.1
______ 1,800
______ 17.214.9
______ 8.772.3
______ 4,200
______ 4,420
______ 6.428
__.____ 15.941.1
______ 1.244
______ 6724.3
______ 660
______ 4.500
______ 2,252
______ 2,645
______ 7,000
______ 711 130.75H.X
Blocks___ 1,707
______ 1.049
______ 7.362
______ 2200.69
______ 9.190
______ 10.100.2
______ 21,913
______ 7,572
______ 6.097
______ 4.309
______ 5.000
Water __________
River ___________
New ._____________
Coffee Alley __.____
Bolton _______ ShellBarnard -- "
Hall _________________
2.297
4,618.1
4.391.64
634.8 88,597.14
11.700
6,500
7.339.4
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 181
Henry . Shell
Gwinnett ___________ Gravel
Liberty Lane "
Bull ______________
Harris _--
St. Julian
Ogeechee Road ___________
Gaston ______Asphal
Bull ______________
York ______________
Abercorn _______
Barnard
Park Avenue __________
McDonough ______
Randolph -____--
East Broad
Jones
Macon ___________
Charlton ______________
Harris ____________
Gordon :_
Perry ______
Wayne
President _________________
Broughton
Taylor -
. ___ 21,000 46.539.4
. ___ 5,666
______ 332
______ 7,374.6
_ __ ___ 1,937
______ 5,244.9
______ 2.333.3 22,887.8
Block ____ 9.998.9
_ . _ 25,175.4
____ 505.7
______ 1,556.71
______ 1,034.3
______ 1,511
______ 2,194.91
______ 10,365.5
... ____ 9.371.86
. _____ 9,120.9
______ 1,213.35
______ 1,211.13
______ 602
____ _- 1,205.3
______ 587.9
____ ._ 657.2
______ 758.2
______ 2,589.3
____ ___ 1,209.8 80.869.44
Recapitulation
Square Yards
Sheet -Asphalt r _ - _______ ___________ 140.814
Asphalt Block __ _____ 80.869.44
Vitrified Brick ____ _____________ 342,519.33
Chert . . ___ 14,912
Cobble _ __-__. ____ -- _____ __ _________ 130,758.8
Granite Block ________ 88,597.14
Shell - - _ -_ _ .___. _ __ 46,539.4
Gravel - _____ _____ 22,887.8
867,897.91
182 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Expenditures in Streets and Lanes Were as Follows:
Cleaning asphalt streets _ _ ____________ $ 7,156.97
Cleaning streets other than asphalt ______ _ _____ 16,641.77
Cleaning catch-basins _____ ..__ _ _ __ 4,941.25
Sweeping crossings 1,718.00
Grading and filling _______________________ 5,941.66
Laying and repairing crossings ____ __ ___ - 342.45
Maintenance shell streets __ __ ____ 556.00
Repairing storm sewers _ _-___ _ __ 1,557.88
Repairing streets other than asphalt _ _____ ____ 6,329.00
Cutting and hauling weeds - __ ____ ___ _ 1.327.82
Help City Engineer and city lot _ 1.575.00
Oil catch-basins __________________________ 342.25
Hauling cinders _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ __ __ 575.00
Sprinkling and sweeping 1,779.00
Removing storm debris _ 252.50
Work and material other than above, and salaries -_ 18,985.29
Balance _______________________________ 4,978.16
Cleaning Paved Streets
The cost of cleaning improved streets follows:
Square
Yards
Asphalt _____________ 140,814
Cobble and Granite _____ 219,355.94
Shell, Gravel, and Chert 84,339.2
Vitrified Brick _________ 342,519.33
Asphalt Block ___ - __ 80,869
$ 7,156.97
3,395.30
672.30
9,559.52
3,014.55
$23.798.64
$75.000.00
Cost per
Square
Yard
.0508
.0108
.0079
.0278
.0372
Repairs to Paved Streets Average
Cost per
Square Square
Yards Yard
Cobble ______________ 132,159.6 $ 2.264.26 .0171
Granite Block? _________ 84,205.5 1,582.37 .0187
Vitrified Brick __.. 342.519.33 1,970.05 .0057
Shell ______ 56,693.4 556.00 .0098
Gravel and Chert __ 42,299.8 512.62 .0121
$ 6.885.30
____ MAYORESS ANNUAL REPORT _____183
Chimney Sweeping Department
The expenditures in this department for the year
amounted to $508.34.
Grading New Streets
During the year the following streets have been graded:
Cann & Bacon Subdivision, SpringfieldWaldburg
Street, Park Avenue, Duffy Street, Henry Street.
Lattimore & Lattimore Subdivision. Teynac Farm Lot
Fortieth, from Habersham to east of Paulsen; Reynolds,
north and south of Fortieth; Atlantic Avenue, north and
south of Fortieth; Paulsen, north and south of Fortieth.
Schreck Subdivision. SpringfieldP>utler Street, Chapman Street, Nelson Street, Hall Street.
Bell & Simpkins Subdivision, SpringfieldReppard,
from Gwinnett to Sycamore; Bolton, from Reppard to West
Boundary.
Falligant & Travis, Trustees, Gartland WardThirtysixth, from Haines to east of East Broad; Hamilton, from
Haines to east of East Broad.
The cost of grading new streets for the year amounted
to $4,768.68.
Granger Tract
During the year the following streets were graded in
the Granger Tract:
Maupas Avenue, from Price to Waters Avenue.
Forty-second, from Lincoln to Price.
Forty-first, from Price to east of Paulsen.
Estill Avenue, from Habersham to Waters Avenue.
Forty-fourth, from Habersham to Waters Avenue.
Forty-fifth, from Habersham to Waters Avenue.
184 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Forty-sixth, from Habersham to Waters Avenue.
Forty-seventh, from Habersham to Waters Avenue.
Habersham, from Estill Avenue to Forty-seventh.
Price, from Maupas Avenue to Estill Avenue.
East Broad, from Maupas Avenue to Estill Avenue.
Chatham Crescent, from Price to Ott.
Battey. from Estill Avenue to Forty-seventh.
Reynolds, from Maupas Avenue to Forty-seventh.
Atlantic Avenue, from Maupas Avenue to Forty-seventh.
Paulsen, from Maupas Avenue to Forty-seventh.
Harmon, from Maupas Avenue to Forty-seventh.
Ott, from Maupas Avenue to Estill Avenue.
Tiedemaii Park.
Baldwin Park.
Guckenheimer Park.
Theus Park.
Streets around Parks.
The cost of grading the above streets, including curbing,
sewer pipe, and brick, amounted to $43.492.89.
Under the present policy of the city, streets are donated
to the city for the grading. Formerly streets were purchased, and then graded at the city's expense. Under the
present plan, the city saves the cost of the land.
Street Signs
I beg to recommend that some action be taken to properly mark the streets. Not only strangers, but citizens, find
it difficult to locate streets, as they are practically without
s:gns.
Very respectfully,
HARRY WILLINK,
Director of Public Works.
APPROPRIATIONS
DEPARTMENTS
Streets and Lanes
Scavenger
Paving Streets
Drainage and Dry Culture
Sink Department (O. E. M.) _____ _._..
Harbor and Wharves
Streets. Asphalt, Notes, and Work
City Lighting
Streets Resurfacing, Gravel and Shell
Storm Work, Special
Paving Strand
S
01 -.
.Appropriations p
8 :
'47,000.00
55,000.00
11,000.00
5,000.00
2,500.00
44,783.00
3,000.00
' 3,500.00
3.000.00
5,000.00
18,500.00
6,000.00
7,300.00
g
3
.
5
B a*s70,021.84
39,821.05
114,936.81
9,483.09'
8,958.64|
5,156.33
1,925.70!
51,343.89
1,985.68
5,548.43
7.900.00
4,768.68
18.163.65
3,539.081
1,273.54
508.34
443.30
10,191.53
01
'-'S
-n
II
ill..
$ 4,978.16
7,178.95
2,041.36
574.30
1,014~32
647.50
231.32
336.35
2.460.92
6,026.46
r " *
Excess of
Appropriations
i
59,936.81
156.33
6,560.89
2,048.43
1
o
IS
SB
I
DIVISION OF EXPENSES, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
FOR Amount
Asphalt Block . ________ ____________________
Drayage and Hauling _____________________
Feed for Stock __ ______________________
Vitrified Brick ._ ___ _________________
Gtjr Lamps __._ ___________________
Freight ___ _ __ _______
Granite Curbing ___ _________________
Scavenger Contract with County _ _____ ____
i Pipe _________ _______
Brick . ____-_.________
: Cleaning Sinks ___ ____ __ _______
Horses and Mules _ _____________________
i Stevedoring ________________________
' Tools and Implements ______________________
i Material and Tools ________________________
Artificial Stone Sidewalks _______ ______
Veterinary Services and Medicine __ _______
; Vehicles, and Repairs to same ______________
Inspecting Asphalt Block _________________
Catch-Basins ___ ________ ______________
Sand _________________ _ __
Wharfage __ _______ _______ _
Graders and Scrapers _______ ___________
Cement and Lime ___ _ ____ __ _
Ofls, Paint. Putty. Etc. ____________________
i lepairs to Tools and Implement- ___ _______
I Hardware _________________ _
; Horse and Mule Shoes and Horseshoe Xails
: Harness and Repairs to same _ __ __ ____
. insurance _____ _ _____ __ ___
! Gravel ________________ __ __
I-cidentals _____ _ __ _
Coal and Wood ________ _ _
Ihiminating Oil ___________________
. Stationery. Postage. Etc. _____________
: Expense Horse and Buggy, Harbor Master
: numbing Work _____ __ _ __ _
|wt of Telephones __ ____________________
, "-pairs to Wharves ______________ __
, wbricating Oil ___.___ ___.______
Disinfectants ____________________
otes and Interest _________ ___________
Time of Hands ___ ____________
Totals ______________ _________
$ 42.652.91
24.452.10
20,388.83
19.239.66
18,163.65
17,581.25
13.282.87
7.900.00
6,654.45
5,403.52
3,776.55
' 2375.00
2J57.40
2.144.97
1,776.16
1,719.79
1,564.49
1.363.45
1.333.07
910.00
907.75
775.67
701.40
675.00
649.10
630.25
594.17
565.56
538.01
546.56
454.00
442.10
416.35
362.25
332.17
329.88
240.00
232.45
224.33
180.00
136.62
104.00
51.343.89
142.540.84
$399.462.47
g__i
& Bl4 ,
1~312.50
6,540.43
9.97
2.425.00
235.94
1,098.06
705.78
1 584.20
i 478.89
21.00
412.80
22.68
190.90
204.61
162.97
254.00
220.30
81.00
260.82
196.53
10.95
30.00
v a
!$..__ _____
34.38
..........
58.06
350.60
~157_Z4
106.88
4.82
i..::::::::
25.00
112.45
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ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
CITY ENGINEER
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
FOR THE YEAR
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 19O9
J. W. HOWARD
CITT KNGINBKR

City Engineer's Report
Office of City Engineer
Savannah, Ga., December 31. 1909
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor
Dear Sir:I have the honor to submit herewith my
annual report of the operations of the City Engineer's
Department for the year ending December 31, 1909.
On account of the many important public improvements made by the city during the past year that have
required the assistance of this Department, the amount of
work accomplished was the largest in the history of the
office. For this reason, although this report may appear
unusually long, I considered it well to give a detailed
description of the work performed, in order that my report
may be a useful record for the future, not only for this and
other departments of the city, but for citizens generally.
I desire here to call your attention to the fact that,
although this unprecedented increase in the duties required
of this Department was thrown upon it suddenly, no call for
help was made except in one instance, the taking of levels
on the Granger Tract; outside aid was obtained for this
purpose for about two weeks, and is scarcely worth mentioning in this connection.
' The employees of this Department have faithfully performed their duties, and I take this occasion to commend
them for it. It should be remembered that the require-
190 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _
ments of this Department regarding the work of its
employees are very different from most of the other departmentsa large amount of technical knowledge and skill are
required, together with a high degree of accuracy and sound
judgment, for upon these qualities depend to a large extent
the amount of money expended on the public improvements
that are planned and laid out by this Department.
The profession of civil engineering no%v covers such a
wide range of subjects that it has been reduced in most cases
to specialties, which require only a high degree of skill in one
direction; but the municipal engineer cannot specialize. His
knowledge must embrace the entire profession, for he has to
solve every variety of engineering problem. In addition to
the knowledge required of a municipal engineer which pertains to the profession, in this city at least he has to acquire
a thorough knowledge of the lines and history of the streets,
property lines, and subdivisions contained in the city's boundaries, because upon this knowledge depends the proper
locations of property lines in the survey of lots and, therefore, the settlement of disputes concerning same. The surveys made by this Department also become a permanent
record of the greatest value to property owners. I have not
cited the above for the purpose of flattering the officials or
employees of this office, but simply as information to the
citizens generally, who I think do not realize the importance
of the work done by the City Engineer's Department, or the
responsibility of its employees.
Granger Tract
The grading of the streets through the property of the
Chatham Land and Hotel Company, commonly known as
the "Granger Tract," is the largest undertaking of its kind
ever attempted in this city, and as far as the work has
progressed has been satisfactory.
The streets have been graded in such a way as to convert a low, wet. and unhealthful plain into a dry and appar-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 191
ently high and beautifully laid-out district, which will in
time be one of the principal residential sections. Had this
grading been done in the manner formerly in vogue, that is,
only shaping up the roadways, without any attempt to
change the relative elevations of property and streets, thereby effecting the speedy drainage of the same, this section of
the city would have remained unimproved and of no value to
the city.
The cutting of the streets considerably below the property has already made a marked improvement in the drainage of this section, and when the storm sewer system
designed especially for this section, and now under construction, is finished the drainage of this part of the city will be
complete, and a lasting benefit to adjacent property particularly, and to the city generally. I would, therefore, recommend that in future when the city has an amount of street
grading to do that would warrant grading in this manner,
that it should be done, not only as a sanitary measure, but
as a business proposition from which the city will reap
future benefits in tax values.
The amount of grading done on the Granger Tract, and
its cost, will no doubt appear in the report of the Director of
Public Works, and will not be gone into here. I will say, in
passing, that the cost of grading this tract considerably
exceeded the original estimate, but the reason for this was
that the original estimate was made when it was only contemplated to grade as has been the custom in former years,
by simply cutting out the gutter lines and shaping up the
roadways without preparing the street for sidewalks or
pavements. The present grading has been done to a true
grade, and sidewalks are now in course of construction; the
streets are also prepared for paving without further grading.
Storm Sewers
Plans have been made for a complete system of storm
water sewers for the drainage of the Granger Tract, and estiM. B. c. B.is
192 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
mates made for same. Since then, however, it was deemed
advisable to increase the size of the Fiftieth Street sewer, in
view of its very probable extension, in order to drain all that
territory between Estill Avenue, Fifty-Second, Habersham,
and Montgomery Streets, thereby extending its sphere of
action as far as practicable, and not restricting its usefulness
to the Granger Tract alone. I heartily recommend this
extension, from both an economical and sanitary standpoint.
In accordance with the above plan, the Fiftieth Street
sewer will empty into the DeRenne Canal at Fiftieth Street
Lane and Waters Road, extending west partly on Fiftieth
Street Lane and Fiftieth Street. This trunk sewer will
receive the drainage of laterals extending north on Harmon,
Paulsen, Reynolds, and Habersham Streets to Estill Avenue,
and south on Paulsen, Reynolds, and Battey Streets to the
city limits. The*extension of the Fiftieth Street sewer west
of Habersham Street will receive the laterals on Abercorn,
Barnard, and Montgomery Streets, reaching as far north as
Forty-Second Street.
In addition to the drainage of the territory south of
Estill Avenue, a system of storm sewers is very much
needed in all that section included between Anderson Street
on the north, Waters Road on the east, and East Broad
Street on the west. -A large outlet sewer for this area should
be provided, either emptying into DeRenne Canal, at about
Fortieth Street and Waters Road, or it should run in a
northerly direction, emptying into Bilbo Canal. This route
would posess the advantage of also furnishing a trunk sewer
for Collinsville, Eastville, the Meadows, and Villa Heights,
which is much needed, Collinsville having only a partial system at present, which does not meet the requirements, and
the other sections named having no drainage at all. A main
sewer is also needed to drain the southwest section of the
city, there being no sewers for storm water in that portion
south of Thirty-seventh Street and west of Montgomery
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 193
Street, and extending south and west to the city limits. A
trunk sewer to drain this area could empty into the Springfield Canal, west of the city.
By reason of the rapid extension and paving of the city's
streets which has taken place in recent years, it has become
imperative that some provision for draining the areas covered by such extension should be made. The sewers now
existing are most of them taxed to their full capacity, and it
would, therefore, be impracticable to extend the present system, even if the grades allowed, which in most cases they
do not. I would, therefore, in view of the above facts,
recommend the construction as soon as possible of two main
sewers, one to drain the east side, and one for the southwest
part of the city, as outlined above.
In addition to the sewers outlined for the new sections,
I desire to call your attention to the necessity for enlarging
and perfecting the present system of storm sewers covering
the older portions of the city. This necessity arises from the
fact that the streets are being rapidly paved, and the already
overtaxed old system cannot satisfactorily accommodate the
additional flow of storm water due to the increasing paved
area. A plan should be made of the city, showing the sewers as they now exist, and a new system of storm sewers,
with suitable trunk lines and laterals should be installed for
*
every part of the city not already provided with proper
drainage. These trunk sewers should be designed with a
view to accommodate all additional sewage due to future
street paving and drainage from buildings.
City Map
No action was taken during the past year regarding the
preparation of a new city map. This was due to the fact
that other important work caused this matter to be delayed
from time to time. The necessity for this map has been
realized by our City Council, and I hope that this work will
be started at the beginning of the new year.
194 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The new map, showing especially the southeastern
extension of the city, will give the Committee on Opening
Streets an intelligent idea as to what is necessary in the way
of opening streets, and will probably be the means of some
systematic method of street opening in this territory, where
the streets are not yet opened. In this connection, I would
also like to call your attention to the confusion of the names
of certain streets in and adjoining the city limits, which
would be well to rectify before a map is published. For
instance, the street on the west side of the city, extending
north from the Louisville Road to Bacon's Mill, thence west
to the Hermitage Tract, is known as Lathrop Avenue from
the Louisville Road to Bay Street, then Schwarz Avenue to
Bacon's Mill, then Lathrop Avenue to the Old Water Works
Tract, and Miller Avenue through this tract to the Hermitage. Estill Avenue is known as such from Bull Street to
Waters Road, where it then becomes Dale Avenue. Railroad Street becomes the Louisville Road at West Boundary
Street. Wheaton Street becomes Moore Avenue at Waters
Road. There is a Stiles Avenue extending south from the
Louisville Road to the Ogeechee Road, and a Stiles Avenue
along the western boundary of the old Water Works Tract.
The street east of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, recently
acquired from J. S. Collins and the Schley Estate, has no
name, but is a continuation of Hains Street. There are also
three streets in the Parsons subdivision, Battery Ward,
unnamed, but which are approximate extensions of ThirtySixth, Thirty-Seventh, and Thirty-Eighth Streets.
The industrial map, which this Department has been
preparing for the trade bodies, is about completed, and I
hope that this map will also be published in conjunction
with the city map, as these organizations already see the
advantages of such a map. As I have said before, these
maps will eventually be of no expense to the city, as the
cost will be offset by their sales.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 195
Subdivisions
I desire to call your attention to the numerous subdivisions of small and large tracts of land in and adjacent to
the city. While I realize the fact that the city has no
authority to dictate to the owners as to how their land should
be divided into streets, lanes, and parks, I think the city
could come to some agreement with the various owners of
this land as to the location of its streets, in order to prevent
the confusion and expense attendant upon the breaking up
of old established subdivisions, and their redivision to comply with the city's plan.
An ordinance was adopted some years ago, laying out
streets in the south and eastern sections of the city, but this
plan has not been strictly adhered to. The proposed streets,
as laid out on the plan, did not conform to the ideas of the
property owners, and the result was that the property owners laid out the streets to suit themselves, so that they would
get the greatest number of lots in their tracts of land.
Especially is this the case with lands adjacent to the city
limits, which will require years to adjust between the property owners and the city.
The only suggestion that I can offer is a systematic plan
for the extension of the city's streets,'at least two miles
beyond the present city limits, and let the matter be adjusted
between the property owners and the city as soon as the
extensions are made, conforming to this new plan.
I would call jour special attention to the western section
of the city, north of the Louisville Road and west of Lathrop
Avenue, which is rapidly being developed in numerous subdivisions, all of which are being laid out regardless of any
general plan. This section will be eventually a second
Yamacraw, with "mystic maze" and serpentine streets, if
this practice is allowed to continue. This western section
was once in the city limits, and if this rapid growth continues the limits will soon be extended again to cover this
area.
196 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
It may be out of place to make suggestions regarding
the location of parks in this city, and if so I will apologize in
advance to the Park and Tree Commission. But in looking
over the physical condition of the city in a general way it
seems to me that some systematic and symmetrical method
should be adopted for the laying out of parks and squares in
the newly extended limits. Some years ago, I made a map
showing the proposed arrangements for parks, and while
the special plan was not carried out, it seems to me that a
plan could be adopted arranging these parks in such a manner that they may be symmetrically distributed throughout
the new extension. I would like also to call your attention
to the fact that if a method of laying out streets and parks in
the newly extended limits could be adopted, so as to increase
the depth of lots to at least 150 feet, it would make a great
improvement in the residential section.
Survey of City
It is impossible, with the limited force in this Department, and with the numerous public improvements going
on, to make any headway whatever in making a complete,
and accurate survey of this city, showing streets, lanes, and
parks as they exist. A separate and distinct engineering
corps will have to be organized and employed for this purpose, and I would certainly recommend it, especially at this
time, when we have in view the extension of the sewerage
system, paving, water mains, etc. A survey of this kind has
been needed by the city for a number of years, and will certainly facilitate the work of this Department, and in addition would be the means of having a uniform system of roadways and sidewalks established throughout the city. While
we have quite a number of surveys of portions of the city,
we have no complete map showing at a glance the present
location of the roadways and sidewalks as they have been
established. This survey should cover all the streets which
the city intends to "open, together with the area to be
purchased and improvements to be removed. An accurate
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 197
location of all the underground conduits, water and gas
mains, sewers, etc., should be located, so that the new work
will not conflict with what has been done. For instance, in
the laying of new sewers in the old section of the city, it is
frequently the case that these underground improvements
conflict with the grades and lines proposed for the construction of the new work, and would result not only in poor construction of our new work, but financial loss to the city.
In this connection, it will be well to have the city limits
well defined, and marked by suitable monuments at the
intersections of all streets, so that they can be readily seen
by citizens looking for this information. The survey, and
marking of the established lines with suitable markers, of all
unimproved city property, is also desirable; this would
include cemeteries, parks, etc.
A topographical map should be made, to show the elevations of the city, with grades established and adopted for
our roadways and sidewalks, and also bench marks established at convenient places throughout the city, together
with street monuments at all intersecting streets, to be used
as a base to locate property lines.
Cemeteries
This department has from time to time been called upon
to locate lots in 'the new section of Bonaventure Cemetery,
and doing such additional work in the way of other improvements as has been needed in the way of locating avenues,
etc. I hope that we will be in a position in a short while to
locate all of the lots in the new part of the cemetery.
On account of the washing of the bluff, and the danger
to lots adjacent to the river, we have been called upon by the
Park and Tree Commission to devise a plan for the protection of this bluff.
In order that the matter may be gone into intelligently,
it was necessary to have a survey made, showing the sound-
198 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ings of Wilmington River directly in front of the bluff,
which has been completed, but no plans drawn. This matter will be given careful consideration, and plans devised
. whereby this bluff can be protected permanently from the
wash of the river. As this river is within the jurisdiction
of the United States Government, this matter will be taken
up with the United States Engineer, and we will be glad to
co-operate with any suggestions they may deem proper.
House Drainage
As you are aware, the question of extending the house
drainage sewers came up for discussion and consideration
during the past year, but no definite action was taken. A
campaign, however, for this improvement has been started
again, and this Department was called on for quite a lot of
data on the subject, all of which has been explained in a
limited way to the public. It would not be out of place,
however, to mention some of the facts in connection with
this house drainage question, as it may be of some interest to
those who are not thoroughly familiar with the subject.
The information which I am giving is taken from records on
file in this office.
The sewerage of this city is called a separate system,
one system to convey the surface water from the 'streets, and
the other a sanitary system for house drainage purposes.
The storm system of sewers was constructed from time
to time, dating back as far as 1847, and was used as a combination system both for surface and house drainage until
the new house drainage sewerage system was installed,
1898-1902. This combination system had its outlet into
Bilbo Canal, at Bolton Street, with a few other outlets into
the Savannah River at the foot of some of the principal
streets. The emptying of this sewage matter into Bilbo
Canal has been the cause of serious complaints by citizens
for years, and was the means of having the present sanitary
system installed. The present house drainage system of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 199
sewers has two outlets, the larger of which is at Bilbo Canal
and Gordon's Wharf, and the other at the foot of West
Broad Street. It practically covers an approximate area of
1220 acres, and lies between Randolph and Bast Broad
Streets on the east, Forty-Second Street on the south, and
Fahm Street, Magnolia Street, and Ogeechee Road on the
west, with its main trunk sewer on the extreme eastern
side of these limits. It is a gravity system, but the plans
originally called for two pumping stations, a small one on
the west side to take care of the sewage which could not be
reached by a gravity system, and one for the east side to
take care of the Collinsville section. These pumping stations
having never been installed, the complete plan was never
constructed.
This system, as it stands to date, with additions and
other expenses, probably cost $250,000, which covers
approximately 51 miles of house drainage sewers.
The trunk sewers of the present system were designed
only to take care of the area within the limits which I have
outlined, but it was intended to pump the sewage from the
Collinsville section into the trunk sewer at Randolph and
Liberty Streets. From my personal knowledge, I cannot see
where any extension can be made with the present sewers
outside of the area which is already connected, as it appears
to me that, when all of the area is built, especially that part
south of Anderson Street, this trunk sewer will be taxed to
its full capacity.
The new area to be covered by the extension of the
house drainage system is all that portion of the city not
accessible to the present system, and covering an area of
about 1400 acres, which will include practically everything
within the city limits: Collinsville, Villa Heights, Park
Place, The Meadows, Granger Tract, the South Side, etc.
The territory immediately south of Estill Avenue and
Forty-Second Streets is comparatively high between Lincoln
200 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
and Burroughs Streets, but the other sections are low, level
plains, about twenty-five feet below the average elevation of
the city. As to whether this section can be drained by a
gravity system, is one which will have to be determined by
surveys; and whether it would be expedient for the city to
cover Bilbo Canal, from Gwinnett Street to its mouth at the
Savannah River, and use this as a part of the trunk sewer,
is another question which will have to be decided.
There is one thing, however, which must be taken into
consideration, whatever is done. The main trunk sewer
which is to take care of all the lateral sewers for this new
territory should be large enough not only for this immediate territory, but for any additional extension south and
east of the present city limits, provided that the grades will
permit. For instance, south of our present limits, or FiftySecond Street, there are subdivisions being opened up from
year to year, and it will only be a question of a short while
when this extended area will be wanting sanitary sewers.
This sewer should provide for at least 100,000 population.
As you are aware, theje are some things to be done in connection with this work, in the way of opening streets, and
the construction of water mains to operate the flush tanks
which are necessary in a system of this kind.
The work in the western section of the city will not be
as elaborate as the eastern section, as it will not require a
very large sewer. This sewer, if constructed, would probably be a pipe sewer, extending from the Savannah River
to Laurel Grove Cemetery.
Nothing has been said in this connection regarding the
outlet for the discharge of these trunk sewers, as we
assume that the Savannah River is the proper and practical
place for them. This question of an outlet for the disposal
of the city sewers was fully investigated some years ago,
and a thorough study of the situation was made at that
time. The city employed some of the most expert sanitary
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 201
engineers in this country, as well as local talent, and it will
not be necessary to revive this matter again.
The various outlets for these trunk sewers considered
by these sanitary engineers were Wilmington River, Timber
Landing Creek, Vernon River, and Savannah River. The
concensus of opinion was that the Savannah River was not
only the best from a sanitary point of view, but the cheapest
route that could be constructed.
The tidal velocity and volume of water was found to
make the dilution of sewage in this river practical, and that
Savannah would have to reach a very large population
before sewage in the river would become obnoxious. The
only difference of opinion regarding the discharge of sewage
in this river, was whether the outlet or discharge of the
sewage should be at Bilbo Canal or at Fort Oglethorpe.
No complaint has reached this office regarding the present
discharge of sewage into the Savannah River, and basing
my views on the opinion of these sanitary engineers, and on
observation, I see no reason, why this proposed outlet should
not be located at the Savannah River.
The cost of the extension of the sewerage system, as
described above, is estimated to be $350,000. While this
figure may look excessive, I believe all this amount will be
necessary to cover the cost of these improvements. No
accurate estimate, of course, can be made until surveys
and elevations are taken of the streets, but basing this estimate on our previous work it will be safe enough for our
purpose. I will, however, have some tentative plans made
at the first part of the coming year, to show the area to be
covered by this new system of sewers, and also some
approximate estimates to show in 'detail the cost of this system.
If the "Bond Issue" is to be voted on by the people
again, and you desire to have these estimates verified by
some of our local engineers, to show the public that this
202 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
amount of money will be needed for this purpose, I will be
glad to co-operate with anyone that you would suggest, and
nrepare this data in any manner advisable.
Encroachments
The encroachments reported to you during the past
year are found elsewhere in this report, and a systematic
record of all encroachments reported by this Department to
you during your administration is being kept on file for
reference. Some of these encroachments have been
removed, but there are quite a number remaining, and
apparently no action has been taken regarding them. I
believe, however, you are to appoint a special committee of
Council to handle this matter, and as soon as this is done I
will be glad to furnish them with all the information on the
subject.
There are some encroachments in this city which have
been in existence for a number of years, and these are not
included in the list sent you. For instance, on the north
side of State Street, between Abercorn and Drayton Streets;
on the north side' of Liberty, between Drayton and Floyd
Streets; and two on north and south side of Park Avenue,
between Abercorn and Whitaker Streets. These encroachments have been in existence for quite a number of years,
and it is doubtful if the city could move them without compensating the property owners for the land. As these
encroachments project considerably into the sidewalks, their
removal would add to the appearance of the streets.
Opening Streets
This Department has, as usual, furnished the Opening
Streets Committee with all information called upon by them
relative to the opening of streets in the city during the past
year. Quite a number of surveys and maps have been made,
and while no action has been taken in a majority of cases
for the purchase of these streets, the information obtained
will be of value when the deals are consummated.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 203
I would also like to call your attention to the fact that
a number of street lines have been given parties intending
to build on lots or parts of lots needed for projected streets.
In some cases, the Committee on Opening Streets has
refused to purchase the property required for the streets,
and the parties owning the land have built within the lines
of the proposed streets, notwithstanding they had no permit to do so. There should be some way in which the city
could deal with this matter differently, so as to better regulate the extension of the streets. It seems to me that some
arrangements should be made whereby the city could control a situation of this kind, as these improvements which
are going into the streets will ultimately have to be removed.
I believe it is the idea of Council to abandon the opening of Lincoln and Drayton Streets, south of Estill Avenue,
and Whitaker and Jefferson Streets, south of Forty-Second
Street, which will carry out the general scheme in that section of the city of having long blocks.
Elsewhere in this report, will be found a tabulated
statement of land acquired by the city during the past year,
which is shown to be the largest amount of streets acquired
by the city in its history. The city is now negotiating with
the Messrs. Lattimore and the Savannah Developing Company. These transactions will be shown in our next year's
report.
Inspection of Asphalt Block
By direction of the Streets and Lanes Committee of
Council, the Director of Public Works and the City Engineer visited New York and other cities for the purpose of
inspecting the pavements of these cities, in order to
determine the relative merits of the asphalt block of the
Hastings and the Barber Asphalt Companies. These companies were rival bidders for the contract to furnish paving
block for this city, and it was considered by the committee
advisable to obtain a thorough knowledge of the material
204________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
entering into the composition of these blocks, the methods
of their manufacture, and their durability, as evidenced by
their condition after subjection to heavy traffic. The Director of Public Works and myself accordingly made a close
examination of the paved streets of New York, where a
large amount of these blocks are used, noting their condition, and how affected by their grades, the weather, and
the heavy traffic of a large city. We visited and inspected
the plants of the two asphalt companies, and were shown by
their officials the materials entering into and the machinery
for making blocks, and had a demonstration of their whole
process of manufacture.
We visited and obtained opinions from the Chief
Engineer of Highways of Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Manhattan, they according us lengthy interviews and all the
information requested of them.
In Washington, we consulted the Inspector of Asphalt
for the District of Columbia, from whom we obtained valuable information, and also the examination of the pavements of this city was especially valuable, as there are here
a greater variety of pavements in use than in any city in the
country.
The inspections of these pavements gave us a knowledge of the various paving materials, their durability, and
suitability as pavements, that would have required experiments here on- our part, covering a number of years, inasmuch as a pavement subjected to the hard conditions of
climate and heavy traffic existing in these cities, will show
its true quality in a comparatively short time as compared
to a similar test here. I will say here in passing that the
present condition of this city's pavements compares most
favorably with those of New York, and Washington, D. C.
Upon our return to the city, a detailed report of our inspections was made, and an opinion given as to the relative
merits of these two varieties of asphalt block under consideration.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 205
In my last yeai^s report, I called your attention to the
necessity of having standard specifications prepared covering the paving materials used in this city. I feel that the
Director of Public Works will agree with me in this suggestion.
We not only have occasion to use these specifications ourselves, but other cities are constantly requesting
our specifications for this kind of work, and we should as a
matter of courtesy and comity comply with their requests.
The importance of having standard specifications prepared and adopted for the various paving materials used is
being taken up by the American Society of Municipal
Improvements; and in the City of Chicago committees of
experts are being formed to investigate the best paving
materials on the market, and I trust that some good results
will follow in determining this important question. From
a financial point of view, it is the most important question
with which any city has to contend.
The question of the best paving materials for the use
of cities has been a difficult problem for municipal
engineers to decide, as nothing but the wear under traffic
affected by grades, climatic conditions, etc., can tell the
result. I trust that this city will join in the above movement,
and lend its hand towards aiding in the matter.
Henry Street Subway
Under the agreement with the Atlantic Coast Line Railway for the construction of a subway at Henry Street during
the year 1910, this department has made a survey and prepared a map showing the present location of Henry Street,
adjacent to the Atlantic Coast Line Railway crossing, and
also has taken levels and made profiles of this street.
As the Railroad Company intends to raise their tracks
five feet at Henry Street, and as the raising of this grade
will necessarily affect Anderson, Duffy, Park Avenue, Wald-
206 MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT
burg, and Bolton Streets, profiles have been prepared, in
conjunction with the Railroad Company, to show the
approaches of these streets, as they will be affected by the
change of grade. These plans have been completed, and
have been sent to the Railroad officials.
If I understand the matter right, after the Railroad
Company has prepared the plans for their abutments, and
designed their girders, at the crossing of Henry Street, this
Department will design the retaining walls, which will be
located east and west of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway
crossing, which forms the subway. No provision, of course,
can be made for the drainage, until these plans are put in
definite shape, but the raising of these grades five feet will
apparently solve the drainage problem in this subway, and
there should be no flood in excessive rains.
Street Improvements
Considerable time was devoted by this Department to
the improvement of various streets paved during the past
year.
I found it necessary to cut down or reduce the grade
on the Cohen and Broughton Street pavements, the grades
of these streets being formerly so steep as to interfere with
vehicles hauling heavy loads up them.
The plan of The Strand improvement, between Lincoln
and Jefferson Streets, designed by this office, is being carried out. and when completed will not only add materially
to the convenience of the public, but to the general appearance of the surroundings.
Septic Tank (Granger Tract)
The question of providing house drainage sewers for
the southeastern section of the city is one with which we will
be confronted in a short while. As you are aware, it will
require some time to determine upon plans and the construe-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 207
tion of the proposed house drainage system for this territory.
In the meantime, the improvements which will be made in
this section during the next two or three years will have no
connections outside of the storm water system, which is now
being installed.
The temporary use of this storm system for house connections will be brought up by the property owners, but I do
not know what action the County Commissioners or Health
Department will take about allowing these sewers to be used
as such, as this outlet is into the DeRenne Canal.
It is possible to build a septic tank at the mouth of this
trunk sewer, or extend this sewer to Casey Canal, and purify the sewage matter by bacteria or chemical process before
its discharge into the canal. This septic tank could, I understand, be built under the ground, out of sight, and would
be free from obnoxious odors, if the fecal matter which collects in this tank is treated chemically. I believe its cost
would be comparatively small.
A septic tank of this kind will probably cost about
$3,000, and could be used to serve a population of about
1,500 people. Of course, in heavy rains, an overflow would
have to be provided for at the mouth of this sewer, and the
tank would be out of commission during that period, but
the mixture of so large a body of water with this sewage
matter would cause no nuisance.
The laterals used for this territory will be constructed
to such grade that it will be possible to connect them to the
trunk sewer, which will be built when the new system is
installed. There are a great many details connected with
this matter which will have to be determined later.
Salaries
I think it my duty to call your attention to the small
salary paid your Assistant Engineer. It is not a just compensation for the work and responsibility required of hiin.
M. R. 0. 8.It
208 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
His salary is less than that of the former Assistant Engineer,
and is less than is paid by bther cities and corporations for
the same services.
I have always endeavored to manage this Department
as economically as possible, and with only such force as is
necessary for the proper execution of the work, but I think
that the city should pay salaries commensurate with the
services and skill required.
This Department has practically the same force it had
ten years ago, and few realize the increased work and
responsibility of this office, due to the growth of the city in
the last decade.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 209
Survey of Lots With Plats for Private Parties
Lot Number Subdivision Ward
31 _______________
1 __ _____________
3, and west half of 4
2 ____________
6, northeast part
30 _______________
198 _______________
77 _______________
219 _______________
21 _______________
S, 6, 7 _____ _________
62 ____________
SO _______________
36 __.___ ______________
49 _______________
10 ____________ __
13 _______________
8. and south half of 7 _____
4, east half _______________
4. and east half of 3
14 ........................
2, east half
69 ___ . _ . _____________
69, east part - _
1
9. west 44 feet __________
5, east half _________
9. east part
IS, north half _______
3. 4, 9, 10. and IS __________
58, and east half of 57 _____
63 _______________
65, and west half of 66 _
6 ____ _ _ _.
20. east three-quarters
K ______ - -
22, west half
10 ____ . ___ .___
First Tything ___
Second Tything -
Second Tything _ .
Second Tything _____
Third Tything ___ _
Section 10 ___________
Section 7 ___ _________
Seller ___ _ _________
Digby Tything ______
Sub. 31. 32, 33 _______
Atlantic
Anson
Bacon
Ballantyne
Ballantyne
Ballantyne
Barry
Battery
Battery
Battery
Battery
Brownsville
Carpenters Row
Charlton
Choctaw
Colding
Columbia
Columbia
Columbia
Crawford
Crawford
Cuthbert
Cuthbert
Cuthbert
Cuthbert
Cuthbert
Cuthbert
Dale
Dasher
Dasher
Decker
Duncan
Duncan
Elliott
Elliott
210 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Surveys of Lots With Plats for Private Parties
Lot Number Ward
3 _______________ Hull's Sub. 8 ____ Elliott
A, and west part B ___ Sub. 21. 22, 23, 24 __ Estill
89 __._._____.___j_____________ Estill
32, west half, and 33 south j
half ___________j______________ Falligant
20 _-| Garden lots, south
! 2 and 3 _______ Falligant
Part Garden lot 2, south. ______ Falligant
20, west half _________ _______________ Flannery
43 ; ___-___,__ Flannery
29 i____ Flannery
46 > ____ Flannery
15, east quarter, and 16, , west half I ____ Flannery
4, west half ..__ Flannery
28 ___-' __-_____ Flannery
A _ ____ Forsyth
25 _.___._____-._-___ Gallic
33. north part _____-__- __ Garden
42 _______________ Willdnson's ______ Garfunkle
20, south one-third, and
21, north one-third ____ Gaston
24, east part _________ -_ Gilmerville
27, northwest part _____ I Gilmerville
7 _______________ Block 17 _______' Glatigny
8 _______________ Block 21 _______ | Glatigny
1 and 2 __1_________ Teynac 7 ____ i Harden
251 and 257 ___________ ! Harmon
7 _______________ ______________ Harmon
8 ________________ -_____- Harmon
B (tract) ___________ -- Haywood
32, 33, 34, 35 ________'. ...._ Haywood
7, west half _________ Belitha Tything __i Heathcote
130 ____________ _________;_____ I Hull
7, east half j Jackson
64 and 65, parts __ J Johnston
246 and 252 ____________ I j Johnston
91 _______________ j ; Johnston
A, B, 20, partsi I Jones .__
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 211
Surveys of Lots With Plats for Private Parties
Lot Number
20. part - _________
29 and 30 __________________
W and X __________
281 __________ ______
102 and 103 _ ____ ___
43 and 44 ___ ___________
9 and 10 _____ ________
10, west part _________
4 ._
J ________
A __________
9 ___ .. _________________
"Tract" _________________
28 - _______________________
46. east half, part 47, west
half 48 __________________
43, west part ______________
51, west three-quarters
10 ____ _ ______ _____
4, and south half of 3
44, east half, and 43, west
half __________ I _._
53. west half _____________
30, east half, and 31, west
half ____ ______
11 _________ ____
90 and 91 ____________
11
v>
35, west part ________
38 _____________________
AH
41 and 43 ____
15 _.__-
A* ._j 44
67
36 -
Subdivision

Sub. 19 ___________
Sub. 19 ____________
Sub. 20 ______________
Section 1 ____________
Ehrlich Sub. _______
Sub. 14 ________
King's __
King's -
King's _
Ward
Kelly
Kelly
Kelly
Kelly
Kelly
Law
Law
Law
Lee
Lee
Lester
Lester
Lester
Lester
Lester
Lloyd
Lovell
Lovell
Lovell
Lovell
Meldrim
Meldrim
Meldrim
Mercer
Mercer
Middle Oglethorpe
Minis
Minis
McKenna
North Oglethorpe
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
212 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Surveys of Lots With Plats for Private Parties
Lot Number Subdivision
43 _____________ ___ King's __ _________
1 and 2 _____ ___ King's ______________
46 _______________ King's ____ _ _ ___
36. 37, and cast half of 35 _ - ___ ______
37, west half __ ___ - _____ ___
30, west part of east part _________________
17. sonth half __
351 _______________ Villa Heights ________
16 ________
34, east two-thirds and
west half of east half of
west half 35 _______ - _______ __
7, 8, 9, 13, 14, parts - _ . - _ - _______
21, and west part 22 _ _ ____________
22, east part, and 23, west
part I __________________
8. and east half of 7 - ... __ Fourth Tything ______
9, west part Fourth Tything _ ~
4. east half ___ - _______ Third Tything _______
1 _______________ , _____ .. _ ________
27 _ _____________ Millen Lots, 7 _______
110 ___ ___________ Millen Lots, 11. _____
2 ._ _____________ Millen Lots, 7 _______
2 _______________ Sob. of 55 and 56 __ _
4, sonth half of east half __ _ __ _____
20 _
44 _______________ ______ _ ____________
38
39, 40, 41, 42 ________ ______________
67 and 68 ___________ ______________
46 _ ___ __ ________
47 ___________ ; __________
30, northwest part _____ _____________
23, west half __ _ ______ ________
22, east half _________ _____________________
45 ___ _ ___ __ _ Section 7 ____________
15 _____________ I Sub. 18 _____________
34 _______________ . ____________
77, west part of east part ___ ________
Ward
Norwood
Padelford
Pulaski
T>lttn el-*
Pulaski
Purse
Reppard
Reppard
Reynolds
Reynolds
Reynolds
Schley
Schwarz
Schwarz
Screven
Solomons
Solomons
Solomons
Solomons
Solomons
South Oglethorpe
South Oglethorpe
Southville
Springfield
Stiles
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 213
Surveys of Lots With Plats for Private Parties
Lot Number Subdivision
71, east part, and 72, west
part _ __ _
31 and 38 ________ _'.
5, east half, and 6, east half
14, east half, and IS, east
half ____________
^
58 and 60 ______ ___
174 . _____ .... ______
120 ___ _____ ...
209 ___________ _ _____
194 and 19S ___________
74 _______________
103 and 105 __________
1 1 19 19
1 and 3 ___ ___ _
57
38, east part _____ ______
75 and 76 ___________
9 __ ___ _ ..
7 _______________
55, 56. and strip 57 ___ ______
8, and east half of 7 _______
37, north half, and east
half of south half _
Sub. 37 to 40 ________
Block 7 _____________
Block 20. 21. 22, 23 .
Block 5 ________
/
( _
.
Stiles
Stiles
Stiles
Stiles
Swoll
Telfair
Telfair
Telfair
Telfair
Telfair
Telfair
Teynac
Teynac
Teynac
Teynac
Thomas
Thomas
Thomas
Thomas
Thomas
Thomas
Troup
Ward
Gas Works, northwest
front ___________________
9, northwest part ________
16, southwest part ________
20, east half ______________
12 _______________________
11. north part of west half _
26 _______________________
33 and 34 ___
71 and 75 ___
101 ___
81 -_--
82, 83, 84 :
3 ________
Sub. 3
Trustees
Trustees
Trustees
Trustees
Trustees
Trustees
Wadley
Wadley
Weed
Weed
Weed
Weed
Weed
Garden
Garden
Garden
Garden
Garden
Garden
214 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Surveys of Lots with Plats for Private Parties
Lot Number Subdivision Ward
31 _______________' ____________ Wesley
37 ....________ __..____ : Wesley
10, 11. 12. 13, 14, IS _____ West of Bull Street __ I Wharf Lots
3 _____ I East of Lincoln Street Wharf Lots
1. northeast part ______ Yamacraw ______ : Wharf Lots
54, north half _________ i ______________ White
19, east part ......
18, and west part 19 .
6 and 8 __... Sub. 30 to 34
White
White
Wylly
Miscellaneous Measurements and Surveys
Survey of Thirty-sixth Street, between Atlantic Coast
Line Railway right-of-way and Waters Avenue, to show
land needed to open same.
Locating markers for lots in the Hebrew portion of
Bonaventure Cemetery.
Surveys for re-location of lines for Fortieth Street, from
Habersham Street to Waters Avenue..
Measurement of cement sidewalks at the new fire engine
house, corner of Paulsen and Gwinnett Streets.
Survey showing encroachments on the south- side of
Cohen Street, between Wilson and Guerard Streets.
Survey of Lot No. 7, "Old Water Works Tract."
Survey of Lots 578 to 585, Hebrew section, Bonaventure
Cemetery.
Surveys for the improvement of The Strand, between
Abercorn and Lincoln Streets, and west of Drayton Street.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 215
Measurements for cement sidewalks through all squares
in city.
Measurements of asphalt cuts made by Savannah Electric Company, Plumbers, Gas Company, Water Works
Department, etc.
Survey of part of the Minis Tract in Demere Ward,
acquired by the city for the opening of Thirty-ninth Street.
Measuring width of roadways on Randolph Street,
between President and Liberty Streets and Broughton
Street and Oglethorpe Avenue, east of East Broad Street.
Survey locating line'between American Can Company
and Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company, "Old Water
Works Tract."
Measurement of cement walks in Thomas Park.
Measurement of brick walk on the east side of Thomas
Park.
Measurement of repairs to cement sidewalk in front of
109 Congress Street, West.
Miscellaneous surveys for work to be done by the city
in the Granger Tract.
Measurement of Guards' Armory, showing first, second,
and third floor plans.
Measurement of floor area in basement of City Market.'
Measurement on Railroad Street, west of West Broad
Street, to locate place for tablet, "Spring Hill Redoubt."
Survey of Lots 606, 607, 608, 609, 610, 611, Section K,
Bonaventure Cemetery.
Measurement of cement sidewalks laid in The Strand,
and Parks on north side of Bay Street, between Lincoln and
Jefferson Streets.
216________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Survey of the northern line, Theater Lot, on Hull
Street.
Measurement of cement sidewalk on south side of Oglethorpe Avenue, from Habersham Street to AberconuStreet.
Measurement of cement sidewalk in Strand, on north
side of Bay Street, between Lincoln and Houston Streets.
Survey of Lot No. 345, Section A, Bonaventure Cemetery.
Survey for subway at Henry Street crossing of Atlantic
Coast Line Railway.
Survey of bluff at Bonaventure Cemetery, and soundings of river in front of same.
Locating Lots 87 and 88 in Weed Ward.
Locating 276 valves on water mains in various parts of
city.
Locating street lines for encroachments on Habersham
Street, between Fortieth Street and Estill Avenue.
Locating street lines for encroachments on Drayton
Street, from Maupas Avenue to Atlantic Coast Line Railway
crossing.
Locating encroachments along Springfield Canal, south
of Gwinnett Street.
Locating street lines and encroachments on Thirty-first
Street, between Harmon Street and Atlantic Coast Line
Railway.
Locating line of Magnolia Street, adjoining Laurel
Grove Cemetery.
Locating street lines and encroachments on Thirtysecond Street, between Harmon Street and Atlantic Coast
Line Railway.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 217
Locating improvements on Thirty-first, Thirty-second,
Thirty-third, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-sixth Streets,
between Hast Broad Street and Waters Road, for opening
streets. -
Estimates of Streets
Street
Barnard ________
East Broad _____
President _______
Harris __________
Wayne -
Paulsen _________
Cohen __________
Hull _ _________
Perry __________
Charlton ________
Tavlor __________
West Broad
Thirty-seventh __
Harmon ________
Thirty-sixth -
Whitaker ___ -
River _._____-
Bay _ _._ ___ -
Bav _______
Lincoln ________
Lincoln ________
Habersham _____
East Broad _____
Drayton
Waldburg ______
Estill Avenue
West Boundary _
West Boundary -

From
Gaston ________
East Broad
Whitaker ______
Whitaker ______
Whitaker ___
Wilson _ _______
Whitaker _
Whitaker ______
Whitaker ___
Whitaker ______
Whitaker ______
Whitaker ______
Thirty-first -
Bull ___________
Burroughs _____
Park Avenue
Thirty-first _-__
West Broad ___
West Broad
Barnard _______
Jefferson ' _____
Thirty-first _
Thirty-first -
Bull __________
Cohen
Railroad Street.
To
Fortieth ____ _
Randolph ______
Broughton _____
Bull ___________
Bull -_-_____
Bull ___________
State __________
Henry _________
West BoundaryFortieth __ _
Ogeechee Road.
Wheaton _ __
Fortieth __
Fortieth ____
Fahm
West Broad
A. C. L. crossing
A. C. L. crossing
A. C. L. crossing
Estill Avenue __
East Broad ____
Waters Road
Railroad StreetIndian - _
Material
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Asphalt Block
Vitrified Brick
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asohalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Asphalt Block
Granite Block
Granite Block
Granite Block
218 MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT
Estimates Miscellaneous
Estimate acreage in Cann and Garfunkle Wards.
Estimate for walks through Thomas Park.
Estimate cubic yards for grading approaches to center
mall, in Baffin Park.
Estimate area of grading in Hamilton Street.
Estimate number of feet of sewer pipe needed for Hamilton Street.
Estimate cost of laying 24-inch sewer pipe in Hamilton
Street, and filling in ditch; also grading said street.
Estimate cost of installing house drainage in the eastern
and southeastern sections of the city.
Estimate cost of extending 24-inch storm sewer through
Brinson Railway property, from West Boundary Street to
Brow Ditch.
Estimate number of feet of water mains needed for the
Norwood Tract.
Estimate cost of grading Fortieth, Atlantic, Reynolds,
and Paulsen Streets, in the Lattimore Tract.
Estimate cost for cement sidewalks through the squares
of the city.
Estimate number of square yards to complete cement
walks around Forsyth Park and Extension.
Estimate for the improvement of The Strand between
Abercorn and Lincoln Streets, and between Whitaker and
Jefferson Streets.
Estimates for cement sidewalks abutting the north and
west sides of Colonial Park; also on Habersham Street,
from Oglethorpe Avenue to county jail.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _____219
Estimate amount of curbing needed for Cann and Myers
Parks.
Estimate for cement walk on the east side of Thomas
Park. ,
Estimate number of feet of sewer pipe for portion of
Granger Tract; also amount of brick required for brick
sewer.
Estimate amount of curbing needed for the center grass
plat in Estill Avenue, from Bull Street to Waters Avenue.
Estimate amount of curbing needed for the center grass
plat in Forty-seventh Street, from Lincoln Street to Waters
Avenue.
Estimate amount of curbing needed for the center grass
plat in Atlantic Avenue, from Baldwin Park to Forty-sixth
Street.
Estimate amount of curbing needed for the center grass
plat in Chatham Crescent.
Estimate of repairs needed for improvement of City
Market.
Estimate of street and park area, also for water mains,
grading, sewers, and curbing, in the Lawton, Rivers, and
Culver Tracts, south of Estill Avenue, between Bull Street
and the Granger Tract.
Estimate area of streets, lanes, and parks acquired by
the city (other than by purchase), during the past three
years.
Estimate for grading Reppard and Bolton Streets,
through lots 68 and 69, Springfield Ward.
Estimate of street and roadway area in Cann & Bacon
subdivision, Springfield Ward.
220 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Measurements of Streets
Street
> Cuyler __ ____ 1
Ogeecbee Road -
Ogeechee Road J
Ogeechee Road J
Thirty-sixth __ '
Thirty-sixth -
Bay Lane
York Lane _____
Hull ____________
Cohen ..........
Randolph _______
Jones -
Wayne _________
Taylor ________
East Broad _____
Prom
Henry _ ________
Thirty-seventh _
S. S. Culvert _
Jefferson ______
Florence ______
Bull _____ _
Bull ________
West Broad _
Wilson . ______
East Broad ____
Bay _ - _______
Drayton
between Drayton
Bull ___________
between Drayton
Bay ___________
To
Anderson ______
Thirty-seventh _
S. S. Culvert _
Ogeechee RoadFahm _________
West BoundaryEast Broad __
and Whitaker .__
Whitaker ______
and Whitaker
Oglethorpe Ave.
Purpose
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Yardage
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Street Lines Given During the Year
Lot Number
5. and east half of 4_
30 ___________________
11 ___________
198, and east half of 197
129 and 130 ___________
89 and 90 _______
15, northeast and
south parts ___
20 ___________________
16 and 47 ________
63 and 64 ____________
48 and 49 ............
33, 34, 35 ____._
2
14 ___________________
Subdivision
Second Tything __
Ward
Anson
__ ! Bacon
Block- A ________ I Ballantyne
____________ j Ballantyne
Barry
Barry
Section 1 of 84
Bartow
Battery
Battery
Battery
Battery
Battery
Berrien
Berrien
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Street Lines Given During the Year
221
Subdivision Lot Number Ward
111 (strip lot) _ ___-_____ Brownsville
97, south half _ ______________ Brownsville
16 _____________ Choctaw
9.and 10 _ ______________ Choctaw
106 ____ Colding
25, west part_, ________________ Gumming
39 ',___________________ Gumming
5 __.__ Cuthbert
61 ________ Dale
49. west half __ ___________ Dale
60 __.___._- ______________ Dale
35 and 37 __ ______________ Dasher
"Tract" _______ between Price and
East Broad Davis
88 ___________ ____ Estill
36 ___________ Estill
A, and west part B._ Estill
24 and 25 ____ Falligant
26 ____________ _1 Falligant
35 and 36 _______ Falligant
"Tract." part ____ Falligant
31. north half, and
32, south half - --_ Falligant
22, west half _____ _ Flannery
24, west half . - Gallic
37 ____________ ______________ Gallic
22 and 23 _______ ______________ Garden
6. 7, 8 _____ Garden
7. g; 9 _________ ________________ I Glatigny
57 to'61. inclusive __ j Glatigny
"Tract." part ____ Millen'Lot 1 ___ Grayson
134 ___________ ______________ Haywood
73 ___________ Block 3 ________ Hull
21 _______..._ .____________.__ Hull
13 __._____._... Block 3 __._____ Hull
7 ____________ Block 2 ________ Hull
209, 210, 211, 212 - Johnston
255, 256 _________ New subdivision ___ Johnston
246 to 252, inclusive -! Johnston
257 and 258 ____ i Johnston
222 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Street Lines Given During the Year
Lot Number
65 to 76, inclusive ____
1,2,3.4,5,1 ____ ;
31 and 32 ___________
G and H ___________ 16 _____ ______:
45 and 46 _____ __.
8 _________ _
61, west half, and
62, east half ______
11 ___________
62, west half, and 63,
east quarter ____
31, east half _____ __
82, and Sooth half 83.
35 __ . ____ __. .
15 ____________
6
5 __________
16 _____ ._
1 _________
10. east part _________
11 _______ ._ _
82 ________
24 and 26 _________
28, 30, 32, 37, 39, 41 __
32 and 33 ____________
A and 11 ___________
28 ________
30. and part 28 _______
67 and 69 ____________
95 ____________
103 _________ _
139 and 140 ___________
7 and 8 ___ _ _______
351 ____________
33 and 34 _________
2. 3, and east half 4_.
7. east half __
14 ____________
144 and 145
Snbdiviaicm
New subdivision _
Section 17 __ _______

_.___
_____________
::::::::::::::::::::::: i
___________ __... i __________..
j Section 3 ________
1 i
1
1 _ ___
Villa Heights ________
1 Third Tything _
Ward
Johnston
Kelly
Kelly
Kelly
Law
Lee
Lester
Lester
Le?ter
Lester
Lovell
Meldrim
Middle Oglethorpe
Minis
Monterey
New Franklin
North Oglethorpe
North Oglethorpe
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Norwood
Owens
Oliver
Padelford
Purse
i Purse
Reppard
Reynolds
Schley
Schroder
I Schwarz
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 223
Street Lines Given During the Year
Lot Number Subdivision Ward
29 .. MJllen Lot 10 _.__ ; Schwarz
2 : 55 _ Screven
8 and 9 10 . Screven
47 and 48 __ *__ Solomons
40 and 41 __ __ Solomons
J 56 Solomons
48 1 Southviife
61 Southville
X (triangular lot) : Southville
1 and 2 ! Southville
' 45 ! aouthville
66 j Southville
2 ____________ : 11 and 12 Springfield
19 ___________ 11 and 12 ... Springfield
68 and 69 .__ Springfield
69 _ I Springfield
68 and 69 ___, j Springfield
68 and 69 _____ j Springfield
57 (east) ' __ Springfield
19 __________ 18 Springfield
58 and 59 __ I ___... Snringfield
31 _-________ i Stephens
54. 55, 56, 57 _____ -_____ Stephens
65 __________ ..- Telfair
67 ___..___...... .....-__- Telfair
22 and 23 ____,_ ...__ I Telfair
92 ___________! -_____ Telfair
9 to 20, inclusive __ New Subdivision ______ Telfair
170 and 171 ____.... -- Telfair
3 and 4 ________ I Telfair
117 and 118 _______ -- Telfair
211. and west part 209.' - Telfair
2 and 3 _______ : Block 12 ________ Teynac
5 _____________ Teynac
59 ____________ Teynac
11___________| Block 10 ___-___ Teynac
98 ___________ I Block 7 _. Teynac
7 and 8 _- ! - Teynac
9 ____________ \ ______________ Thomas
8 ___________1__________ Thomas
M. R. C. 8.15
224 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Street Lines Given During the Year
Lot Number Subdivision ! Ward
36 Troup
9 ___ '-| Trustees Garden
22, northwest quarter- f i Trustees Garden
11, northwest part _ i Trustees Garden
9 and 10 ______ Section 4 j Wadley
5. and west half 6 __ ! Wadley
6 ._...____.... Block 2
31
Wadley
Wadley
68 _____________ __,.________ i Waring
K ___________ Section 10 _______ i Waring
71. 72, 73, 74 ________~______ Weed
106 and 107 _______ ______________ Weed
13, south half _____ _________ Weed
9 ____________ ___.___________ Weed
87 and 88 _______ _____I Weed
80 and 81 _______ _____ Weed
3 _-_-____ West of Bull Street .. Wharf Lots
17 and 18 _______ _-__ Wright
6 _____________ ________________ Wylly
Maps and Plats of Lots
Lot Section , Ward I Purpose
75. part Owens - Opening Streets
10, 11. 12, 13. West of Bull
14, 15 Street _ Wharf Lots __ Division Line
146 _- Millen Lot 10 Schwarz ____; Opening Streets
13, 14. 15. and North Ogle- Copy for
oart 12 ____________ thorpe ____ Aldermen
7, 8. 9, 13. 14,
parts Reppard .
47. M. two-thirds Lester _____' Division
Part 47, and
West half 48- Lester _____ Division
Part 47. and
East half 46- Lester _ Division
9 and 10, part*. Section C. (lot
5) ______ Demere ____ Opening Streets
8 _________ Kings ______ Norwood ; Opening Streets
MAJOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 225
Maps and Plats of Streets
Street From
, , ,,, ,. . j
Fortieth _-_.
Cast Broad
Habersham
Rav
Barnard - - - 1 f*a ^t^n
Hull - ___
West Broad
Bull ___________
Thirty-first
To
Oglethorpe Avc.
Forty-second -
Drayton
Fortieth _______
Purpose
Opening
Paving
Paving
Paving
Paving
Tracing of Lots
Noj Lot
1 10. 11, 12,
13, 14, 15
2 75 _ _____
1 37 - __
1 24
1 41 to 61 __
2 9 and 10,
parts __ _
i
Section
West of Bull
Street | ir:.v/:.-_:~~:!
Section C (lot 5)
Ward
Wharf Lots __
Law
Norwood
Stiles - _________
Demere ________
PnrpoM
Opening Streets
Maps and Plats Miscellaneous
Map of the City of Savannah, showing area where storm
sewers are needed.
Plan of southeastern section of the City of Savannah,
showing streets as laid out by City Ordinance.
Plan showing encroachments on south side of Cohen
Street, between Wilson and Guerard Streets.
Plan of Thomas Park, showing proposed location of
fountain.
Plan of Granger Tract.
226________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
Two plans showing strip of land in Lawton and Watson
Wards, purchased by the City of Savannah from the Estate
of A. R. Lawton for the widening of Estill Avenue.
Plan showing part of the Minis Tract, in Demere Ward,
acquired by the City of Savannah for the opening of Thirtyninth Street.
Plan showing the proposed location of Paulsen Street,
between Park Avenue and Duffy Streets. \
Plan showing arrangement of graves in Lots 17, 18, 31,
and 32, Section A, Bonaventure Cemetery, for Solomons
Lodge, No. 1, F. & A. M.
Three plans of Guards' Armory, showing first, second,
and third-story floor plans.
Two plans showing portion of lot 28, King's subdivision,
Norwood Ward, purchased by the City of Savannah for the
opening of Barnard Street.
Map of Granger Tract, showing location and size of
storm sewers, also location of catch-basins.
Plan for constructing new wharf and repairing old
wharf on front lots 7 and 8, Wharf Lots, west of Bull Street.
Map locating information regarding Pig Island and
Deptford Plantation, for Chamber of Commerce.
Two maps showing location of grade crossings over
Atlantic Coast Line Railway, between Gwinnett Street and
Estill Avenue.
Two plans (copy) of Granger Tract, showing streets,
lanes, and parks acquired by the City of Savannah, and
adopted by Council, October 6, 1909.
Plan of part of Estill Avenue, between Abercorn and
Lincoln Streets, showing paved roadways and excavation for
sidewalks, as now exist.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 227
Plan showing encroachments in Maupas Avenue Lane,
west of Abercorn Street.
Two plans for bulkhead and retaining wall for protecting bluff at Bonaventure Cemetery.
Map of city, showing location of "Near-Beer" saloons.
Thirteen plats, showing strips of land owned by city.
Plan of Henry Street Subway at Atlantic Coast Line
Railway crossing. ,
Plan showing elevations and improvements on Henry
Street, at Atlantic Coast Line Railway crossing, prior to
construction of subway.
Plan of Bonaventure bluff, showing soundings of river
in front of same.
Grades and Lines
Street
Paulsen ___ _
Waldburg Lane-.
Tattnall, W. S. -
Montgomery
Howard, W. S. -
York Lane __ -
Ogeechee Road
Wheaton
Charlton
Taylor _
Macon
Hull ___ __
Broughton
]f!POBI
Gwinnett
Harmon
Jefferson
From Gwinnett
Oglethorpe Ave.
Bull _-. _ . __
Bull ___________
Thirty-seventh _
Between Drayto
Harmon T
Between Drayto
Wilson _______
Between Drayto
West Broad __
East Broad ____
To
Bolton _________
Paulsen __
Tattnall ____
Street, 100 feet _
Hull ___________
Drayton
Bolton _________
-Drayton _______
'City limits _____
n and Whitaker--
Bilbo Canal .__
n and Whitaker
West Boundary -
Fahm _________
Randoloh
Purpose
Engine house
Sewer
Curbing
Curbing
Drainage
Paving
Curbing
Paving
Curb and paving
Curbing
Sewer
Curbing
Curb and paving
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
228 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Grades and Lines
Street
West Boundary .
Randoloh _
Reppard __ J
Bolton ____
East Broad __
President
Hull, N. S. __
Hull _ _ _
Perry ___ .._
Harris, N. S. __
Wayne _____
Henry Lane -'.
Broughton
Thirty-seventh
Whitaker, E. S.
West Broad __
Thirty-seventh _.
Barnard ... ._.*-
Forty-first
Estill Avenue
Fort---fourth
Forty-fifth
Forty-sixth
Forty-seventh
Habersham
Chatham Crescent
Battey
East Broad
Reynolds
Atlantic Avenue.
Harmon
Ott
Price _ _ _
Baldwin Park
Gnckenheimer P^rk
Thens Park
From
Intersection of C
President ______
Bay
Bull - __
Ball ___ - _
Bull
Between Drayto
Bull _
Bull - _
Atlantic Coast
Line RailwayReynolds
Bullock .-
Forty-first
Thirty-sixth
West Broad
Gaston
Price __
Price
Bull
West of Habersham
West of Habersham
West of Habersham
West of HabEsrill Avenue
(East and Wes
Estill Avenue __
Manpas Avenue.
Manpas Avenue.
Manpas Avenue.
Maupas Avenue.
Maupas Avenue.
To
ohen Street
Bay
Reppard
Qglethorpe Ave.
Whitaker __
Whitaker -
n and Whitaker
Whitaker
Whitaker ..
Atlantic _ _
Randolph
Forty-second
Thirty-seventh _
Burroughs
Bolton
Waters AvenueWaters AvenueWaters AvenueWaters AvenueWaters AvenueWaters AvenueWaters AvenueForty-seventh
t) _ -
Forty-seventh
Estill Avenue
Chatham
Crescent
Tiedeman ParkChatham
Crescent
Forty-seventh _
Estill Avenue
Estill Avenue
Purpose
Grading
Curbing
Curbing
Curbing
Sewer
Retaining Wall
Carbine
Curbing
Sewer
Sewer
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Openinsr
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
Opening
^.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 229
Grades and Lines for Sidewalks
On both sides of Fortieth Street, between Habersham
Street and Waters Road.
On Thirty-sixth Street, between Lincoln and Habersham, Lot No. 205, Dasher Ward.
On Abercorn Street, between Taylor and Wayne
Streets, Lot No. 22, Calhoun Ward.
On Ogeechee Road, between Sarah and Battery Streets,
north half of Lot No. 85, Battery Ward.
"Norwood Tract," south of Forty-second Street,
between West Broad and Florence Streets, in Myers Ward.
On Oglethorpe Avenue, between Drayton and Abercorn
Streets, part of east half of Lot No. 7, Third Tything, Anson
Ward.

On southeast corner Live Oak and Duffy Streets, Lots
148 and 149, Ballantyne Ward.
On West Broad Street, between Hull Street and Perry
Lane (for Central of Georgia Railway).
On Lincoln Street, between Liberty and Harris Streets,
Lots 29 and 30, Lafayette Ward.
i
On York and Drayton Streets (Marine Hospital), Lots
4 and 5, third Tything, Anson Ward.
\
In front of No. 511 Huntingdon Street, West, Lot No.
4, Minis Ward.
On Bolton Street, between Harmon and Paulsen
Streets, Lots 29 and 30, Kelly Ward.
On Bolton Street, between Harmon and Ott Streets,
Lots W and X, Kelly Ward.
230_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
On Thirty-ninth Street, between Price and East Broad
(south side), in Teynac Ward.
On Bay Street, between Montgomery and West Broad
Streets, Lots 5 and 6, Franklin Ward.
On Cuyler Street, between Henry Street and Duffy
Lane, Lot No. 16, Marshall Ward.
On Fortieth, Habersham, Price, and East Broad Streets,
Atlantic Avenue, and Reynolds Streets, in Teynac Farm
Lots No. 5.
On southwest corner West Broad and Broughton
Streets, Lot No. G, Middle Oglethorpe.
On Forty-first Street, between. Barnard and Jefferson
Streets, Lot I of the subdivision of 55, Lovell Ward.
* On southeast corner Liberty and Whitaker.Streets, Lot
No. 1, Jasper Ward.
On Thirty-third Street (south side), between Florence
and Burroughs Streets, in front of house 634, in Law Ward.
On northeast corner Congress and Lumber Streets, Lot
No. 35, Middle Oglethorpe Ward.
On Taylor Street (north side), between Drayton and
Abercorn Streets.
On West Broad, Harris, and Stone Streets (Central
Hotel).
On Congress Street (south side), between Drayton and
Abercorn Streets (Bijou Theater).
On Forty-first Street, between West Broad and Burroughs Streets, Lots 38 to 42, Dale Ward.
On Forty-first Street, between Burroughs and Florence
Streets. Lots 51 to 60, Stiles Ward.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________231
On Taylor Street, between Price and Habersham
Streets, Lot No. 10, Wesley Ward.
At southeast corner Paulsen and Gwinnett Streets
, (Engine House).
On north side Bay Street "Strand," between Lincoln
and East Broad Streets.
On north side Bay Street "Strand," between Whitaker
and Barnard Streets.
On north side Bay Street "Strand," between Barnard
and Jefferson Streets.
On Oglethorpe Avenue (south side), from Habersham
to Abercorn Street.
In Congress Street Lane, between Drayton and Abercorn Streets.
On Estill Avenue"Granger Tract."
On Atlantic Avenue"Granger Tract."
On Chatham Crescent"Granger Tract."
On Forty-seventh Street"Granger Tract."
Grades and Lines Miscellaneous
Grades and lines for tree planting in "Center Mall,"
Daffin Park.
Grade and lines to change grade of paving in front of
H. Traub & Sons' store, on West Broad Street.
Grades and lines for sewer, at Ogeechee Road and
Thirty-sixth Street Lane.
Grades for streets, between Forty-third, Forty-fourth,
Forty-fifth, West Broad, and Florence Streets, Norwood
Tract.
232 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Grades and lines for curb on the north side of Hull
Street, at the intersection of Fahm Street.
Grades at Gordon and Habersham Streets, for drainage.
Grades to repair paving at the intersection of Gaston
and Drayton Streets.
Grades for roadway in Fortieth, Atlantic, Reynolds, and
Paulsen Streets, Teynac Farm Lots No. 5.
Grades for sewer in Henry Lane, west from Atlantic
Avenue.
Grades for sewer in Wolf Street, east from Ott Street.
Street lines on south side of Estill Avenue, between
Drayton and Abercorn Streets, to move buildings.
Grades to change catch-basin on Taylor Street, between
Abercorn and Lincoln Streets.
Lines and grades for cement walks in Thomas Park.
Grades established for grading Waldburg Street, Park
Avenue, Duffy and Henry Streets, in the subdivision of lots
99, 100, and 101, Springfield Ward, known as Cann & Bacon
subdivision.
Grades and lines for catch-basins in Granger Tract.
Grades for roadway and sewer in Hamilton Street, east
of Atlantic Coast Line Railway.
Grades for curbing at northeast corner of Montgomery
and State Streets.
Grades and lines for sewer in Park Avenue Lane, east of
Paulsen Street.
Grades and lines for street railway tracks, on Randolph
Street, between Liberty and President Streets.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 233
Grades and lines for the improvement of The Strand,
between Whitaker and Jefferson Streets.
Grades and lines for the improvement of The Strand,
between Abercorn and Lincoln Streets.
Establishing street lines through the Bolton Street ball
park.
Grades and lines for curbing at southwest corner Bay
and Montgomery Streets.
k*.~. Grades and lines for curbing center grass plats in Estill
Avenue, Chatham Crescent, Atlantic Avenue, and Fortyseventh Street, Granger Tract.
Grades and lines for curbing center grass plats in West
Broad Street, from Thirty-first to Fortieth Streets.
Grades for tracks of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway
and Central of Georgia Railway, at intersection of Randolph
and St. Julian Streets, prior to paving Randolph Street.
Grades and lines for street car tracks at Jones and Abercorn and Jones and Habersham Streets.
Grades and lines' for street car tracks on East Broad
Street, between Bay Street and Oglethorpe Avenue.
Grades and lines for roadways in Bonaventure Cemetery.
Grades and lines for curbing, in Strand, just west of
Drayton Street.
Grades and lines for curbing northwest corner Fortyfifth and West Broad Streets.
Grades and lines for curbing, on the west side of Abercorn Street, between Oglethorpe Avenue and York Street
Lane.
234 MAYOR'S ANNUM. REPORT
Grades and lines for foundation of water tower, Bonaventure.
Lines for fire plugs on Florence Street, from Fortysecond to Forty-fifth Streets.
Levels of Streets
Street i
Cohcn !
Randolph __.-__J
Reppard 1
Bolton _ ___.__!
From
Wilson _____
President
West BoundaryTo
West Boundary.
Bay .._...-_
Sycamore
Purpose
O*_A_
Paving
Grading
Grading
Profiles and Cross-Section Streets
Street
Cohen
Broughton
Reppard
Bolton
Randolph
From
Wilson _______
East Broad _ -
Gwinnett _____
West Boundary
President
To
West Boundary
Sycamore
Reppard _______
Bav _____ _
PnrpoM
Sewer
Paving
Grading
Pavinor
Cross section of Estill Avenue, to show proposed roadways, sidewalks, and trees.
, Profile of the approaches to Center Mall, Baffin Park.
Copy of profile to Center Mall.
Profiles of all streets in Granger Tract, to establish
roadways, sidewalks, and sewers.
Profiles for subway at Henry Street crossing of Atlantic
Coast Line Railway.

Profiles to establish grades of proposed storm sewers,
in Granger Tract.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 235
Levels Miscellaneous
Levels around engine house lot, at Gwinnett and Paulsen Streets, for retaining wall.
Levels for floor in engine house No. 7, corner of Paulsen
and Gwinnett Streets.
Levels for house drainage sewer, in lane opposite'
Thirty-seventh Street, west of Ogeechee Road.
Levels of the approaches to Center Mall, Daffin Park.
Levels for sewer in Cohen Street.
Levels at Gordon and Habersham Streets, for drainage.
Levels for Water Works Department, in front of City
Hall, and in Hall to basement floor.
Levels of all streets in the Granger Tract, to establish
grades for roadways, sidewalks, and sewers.
Levels taken along the DeRenne Canal, from Waters
Road to Casey Canal, to establish grades for the Fiftieth
Street outlet trunk sewer.
Levels for subway at Henry Street crossing of
Atlantic Coast Line Railway.
Tracings Miscellaneous
Tracing of plan of Thomas Park, showing proposed
location of fountain and walks.
Tracing of plan showing encroachment on the south side
of Cohen Street, between Wilson and Guerard Streets.
Tracing of plan of Granger Tract.
Tracing of plan showing part of the Minis Tract, in
Demere Ward, acquired by the city for the opening of
Thirty-ninth Street.
236 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
. Two tracings of part of lot No. 28, Kings subdivision,
Norwood Ward, for the opening of Barnard Street.
Tracing of plan of Blocks 5 and 6 in the Seller subdivision of Teynac Farm Lots No. 2.
Tracing of plan of part of Estill Avenue, between Abercorn and Lincoln Streets, showing paved roadway and
excavation for sidewalks as now exist.
Tracing of Bonaventure bluff, showing soundings of
river in front of same.
Tracing of plan of Henry Street Subway, at Atlantic
Coast Line Railway crossing.
Encroachments
Encroachments and obstructions in streets have been
reported at the following places:
Encroachment of fence at northeast corner of Fortyfirst and Habersham Streets, Lot 79, Southville Ward.
Encroachment of fence on the east right-of-way of the
Springfield Canal, south of Gwinnett Street.
Encroachments on the south side of Cohen Street,
between Wilson and Guerard Streets.
Encroachment of fence and gate across Sycamore Street,
at the corner of Spring Street.
Encroachment at northeast corner Barnard and Thirtythird Streets, Lot No. 20, Falligant Ward.
Encroachment on Forty-first Street, between Paulsen
and Harmon Streets.
Encroachment on Maupas Avenue Lane, west of Abercorn Street.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 237
Encroachments or obstructions in parts of Thirtysecond, Thirty-third, Thirty-sixth, and Harmon Streets,
located in Millen Farm Lots 3 and 4, Grayson and Harmon
Wards.
Encroachment on Gwinnett Street, West, building on
Lot 59, Springfield Ward.
Encroachment of fence at southeast corner of Randolph
and Bay Streets.
Encroachment of fence in Chapman Street, on Lot 34,
Springfield Ward.
Opening Streets
' During the past year, the city acquired for opening
streets the following property:
Granger Tract
Square Square
feet feet
Maupas Avenue ___________ 182,000
Forty-second Street __________ 25,000
Forty-first Street ____________ 115,088
Estill Avenue ______________ 204,200
Forty-fourth Street ___________ 245,214
Forty-fifth Street ______1_____ 209,376
Forty-sixth Street _____________ 245,550
Forty-seventh Street __________ 412,000
Forty-eighth Street __________ 196,800
Forty-ninth Street ___________ 245,700
Fiftieth Street ______________ 211,200
Fifty-first Street ____________ 156,940
Habersham Street ___________ 116,520
Price Street ....______________ 30,000
Chatham Crescent ___________ 240,000
Battey Street ______________ 64,750
I
238 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
East Broad Street ________________ 30,000
Reynolds Street _____________ 114,000
Atlantic Avenue ____________ 285,000
Paulsen Street _____________ 116,250
Harmon Street ______________._ 87,750
Ott Street _______________ 19,500
Streets around parks __________ 146,791
Lanes ___________________ 456,623
Tiedeman Park _____________ 119790
Baldwin Park ______________ 42,273
Guckenheimer Park __________ 42,273
Theus Park ________________ 42,273
McCauley Park _____________ 42,273
Solomons Park ______________ 42,273
4,487,407
Previously acquired:
Streets _________________1,397,666
Lanes __________________ 236,096
Parks __________________ 293,211
1,926,973
Acquired during the year 1909 ____ 2,560,434
Cann ft Bacon Subdivision, Springfield
Square Square
feet feet
Waldburg Street ____________ 30,269
Park Avenue __________ 33,453
Duffy Street _______________ 33,481
Henry Street ______________ 35,099
Lanes __________________ 27,>53
' 159,755
I
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 239
Lattimore & Lattimore Subdivision, Through Teynac
Farm Lots No. 5, Tcjmac, Garrard, and
Harden Wards
Square Square
feet feet
Fortieth Street _____________ 97,590
Reynolds Street _____________ 7,240
Atlantic Avenue _____________ 9,000
Paulsen Street _____________ 8,950
122,780
Estate A. R. Lawton, Lawton and Watson Wards
Square Square
feet feet
Estill Avenue _____________ 59,585
59,585
Shreck Subdivision, Springfield
Square Square
feet feet
Butler Street _______________ 18,537
Chapman Street ____________ 19,174
Nelson Street _____________ 19,392
Hall Street _______________ 1,500
58,603
Bell & Simkins Subdivision, Springfield
Square Square
feet feet
Reppard Street _____________ 18,000
Bolton Street _____________ 15,840
33.840
M. R. C. 8.IB
240 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Falligant & Travis, Trustees, Gartland Ward
Square Square
feet feet
Thirty-sixth Street ___________ 12,648
Hamilton Street _____________ 6,300
18,948
A. S. Nichols, Part of Lots 9 and 10, of Lot 5, Section
C, Demere Ward
Square Square
feet feet
Fortieth Street ______ 3,048
3,048
J. T. Chapman, Lot No. 26, Norwood Ward
Square Square
, feet feet
Barnard Street ______________ 3,600
3,600
Julius D. Hirsch, Part of Lot 75, Owens Ward
Square Square
feet feet
Burroughs Street _______ 685
685
Minis Tract, Demere Ward
Square Square
feet feet
Thirty-ninth Street ___________ 263
263
C. H. Schroder, West Part Lot 28, Norwood Ward
Square Square
feet feet
Barnard Street __________ 180
180
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 241
Estate of Walsh, Lot 16, Choctaw Ward
. Square Square
feet feet
Cohen Street _______________ 178
178
Grand Total ____________ 3,021,899
Sale of Lots
The city sold Lot No. 7, "Old Water Works Tract," at
the northeast corner of Stiles Avenue and McKenna Streets.
The city sold strip of Lot No. 69, Solomons Ward, on
the south side of Thirty-ninth Street, between Whitaker
Street and DeSoto Avenue.
Blue Prints
No. of
Prints
4Plan showing location of water mains, valves, fire
hydrants, on map of city.
162Small prints showing location of valves on water
mains, for Water Department.
1Plan of Wharf Lots 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, west of Bull
Street. '
1Plan showing Lot No. 7, "Old Water Works Tract."
1Topographical map of Daffin Park.
7Plan of a portion of Beaufort County, S. C.
3Plan showing proposed "Ferry Road Bridge Connection," between the City of Savannah and Beaufort
County, S. C.
2Plan of the southeast portion of the City of Savannah,
showing streets opened by the city.
242 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
2Plan of Thomas Park, showing proposed location of
fountain.

3Plan showing encroachments on the south side of
Cohen Street, between Wilson and Guerard Streets.
4Large map of city.
4Planjof Bonaventure Cemetery.
2Plan showing streets as laid out by the city in the
Lawton Tract, Lawton and Watson Wards.
1Plan showing strip of land in Lawton and Watson
Wards, purchased by the City of Savannah from
the estate of A. R. Lawton, for the widening of
Estill Avenue.
19Plan of Granger Tract
1Plan of Thomas Park.
1Plan showing part of the Minis Tract, in Demere
Ward, acquired by the City of Savannah for the
opening of Thirty-ninth Street.
1Plan showing the proposed location of Paulsen Street,
between Park Avenue and Duffy Street.
1Plan of City Market.
1Plan showing subdivision of Lots 6 and 8, "Old Water
Works Tract."
4Plan showing arrangement of graves in Lots 17, 18,
31, and 32, Section A, Bonaventure Cemetery, for
Solomons Lodge, No. 1, F. & A. M.
35Plan of Guards' Armory, showing first, second, and
third floor plans.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ________Z43
1Plan showing portion of Lot No. 28, Kings subdivision,
Norwood Ward, purchased by the City of Savannah
for the opening of Barnard Street.
2Plan of portion of the city known as Cuthbert Ward.
2Plan of wharf construction, adopted by Council.
2Plan showing approximate location of piles, etc., for
proposed wharf on Savannah River, east of Whitaker Street.
1Plan showing parts of Lots 9 and 10, of Lot 5, Section
C, Demere Ward, for the opening of Fortieth Street.
2Plan of Hull Street, between Bull and Drayton Streets.
2Copies of plan of the Granger Tract, showing streets,
lanes, and parks acquired by the city, and adopted
by Council October 6, 1909.
2Plan of Lawton Tract, in Lawton and Watson Wards,
showing land needed by the city to open streets.
1Plan of part of Estill Avenue, between Abercorn and
Lincoln Streets, showing paved roadways and excavation for sidewalks as now exist. .
1Plan showing division line established between Fig
and Hutchinson Islands.
1Plan of Lot No. 8, Norwood Ward, showing part
needed by the city for the opening of Forty-fourth
Street.
3Plan showing lands belonging to Lamar Estate, east of
city.
1Sketch of a part of the eastern section of the city,
showing proposed location of ball park.
6-Showing elevations and improvements of Henry Street,
at railway crossing, prior to construction of subway.
244________MAYORS ANNUAL REPORT__________
Miscellaneous
Investigation and report as to the merits of asphalt
block manufactured by the Barber Asphalt Company and
Hastings Paving Company.
Inspection of City Market building for proposed
improvements.
Inspection of street crossings over Atlantic Coast Line
Railway tracks, between Gwinnett Street and Estill Avenue.
Location of Y branches, reducers, manholes, etc.,
Granger Tract.
Specifications for constructing new wharf and repairing
old wharf on Front Lots 7 and 8, Wharf Lots, West of Bull
Street
Investigation as to encroachment on north side of
Thirty-ninth Street, between Barnard and Jefferson Streets.
Locating old catch-basins and proposed catch-basins
(on map), for Barnard Street, between Gaston and Fortysecond Streets.
Examination of bluff at Bonaventure Cemetery.
Investigation of drainage at intersection of Barnard and
Forty-first Streets.
Locating proposed sewers and catch-basins on Barnard,
West Broad, and Thirty-seventh Streets, prior to paving
same.
Report on Gwinnett Street Lane, between Bilbo Canal
and Paulsen Street, to City Attorney.
Report of Estill Avenue Lane, between West Chatham
Crescent and Battey Street, to Mayor.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 245
Compiling information and data of proposed sewerage
system, for Alderman Barrow.
Investigation of alleged encroachment at northwest
corner Gwinnett and Price Streets.
Investigation to determine grade for street car tracks at
Lathrop Avenue Subway, for Savannah Electric Company.
Statement showing land needed by the city for opening
streets, lanes, and parks, in the Estill, Goerz, and Barstow
Tracts, now known as the Granger Tract.
Investigation sidewalks in front of Central Hotel on
West Broad Street, between Stone and Harris Streets, to
determine proper grade.
Information for City Attorney to condemn land in the
Granger Tract, for the opening of Fiftieth Street.
Compiling data in book, of various encroachments.
Compiling data in book, of opening streets.
Investigation of Railroad Street, to change grade of
same.
Recapitulation
Survey of lots, with plats for private parties _ 269
Miscellaneous measurements and surveys _______ 37
Estimate of streets _____________ 35
Estimates, miscellaneous __________________ 26
Measurement of streets _______________ 17
Street lines given during the year _____j______ 260
Maps and plats of lots ____________________ 25
Maps and plats of streets ___________ 5
Tracing of lots ___________ 8
Maps and plats, miscellaneous ______________ 53
Grades and lines _____________ 55
245________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Grades and lines for sidewalks ____ 37
Grades and lines, miscellaneous ___ 34
Levels of streets ____ 4
Profiles and cross section, streets ___________ 11
Levels, miscellaneous _____ 9
Tracings, miscellaneous ______- 9
Encroachments reported ________________ 12
Blue prints -_____________________ 287
Miscellaneous reports, etc. ___ 21
Total ___________________________1214
Respectfully submitted,
J. W. HOWARD
City Engineer
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF
SANITARY COMMISSIONERS
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
FOR THE YEAR
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 19O9
W. F. BRUNNER. M. D.
HEALTH OFFICER

Board oi Sanitary Commissioners
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910.
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman,
Mayor, City of Savannah.
Sir:The following report, for the year 1909, of that
part of the sanitary work of this city performed under the
direction of the Board of Sanitary Commissioners, and
under the direction of the Health Officer, is presented for
your consideration.
Deaths from Natural Causes
While the preceding year was an exceptionally good
year, the year of 1909 furnished a still lower death-rate. The
figures for the two years are here presented:
Whites Colored Total
1908 __ _ ______________ 467 939 1406
1909 ___________________ 462 878 1340
Decrease ___________ 5 61 66
A comparative statement of deaths from the principal
causes is submitted:
(1908) (1909)
White Colored Total White Colored Total
Tuberculosis __ 47 121 168 34 124 158
Heart Disease.- 28 57 85 39 55 94
Slight's Disease 30 43 73 32 40 72
Malarial Fever- 6 73 79 8 45 53
Pneumonia __ 36 91 127 28 57 . 95
Marasmus __ 26 60 86 18 55 73
Typhoid Fever. 8 6 14 9 4 13
250 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
In your Health Officer's report for the preceding year,
this statement was made: "Your Health Officer would call
your attention to the apparent large number of deaths
among the negroes from malarial fever. The number is
fictitious: two medical men furnished over fifty per cent, of
the death certificates where malarial fever was assigned as
the cause of death, and it is 'up' to your Health Officer to
prove Jbhis statement during the year 1909, as one of the
medical men was the Coroner, and is not now in office, and
the second man is dead." Note the lessened death-rate from
malarial fever.
Your attention is called to the number of deaths among
the whites each year, in persons who are brought to this
city for treatment at the different hospitals. These persons
were non-residents, and contracted the diseases which
caused their deaths outside of this city. Ten per cent, of
the deaths among the whites occurred in such persons.
Under the accepted rule of vital statistics a death must be
recorded where it occurs. Manifestly, this is unfair, and
your Health Officer has brought this matter to the attention
of the Chief Statistician of the Census Bureau at Washington, who at once saw the injustice of the rule, and, beginning
in the year 1911, such deaths will be separated from the
legitimate death record.
Our death rate from typhoid fever has been annually
augmented by persons sent' here from the surrounding,
country, and in the face of the fact that the removal of
typhoid fever patients is contra-indicated after the first week
or ten days of the disease, and the true nature of this fever
is not often learned in its incipiency.
Births (1909)
White Colored Total
January __________________ 67 76 143
February ________________ 68 87 155
March ___________________ 50 80 130
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 251
April ___________________. 56 86 142
May -________________ 46 90 136
June ____________________ 53 72 125
July ___________________ 76 91 167
August _________________ 70 112 182
September ________________ 82 83 165
October __________________ 69 95 164
November _________________ 59 71 130
December ________________ 67 89 156
Total ___1______________ 763 1032 1795
TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES
Diphtheria
There were 130 cases, with five deaths. Note low mortality, the result of the administration of antitoxin. Before
the serum-therapy, the mortality ran from 25 to 40 per cent.
Scarlet Fever
There were 40 cases, and 3 deaths. For six years there
were no deaths from this disease.
Typhoid Fever
There were 70 cases, and 13 deaths; the usual importation of cases augmented the death-rate.
Smallpox
One case of smallpox was found, on December 29, in
the person of an employee of the American Construction
Company, engaged in constructing a steel bridge at a point
about twelve miles above the city. Other nearby cities have
had the disease for months, and Savannah will be infected
to some extent during the year 1910. Previous to the case
mentioned above, we were free from this disease for nearly
four years.
252 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Milk
The following ordinances were made effective, and during the year 1910 the strict enforcement of these laws will
be carried out, with the result that Savannah will have a
milk supply beyond reproach. The detailed reports for that
year will be shown.
ORDINANCES
By Alderman Barrow
An ordinance to provide regulations touching the keeping of cows, stables for cows, dairies, milk, and the sale of
milk; to provide for the election of an inspector of milk,
and for other purposes designed to secure purity in the
milk consumed in the City of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that it shall
not be lawful for any person, persons, or corporations to
keep or. possess within the corporate limits of the City of
Savannah any cow or cows, either for the conduct of the
dairy business or for his or her personal use, unless and
except that a permit shall have been first obtained from the
health officer permitting such cow or cows to be located
within the corporate limits of the City of Savannah, as by
this ordinance prescribed; which permit must designate
upon its face specially the location for the keeping of such
cow or cows. And all owners of cows must register with
the health officer the places where said cows are kept, and
the number of cows, and the health officer shall keep a complete register thereof.
Sec. 2. Be it further ordained, that no building or
shed shall be used for stabling cows kept within the city
limits which is not well lighted, ventilated, and drained,
provided said cows are kept in a stall or stalls having win-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 253
dows or doors on at least two sides, all stalls to be not less
than four (4) feet in width by six (6) feet in length; and
provided, further, that said stalls and premises shall be
kept in absolutely perfect sanitary and hygienic condition,
and free from all offensive odors.
Sec. 3. Be it further ordained, that no building shall
be used for stabling cows for dairy purposes which is not
provided with a. suitable floor, laid with grades and channels to carry off all drainage; if a public sewer abuts the
premises upon which such building is situated, they shall
be connected therewith.
Sec. 4. Be it further ordained, that no building shall
be used for stabling cows which is not provided with good
and sufficient feeding troughs or boxes, and with a covered
watertight receptacle outside of the building for the reception of dung or other refuse.
Sec. 5. Be it further ordained, that no watercloset,
privy, cesspool, urinal, inhabited room, or workshop shall
be located within any building or shed used for stabling
cows for dairy purposes, or for the storage or sale of milk
or cream; nor shall any fowl, hog or horse, sheep or goat,
be kept in any room used for such purposes.
Sec. 6. Be it further ordained, that it shall be the duty
of each person using any premises for keeping cows for
dairy purposes to cause the building in which cows are
kept to be thoroughly cleaned daily, and to remove all
dung from the premises at least once every twenty-four
hours, so as to prevent its accumulation in great quantities.
Sec. 7. Be it further ordained, that every person keeping cows, for the production of milk, shall cause the yard
used in connection therewith to be provided with a proper
receptacle for drinking water for such cows, none but fresh,
clean water to be used in such receptacles.
254 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Sec. 8. Be it further ordained that every person using
any premises for keeping cows shall cause the yard used in
connection therewith to be provided with a proper receptacle for drinking water for such cows, none but fresh, clean
water to be used in such receptacles.
Sec. 9. Be it further ordained, that any enclosure in
which cows are kept shall be graded and drained so as to
keep the surface reasonably dry, and to prevent the accumulation of water therein, except as may be permitted
for the purpose of supplying drinking water. No garbage,
urine, fecal matter, or other similar substances shall be
placed or allowed to remain in such enclosure, and no open
drain shall be allowed to run through it.
Sec. 10. Be it further ordained, that any person using
any premises for keeping cows for dairy purposes shall provide and use a sufficient number of receptacles, made of
non-absorbent materials, for the reception, storage, and delivery of milk, and shall cause them at all times to be
cleaned and purified, and shall cause all milk to be removed
without delay from the room in which the cows are kept.
Sec. 11. Be it further ordained, that it shall be the
duty of any person having charge or control of any premises upon which cows are kept to notify the health officer
in writing of the existence of any contagious or infectious
disease among such cows, immediately upon the discovery
thereof, and to thoroughly isolate any cow or cows affected,
or which may reasonably be believed to be affected, and to
exercise such other precautions as may be directed by the
health officer.
Sec. 12. Be it further ordained, that it shall be the
duty of any person having charge or control of any premises upon which milk or cream is produced, handled, stored,
or distributed, or sold, to notify the health officer imme-
_____MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________255
diately upon the discovery of any case of croup, diphtheria,
measles, scarlet fever, smallpox, typhoid fever, typhus fever,
or any other contagious or infectious disease upon such
premises. No milk or cream shall be sold, exchanged,
given away, or in any other manner distributed from such
infected premises, until all danger of spread of disease
has been removed, and the health officer certifies to that
effect. No person who attends cows or milks them, or
who has the care or handling of vessels for the sale, storage,
or distribution of milk or cream, shall enter any place
or premises wherein exists any of the diseases mentioned
herein, nor shall any such person have any communication,
direct or indirect, with any person who resides in or is an
occupant of such infected place.
Sec. 13. Be it further ordained, that every person or
corporation desiring to sell, offer for sale, expose for sale,
dispose of, exchange, or deliver milk or cream in the City
of Savannah shall make application to the health officer
for a permit so to do. Such application shall be made on a
printed form, to be furnished by the health officer upon
demand., and the applicant, if an individual, shall state
therein his full name and residence, and if a corporation
shall state therein full name and residence of each of its
officers. Such application shall also state the location of
the place at which it is proposed to carry on the business.
It shall also contain a statement of the number and character of wagons or other vehicles to be used by the applicant in or about his or Its business; also the number of
cows, if any, owned or controlled by the applicant, and
such other data concerning the conduct of such business as
the health officer may require. The health officer, upon
receipt of such application, shall cause to be investigated
the place of business described in such application, and the
wagons and other vehicles, if any, intended to be used
by such applicant. If such places of business and such
wagons or other vehicles are found upon such investigaM. K. c. s.17
256________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_____
tion to be in a sanitary condition, and fit for the uses and
purposes to which they are intended to be put, said health
officer shall forthwith register said applicant in a proper
record to be kept for the purpose, and issue a permit authorizing such applicant to carry on, engage in, and conduct the
business of vendors of milk in the City of Savannah, at the
place designated in such application. All permits granted
pursuant to this ordinance may at any time be revoked by
the health officer, subject to the approval of the Board of
Sanitary Commissioners, for the persistent, repeated, or
wilful violation of any law or ordinance, or of any regulation of the health officer, governing the sale of milk in the
City of Savannah; provided, however, that no such permit
shall, at any time, be revoked by the health officer unless
he shall first have given the holder of the same not less
than ten days' notice in writing of his intention to revoke
such permit, and an opportunity to be heard by the Board
of Sanitary Commissioners as to why such should not be
done; this proviso not to be taken to apply to cases where
the sale of milk or cream may be temporarily prohibited by
the health officer because of disease on the premises, temporary insanitary condition, or similar causes. Such permits shall not be transferable, and no permit used hereunder shall entitle or authorize the holders thereof to carry
on, engage in, or conduct the business of vendor of milk
in any place or places other than those designated and set
out in such permit. If any person having a permit to vend
milk, as aforesaid, shall change the location of his or its
place of business, notice of such'proposed change shall be
given to said health officer, and his consent in writing received to conduct such business at such new location; and
no business shall be conducted or carried on at such new
location until such consent has been received.
Sec. 14. Be it further ordained, that every vendor of
milk having a permit, aforesaid, shall, whenever so re-
______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________257
quired, furnish the health officer a statement of all changes
in the data and information provided for in the preceding
section, and shall also, whenever so required, furnish him
a list of all persons from whom he or it receives milk or
cream for use in his said business, whether said shipments
be from within or outside the City of Savannah; and said
health officer shall have power by regulation to require that
changes or additions in said lists of shippers shall be furnished him from time to time as 'they occur. Said health
officer shall keep a record of such shippers, when furnished
as aforesaid, for the use of his office, but the same shall
not be open to the inspection of other persons.
Sec. 15. Be it further ordained, that the permit to engage in the vending of milk, hereinbefore referred to, shall
be posted conspicuously in the applicant's place of business, at a point to be designated by the health officer or a
health inspector. Each vendor of milk shall, before engaging in the sale of milk or cream, cause his name or the name
of the dairy and the permit number (the former in letters of
a readable size, the permit numbers in figures not less than
three inches in height) to be placed and remain on each
outer side of all wagons or other vehicles used by such
vendors in the conveyance or sale of milk or cream.
Sec. 16. Be it further ordained, that the health officer
shall have power to adopt such regulations as he may deem
proper and necessary to insure all milk and cream intended
for consumption in the City of Savannah being produced,
transported, stored, kept, distributed, retailed, and delivered
under conditions rendering them suitable for consumption
as human food, and to compel perfect hygienic and sanitary
conditions of all cow stables, creameries, and dairies from
which milk and cream so intended for consumption in
the City of Savannah are produced; copies of the same to
be printed and kept for free distribution to the public; and
said health officer shall have power to prohibit the sale
within the corporate limits of the City of Savannah of milk
258________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
and cream produced, transported, stored, kept, distributed,
retailed, or delivered contrary to such regulations, whether
said milk or cream be produced within or outside the corporate limits of the City of Savannah; and to the end
that said regulation may be enforced in the case of milk
or cream produced outside the corporate limits of the
City of Savannah, but intended for consumption -therein, said health officer" may require such of the city
milk inspectors as he may designate for the purpose
to make inspections, at such intervals and times as
he may deem expedient, of all dairy farms, stables, and
other places outside the City of Savannah from which milk
or cream is shipped for consumption in the City of Savannah. In case full access to such premises, or a full opportunity to investigate all the conditions under which milk
is there produced or kept, shall be denied said inspectors,
or in case,' upon such inspection, the conditions are found
such as in the opinion of said health officer render such
milk or cream unsuitable or unsafe for human food, and
warrant the exclusion of said cream or milk from sale in
the City of Savannah, said health officer shall have power
to absolutely prohibit the sale thereof at any place in the
City of Savannah until such time as the reason for their
exclusion shall, in his opinion, have ceased, and he shall
adopt such means of identifying such milk and cream as to
him may seem proper and expedient. In case of the exclusion of any milk or cream as aforesaid from sale within the
City of Savannah, said health officer shall immediately
make a record of such fact in a properly indexed book, kept
for that purpose, said book to be open to the inspection of
all vendors of milk who may desire to inspect the same.
The action of the health officer hereunder to be subject
to the approval of the Sanitary Board.
Sec. 17. Be it further ordained, that the health officer
and all other officers of the health department, and any inspector or police officer authorized by the health officer,
shall have the right and power to enter and have full access
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 259
to any building, structure, or premises where any milk and
cream, or either of them, is stored or kept for sale, and shall
have the right of access to all wagons, railroad cars, or
other vehicles of any kind for the conveyance or delivery of
milk and cream, or either of them, and to any building,
structure, or premises where he believes or has reason to
believe milk or cream, or either of them, is stored or kept
for sale; and shall have the right to take samples of milk
and cream therefrom (such samples not to exceed one
quart) for the purpose of inspecting, testing, or analyzing
the same.
Sec 18. Be it further ordained, that every sample of
milk delivered to any officer of the health department, or
inspector, shall have a label attached to the vessel containing such sample, upon which shall be written, at the time
of the delivery of such sample, the number of the dealer's
permit, the number of the sample, the date of collection,
and the name of the inspector or officer taking the same;
and a memorandum shall be made by the officer or inspector
collecting such sample of the number of the sample, and the
name of the owner and driver from whom collected; and no
conviction shall be had of any person for selling or having
in his possession adulterated milk, as in this ordinance defined, unless, at the time of taking the sample upon the
evidence of which conviction is asked, a duplicate sample,
properly sealed and marked for identification, shall have
been delivered to the person from whose possession such
original sample was taken.
Sec. 19. Be it further ordained, that the violation of
any provision or regulation of this ordinance, and any failure to comply therewith, and the refusal or failure to comply with any direction or order of the health officer hereunder, shall be subject, upon conviction before the Police
Court of the City of Savannah, to a fine not exceeding fifty
dollars ($50), and to imprisonment not to exceed ten (10)
days, either or both, in the discretion of the court, and each
260 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
day's failure or neglect to comply shall be held and deemed
to be a separate and distinct offense, and punishable accordingly.
Sec. 20. Be it further ordained, that the provisions of
this ordinance shall become effective thirty (30) days from
date of passage.
Sec. 21. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Above ordinance adopted in Council August 11, 1909.
By Alderman Wilson
An ordinance to provide that the ordinance commonly
known as the "Milk Ordinance," adopted by Council on the
eleventh day of August, 1909, shall not go into effect until
November 1, 1909,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
ordinance commonly known as the "Milk Ordinance," which
provides regulations touching the keeping of cows, stables
for cows, dairies, etc., adopted by the Council of the City
of Savannah on the eleventh day of August. 1909, shall not
go into effect or be enforced until November 1, 1909.
/
Sec. 2. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Above ordinance adopted in Council September 8, 1909.
_ JMAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _ 261
By Alderman Barrow
An ordinance to provide rules and regulations for the
purpose of carrying out and effecting the ordinance adopted
September 8, 1909, entitled, "An ordinance to provide regulations touching the keeping of cows, stables for cows,
dairies, milk, and the sale of milk; to provide for the
election of an inspector of milk, and for other purposes
designed to secure purity in the milk consumed in the
City of Savannah," and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
following rules and regulations, for the purpose of carrying
out and effecting the ordinance passed September 8, 1909,
entitled, "An ordinance to provide regulations touching the
keeping of cows, stables for cows, dairies, milk, and the sale
of milk; to provide for the election of an inspector of milk,
and for other purposes designed to secure purity in the milk
consumed in the City of Savannah," be and they are hereby
adopted, to become effective and of force on and after November 1, 1909, to wit:
WHOLE OR PURE MILK
is milk that shall conform to the following standard:
Not less than fat, 3.5 per cent.; solids (not fat), 8.5
per cent.; total solids, 12.00 per cent. Specific gravity, 1030.
Water (not more than) 88.00 per cent.
The removal of cream, addition of water or any foreign
substances to be considered adulterations. Milk so altered
will be condemned and confiscated, and on third offense
revocation of license will result. Milk drawn from cows
within fifteen (15) days before calving or within seven (7)
days afterwards is not whole or pure milk, and will be condemned and confiscated as above stated.
262 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
CREAM
shall conform to the following standard:
18 per cent, fat.
SKIMMED MILK
may be sold, provided each container holding said milk be
distinctly marked on the outside "SKIMMED MILK." in
letters not less than one (1) inch in length.
BACTERIAL STANDARD
Milk shall not contain more than (from April 1 to November 1) 500,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter; November 1 to April 1 of each year, not more than 300,000 bacteria
per cubic centimeter; and shall be entirely free of any bacteria of transmissible diseases.
CREAM
shall not contain more than (from April 1 to November 1)
1,000,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter; November 1 to
April 1, 500,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter; and shall be
entirely free from any bacteria of transmissible diseases.
COW STALLS
Requirements of Dairy Cows Within Corporate Limits
i
Xo cow or cows shall be kept, stalled, or milked within
fifty (50) feet of a building used as a residence; of a watercloset, privy vault, nor a garbage receptacle, unless said
receptacle be of metal with tightly fitting top. No cow or
cows shall be milked while standing on the ground, but all
barns, stables, or sheds must be floored, preferably of cement
or similar material; if of wood, to be so constructed as to
shed all urine. Floors shall be flushed daily with water.
No bedding shall be used containing dirt or dust. Manure
must be removed from barns, stables, or sheds twice a day,
and from the premises every day, as prescribed by ordinance.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________263
No loose food products shall be stored above apartment
where cows are milked, unless the ceiling of said apartment
is of tongued-and-grooved boards so that dirt or dust will
not fall into said apartment. No horses or mules shall be
kept in stables, barns, or sheds with cows.
FOOD
Cows shall not be fed on slops, swill, or any refuse,
decaying or fermented material.
WATER
For all purposes artesian, and it is recommended that
it be from tap for its detailed use.
PASTURES
No cows shall be pastured where there is any garbage
deposit or dumping ground for refuse matter, nor where
they have access to any stagnant or polluted surface water,
either for drinking purposes or where cows may lie down
in said water.
MILKING
Cows shall at all times be kept free from manure and
other filth, and before being milked all long hairs on flanks
and udders shall be removed. Udders should be washed
and dried before milking.
THE MILKER
should cleans"e his hands with soap and water, and dry
them. Foremilk should not go into milking pail. Clean
clothes, preferably of cotton stuff, are recommended, and
the same are requisite for a perfect score on the score card.
UTENSILS
Each time before use all milk containers, beginning at
the milking pail and ending with receptacle in which milk
264 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
is delivered to consumer or retailer, must be immaculately
cleaned and sterilized by exposure inside and outside to a
temperature of not less than 212 degrees Fahrenheit for five
minutes.
MILKING PAILS AND CONTAINERS
should be narrow-mouthed, metal containers, free from
dents and sharp angles, rust, seams not properly soldered.
As soon as filled they should be covered and removed to
milk-house or -room for straining, aeration, and lowered to
a temperature of Jess than 50 degrees Fahrenheit. This
house or room must not be used as a residence, nor must
any other food product be stored there. The walls, ceiling,
and floor must be kept immaculately clean, and all doors
and windows screened to exclude flies and dirt; bottling and
canning tables, stands, or racks should be kept immaculately
clean, and exposure to atmosphere in this process to be as
short as possible.
TRANSPORTATION
All vehicles used for transporting milk shall be free
from dust and dirt, and kept so at all times. They shall be
covered. The name of the proprietor or .name of dafry must
be on such vehicle in large, plain letters.
If milk is transported by hand in wire racks, or by other
devices, the container must be covered, to exclude dirt and
dust. No milk container shall be returned from any house
where is any contagious or infectious disease, but the milk
must be delivered to such a house by transferring it to a
receptacle from the house.
DAIRIES OUTSIDE OF CORPORATE LIMITS
In addition to the regulations laid down for dairy cows
in the corporate limits, the following requirements are promulgated :
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 265
The use of surface water is prohibited. Manure shall
be removed from barns, stables, and sheds before each milking, in a watertight vehicle, to a point not less than one
hundred (100) yards from barn, stable, or shed; urine
deposits to be treated in the same manner. Cow-yards
must be free from stagnant pools of water, and shall be
cared for so that the footing for cows shall be free from
quagmires. Surface wells are forbidden. Waterclosets or
privies shall not be less than one hundred (100) yards from
milking stable, barn, or shed.
MILK DEPOTS
Milk shall be kept at a temperature below 50 degrees
Fahrenheit. No milk or any of its products, save butter,
shall be handled, stored, or sold from any building used as
a residence. All surface floors, walls, and ceilings shall at
all times be kept immaculately clean. Windows and doors
shall be screened for the prevention of flies and dirt. Refrigerators and ice boxes shall have their inner surfaces
lined with porcelain or metal. No other food products
shall be stored in refrigerators or ice boxes. Utensils must
be clean, free from rust and rough surfaces, and must be
sterilized in inner and outer surfaces by exposure to a temperature of not less than 212 degrees Fahrenheit before
receiving milk.
PASTEURIZATION OF MILK AND CREAM
First. No person, either himself or his agent, shall
offer for sale pasteurized milk or pasteurized cream, unless
the same shall have been produced, transported, stored,
pasteurized, and handled in accordance with the rules of the
Board of Sanitary Commissioners.
Second. Any person or corporation desiring to pasteurize milk or cream for sale in the City of Savannah shall
make application to the health officer for a permit, said
permit to be issued on proof that the rules and regulations
of this Board are "and can be complied with.
I
266 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Third. Raw milk and cream containing more than
5,000,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter, or showing an abnormal fermentation, shall be considered insanitary and unfit
for consumption as human food, even when pasteurized.
Fourth. Pasteurized milk or cream shall contain not
more than 50,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter, nor more
than 1 per cent, of the number of bacteria contained in the
product before pasteurization, and shall contain no pathogenic bacteria. Pasteurized products shall otherwise conform to the usual tests for efficiency of pasteurization.
Fifth. Pasteurized milk and cream shall be sold only
in bottles sterilized in live steam for thirty minutes; the
packages shall be plainly marked to indicate the contents.
THE CONSUMER
The responsibility of the producer ends with the de- '
livery to the consumer. Immediately after the delivery of
milk it should be refrigerated in the original package, and
when taken from it for use should be placed in a serving
vessel of simple design, with rounded bottom, and with covered top; which, after being used, should always be washed
in hot water, with either soap or washing powder, and rinsed
with hot water, and so placed that it will be safeguarded
from flies. The same procedure should be followed with
containers in which the milk is brought by the producer
before their return. Bottled milk is the best form of milk
containers.
CERTIFIED MILK
While at this time it is not deemed advisable to legislate on this subject, certified milk will, in time, be a neces- v
sity, and the following statements should be embodied in
the regulations:
The term "Certified Milk" shall mean milk produced,
stored, handled, and sold in accordance with special rules
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 267
of the Board of Sanitary Commissioners, for the control of
certified milk, in general accordance with the methods of
the American Association of Medical Milk Commissions.
The sale of milk, under the term "Certified Milk," not produced, stored, handled, and sold in accordance with these
rules shall be subject to penalty, as provided by ordinance
for violation of the rules of the Board of Sanitary Commissioners.
The following score cards, on which results of inspections of dairies and milk depots, are to be used to educate
the producer and handler of milk, to protect the consumer,
and to systematize the work of milk inspection:
DAIRY SCORE CARD
Division 1Health, Comfort, and Protection of Cows
1. Health of cows ______ 25
2. Isolation during sickness and calving 10
3. Comfort, bedding, etc. 10
4. Location of stable 11
5. Construction of stable 12
6. Lighting of stable 4
7. Ventilation, cubic space, etc. _______ 8
8. Food ___________:_______________ 10
9. Water ___________________________ 10
Total score _____________________100
Division 2Cleanliness of Cows and Their Surroundings
10. Cleanliness of cows ___'._______________________ 45
11. Cleanliness of stable, freedom from odor and dust_ 45
12. Condition of barnyard _________________ 8
13. Condition of pasture __________________ 2
Total score _____________________100
268 MAYOR'S ANNUM, REPORT
Division 3Construction, Cleaning, and Care of Utensils
14. Construction of utensils 25
15. Cleaning of utensils ___________________ 30
16. Water supply for cleaning 25
17. Care of utensils after cleaning . 20
Total score _______________________100
Division AHealth of Employees, and Their Methods of
Milking
18. Health of employees 45
19. Cleanliness of milkers 15
20. Milking with clean, dry hands 15
21. Quiet milking _______________________ 5
22. Cleaning of udder __________________ 12
23. Rejection of foremilk _________'________ 8
Total score _____________________100
Division 5Handling of Milk
24. Cleanliness of attendants '_ 5
25. Prompt removal from stable 8
26. Promptness of cooling and aeration 8
27. Efficiency of cooling _____ 22
28. Method of straining _______________-___ 10
29. Sanitary milk-room __________ 25
30. Methods of storage 11
31. Methods of transportation _______ 11
Total score _______-__________________100
Total of all-scores __500
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 269
SPECIAL DEDUCTION FOR CAUSE
Total score
Sanitary Rating:
SCORE CARD FOR MILK DEPOT
1Location and Cleanliness of Plant
Perfect
1. Location __ 10
2. Arrangement 10
3. Construction _____________ 14
4. Light and ventilation 3
5. Screens IS
6. Cleanliness 48
Total score _____________________100
2Machinery and UtensilsWater Supply
7. Construction __________ 20
8. Cleanliness _________________ 59
9. Water supply ______________________ 30
Total score ____________________100
3Handling and Storage of Milk
10. Handling of milk _____________________ 70
11. Storage of milk ______________________ 30
Total score ___________________100
270 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ______
4Wagons and Salesrooms
12. Wagons (construction) ____:__________ 8
13. Wagons (condition-cleanliness) ___________ 18
14. Wagons (protection of product) __________ 18
15. Salesrooms (location) __________ 20
16. Salesrooms (ordercleanliness) _ 36
Total score _____________________100
5Health, Cleanliness of Employees
17. Cleanliness and neatness of employees ______ 40
18. Health of employees ___:_____________ 60
Total score _1___________100
Grand total score 500
Rating:
FirstA total score of 480 per cent, and each Division
of 90 per cent., Excellent.
SecondA total score of 450 per cent., and each Division of 80 per cent., Good.
ThirdA total score of 400 per cent., and each Division
of 60 per cent., Medium.
FourthA total score of 350 per cent., and each Division of 55 per cent., Poor.
FifthA total score of 300 per cent., and each Division
of 50 per cent., Lowest Score Passable.
Sec. 2. Be it further ordained, that all of the provisions
of the said ordinance of September 8, 1909, known as the
"Milk Ordinance," for the purpose of enforcing and carrying
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________271
out the said rules and regulations, and providing for a punishment for a failure to comply therewith, be and they are
hereby adopted and ratified.
Sec. 3. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Bacteriological Laboratory
The Municipal laboratory, with its Director, Dr. Bassett, are two of the most valuable health assets a city could
have, and in the case of Savannah, your administration, with
liberal appropriations, and under the control of its most
efficient Director, we stand easily ahead of the procession.
The report of Dr. Bassett will follow this report.
Recommendations
The entire sanitation of the city should be under the
control of the Board of Sanitary Commissioners. The
responsibility lies there, and the work can be better accomplished there thani in any other department.
The collection of garbage and its removal is a sanitary
measure, and its conduct should be under the direct control
of the health authorities. At the present time, and for
many years past, this forceprimarily intended to remove
the garbageis taking anything that is in the way of personsfrom back yards, streets, and lanes; and this tax on
the garbage wagons prevents a daily removal of garbage.
These wagons remove tons of horse and cow droppings,
which removal is forbidden under the law, which provides
for such removal by the owners of such animals.
Debris on the streets and in the lanes, which should
be removed by the Streets and Lanes Department, is moved
by these wagons, and much of the work of the Park and
Tree Commission is performed by these wagons. All this
M. H. c. 8.is
272________MAYOR'S ANNUAL RBPORT________ _
prevents the prompt removal of garbage. Again, this material, for its final disposition, is not handled in a sanitary
manner.
It is now taken to a spot within the city limits, placed
in cars which are hauled through the streets of the city for
a mile and a half: and there is no sanitary responsibility on
anyone concerned with the work, from the gathering of
garbage in back yards to its removal from the city. If the
scavenger service was placed where it belongs, a daily
removal of garbage could be maintained with fewer wagons,
and the surplus wagons could be turned over to the Streets
and Lanes Department for the removal of such matter
which is good filling material for the low grounds east and
west of the city; and for the removal of trees, grass, and
weeds of the Park and Tree Commission. Your attention
is particularly called to the many objections raised against
the location of the present dump.
Building Laws
It is an imperative necessity that this city enact building laws which will prevent the construction of uninhabitable houses, which are so constructed that the only idea appears to be the revenue to be obtained from their rental.
These houses are built with cunning ingenuity as to getting
as many buildings as possible in the smallest area of ground.
From a sanitary standpoint, the worst problem we have to
deal with in the City of Savannah is this one. There
should be laws enacted to prevent the overcrowding, not
only of these houses, but to prevent the congestion of people in these houses. A midnight visit to such buildings
would be a revelation to the average citizen.
The congestion of residences and of people in them is
the one reason why, last year, 34 white people died of tuberculosis and 124 negroes succumbed to that disease; and, for
the same reason, three negro children die when one white
child dies: and there are other diseases, causing a high
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 273
death-rate, which are a result of this disregard of the laws
of sanitation. The moral side figures here also. Would
you expect an improved morality when families of male and
female children grow up in direct contact, which necessarily
follows when the family is restricted to one room? Would
you expect normal health conditions?
It is time for the dominant white race to look this and
kindred problems squarely in the face, and legislate for the
betterment of these people. The municipality of the future
will not be the city of the largest number of inhabitants,
but of the better personnel of its citizens.
Your Health Officer for nearly twenty-five years has
watched these conditions, and he is neither a sentimentalist
nor does he pose as a philanthropist; but, once more, he
urges the appointment of a Commission (non-political) to
look into the conditions which exist here. Better now than
when the exigencies of some impending health or social
trouble forces itself on this community for immediate solution. The collateral evils which exist here need the work
of such a Commission, as do the lack of sanitary habitations
and surroundings for the negro.
Sanitary Inspection
This work, never in the public eye, can partially be
appreciated by a glance at the following table:
Water service shut off from watercloset_________ 380
Sewers choked _______________________ 211
Sewers broken, leaking, caved __________ 135
Sewers (waste from same "backing up" in yards)__ 102
Waterclosets choked __________________11486
Watercloset bowl leaking, overflowing _______ 76
Watercloset bowl broken, loose, disconnected _____ 78
Watercloset wastepipe broken, leaking, loose, with holes 62
Watercloset .trap broken, leaking, disconnected ____ 35
Watercloset trap, no cover ______________ 60
274 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Watercloset trap cover improperly fastened 27
Watercloset tank and valve to same deranged 284
Watercloset tank without proper support _ 38
Watercloset tank leaking, overflowing 269
Watercloset tank missing, disconnected 6
Watercloset tank and valve to sameparts missing 3
Watercloset flush pipe leaking _ 321
Watercloset flush pipe mashed, broken, punctured 59
Watercloset flush pipe choked 40
Watercloset flush pipe missing, disconnected 43
Watercloset flooring in disrepair 94
Bathtub wastepipe or trap choked 67
Bathtub wastepipe leaking 60
Bathtub wastepipe in disrepair 3
Wash-basin wastepipe or trap choked 3
Wash-basin wastepipe leaking _- 3
Wash-basin wastepipe or trap in disrepair 1
Sink wastepipe or trap choked _ 122
Sink wastepipe or trap leaking 98
Sink wastepipe in disrepair or disconnected 68
Sink wastepipe or trap missing _ 5
Urinal wastepipe or trap leaking ________ 4
Hydrants and supplies to same leaking ________ 370
Watercloset supplies leaking ____________ 350
Supplies to other fixtures leaking _____________ 25
Watercloset valves leaking _____ 51
Vacant houses inspected _________________ 339
Vacant stores inspected ____-____ 7
Yards littered with trash, garbage, etc. _________ 331
Alleys littered with trash, garbage, etc. _________ 1
Houses littered with trash, garbage, etc. _______ 4
Stores littered with trash, garbage, etc. _________ 6
Roofs leaking and defective ___!_____________ 5
Lots littered with trash, garbage, etc. ______ 4
Weeds growing on lots ______________-_____ 9
Weeds growing in yards and alleys ___________ 18
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 275
Privy and surface vaults caved, also with defective
curbing _____ 52
Privy vaults for cleaning ____________1556
Privy vaults defective ___________-___ 184
Privy vaults for abandonment ____ 34
Privy vaults with water in same __ 24
Holes in yards used as privies (nuisance) _ 3
Mosquitoes breeding in privy vaults __ 1
Surface vaults full (for cleaning) _____ 9
Dry wells for cleaning _______ 6
Cesspool in bad order __'___ 1
Manure in stables, stable lots, etc. 36
Stock pens in offensive condition 2
No sanitary convenience provided for occupied premises 9
Water service insufficient _________ 34
Houses abused by trespassers ___-__ 15
Stormwater leaders and gutters to same choked___ 16
Stormwater leaders corroded _______:__ 16
Stormwater leaders improperly diverting rainfall . 35
Stormwater leaders with lengths missingdisconnected 50
Ditches holding water _________ 7
Waterclosets improperly used by trespassers ______ 19
Yards flooded with water from hydrant supplies, etc._ 208
Defective drainage of yards _ 22
Wells holding stagnant water ___ 6
Yard cesspools in bad order (defective curbing)___ 35
Yard cesspools choked 5
Special nuisances _ 7
No tank for watercloset ___________________ 4
Lots.used improperly by trespassers -_______ 7
Water under houses _____________________ 28
Defective drainage of streets and lanes _________ 50
Irregular scavenger service ______ 10
Garbage, etc., in streets __ 4
"Plumbing of sink referred to Inspector of Plumbing_ 26
Plumbing of bathtub referred to Inspector of Plumbing 13
276 MAYOR'S ANNUAL. REPORT
Plumbing of waterclosets referred to Inspector of
Plumbing __________ 53
Stormwater pipe connection with sewer referred to
Inspector of Plumbing 8
Plumbing of yard cesspools referred to Inspector of
Plumbing __________________ 4
Defective vent pipes referred to Inspector of Plumbing 8
Defective sewers referred to Inspector of Plumbing_ 8
Old, wornout, and obsolete closets referred to Inspector
of Plumbing 18
Operation automatic tank closets referred to Inspector
of Plumbing 8
Docket case on account refusal to relieve stoppage in
sewer _ 7
Docket case on account refusal to repair sewer or
plumbing ____. ______________ 7
Docket case on account holding back condemned meat 2
Docket case on account refusal to cut rank vegetation 18
Docket case on account of unsanitary yard 6
Docket case on account refusal to dispose of manure_ 3
Barrels at railroad terminal without oil to prevent mosquitoes from breeding in water in them 511
Ditches and culverts at railroad terminal holding stagnant water __ 1
Rank vegetation at railroad terminal 3
There is still a disregard of sanitary details among our
people, and the rights of neighbors are not considered. We
find, not infrequently, that the rank growth of weeds which
hides objectionable matter, and which produces and hides
mosquitoes, does not interest the property owner, because
he lives in another part of the city, and the health of those
persons is no concern of Jiis. Even when notified by this
department, and later brought into Police Court, too often
he escapes punishment. The lack of administration of laws
is our greatest deficiency.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 277
The Board of Sanitary Commissioners consists of
Mayor Geo. W. Tiedeman, Chairman; Aldermen Battey and
McCauley, and citizens Mr. J. M. Solomons, Col. Beirne
Gordon, and Dr. Jabez Jones: the Health Officer acting as
Secretary.
Very respectfully,
W. F. BRUNNER, M. D.,
Health Officer.
278 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
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Calculi Biliary f* snpf*T
Cancer of Bladder
Breast - ____ _ ______

Head ___________ .
_
Intestines
Kidneys
Liver - ____________
Mouth ____ ___

Neck
Pancreas
Rectum
Stomach Uterus ____ . _ ____
Catarrh, Gastric ______ .

Childbirth ____________ ........
Cholecystitis
Climacteria __ _______ - _
Colitis _____ . _______

Convulsions, Puerperal
Cord, Hemorrhage of
Cyst, Ovarian
Cystitis ___________________
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278 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
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Bright's Disease ____
Bronchitis, Capillary
Calculi Biliary ._
Cancer ._ _________ __
Cancer of Bladder _____ ___

Breast _
Head _ ___________ _
_
Intestines ___
Kidneys _ ____
Liver _ _____ ____
Mouth __________

Neck
Pancreas __
Rectum ____ ___
Stomach _
Uterus
Childbirth _____________ .__.
_
Cholecystitis _ ______________ _.
Cirrhosis of Liver _
Colitis _________________
Convulsions, Puerperal _ _
_
Cord, Hemorrhage of ____ _-_
Cystitis _______ _____
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Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes in the Chy of Savannah, Qa., for 1909 Continued
CAUSES OF DEATH
Dementia .. _ ..
Diabetes __.' __.. __
Diarrhea _
Diphtheria _
Dropsy ___ ___ . _
Dysentery ... _ _____ __. _
Dystocia __ . ______ . _
Embolism, Cardiac . .
Emphysena _
Endocarditis -- _________
Endometritis .. __-_ _________
Enteritis .
Entero Colitis _ _ _____
Epilepsy _ .__ _____
Esophagus. Stricture of . ______
Fistula ... _______
Fever, Malarial . _.__ ___
Fever, Malarial, Intermittent _____
Fever, Malarial, Remittent ______
j
W 0
1
1
February
w
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
i
w
1
1
1
1 1
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3
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1
1
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4
6
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September
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1
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1
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1
2
2
October
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1
1

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1
1
4
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Kovember
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1
1
1
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1

2
2
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December
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1
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1
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3
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1
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7
13
1
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1
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1
10
2
8
3
1
8
7
26
2
1
38
1
6
Total Grand
W*0
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3
11
5
8
6
1
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13
3
14
39
2
1
1
45
1
7
280 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Fever, Scarlet
Fever, Typhoid
Fever, Typhus
Gangrene
Gastritis
Gastro Enteritis -
-
Gestation, Octopic
Heart Disease
Heart Disease, Valvular
Heart, Neuralgia of
Hemorrhage, Post partum
Hernia
Hydrocephalus
Ileocolitis
Indigestion, Acute
Influenza
Intestines, Hemorrhage of
Intestines, Intersusception of
Intestines, Obstruction of
Intestines, Prolapses of
Jaundice .
Leukemia
Liver, Hypertrophy of
Locomotor Ataxia
Lungs, Abscess of -
1114131-1
13
?, 1
?, -11
1?
.. 11
221S134-1
1
?. 1 -
1133111
?. 1I
?,
?, ?\\1
113?1
11174111
1
?,14
111
fi14
?,
3111
4131111
1311
3?311
?,
118
1341
S11
4
?, 6131
11211
122133
12411
1312\12
1911661
3721
111131
7.31
43
20
10
41
142111
2761314311
10
1
1314
26
16
' 1
78
1621111
3871161413331
11
K>
* O%1Fg8
to 38
Annual Report of Deaths from Natural Causes in the Chy of Savannah, Qa., for 1909 Continued
CAUSES OF DEATH
Dementia .. _ ..
Diabetes __.' __.. __
Diarrhea _
Diphtheria _
Dropsy ___ ___ . _
Dysentery ... _ _____ __. _
Dystocia __ . ______ . _
Embolism, Cardiac . .
Emphysena _
Endocarditis -- _________
Endometritis .. __-_ _________
Enteritis .
Entero Colitis _ _ _____
Epilepsy _ .__ _____
Esophagus. Stricture of . ______
Fistula ... _______
Fever, Malarial . _.__ ___
Fever, Malarial, Intermittent _____
Fever, Malarial, Remittent ______
j
W 0
1
1
February
w
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
i
w
1
1
1
1 1
0
3
1
1
1
1
|W
1
1
0
1
5
S
1

w c
,
1
>
1
1
2
-
j
V
4
w
2
1
1
6-
4
1
0
c
1
1
2

1
til
w
1
1
4
c
1
1
1
3
1
5
2
W
1

1
1
2
1
0
1
1
1
4
6
1
September
W
1
1
--
1
1

c
1
2
1
2
2
October
W!
1
1

--
1
1
4
0
1

1 1
4
Kovember
w
1

1
1
1
0
1

2
2
i
December
w,

1
1 1

0!
1
1

3
1
1
2
1
1
w
3
3
1
3
3
1
1
i
7
13
1
7
1
0
1
10
2
8
3
1
8
7
26
2
1
38
1
6
Total Grand
W*0
4
3
11
5
8
6
1
1
1
13
3
14
39
2
1
1
45
1
7
280 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Fever, Scarlet
Fever, Typhoid
Fever, Typhus
Gangrene
Gastritis
Gastro Enteritis
Gestation, Octopic
Heart Disease
Heart Disease, Valvular
Heart, Neuralgia of
Hemorrhage
Hemorrhage, Post partum
Hernia ___________ . ______
Hydrocephalus
Ileocolitis
Indigestion, Acute
Influenza
Intestines, Hemorrhage of
Intestines, Obstruction of
Intestines, Prolapses of
Jaundice . .
Leukemia
Liver, Hypertrophy of
Liver, Yellow Atrophy of
Lungs, Abscess of -
Lungs, Congestion of
1114131-1
13
?, 1
?,
1-11
1?-11
?
?. 1S134-1
1?1
I1133111
7117
?.
?,\\\ 11321
11174111
-f
?,14
111614?
3111
4131111
1311
32311
7.
118
1341
S11
4
?. 6131
11
?,11
12
7,\33
12411
131
?,11
7,
1911661
372\
111131231
43
20
10
41
142111
2761314311
10
1
1314
26
16
1 1
78
1621111
3871161413331
11

J5 O
31g2gF
Irt %SS
_ Pneumonia __________ Broncha Pneumonia, __________ Prostititis _______________
Co
Ul
to
CO
_
Ul
Ul
_ ^
_
^
, -
to
I
tvJ
I w> t
CO
to
to
1

~co
c*
k-CK

-,,
Ul
oo
Peritonitis, Puerperal __________
ti"
O f
2 :
t^. i
PU)
^
^
to
1
1
ro
to
^
t
i
^
i
i
i
toJN;
1'
~NJ
1
1 H*
-> 1
Jhfl
s1

n
3
O

TJ O
a *
<* >
2.
tfl O
- INJ
CO
-n is*
N>
0
>-> to
^-^ H-
1
Ul 1
to OS
to H-
IO
to i ! to
Os
*.
Ul
tO 4^
u> to
! CO
1 CO 1
1
1 tO
*. CO
OJ
Chloroform Narcosis, __________
_
9
t=v, 8
Tubercular Meningitis, __________
jto

Meningitis, _______ Cerebro-Spinal
^

n
33"
5.
*'
Marasmus -. __
_ ->
to
^
o
_l
to
to
~N>
*.
^^
4k.
l-o*.
Ul
to
Co
r
- H-l .
^-Os
1
. .>.
fc-^-
to
to
SO
< h >~^ QO C
o
hJCOU
*
9 CO
of Lungs, _________ Hemorrhage
10
0
i I-O*.
f
* 4^ cy\ " ' vj
1 (/I f^ * OL> *- -* VJ *^ t* *-^ t*l (/| J^- 1
O
G
0
G*."*
^January
Q
^ March
0
si '
O
55 May
- June
-
o }vy
October
o
I
- JDecember
a 1
iTotal
Grand Total
o
Annual otueatna weporttrom Natural inuautei thoffor 1909 Ga.,CHy Savannah, Continued I
xaoaax S.HOAVH
Purpura Hemorrhagica
Pyelonephritis
Rheumatism
Scrofula
Septicemia, Puerperal
Shock _ . _______ .... ____ ...
Stomach. Ulcer of
Syphilis __.__
Tabes Dorsalis . __ _ - _ _ _
Teething _. . _. __
Tetanus -_--_. ____ __ ... .....
Thrush _ . __ _
Trismus Nascentium __
Uterus. Hemorrhage of
Whooping Cough
1
3
?,
I
1
1
14
1
Total _ - __ . __ - ___ -i41|57
1
1
1
1
4
1
37
3
1
12
?
1
77
1
--
4
1
2
I
9
3
2
1
1
1
5
3S|55|37
1
1
2
2
1
3
13
?
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
7

1

11
1|
1
1,
~
--I
?
1
11
1
2
1

1
1
1
1
1
10
2
1

1
1
2

1
1
?
1
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
3

1
?
?
12
1
1
1
2
1
]
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
3

-
2
"l
3
1
-
1
?
8
2
^

1
2
~
1
2
2
3
1
10
3
1
?.
1
2
1
7
1
1
1
3
1
5
3
1
34
1
1
3
1
1
1
13
1
3
1
16
4
11i
8
8
124
1
20
3
1
9
2
1
3
1
1
20
2
4
1
1
19
1
4
16
4
8
9
158
1
1
21
6
1
10
7Sj47|91!?OI67|33|73|33i67i143i67i 53J81J34i'82i'39J86i 462J 878J1340

MAYOR'S ANNUALREPORT
133
O a a
e c
ffSl
tilts
o3*
0>
Cfl
to
w
^
in
In
VI
__
^
_
to
1 1
to
t
I-* t
w
to
to
1

_.!_>
ON
H-CK
2
-^
cn
OO
ftJhrJ^
rr* (t rt
S3. 2.
3 oo
S. 3 3
" E5C
fa
B-flj
o
o
V


N
.
to
1
10
to
>-
1
- 1
1
_
1
1
j N
toJt
r
h
1 H
1
Old _............ Age Paralysis _________ Patent Foramen Ovale - ________ Pellasrra ________ _____
-" 10
OJ
i to
01 10
to
1 Cd
>-> to
- -* i
1
-* - 1
UI 1
to ON
to >->
to
- to i
i
--- ON
4-
C/l
- IO 4-
O tn to
- ! w
0 <W !
1
i to
4k Crf
i OJ
Chloroform Narcosis, __________
o>
i-> O> tO
Tubercular Meningitis, __________
to
^-
Meningitis, _______ Cerebro-Spinal
^__
S
n
35"
S.
5"
Marasmus ______
->->
to
->
o
-
to
to
-to
4k
O\
I
4k
tO 4k
Ul
to
cf 1 1 .
~o>
1
1 *
4k
--
r
3
<*)
0
n
D.
3
oi-h
fcto
to to
3 1
4k OO1X U
O
KJ(U
of Lungs, Hemorrhage _________
to
n
C
O
**
Q January
^ March
Q
si '
53 May
- ^
. o June
: S T..I
0
1 tO4k
_ . ....... .
October
o
November I
o 1
^ ' [Total
a 1
- *. o, ^ -v. ^ Grand Total

3
o
3
O
S^
sr
* -i
o
3
Z
rt5
XHOd3H TVHNNV S.HOAVH 28Z
Parpura Hemorrhagica
Pyelonephritis
Rheumatism
Scrofula
Septicemia __ ,.
Septicemia, Puerperal ___
Shock ___________________
Spina Bifida
Stomach. Ulcer of __
Syphilis
Tabes Dorsalis
Teething ___ ...._. __________
Tetanus _________ _______
Thrush ________________
Tuberculosis
Tumor, Ovarian
Undefined
Uremia
Whooping Cough _
1
3
?,
I
1
1
14
1
Total _ - __ . __ - ___ _|41|57
1
1
1
1
4
1
37
3
*
12
}
1
77
1
~
4
1
?
I
9
3
2
1
1
1
S
1
1
2
2
1
3
13
?,
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
7

1

11
H-
-I--
I,
-

?
1
11
1
2
1
--
1
1
1
1
1
10
2
1

1
1
2

1
1
?
1
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
3

._
1
?
?
12
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
i*j

2
"i
3
1
1
?
8
2
j

1
2

1
2
2
3
1
10
3
1
?,
1
2
1
7
1
1
1
3
1
S
3
1
34
1
1
3
1
1
1
13
1
3
1
16
4
11i
8
8
124
1
20
3
1
9
2
1
3
1
1
20
2
4
1
1
19
1
4
16
4
8
9
158
1
1
21
6
1
10
3sisS|3"7i 7S|47|91|?0|67|33|73|33i67i43i67i53i81J34i82i39i86J 462J 878J1340

MAYOR'S ANNUALREPORT
MONTHS
January
February . March ._. _ _ _ _ _
April
i""* Mav _
June
July ..._.-....
August
September
October _
November
December
Total . _ - _
w
3
4
3
6
11
2
5
5
2
8
5
6
50
1
~*
c
9
18
8
21
25
13
17
18
10
13
23
24
199
Between and 21
w
~4
~2
1
1
4
1
3
1
2
2
21
c
2
2
~2
6
5
3
3
3
3
29
^ Between
"l
"l
1
~3
6
2 and So
1
2
6
~2
1
1
4
3
1
3
24
i
w

1
~2
5
O
C
1
1
2
2
2
1
t
I
12
* Between
'and 102in
"l
2
2
1
"l
~2
9
S
4
2
4
6
3
7
5
1
5
3
7
52
AGE SUMMARY
w
4
2
4
4
4
~4
2
2
3
1
1
31
i
3
,1'a
c
12
12
7
12
14
15
12
7
11
15
14
11
142
w
8
2
3
6
6
3
4
1
1
6
7
4
51
B |
L.
c
10
14
11
10
11
13
8
12
6
12
14
11
132
i
w
4
5
3
6
6
2
2
5
6
6
4
4
53
9.
* *
f
c
6
14
13
9
10
4
12
9
10
14
9
10
120
I
j
1
w
8
2
6
1
5
2
3
3
7
6
6
3
52
3
1
S
c
5
4
3
11
9
6
6
4
8
4
11
9
80
1
w
7
7
6
7
6
5
2
6
13
13
2
9
83
S
el
r.
c
4
3
3
5
4
4
2
7
3
5
8
48
i
i
,
3
5
7
4
3
9
5
7
4
5
2
3
57
S
Si
IB
c
2
2
4
2
2
1
"s
4
1
23
w
4
6
2
2
4
1
2
1
2
3
4
31
t
m
s
c
1
2
1
2
2
2
3
13
i
w
"I
2
-
3
8
8
c
1
1
-
2
w

"
_

8
c
2
--
_
2
1
1
w
41
37
35
37
47
30
33
33
43
53
34
39
462
c
57
77
55
75
91
67
73
67
67
81
82
86
878
\
W4C
98
114
90
112
138
97
106
100
110
134
116
125
1340
I
DEATHS FROM VIOL.I
CAUSES OF DEATH
. ..._ _. .... . . .. 1
Accidents
Asphyxiated _____ _____
Brain. Concussion cf" . _________
Burns __ ___________________
Fracture of Skull _ ___________
Gunshot Wound .. ___________________
Internal Injuries _ _________________
Poison, Chloroform ______________
Poison, Colchicun _ ______________
Spinal Injuries ~ ________________
Total . __ _ ___________
_N
>
c
i
rt *_
W
1
1
u*

^
0
', 5
.
{]
W
1
1
?
.1
!
>>
3
3
5L>
.,
0
1
1
?
4
1L,
s t
i
r
9

1
1
L,t
i
4 1
0
1
1
lit
,w
cm
0. <
c
?,
7
\
S
IS.
W
1
2
1
V
>.
8
0
1
1
3
5
Kb
iw
?
1
1
4
,M
^
3 -*
0
-_
AJ
iW|
1
1
'U
>.
3 "
C
1
1
2
Kh
4i
1
<
W
1
1
, i
*
1) i
>
0
,11
L 1
1
4
t
Wl
<1
j 2
^
Jl1
5
c
1
1
1
3
Hb
L
<
4.
C
W
2
1
1
, 1
1
-
i > >
C
-1
-
Wl
1
1
c.
S
.
s
c
1
1
1
1
4
_i
c
W,
1
1
?
J
5
j
J
>
3
0 W
3
4
2
1
4
1
1
1
2
19
"
1
0
4
4
S
?,
7
2
?4
1
o
2
O
w*o
7
8
7
1
2
11
1
1
1
4
41
I
0
3
CO>
z
Z
%! ^

a
S
5H

MONTHS
January
February March ___ _ _ ____
April
May June _ _____
July __-____________
August
September ___________
October _
November __________
December ___________
Total _ _ -_ _ .__
w
3
4
3
6
11
2
5
5
2
8
5
6
50
1
*
c
9
18
8
21
25
13
17
18
10
13
23
24
199
Between and 21
w
~4
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
2
2
21
c
2
2
~2
6
5
3
3
3
3
29
^ Between
1
"I
1
~3
6
and 52
1
2
6
~2
1
1
4
3
1
3
24
i
w

1
~2
"2
S
Or"4
1
I/)
C
1 ]
2
2
2
1
t
I
12
* Between
'and 10i" n
"l
2
2
1
"l
1
9
S
4
2
4
6
3
7
5
1
5
3
7
52
AOE SUMMARY
w
4
2
4
4
4
~4
2
2
3
1
1
31
I
3
,1'a
c
12
12
7
12
14
15
12
7
11
15
14
11
142
w
8
2
3
6
6
3
4
1
1
6
7
4
51
9
.5
fai
c
10
14
11
10
11
13
8
12
6
12
14
11
132
!
W
4
5
3
6
6
2
2
5
6
6
4
4
53
9.
\ *
>s \
c
6
14
13
9
10
4
12
9
10
14
9
10
120
t
1
]
w
8
2
6
1
5
2
3
3
7
6
6
3
52
8
1
S
c
5
4
3
11
9
6
6
4
8
4
11
9
80

w
7
7
6
7
6
5
2
6
13
13
2
9
83
S
el
r.c
4
3
3
5
4
4
2
7
3
5
8
48
8
ulIw c
3
5
7
4
3
9
5
7
4
5
2
3
57
2
2
4
2
2
1
"s
4
1
23
*
si
8
i
w
4
6
2
2
4
1
2
1
2
3
4
31
c
1
2
1
2
2
2
3
13
i
w
"I
2
-
3
8
|
1
c
1
1
--
2
w

"
__

S
!
c
2

_._.
2
1
1
w
4!
37
35
37
47
30
33
33
43
53
34
39
462
c
57
77
55
75
91
67
73
67
67
81
82
86
878
1
W4C
98
114
90
112
138
97
106
100
110
134
116
125
1340
I
DEATHS FROM VIOLENCE, STILLBIRTHS. PREMATURE BIRTHS, ETC.
CAUSES OF DEATH
'
Accidents
Asphyxiated _ .__ ___
Brain. Concussion cf* __________
Burns ___ _ __________ ______
Fracture of Skull _______ _____
Gunshot Wound ___________
Poison. Carbolic Acid __________
Poison, Chloroform .______.__. ________
Poison, Colchicun ______ __ ______
Spinal Injuries . _______ . ___
Total __ _ _________________
January February
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DEATHS FROM VIOLENCE, STILLBIRTHS, PREMATURE BIRTHS, ETC.
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Homicides
Brain, Concussion of
Gunshot Wound
Incised Wound ......... ..........._
Total . - . .....
Suicides
Internal Injuries
Poison, Opium . ________
Total ____ _____ __ ......
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'| Premature Births
Still Births - ____ ____ _______
3
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204
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DEATHS FROM VIOLENCE, STILLBIRTHS, PREMATURE BIRTHS, ETC.
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Homicides
Brain, Concussion of ...
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Total , __ ---_-_-._--...-_-
Suicides
Incised Wound
Internal Injuries
Poison, Opium . ........
Total _ __ . .. .... ...
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K
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 287
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________________ Q Q Pu o
M.R. C. P.19
288 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
LONGEVITY TABLE
lite Males
ouis _ ____
Age
86
White Females
Welch. Tane Mrs. __
Age
t Snow, Louis 97
Von Wagnon. Frederick , 85
White. John F. _____ 84
Sheridan, Patrick ____ 83
Arnerich. George 81
Eivers, John -__i 81
Craig, John H. _____| 80
Johnstone, John M. 80
Schwab, Henry _____I 80
Ernst, George _r 79
Parker, Thomas M. __ 79
Exley, Wm. L. -__~j 7?
Sauls, George :rg< W.
Strickland, Z. L.
Izlar, Samuel T. __
77
77
76
McWilliams. Joseph .__' 76
Wakelee. Wm. L. ___ 76
Hanley, Matthew ____ 75
Nungezer, Daniel ___ 75
Stevens. C. W. _____ 75
Taylor. M. F. _____ 75
Buck, Thomas _____ 74
Fannin, J. H. ___ 74
Garden, Frederick A. __ 74
Rogers, Daniel ____ 74
Rosenwagner, Henry __ 74
Oppenheimer. Karl M.__ 72
Fashman, David ____I 72
Jones, Joseph W. ___ 71
Carrol!, Charles
Cavanaugh. John
Fitzgerald, John .
Furlong, Peter
Patterson, S. G.
Sauls. W. H. _.
70
70
70
70
70
70
Roshard, Marie Mrs.
Lavender, Sarah E. Mrs.
Burke, Celia Mrs.
Baumont, Margaret Mrs.
Gnann, Salome Mrs. -
Berry, Jane D. Mrs.
Furlong. Ann C. Mrs. _
Heyden. Ellen Mrs.
Johnson. Mary E. Mrs..
Kelly, Mary Mrs. ___
Robinson. Ann Mrs.
Beranc. Caselda Mrs.
Butjer, Lou Mrs. --
Faries, Mary B. Mrs.
Goo_dwin, C. A. Mrs. | Golinski, Dora Mrs. ...
Zittrauer, Louisa J. Mrs.
Lawless, Martha Mrs. _
Mouro, Mary E. Mrs.
Bandy, Georgia E. Mrs.
Dickey. Mary Mrs. __j
Dupon, Catherine Mrs._
Erwin, Eliza Mrs.
McDermott, Martha Mrs
Dooner. Margaret Mrs.-
Laffateau. Maria Mrs.
Cosgrove, Mary Mrs.
Zittrauer, Maria Miss. _
Agati, Camela Mrs.
Maner, Frances Mrs. __
Prescott. Julia A. MrsSmith. Eflen Mrs. ___
Taylor, Mary M. Mrs._
Tibbs. Mary T. Mrs. _
Tison, Arabella C. Mrs.J
Sherlock. Annie B. Mrs.j
Middleton, Mary H. Mrs.
Murphy, Johanna Mrs.J
Wall, Ellen Mrs.
Maguire, Georgia Mrs._
O'Brien, Ann Mrs. I
Raines, Mary J. Mrs. !
Robins, Phoebe W. Mrs.
Peck, Julia A. Mrs. _ i
91
90
89
88
87
85
84
84
84
83
83
82
82
82
82
82
82
81
81
80
80
80
80
80
79
Latham. Margaret Mrs..! 79
78
77
Salte, Mary A'. Mrs._[ 77
Sams, Cornelia J. Mrs.-! 77
Henderson, M. E. Mrs..! 76
76
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
74
73
73
73
72
72
72
72
71
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
White Females Age
Colored Males Age
Murphy, Catherine Mrs.
Ray, Margaret Mrs.
Scott, Sarah Mrs. _____
Strasser, Mary Mrs.
Winders, Martha Mrs. .
Woods. Georgia Mrs. __
70
70
70
70
70
70
Colored Females Age
Maxwell, Hector '.
Carter, Thomas -
Harris, Alexander
Brown, Henton ___
Alexander, Gaston H
Nichols, Pompey -
Sanders, Joseph _.
Washington, George _-
Cost, Sim _________
Graham, Isaac ____
Heyward, January ___
Jones, Franklyn
Warrant. Sam ____
Baker, Robert R. __
Berrien, George ______
Brown, Jason __
Givins, Laurence
Green, Ben __________
Jackson, John _______
Jarrett, Sam __
Johnson, Henry _____
100
96
91
85
84
80
80
80
75
75
75
75
74
72
70
70
70
70
70
70
70
Lewis, Sarah ________
Henderson, Annie
Deveaux, Annie E.
Green, Mary ________
Jones, Mary ______
McGett, Sallie ___
Cox, Cornelia -___.
Greene, Diana
Neal, Harriet _______
Lewis, Judy ____
Weston, Harriet _
Moore, Sarah _
North, Mary _____
Wright, Dora ____
Bradley, Susan
Ficklen, Maria _
Mutric. Lucy _.
Jackson, Martha
Johnson, Maria ___
100
88
85
85
85
85
80
80
80
76
76
75
75
75
72
72
71
70
70
NATIVITY
PLACE OF BIRTH
Savannah .
Georgia, other than Savannah .... __
South Carolina .. ______
North Carolina
Florida .. ___
Virginia . . __
New York ________________
Kentucky .
Pennsylvania _._. .
Alabama _ -- __
Maine
New Jersey
Texas _ _ .... _______
Arkansas
Connecticut
Illinois - -.
Louisiana
Maryland
Massachusetts --
Minnesota _ .
Missouri .- _ .... _ .. _ _ ._ _

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184
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260
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236
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Ohio - _ ... ____ _ ____ _
Tennessee
Wisconsin __
United States ________________
Ireland _____ ___ _______
Germany _ ___________ ....
England ... . _____ __
France _ ._
Italy ____________ _ _
Norway and Sweden --_ ___ __
Russia ______ _ _____ _._
West Indies ________________
Austria ___ _ _
Denmark __ ._ __ __ ._
Greece _____ _. ___ __
Canada -- __________________
Finland ___ .._ __
Holland _____________ . ___ _ ...
Hungary __ _
Ind'a
Mexico _______
Scotland _ ___ _ _
Turkey __________________
Unknown
Total _.___ ___ ..... _ ....
1
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2
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1
41
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57
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1340
291 ANNUAL REPORT MAYOR'S

Report oi City Bacteriologist
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
Dr. W. P. Brunner, Health Officer, and Secretary Board of
Sanitary Commissioners, Savannah, Ga.
Dear Doctor:The report of the City Bacteriologist,
covering the work of the laboratory for the period beginning January 1, 1909, and ending December 31, 1909, is herewith submitted.
The Municipal Laboratory was established in the year
1908, in accordance with the terms of the City Ordinance,
and under the regulations of the Board of- Sanitary Commissioners. Active work began October 1, 1908, and continued
during the remaining three months of the year, during which
time 405 examinations were made. During the year ending
December 31, 1909, the work has increased in amount, including 2603 examinations, making a total of over 3000
examinations since the establishment of the laboratory.
*
The Municipal Laboratory is primarily a Board of
Health Laboratory. The work of the laboratory should
therefore be confined, except under certain well-defined conditions, to examinations which have a bearing upon the conservation of public health, and should not include, as a part
of the regular routine, examinations of purely clinical interest of a private nature. At the same time, the regulations
should be sufficiently elastic to allow the making of any
examinations considered advisable by the executive officer
of the Board. The following regulations, adopted by the
Board in 1908, and sent to physicians in the form of a letter,
are consideVed to cover the field of work, and to make provision for examinations in emergencies:
4________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
The Laboratory places at the disposal of the physicians
of Savannah, free of charge, the following services, which
have a bearing upon the control of Public Health:
(1) Examination of throat cultures for diphtheria bacilli;
(2) Examination of blood for Widal Reaction in suspected cases of Typhoid Fever;
(3) Examination of blood for malarial parasites;
(4) Examination of sputum for tubercle bacilli;
(5) Examination of dogs for diagnosis of rabies;
(6) Examination of feces for ova of hookworm and
other parasites; .
(7) Such special examinations of ice, water, and of
milk and other food used in Savannah, as shall be determined necessary by the Health Officer.
In addition to the above, the following examinations are
now made:
(8) Examination of urine of typhoid patients, for the
diazo-reaction. . t
(9) Examination of urine of typhoid patients, by culture methods.
(10) Examination of blood of typhoid patients, by culture methods.
(11) Examination of blood of typhoid patients (leucocyte count and differential count).
(12) Examination of exudate from cases of ophthalmia.
(13) Examination of fluid obtained by lumbar puncture, for the diagnosis of meningitis.

BACTERIOLOGIST'S OFFICE
PREPARATION ROOM
FOUR VIEWS OF THE
LABORATORY ROOM
LABORATORY ROOM
BACTERIOLOGICAL LABORATORY
M R C. rt. 10 -.'01..

__________UAYOR'8 ANNUAL REPORT________5
The work will be extended as indicated by the needs
of the community. Physicians are requested to communicate with the Department in regard to such special needs,
and to refer requests for all special examinations to the
Health Officer. For the present, examinations other than
those listed above will not be undertaken, except on special
order of the Health Officer.
The Laboratory has in stock special outfits for the
securing of material for examination. Outfits may be
secured and material left for examination at any one of the
following stations:
(1) Huff's Pharmacy, 122 West Broad Street;
(2) Knight's Pharmacy, 102 Oglethorpe Avenue, East;
(3) Solomons' Drug Store, 336 Bull Street;
(4) Kieffer's Drug Store, West Broad Street and Park
Avenue;
(5) Persse's Drug Store, 202 Henry Street, East.
Specimens left at the stations during the day will be
collected at 5.00 p. m. Specimens may be left at the Laboratory until 6.00 p. m. Diphtheria cultures, which require
prompt examination, may be left after office hours with the
City Bacteriologist; address, 402 Henry Street, East. Telephone No. 4024.
The examinations made during the current year are presented in tabular form, as follows:
1909
Sputum Examinations for Tubercle Bacilli, Positive- __
Sputum Examinations for Tubercle Bacilli, Negative
Diphtheria Culture for Diagnosis, Positive ....
Diphtheria Culture for Diagnosis, Negative _. _
Diphtheria Culture for Control of Quarantine, PositiveDiphtheria Culture for Control of Quarantine, NegativeTyphoid Fever, Widal Test. Positive _ _..._.
Typhoid Fever, Widal Test, Suggestive . ...
Typhoid Fever, Widal Test, Negative .
Typhoid Fever, Blood Culture . ...
Typhoid Fever, Urine Examination * ...
Malarial Fever, Blood Examinations, Positive
Malarial Fever, Blood Examinations, Negative
Animal Parasites, Positive -> .___
Animal Parasites, Negative
Milk Examinations, Chemical
Milk Examinations, Bacteriological
Special Examinations _ ...
1
Total ____ - - - . _ ..... >*. .r*tHt i-erTS* '"M *** - <***:: |
b
3
5 , *<
6
'?
18
6
7
4
9
6
8
3
11
102
1
198
brt
g
1
10
27
3
16
2
5
3
10
2
6
21
1
8
1
8
72
Q
204
u
%
6
14
6
9
"l
3
8
1
"I
15
47
41
1
52
61
12
278
1
0.
8
19
"7
2
2
4
12
1
5
1
13
24
33
2
70
62
35
300
X
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4
26
2
2
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6
3
7
2
3
25
34
45
1
67
57
14
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10
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6
8
15
3
2
22
6
12
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11
2991131
1
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10
19
4
6
4
4
9
9
21
2
5
35
7
3
4
2
17
161
**
t/1
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7
14
17
8
9
11
5
6
36
1
6
25
3
5
4
2
13
172
1
u
4-
a
A
10
13
30
17
29
23
3
~19
1
4
18
3
7
4
"ll
192
1.
1
3
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6
12
24
9
36
29
1
1
12
"i
17
4
7
1
10
14
19
210
h.
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B
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9
28
23
26
30
32
5
5
10
1
2
19
5
42
8
33
17
295
| !
V
u
u
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1
17
20
26
18
16
6
1
5
1
...
14
2
11
1
4
3
16
163
"s
A
87
223
138
146
136
133
55
33
164
S
27
33
232
139
214
7
245
411
175
2603
Grand Total, 2603 Examinations
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______ 297
In order to shtow more completely the scope of the work
of the laboratory, the following condensed table, covering
all the examinations made since October 1, 1908, is presented :
Recapitulation
Total number of examinations for tuberculosis_____ 345
Total number of examinations for typhoid fever____ 318
Total number of examinations for diphtheria _____ /09
Total number of examinations for malarial fever ___ 289
Total number of examinations for animal parasites__ 373
Total number of examinations for meningitis _____ 7
Total number of examinations of milk and other foods_ 777
Total number of special examinations ____'. _____ 190
Grand total ________________________3008
These examinations have been made in the service of
the people of Savannah, the population being about 65,000,
over half of the number being colored people. A casual
survey of the records shows that a comparatively small
number of examinations were made of specimens secured
from colored people, although the records of the Health Department show that the negro suffers disproportionately
from communicable diseases. The conditions responsible for
the higher mortality of the colored people have been discussed by the executive officer of the Board, who has
emphasized the fact that it is impossible to control communicable diseases in the white race without controlling
them in the colored race. It seems desirable, therefore, that
measures be taken which will insure the full use of the
laboratory for the diagnosis and control of the communicable diseases of the negro.
An examination of the titles in the tables will indicate the
value of the laboratory work in the diagnosis of infectious
diseases. With the co-operation of the physicians of the
city, to whom my thanks are due for hearty support, it is
298________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
proposed to extend the work, and to increase the number of
examinations made until the maximum number of examinations possible for the population served is attained. In order
to emphasize certain features of the work, the following discussion of results is presented:
Tuberculosis
In all, 342 examinations for tubercle bacilli in sputum
were made, of which 100 were positive, and 242 negative.
Too much emphasis cannot be laid on the fact that tuberculosis, if the condition is recognized in its early stages, is a
curable disease. Early diagnosis usually depends upon a
careful physical examination by the physician. The examination of sputum should be used to confirm the diagnosis.
In some instances, comparatively few in number, the finding
of tubercle bacilli in the sputum will be the first positive
finding. The examination of sputum is therefore of value
in the early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, and especially of value in the confirmation of a diagnosis indicated
by the physical examination. In the 242 negative .examinations, negative reports were made only after long search
for bacilli, often in duplicate specimens. An exact record is
kept of the time spent in the search for-tubercle bacilli in
each specimen. In 242 negative examinations, an average
of 36 minutes' search was made on each specimen. The
installation of apparatus for the shaking and sedimentation
of sputum, after treatment with alkaline hypochlorite solution before examination, would result in a higher percentage
of positive results, and be an economy in the saving of
time.
Malarial Fever
Since the establishment of the laboratory, there have
been made in all 289 examinations of blood for the parasites
of malarial fever. As a routine measure, blood smears are
made by physicians and sent to the laboratory for examination. The Romanowsky stain is used for the demonstration
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 299
of the parasite, with the occasional use of Carbol-thionin, or
of Koch's borax methylene blue stain.' Blood smears which
are used for differential counts are stained with Jenner's
stain, and occasionally with Ehrlich's triple stain. Fresh
blood specimens have been examined a number of times, and
physicians are urged to bring such specimens directly to the
laboratory for examination.
Malarial parasites were found in 34 of the specimens
submitted. In 14 instances, the tertian parasite was demonstrated ; in 17 instances, the parasite of aestivo-autumnal
fever was found; and in 3 instances, there were mixed infections with aestivo-autumnal and tertian parasites. There
was one case of aestivo-autumnal infection with two broods
of parasites, and seven cases in which there were found two
broods of tertian parasites. Of the mixed infections, one
case showed one brood of aestivo-autumnal parasites and
two broods of tertian parasites in the same blood specimen.
Crescents were observed in only three instances. Other
observers have noted the rare finding of crescents in the
blood of malarial patients in this territory. Possibly the
more frequent examination of fresh blood would show a
higher percentage of results.
In the negative examinations, 255 in number, a report
was made only after long search for parasites. An average
period of about 40 minutes was devoted to a search for parasites in each specimen. As indicated, differential counts
of the leucocytes were made, in all 103 specimens being so
examined. Data of value were thus obtained, a leucocytosis
indicating the possible diagnosis of septic infection, an
eosinophilia indicating infection with Uncinaria or other
animal parasite. In many instances, the previous use of
quinine as a therapeutic agent made the finding of parasites
difficult or impossible. Physicians are urged to submit
blood for examination before the use of quinine, and to make
repeated examinations of suspicious cases. Cases of aestivoautumnal fever may be difficult to differentiate from typhoid
300 MAYOR'S ANNUAL. REPORT ___
fever or certain forms of septic infection, and the blood examination may give the first positive evidence of the nature
of a severe illness. The number of cases of aestivo-autumnal infection indicates that we have a constant source of
such infection in the community. The mortality reports of
this city for 1908 are, however, misleading, as noted by the
Health Officer, since, in the absence of exact blood examinations, the diagnosis of many fatal cases in which the
cause of death was returned as malaria, must remain in
doubt. Most of the fatal cases occur in those who have
resided outside the city, in localities in which the more
severe malarial infections are common. One case of black
water fever, clinically without doubt malarial in origin, was
observed. Parasites could not be found in the blood of this
patient.
Typhoid Fever
The number of examinations required of the bacteriologist for the diagnosis of typhoid fever has not been large,
reaching a total of 318 examinations, including 277 Widal
tests, 11 blood cultures, and 30 urine examinations. We
have a good water supply, and excellent sanitary conditions.
The proper safeguarding of the milk supply will prevent, it
is hoped, a recurrence of a typhoid epidemic such as occurred in 1907. In the diagnosis of typhoid fever, the Widal
test, while of great use in the confirmation of the diagnosis,
is often of little value early in the disease. This test should
be used, therefore, in all cases, for confirmation of the diagnosis, and especially to determine the character of doubtful
cases. The blood culture, properly made, will be of greater
value, and it is proposed to offer increased facilities for the
use of this method by physicians. The method now in use,
the attempt to culivate the typhoid bacillus from small
amounts of blood taken by the physicians, has proven of little use in the diagnosis of typhoid fever. The leucocyte
count, the differential count of leucocytes in blood smears,
and the urine examination will all prove of value, and will be
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT^ 301
made as provided for in the regulations governing the work
of the laboratory. It is hoped that physicians will avail
themselves more freely of these methods. In the mild types
of fever, prevalent in this community, and by some regarded
as typhoid in character, such examinations should prove of
special value.
Animal Parasites
A large number of examinations were made for animal
parasites other than the malarial parasite, including 227
negative examinations and 146 positive examinations. Most
of the examinations were for the ova of the hookworm
(Uncinaria Americana). A number of multiple infections
were discovered. The parasites found were as follows:
Hookworm, positive - 114
Hookworm, negative ____ 227
Encysted flagellates 2
Taenia saginata _ 1
Hymenolepis nana (dwarf tapeworm) 3
Oxyuris vermicularis ______ 2
Ascaris lumbricoides . 3
Ameba coli ___-____ 1
Cercomonas hominis 7
Larva migrans 1
Larvae of fly (in stool) _ 1
Parasites of lower animals, unclassified _ 13
Since the establishment of the laboratory, examinations
have been made for the diagnosis of Uncinariasis by the finding of ova in the stools. Outfits for the collection of specimens, including a well-stoppered sterile bottle for feces, container, and data-blank with special directions for collection
of specimens and securing of data, have been placed in the
hands of physicians for use. A second outfit, consisting of
a large jar, is supplied for the collection of the whole stool
after treatment, for recovery of the worms. Examinations
are also made after treatment to determine whether the
302 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
worms have all been expelled. The examinations show that
hookworm disease is common in this locality, though probably not so common as in the rural districts of south Georgia. As the house drainage system is extended, and soil
pollution, now to a certain extent unavoidable in certain
districts, is prevented, the infection will probably become
less common. It is evident, from the data accumulating,
that many cases of so-jcalled ground-itch are not followed
by infection with Uncinaria. It is probable that the term
ground-itch is applied to a number of conditions, not all
alike. Attention is called to the fact that infection with
larva migrans may simulate ground-itch in appearance.
The examinations for ova of hookworm have been made
by direct miscroscopical examination of feces; also by the
examination of specimens diluted and centrifuged, according
to the method of Bass.
In a number of instances, physicians have submitted
blood smears from anemic patients who have fever of irregular type, a diagnosis of malaria having been made,
for examination for malarial parasites. Parasites were not
found, but the blood count showed an increase in eosinophiles, indicating the presence of animal parasites. Subsequent examination of specimens of feces have shown, in
many such cases, ova of the hookworm. The examination
is therefore indicated in all anemic patients, and is of value
as a routine examination in all cases of indefinite character.
Meningitis
Examinations of fluid obtained by lumbar puncture
should be made in all cases in which the diagnosis of meningitis is considered. An outfit is furnished consisting of a
container, with a sterile vial calibrated in cubic centimeters,
so that the exact amount of fluid withdrawn can be determined. The examinations are made by culture; also microscopic examinations of centrifuged specimens. Seven specimens have been submitted for examination during the year;
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 303
of these, the fatal cases, with the exception of one case of
pneumococcic meningitis, were tubercular. Not a single
case of cerebro-spinal fever has come under observation.
Since the brilliant results of Drs. Plexner and Jobling in the
use of antimeningitic serum in the treatment of meningococcic meningitis, the examination of fluid removed by lumbar puncture for diagnosis has an added value. Through
the courtesy of Dr. Simon Flexner, of the Rockefeller Institute, the department has been supplied with antimeningitic
serum for use in suitable cases. Such serum can now be
secured in the open market for treatment, in convenient form
for administration.
Rabies
The following examinations have been made for the
diagnosis of rabies:
December 30, 1908, brain of horse, Negri bodies not found.
April 3, 1909, brain of dog, decomposed, examination unsatisfactory.
May 17, 1909, brain of dog, Negri bodies demonstrated,
positive.
May 19, 1909, brain of dog, unfit for examination on account
of injury to head and decomposition.
June 5, 1909, cat, Negri bodies not found.
November 26, 1909, dog, Negri bodies found.
December 13, 1909, dog, Negri bodies found.
A positive diagnosis was made in three of the examinations; in two instances the examination was negative. In
two instances the dog's head was in such condition that a
satisfactory examination could not be made. Persons bitten
by rabid animals can now receive the Pasteur treatment at
home, the virus being supplied by the State Board of Health
Laboratory. All persons bitten by dogs should come at
M. R. c. s.20
304________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
once under the observation of a physician. The animal supposed to be rabid should not be killed unless it is necessary
to. do so to prevent further injury to persons or animals.
If it becomes necessary to kill animals supposed to be rabid,
the head should not be injured, so that a proper examination
of the brain can be made, and a diagnosis established.
The occurrence, at intervals during the year, of rabies
in dogs in this city, indicates that the infection is endemic,
and that we may expect occasionally to have animals submitted for examination. It is of importance that all cases
be presented for examination promptly, so that there may
be no delay in the beginning of treatment, if necessary.
Bites on the face are especially dangerous.
Examinations of Meat and Other Food
A number of examinations have been made of meat condemned by the Food Inspector. A number of examinations,
bacteriological and chemical, have been made of food and
drugs. A small number of examinations of water have been
made. It is recommended that additional work of this kind
be done.
Miscellaneous Examinations
Examinations have been made, on order of the Health
Officer, for the Waterworks Department, the Fire Department, the Park and Tree Commission, and for the Police
Department.
Milk Examinations
Since the establishment of the laboratory, there have
been made 777 examinations of milk and other products
used for food. Of these examinations 300 have been chemical, 477 bacteriological. The results of these milk examinations, all of which were made before the enforcement of the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 305
ordinance of September 8, 1909, providing for regulation
of the production and sale of milk in the City of Savannah,
are tabulated as follows:
Bacteriological Examinations
Specimens secured from November 1 to April 1.
Percentage of specimens containing less than 100,000
bacteria per cubic centimeter 10.7 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing less than 300,000
bacteria per cubic centimeter __ 29.4 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing more than 300,000
bacteria per cubic centimeter ______ 70.6 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing more than 1,000,000
bacteria per cubic centimeter __ 12.8 per cent.
Specimens Secured from April 1 to November 1.
Percentage of specimens containing less than 100,000
bacteria per cubic centimeter_ 2.1 percent.
Percentage of specimens containing less than 500,000.
bacteria per cubic centimeter __ 37.9 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing more than 500,000
bacteria per cubic centimeter ______ 62.0 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing more than 1,000,000
bacteria per<:ubic centimeter ___ 41.0 per cent.
About thirty per cent, of the milk examined during the
period from November 1 to April 1 meets the requirements
of the ordinance of September 8, 1909, as regards the bacterial content. About forty per cent, of the milk examined
from April 1 to November 1 meets the requirement of the
ordinance. It is evident, therefore, that under proper regulation, the standards proposed can easily be complied with
by dairymen. The low counts obtained in many specimens
indicate that certain dairymen are now supplying milk of
good quality. The high counts in certain specimens indicate that improvement is much to be desired.
306 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Chemical Examinations
Butter Fat (standard 3.5 per cent.)
Percentage of specimens containing more than 4 per
cent, of butter fat ___________ 59.1 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing from 3.5 to 4.0 per
cent, of butter fat _________.._ 28.6 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing from 3.0 to 3.5 per
cent, of butter fat _____________ 8.7 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing less than 3.0 per
cent, of butter fat _____________ 3.6 per cent.
Total Milk Solids (Standard 12.0 Per Cent.)
Percentage of specimens containing more than 13.0 per
cent of solids ____ 44.7 per cent
Percentage of specimens containing from 12.5 to 13.0
per cent, of solids ______'_ 24.4 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing from 12.0 to 12.5
per cent, of solids _'__________ 16.0 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing less than 12.0 per
cent, of solids ____________ 14.9 t*er cent.
Milk Solids Other Than Fat (Standard 8.5 Per Cent.)
Percentage of specimens containing more than 9.0 per
cent, of solids not fat __ 38.6 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing from 8.5 to 9.0 per
cent of solids not fat ________ 41.3 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing from 8.0 to 8.5 per
cent, of solids not fat _______ 15.3 per cent.
Percentage of specimens containing less than 8.0 per
cent, of solids not fat ___________ 4.8 per cent.
From the results presented, the average milk sold in the
city is seen to be of very good quality. In butter fat, 12.3
per cent, of the samples examined failed to meet the standard of 3.5 per cent. In total solids, 14.9 per cent, of the
MAYOR'S AkNUAL REPORT 307
specimens examined failed to meet the standard of 12.0 per
cent. In solids not fat, 19.8 per cent, of the specimens
examined failed to meet the standard of 8.5 per cent, solids
not fat. The examinations indicate that the practice of
skimming milk, or diluting it with water, is followed by
some dairymen and dealers. If this practice is prevented by
the enforcement of proper regulation, a good supply of milk
of excellent quality will be assured. The examinations
further indicate that the use of preservatives in milk is not
practiced to any extent in this city. The examinations for
preservatives, with one exception, were all negative.*
Pasteurized Milk
A series of examinations of pasteurized milk have been
made, to determine the efficiency of pasteurization. In nineteen series, a total of 360 bacteriological examinations were
made; 170 of milk before pasteurization; 190 tests of pasteurized milk. The results are tabulated 'in the following
table:
Table Showing Efficiency of Pasteurization
Series
I. -
II. __
III. ___
IV. _ _
V. ___
VI. _
VII. __
VIII. _ _
IX. _
X. _.
XI. ___
Hacteria per
cubic
centimeter in
raw milk ]
. _ 524,000
__ 880,000
_ 930,000
__ 420.000
396,000
_ 1,029,000
_ 712,000
_ _ 529,000
_ .403000
____ 290,000
______ 220,000
Pacteriaper
cubic
centimeter in
pasteurized milk
116,000
84,000
58,000
51,000
79,000
69,000
131,000
77,000
107,000
48,000
44,000
Percentage of
bacteria
killed by
r pasteurization
96.4 per cent.
90:4 per cent.
93.7 per cent.
87.9 per cent.
80.1 per cent.
93.3 per cent.
81.6 per cent.
85.4 per cent.
73.4 per cent.
83.5 per cent.
80.0 per cent.
* At the time this report goes to press, the regulations of the ordinance of September
8,1909, are in force; the examinations made show that there has been a great improvement in milk offered for sale.
306 _______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
XII._______2,993,000 307,000 90.0 per cent.
XIII._______4,169,000 111,000 97.3 per cent.
XIV._____ 447,000 330,000 26.2 per cent.
XV.________ 959,000 171,000 82.3 per cent.
XVI.________ 702,000 92,000 86.8 per cent.
XVII._______ 416,000 9,950 99.7 per cent.
XVIII._______ 369,000 33,000 91.8 per cent.
XIX.________ 530,000 130,000 75.5 per cent.
In one instance only (series XVII) was the result
satisfactory from a sanitary standpoint. In seven of the
series only was the efficiency of pasteurization over 90.0 per
cent. In one instance (series XIV) the results were so bad
that the process of pasteurization was utterly worthless from
the standpoint of efficiency. It is evident that pasteurization, as practiced in the city, is of no value from the standpoint of public health; the process used is sometimes designated commercial pasteurization. Pasteurized milk should
be a product of high quality, properly treated to insure the
destruction of all pathogenic organisms. It is recommended that regulations be secured which will require an
efficiency of pasteurization of over 99.0 per cent.; which will
insure the heating of the milk at a temperature sufficiently
high, and for a period sufficiently long, to safeguard the
product properly, and kill all pathogenic organisms. Milk
of a high degree of uncleanliness as determined by the bacterial count, should not be used for food even when pasteurized.*
Certified Milk
The high quality and excellent character of the milk
furnished by a number of dairies may be taken as the basis
for a belief that at some future time, when the demand for
such a product is sufficient, a special certified milk for the
use of infants and invalids may be furnished.
* At the time this report goeii to press, the regulations of the ordinance of September 8,1909. are in force, aad pasteurized milk of good quality is offered for sale in the city.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 309
In order that physicians may easily collect pathological
material for examination, portable and convenient outfits
for that purpose have been prepared, accompanied by
printed data blanks. These outfits can be secured by physicians at the culture stations, as listed in the letter to physicians. It is proposed also to place outfits in the hospitals
of the city. The following outfits are available:
(1) Outfit (box, sterile bottle, and blank) for sputum
in cases of suspected pulmonary tuberculosis.
(2) Outfit (culture tube and sterile swabs) for making
throat cultures in cases of suspected diphtheria. Blanks are
furnished for diagnosis and for control of quarantine.
(3) Outfit (slide holder, slide, lancet, and blank) for
the Widal examination of blood from cases of suspected
typhoid fever.
(4) Outfit (box, sterile vial, and blank) for the examination of urine from cases of suspected typhoid fever.
(5) Outfit (culture tube and pipette, with lancet and
blank) for blood culture in cases of suspected typhoid fever.
(6) Outfit (flask of nutrient medium, sterile syringe,
blank, etc.) for blood cultures in cases of suspected typhoid
fever.
(7) Outfit (box, slides, lancet, and blank) for blood examination for detection of parasites in cases of suspected
malarial infection.
(8) Outfit (box, sterile bottle, and blank) for the collection of feces and other material in cases of suspected
infection with animal parasites.
(9) Outfit (box, sterile vial, and blank) for the collection of spinal fluid in cases of suspected cerebro-spinal fever.
llAVOR'S ANNUAL
(10) Outfit (box, culture tube, slide, swab, and blank)
for examinations of exudate from the eye in cases of suspected ophthalmia.
Other special outfits are furnished on application.
Every endeavor has been made to secure convenient arid
practical outfits for the use of physicians, since it is considered that such facilities will add to the total number of examinations made. The cost of such outfits is considerable, but
is a necessary part of the running expense.
Reports are made to physicians by telephone as soon
as the examinations are completed. Diphtheria cultures are
examined first, and reported usually by 10 o'clock a. m.
Widal examinations and other laboratory tests for typhoid
fever are next made, and reported usually by 1 1 o'clock a. m.
The examination of sputum and other material is then undertaken, the reports being made usually by midday. Written reports, on suitable blanks, are also made to physicians,
to avoid the possibility of error. Every effort is made to secure accuracy in reports. Daily reports of all cases which
are required by law to be reported are made to the Health
Officer. Physicians are respectfully requested to note that
these reports do not take the place of reports by physicians,
as required by law, and which should also be made in writ
ing to the Health Officer. Blanks for this purpose are placed
in each outfit.
A monthly statement, covering the work of each period,
is made to the Board of Sanitary Commissioners.
The results of the laboratory examinations are entered
on the data blanks, which are numbered seriall}', and filed
for reference. For the convenience of physicians, and for
ready reference to the results of the examinations, the data
blanks are also indexed alphabetically.
An inventory of apparatus and supplies, the property
of the city, has been made and entered on a card index.
liAVdftS ANNUAL REPORT 311
Additional apparatus and supplies, as purchased, are entered
bn this index. An account of the number and character of
the outfits supplied to the culture stations and to physicians is also kept. Accounts are also kept of the supplies
used in the work of the laboratory, and of apparatus broken
or injured in the course of the routine work. Accounts f.i
incidental and other running expenses are kept, in the interest of economical administration, and to furnish a basis
for estimates.
The laboratory examination of the throats of convalescent diphtheria patients, to determine the length of time required for quarantine, has shortened the average time of
quarantine, and been of assistance in controlling sources of
infection, the danger of which could not be determined from
clinical considerations alone. But one negative culture has
been required for release of quarantine. It is respectfully
recommended, in accordance with the usual practice in the
cities of this country in which municipal laboratories have
been established, that two consecutive negative cultures be
required for the release of quarantine, the first to be taken
by the attending physician, the second by an officer of the
Health Department. The incidence of a widespread epidemic of diphtheria soon after the opening of the schools in
the fall of 1908 indicates that the infection is spread through
its persistence, often unsuspected, in the throats of convalescents and of those who come in contact with them.
Chemical Laboratory
An additional room has been secured and equipped as
a chemical laboratory, for use in the examination of milk
and food.
Library
Books and journals are much needed for use in the
work of the department. The budget submitted for the coming year makes provision for securing a journal dealing with
the subject of bacteriology, and for securing a chemical
312________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
year-book. The reports of Boards of Health and laboratories, State and municipal, and the publications of the
medical departments of the United States government can
be secured without cost, and will be valuable additions to a
department library.
The assistant bacteriologist, Miss Jane Van de Vrede,
has rendered skilled and faithful service in the conduct of
the routine work, and in the making and preservation of
records. A second assistant has been secured to give assistance in the preparation of outfits, sterilization of media, and
in the collection of specimens from the culture stations.
The thanks of the bacteriologist are due to the Health
Officer, and to the members of. the Board of Sanitary Commissioners for hearty support; also to the physicians of
Savannah for their co-operation.
Respectfully submitted,
V. H. BASSETT, M. D.,
City Bacteriologist
Report of City Physicians
Eastern District
Savannah, Ga., January 1. 1910
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor, Savannah:
Sir:I herewith render my report as City Physician of
the Eastern District, from October 1 to December 31, 1909:
October _____
November _ _ _ _
December ___ _
Total ___ __
g S^O<J
117
183
186
486

1
>
169
197
205
571
No. ofPatients
204
260
303
767
Georgia Infirmary
4
3
4
11
>5
T 5.
a y J30
o5S
2
2
4
Very respectfully
C. B. TYSON
City Physician, Eastern District

Report of the City Dispensary
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor City:
Dear Sir:I hereby beg to submit to you this my
report for the year ending December 31, 1909.
The number of prescriptions filled is as follows:
White Colored Total
January ______________ 639 1242 1881
February _____________ 437 1065 1502
March _______________ 577 1289 1866
April ________________ 633 1190 1823
May _________________ 629 1185 1814
June _________________ 500 1399 1899
July _______________ 621 1194 1815
August ______________ 625 1164 1789
September ____________ 618 997 1615
October ______________ 638 1066 1704
November ____________ 513 1001 1514
December ____________ 496 959 1455
Total _____________6926 13,751 20,677
Expenditures
January
Rent _____________________$ 40.00
Wages _________________________ 205.00
Solomons Company ________________ 192.50
316 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Gas ___________________________ 15.00
Small's Cash Grocery _____ 10.70
Ice ____________________________ 3.62
Savannah Stationery and Printing Company ____ 3.55
F. S. Jette & Son ____________________ 7.00
Laundry L______________________ 2.50
Drug Circular _____ 1.50
Kiernan ____________________________ .75
Total ___________________$492.12
February
Rent ___________$ 40.00
Wages _____-______________ 205.00
Columbia Drug Company _____ 147.97
Gas __-____-______-____._____________ 12.15
Ice __________._________________ 1.25
Braid & Hutton -______ 17.00
J. A. Tison & Son ___________________ 5.85
M. S. &. D. A. Byck Company_____________ 1.35
Southern Builders' Supply Company ________ .85
I
Total ________________________$431.32
March
Rent ________$ 4000
Wages _______1_________________ 205.00
Solomons Company __ 153.72
Gas ____________________________ 9.00
Small's Cash Grocery _________________ 9.75
Ice ____________________________ 1.80
Savannah Press _________________ 5.00
Directory _________________ 6.00
J. A. Tison & Son _.___ 4.50
Total ____-__________________$434.77
__ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 317

April
Rent _____________________________$ 40.00
Wages __________________________ 205.00
Columbia Drug Company __ 199.36
Gas ______________________________ 10.70
Small's Cash Grocery _________ 6.00
Ice ____________________________- 2.47
Braid & Hutton _____________ 2.50
Lindsay & Morgan ____ 10.00
Phosphorized Oil Company 5.40
F. B. Durham ________________ 2.00
Total __________________________$483.43
May
Rent _____________________________$ 40.00
Wages _________________-_______ 205.00
Solomons Company 147.14
Gas ______________________________. 9.20
Small's Cash Grocery _____________ 6.83
Ice ____________._______'_______________ 1.52
Total __________________________$409.69
June
Rent _____________________________$ 4000
Wages ___________________________ 205.00
Columbia Drug Company ___ 140.42
Gas _______________________ 6.60
Small's Cash Grocery _________________ 7.08
Ice ______________________________ 2.48
Kennickell Printing Company _____________ 20.50
Eckstein __________________________ 3.90
Haines, Jones & Cadbury ________________ .80
Total ________________________$426.78
318_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
July
Rent _____________________________$ 40.00
Wages __________________________ 205.00
Solomons Company _________._____ 153.40
Gas ____________________________ 7.00
Small's Cash Grocery ___________________ 7.06
Ice ________________.______.___ 3.71
Total __________________________$416.17
August
Rent _____________________________$ 40.00
Wages ____________________________ 205.00
Columbia Drug Company _ 99.46
Gas _____________________________ 2.25
Small's Cash Grocery __________________ 8.45
Ice ______________________________ 3.15
Kennickell Printing Company ____________ 7.00
F. B. Durham _______________________ LOO
Total __________________________$366.31
September
Rent _____________________________$ 40.00
Wages __________________________ 155.84
Solomons Company _________ 121.29
Gas ____________________________ 8.00
Small's Cash Grocery ___________________ 5.65
Ice _________'-___________________ 2.35
Lewis Manufacturing Company _________ 24.50
Telephone _________________________ 5.00
Scrubbing ________________________ 1.50
Laundry _________ .35
Total __________________________$364.48
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 319
October
Rent ______-____________-$ 40.00
Wages __- 140.00
Columbia Drug Company _ 128.81
Gas _____:________-_-__-__:_:_- ,1.00
Harms' Grocery '.________________ 4.35
Ice __-_____-___-_____-___ 1.81
Scrubbing ___^_____ 2.85
Laundry _ .35
Total __-____-_-______$319.17
November
Rent ____________-________________$ 40.00
Wages ___-____________________ 160.00
Solomons Company :.__ 104.79
Gas _____________________________ 4.00
Harms' Grocery ___________________ 4.53
Ice ____________________________ 1.08
Scrubbing _____________ 2.00
Total _______________._______$316.40
December
Rent __________________$ 40.00
Wages __________ 160.00
Columbia Drug Company _______________ 38.85
Gas ______________ 525
Harms' Grocery ____________________ 4.35
Ice ________________ .70
Scrubbing ________________ 2.00
Wood ________________ 3.75
Total __________$254.90
II. K. O. 8.21
306 MAYOR'S ANrftiAL
Totals
January __________ _ ____ ____________$ 492.12
February ___ _____ __ __ _ : 431.32
March ___________________________ 43477
April __________ -II __________ 483.43
May ______ _ _____________________ 409.69
June ____________________________ 426.78
July __________ :_ _________________ 416.17
August __ _____ ___: 366.31
September ______________ _ _ 364.48
October _______________ _ ____ __ 319.17
November _ _ _________ 316.40
December ________ _ ________________ 254.90
. Total _______________________ $4,715.54
This includes supplies for the various charitable institutions of the city and City Physicians.
Very respectfully yours
JNO. H. HARMS
Keeper City Dispensary
Report oi Inspector oi Plumbing
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
Hon. George W. Tiedeman .
Mayor City of Savannah, Ga.
Sir:Herewith I have the honor to submit my report
for the year ending December 31, 1909.
Bills tor Inspections Made touring 1909
Month Fixtures Amount of Fees
January _________ 73 $ 36.50
February ________ 18 9.00
March ______________ 78 39.00
April _______________ 115 ' 57.50
May _______________ 72 36.00
June ______________ .40 70.00
July___.___________ 229 .. '. . .114.50
August ______________ 138 69.00
September-_____________ 143 '; '71.50
October .:______"___j_,l_'_ 119 ./'. : 1 : 5&50
November _______I____ 111 55.50
December ______^:i__i____ 73 36.50
Grand total _____ 1,309 $654.50
, Net total _._____1,289 644.50
By your order, the inspection fee on twenty fixtures,
amounting to $10.00, was waived on account of charity, this
being a special case that was brought to your notice.
322________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
Against 1906,1909's fees decreased $43.50. Besides these
inspections, I also made others, for which no fee is charged.
I have them arranged herewith:
Number of sewers inspected _169
Inspections for Health Department ____149
Inspections for property owners ________ 65
Total No-Fee Inspections________383
I have made inspections of sewers, this work formerly
being done by regular sewer inspectors. The city is thus
saved the sum of $1560.00 per annum.
Many cases of bad plumbing were brought to my
attention by the Health Department, and proper action
taken to remedy the trouble. It is sometimes necessary to
make two or more re-inspections before my directions are
properly carried out. On the other hand, a number of the
cases referred to me by persons who have a grievance
proved to have no foundation, there being instances where a
new bathtub or water closet was wanted, simply because it
was not of the latest model.
The amount appropriated for the operation of my
office for the year 1909 was $1750.00. Of this amount, at
the close of the year, $14.95 remained.
In conclusion, I desire to thank your Honor and the
Committee on Public Health for favors shown and suggestions offered during the year just ended.
Very respectfully,
>v
A. ROBIDER,
Inspector of Plumbing.
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PARK AND TREE COMMISSION
OF THK
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
FOR THK YEAR
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 19O9
Pi D. D A'FFlN
CHAIRMAN
PARK AND TREE COMMISSION
CHARLES S. ELLIS-___Term Expires January 1,1910
PHILIP D. BAFFIN____Term Expires January 1,1912
ISAIAH A. SQLOMONS_Term Expires January 1,1912
GEORGE J. BALDWIN*_Term Expires January 1,1914
S. E. THEUS__________Term Expires January 1,1914
T. H. McMILLAN**_____Term Expires January 1,1914
*Resigned November 29, 1909.
**Appointed December 22, 1909.
Chairman
PHILIP D. DAFFIN
Vice-Chairman
CHARLES S. ELLIS
Secretary
ISAIAH A. SOLOMONS
Clerk
WILLIAM H. ROBERTSON
Foreman
JAMES B. WISE
Florist
FRANZ SCHWALBE
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery (White Portion)
A. B. LAROCHE
Keeper Bonaventure Cemetery (White)
B. C. THQRPE
Keeper Laurel Grove Cemetery (Colored Portion)
HENRY WILLIS
Report of the Park and Tree Commission
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910. .
Hon. Geo. W. Tifcdenun, Mayor :
City
Sir:In accordance with Section 6 of an Act of the
Legislature of the State of Georgia, approved November 30,
1895, to create and organize a Park and Tree Commission
for the City of Savannah, the Commissioners have the honor
to submit this report of their doings for the past year:
Our Public Ground*
Acres
Forsyth Park_____ 10.
Forsyth Extension 21.
Colonial Park______________________ 6.6
Twenty-five squares '. 21.8
Oglethbrpe Green-______ 3.44
Liberty Street Green____________________ 2.18
Dasher Park _________________________ .2
Thomas Park__________ .2.
Wells Square________j______._______ 1.4
Emmet Park _________________________ 4.75
Myers Park _______________________ 1.56
Cann Park ____________________________ 24$
Dixon Park __________________________ 1.29
Grayson Park ______,_________________ 1.75
Baffin Park _________________________ 80.40
Park in Dixon Ward (not named) ___________:. 2.17
Park in Grayson Ward (not named)_________ 2.78
Park in Watson Ward (not named)__________ 1.29
Tiedeman Park_______________________ 2.7*5
McCauley Park______________!________ 1.2
Solomons Park ____________________:___ 1.2
326________MAYOR'S ANNUAL -OtPOKT_________
Theus Park ____'______:_____________ 12
Baldwin Park ________________________ 12
Guckenheimer Park_____________________ 1.2
Total _________________________175.54
Total area of Parks and Squares-__________175.54
Laurel Grove Cemetery (White, 57.1; Colored, 60.8)_117;9
Bonaventure Cemetery _________________ 91.22
Total area of our public grounds ___:_____384.66
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Parks and Squares
There has been appropriated during the year _$12,000.00
There has been expended______________ 13,507.80
Appropriation overdrawn ___________-._$ 1,507.80
' Parks and Squares (Tree Planting) .
There has been appropriated during the year__$ 2,000.00
There has been expended____________ 1,999.58
Balance unexpended-.__*--$ -42
Parks and Squares; Special Appropriation, Cement Walks,
.'.. . Thomas Park
There was appropriated .$ 745.00
There was expended 756.55
Appropriation overdrawn ,_$ 11.55
Parks and Squares, Special Appropriation, New Lawn
Mowers
"Fhere was appropriated$ 250.00
There was expended . 249.94
Balance unexpended.$ .05
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Parks and Squares, Special Appropriation, Cement Walks,
Bay Street Strand
There was appropriated ________ _ _ _ $ 3,315.64
There was expended : 3,315.64
Parks and Squares, Special Appropriation, Planting Palmettos, Y. M. C. A. Building
There was appropriated ___ _ ___ _ _ __ _ $ 160.00
There was expended _________ __ _ ___ 160.00
Parks and Squares, Special Appropriation, to Exchange of
Mule
There was appropriated $ 140.00
There was expended __________ ______ 140.00
Baffin Park
There was appropriated. : _$ 1,555.37
There was expended _ _ 1,555.37
Bonaventure Cemetery
There was appropriated $ 8,000.00
There was expended ___________ _ _ _ __ 9,062.83
Appropriation overdrawn __________$ 1,062.83
Bonaventure Cemetery, Special Appropriation, Improvements
There was appropriated_______-$15,000.00
There was expended 7,910.8t
Balance unexpended$ 7,089.19
i
<
I 32? HAYOIfS ANNUAL REPORT ____
j' Bonaventure Cemetery ] . ' . . : ...:..
Receipts
Received from sale of lots-___$ 3,937.47
Received from burial fees______________ 495.50
Received from care of lots, water rents, and
miscellaneous work _______________ 3,900.15
Total paid to City Treasurer_____________$ 8,333.12
Laurel Grove Cemetery
There was appropriated_______________$ 5,000.00
There was expended________________ 6,410.08
Appropriation overdrawn ___'. ________________$ 1,410.08
Laurel Grove Cemetery
Receipts
/
Received from sale of lots, white $ 1,143.50
Received from burial fees, white 1,465.00
Received from sale of lots, colored 1________ 198.00.
Total paid to City Treasurer$ 2,806.50
Daffin Park, Rent Fond
Cash balance on hand, January 1,1909 _$ 16.78
Received from rents, sale of stables, etc. 148.50
$ 165.28
Expended as per vouchers on file 25.00
Cash balance on hand, January 1, 1910$ 140.00
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 329
Trust Fund for the Care of the Mazy E. Williams LotLaurel Groye Cemetery
Received from City Treasurer:
jy 1, 1909 _
ile _ __ _
$
_ $
2.70
11.25
13.95
Expended as per vouchers on file 13.95
Forsyth Park and Bull Street Squares
The regular routine work has been carried on in these
parks and squares the past year.
Forsyth Park and Bull Street squares were planted in
Italian rye grass, but we had no rain after the seed were
planted, and so the success of planting was very indifferent;
'but we are, however, glad to report that towards the latter
part of the year the seed began to germinate, and now the
plats are presenting a very beautiful spring-like appearance.
The stock of plants in our greenhouses on Barnard
Street is not as large as last year, as our former florist did
not keep same up, but we hope during the coming year to
propagate and add materially to our stock before the planting season begins.
The Commission dispensed with the services of its
florist, Mr. Franz Schwalbe, on November 30, 1909, and
'this department is now under a foreman, the work being
directed and superintended from the office of this Commission.
Below is given the stock of plants on hand in our park
greenhouses on December 31, 1909:
Phoenix Roebelenii ______________ 75
Latania Borbonica._____________ 50
Dracaenas _________;__ 700
330________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______
Small Palms, different varieties_ ISO
Pandanus Utilis and Sanderii 125
Hibiscus _____-___.___. 600
Acalypha ________-________ 550
Sancevia __ 400
Aspidistra Plectogina 100
Strobolanthus, variegated 350
Strobolanthus, flowering _________ 250
Phylodendron ________ 200
Dieffenbachia 25
Cypress Alternifolius _________ 75
Phylanthus _________________:_ 350
Abutilon _______________ 200
Plumbago 250
Croton _____________________ 700
Ficus Elastica 25
Clerodendron 150
Poinsettia Pulcherima 25
Euvanimus 75
Acheranthum : 100
Hydrangea _____ 300
Geranium 50
Camellia ___________________ 150
Alternanthera -________ 500
Sedum, variegated _______:_ 100
Cactus ___- 75
Begonia 50
Ferns _____L_______________________ 75
Salvia Splendens 500
Asparagus Sprengeri 400
Azaleas ________T______ 300
Coleus, 8 colors_________________:2,850
Amaryllis __ 50
Miscellaneous plants J____ 450
Total number of plants in Park greenhouse._11,375
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 331
Attention is again called to the necessity of rebuilding
our greenhouses on Barnard Street, the present ones, aside
from being overcrowded and unsightly in their present condition, have been patched and patched until there is no
longer any possibility of patching, and it will be out of the
question to use them another year; so that it now becomes
necessary to rebuild, and since that is necessary, we desire
to do so as soon as the plants are out in the spring, so that
we will be ready to receive them back in the greenhouses
in the fall without delay, as delay means loss of plants, and
loss of plants means loss of money; so that to build right
and quickly is very important.
We regret that it becomes necessary to again trouble
your honorable body about the condition of the walks in
Forsyth Park, but the necessity for new walks is very
apparent; the present ones are practically worn out, and in
rainy weather almost impassable; we therefore urge your
honorable body to make some provision in the next budget
for the laying of artificial stone walks in this park.
The fountain, which we painted five years ago, with our
own labor, has stood the test of time remarkably well, but
now needs to be painted again, which we will do the early
part of the coming year.
Bonaventure Cemetery
The total area of Bonaventure Cemetery at present,
including the purchase of 12.29 acres in 1907, is 91.22 acres.
In the old portion, nearly all the lots which had been surveyed and opened up. had been sold, and there were very
few available for burial purposes. We have had surveyed
and are offering now a portion of Section "K," from the
river outa Very choice and beautiful portion of the old
Cemetery; also all of Section "P," in the Hebrew part, comprising 250 lots in a most beautiful location. A few of these
lots, 32 in number, have been sold, and are being improved!
A notable improvement is the noble and costly mausoleum
recently erected by the Meinhard family.
332 . MAYOR'S AKNUAL I&PORT
Considerable portions of the Cemetery, both old and
new, have been cleared off, and are being improvednearly
all around the main entrance is now cleared off, trees
trimmed, and ground grassedmaking a pretty lawn effect.
When the special appropriation of $15,000.00 for improvements was made available in November, by direction
of the Commission, contracts were made for 200 carloads of
Augusta gravel to be delivered in the Cemetery, and work
begun on the roadways at once. At this time the principal
avenues have been graveled, the spreading having been done
by our own force. There will be gravel enough to harden
all the avenues now opened up, and some of the cross streets
needing it most. The work is already showing up well, and
is markedly effective and popular.
It having been decided that a better system of waterworks was demanded by our necessities, the Commission
advertised for bids to erect a modern steel tank of 50,000
gallons capacity. Seven bids were received, ranging from
$4,200.00, the highest, to $2,540.00, the lowest. The latter
($2,540.00) bid was awarded to Messrs. J. S. Schofield's
Sons Company, Macon, Ga., and the tank has been erected,
and, according to the specifications, will be accepted by the
Consulting City Water Engineer, Mr. H. S. Jaudon, to
whom we are indebted for valuable assistance. Cost of concrete foundations and necessary large central mains have
run up the cost to about $3,600.00.
It was hoped that the old gasoline engine could be made
effective for the new tank, but the highest elevation that the
present pumping outfit will raise the water is not sufficient
to put same in new tank, the height of the new tank being
over 105 feet, as against 20 feet in the old tank, renders it
necessary to have a more powerful engine. The completion
of this work will cause a considerable reduction in bur labor
bill, and give us plenty of water for years to come.
As the avenues are opened up, it becomes necessary to
set out trees, lay off grass plats, especially iri the very wide
StAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 333
spaces of the principal avenue, and to plant shrubbery, not
only to occupy the blank spaces, but to add adornment to
the general effect. Such work has been done during the
year, and the results are evident in Tattnall, Magnolia, Palmetto, and other avenues. It was impossible to plant trees
to any extent, but we hope to do this where most needed
^the present year.
During the past year, the old tool-house has been fitted
up for an officethe office having heretofore been in the
keeper's dwellinga safe provided, and the records and
papers now have a secure home.
A ladies' toilet and lavatory has also been provideda
want long called for.
The keeper's house has been repaired and made habitable.
Granite posts have been, and are being, placed, to define the lines of the avenues and streets.
An additional mule and wagon has been added to our
stock, rendered necessary by the accumulated work of trimming and hauling trees and brush.
One thousand, nine hundred feet garden hose has been
purchased, and also necessary mowers, tools, etc.
-. ' *
" The general care and beautification of the Cemetery has
been carried on in many details too numerous to mention.
Our force is now caring for 281 private lots, and the
difference between these lots so cared for and other lots
cared for by the owners thereof is so great as to be marked.
During the whole year, whether the seasons are favorable or unfavorable, the lots cared for by the Cemetery force
are spots of beauty, appealing to the commendation of their
owners, and giving satisfaction to them. This, of course,
requires full, steady libor, but is repaid in the consequent
revenue.
334________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ______
I beg to call your attention to the increasing revenue
from sale of lots, burial fees, and care of lots, in various
waysgrassing them, mowing, trimming, manuring, etc.

Receipts from such sources for 1909 were__-$8,333.12
Receipts from such sources for 1908 were. 6,383.22
Being an increase of _______________ 1,949.90
or over 30 per cent.
The annual budget for 1909 provided for
Bonaventure Cemetery _______$5,000.00
Afterwards, March 10, increased___________ 3,000.00
Making ___________________________$8,000.00
for the year 1909.
The increase of revenue thus exceeded the appropriation
$333.12.
It still seems to be the opinion in some quarters that as
the revenue increases the appropriation should be decreased.
This might be proper if the revenue was placed to the credit
of the Commission, to be paid out on their orderbut this
is not so. The Commission gets nothing except by actual
appropriation. The revenue goes into the City.Treasury as
it is paid into the Park and Tree Commission, and only goes
out again by actual vote of the City Council.
In regard to work on the river front, to prevent the
same from being washed away by the river, beg to advise
that we have taken the matter up with the City Engineer,
who is preparing plans to cover the said work, which, when
completed, will be submitted to your honorable body, with
an estimate of the approximate cost of such work.
We cannot impress upon you too strongly the importance of immediate action in this matter.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________335
Wells Square, Thomas Place, and Dasher Park
In "Wells Square," the usual routine work has been
carried on, the old railing around fountain removed, fountain
repaired and put in good running order.
We beg to report that it is almost impossible for us
to keep benches in this park, as they are mutilated and destroyed almost as soon as they are placed, and we are unable
to get any information that would lead to the apprehension
and conviction of the parties guilty of this piece of vandalism, and unless the property owners and tenants living
around said park, together with the Police Department, assist this Commission in breaking up this practice, then it will
become necessary to abandon the placing of benches in the
said park, and the innocent ones will be deprived of the comfort of suitable means of rest, and made to suffer, because of
the meanness of a few unappreciative people.
We beg to respectfully call your attention to the need
of artificial stone walks in this park, the present ones being
very badly worn, and fast becoming unserviceable.
We are indeed glad to report that, with the appropriation
allowed us by Council for artificial stone walks, we have
completed the walks in Thomas Park, and pedestrians are
now afforded a more comfortable means of passage. .
We havfc- prepared a place in Thomas Park to receive
the fountain, which will be removed from Chippewa Square
to make room for the Oglethorpe Monument, and trust that
Council will approve of the site selected.
In "Dasher Park," we have done but little, except to
keep it in good condition, no extra or unusual work having
been done.
Squares East and West of Bull Street and North of Gaston
Street
The squares have been as well kept as the funds in
hand would permit.
M. R. C. S.22 k
3M MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
In the fall, the squares were planted in Italian rye
grass, but they, too, like the parks, did not present the
pretty green appearance for the winter months that we had
hoped, owing to the continued dry weather.
We beg here to respectfully call Council's attention to
the urgent need of new walks in some of our squares, as
the present ones are in very bad condition, and especially is
this true of Warren Square; and we hope that Council will
make an appropriation to cover the cost of such walks.
The Strand
It affords us great pleasure to report the wonderful
improvement in "The Strand" the past year.
What has been for so many years an eyesore, has been
and is being transformed into a thing of beauty, and is today
one of the prettiest parts of our city.
The paving of the roadways in The Strand with vitrified
brick, the laying of artificial stone walks, the planting of
hedges, grading and planting of the grass plats, all have
tended to aid in its material beautification, and we trust that
by the middle of the coming year all of the improvements
will have been completed.
We have removed the old unsightly hitching racks
for horses, and replaced the same with ornamental galvanized iron ones, which' add very much to "the improvement
of The Strand.
The fund which was subscribed by the property owners
and tenants, in the block on Bay Street between Drayton
and Abercorn Streets, was and is being devoted to the direct
improvement and beautification of that particular block, and
we beg to report the placing of two very large and beautiful
metal urns on the grass plat, which during the spring and
summer are kept filled with ornamental plants, adding much
to the beauty scheme.
_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______337
The hitherto unused grass plats, directly in front of
the office buildings, have been converted into hydrangea
beds, and we are quite sure that no improvement could have
been made that would give better results and add more to
the attractiveness of this spot.
The retaining wall, which adjoins Factors' Walk, has
been planted with Ampelopsis, and in a year or two this
unsightly wall will be completely covered from view by this
pretty creeper; in the spring we will plant English Ivy, so
that the said wall will be kept green both summer and
winter.
Myers and Cann Parks
We dislike very much indeed to place ourselves in a
nagging position, but we feel that we must keep before
Council the things which we deem necessary to be done;
and so, therefore, desire to again respectfully call your attention to the necessity of curbing these parks, and allowing
an appropriation for their further improvement.
Grayson and Dixon Parks
Grayson Park has been placed in fairly good condition,
but the lack of funds has prevented many improvements that
could have been and should be made.
Dixon Park has been given as much care as possible
the past year, but the fact that this park has no walks of
any kind in it is deplorable, and causes much inconvenience
to pedestrians.
Grass Plats
We have made some improvement in the grass plats
the past year, but it was not as much as we had hoped;
but when the large territory which we have to cover and
the funds with which we have to do it is taken into consideration, we feel that we have accomplished a great deal.
338________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The grass plats were planted in Italian rye grass, and
are beginning to show up very pretty now." .,
There is still much filling in necessary, and we are endeavoring to do this from time to time.
Trees
The Commission are accomplishing a great deal in their
tree planting work, and Council will readily see from the
number of trees planted that the appropriation is being very
carefully expended.
We are striving each year to cover the sections of the
city that are still bare of trees, but as Savannah keeps on
growing and the territory, therefore, increasing, it does not
give us a chance to catch up with the old work, but we are
steadily plodding on, and time alone will show the results
of our labor.
Trees fit for planting purposes are each year becoming
more scarce, and the distance traversed in procuring suitable
trees is growing larger each year; in fact, we have been getting trees at a distance of forty miles from Savannah, so
that in itself will give some idea as to how the forests around
Savannah have been depleted of their trees by this Commission for use in its tree planting work.
We planted during the past year 1,152 trees, and the
following will show the number and variety of each:
Live Oak ___________-________ 523
Hackberry ___________________ 170
Sweet Gum ________________ 155
Dogwood -_____--_ 60
Palmetto ___________________ 57
Magnolia __________ 53
Green Ash ___ 40
Red Oak _____.__ 20
Lagerstremia 20
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________339
Lombardy Poplar 16
Crab Apple 16
Ironwood 11
Red Bud __________________ 6
White Oak __________________ 5
1,152
Trimming Trees
We have given considerable attention to this branch of
our work the past year, and one may readily see the marked
improvement which has been made by judicious pruning
and trimming.
Spraying of Trees
This branch of our work has been given very careful
attention, and we are able to report that we are controlling
the various insects and scale that attack our trees.
Removal of Trees
During the year we removed 160 trees, 148 of that number being dead and dangerous, and remainder of 12 having
been blown down by storms.
The following will show the number and variety of
dead trees removed:
Water Oak ___________________ 42
Sycamore 38
Elm _______________________ 19
Chinaberry __________________ 18
Mulberry ___________1________ 17
Red Bud _____________________ 3
White Oak __________________ 3
Ash _______________________ 3
Cedar _____________________ 1
Live Oak_____________________ 1
MO MAYOR'S .ANNUAL REPORT
Magnolia _ 1
Poplar ____________________ 1
Maple ________________ 1
148
The following show the number and variety of trees
blown down by storms:
Mulberry _____________________ 5
Sycamore _______________ 3
Chinaberry ____________________ 1
Water Oak ____________________ 1
Maple ________________._____ 1
12
Tree Nursery
The routine -work in the tree, nursery has been carried
on the past year, in spite of the fact that no special appropriation for the purpose was made by Council, the cost of
such care and maintenance being borne by our regular appropriation.
We have a number of fine young trees in our nursery,
which by care and attention should be ready for planting in
the fall.
Unfortunately, the site selected for this nuftery was not
a good one, in that the soil was very poor indeed, and it, of
co'urse, takes much longer to bring the trees up to proper
planting size.
Emmet Park
The work in Emmet Park has been done the past year
as usual, Italian rye grass having been planted, new benches
placed, the old ones repaired and painted, and the park presents a most attractive appearance.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 341
Parks in Granger Tract
We desire to call your attention to the fact that these
parks are as yet uncurbed, and as they are terraced it is
really very necessary that this be done as early as possible,
to prevent the earth from being washed into the street; and
then, too, no definite improvement can be made until this
curbing is laid.
Colonial Park
The Commission has used every effort in its power to
break up the vandalism that exists in this park, but has had
little success, and we hope that the Police Department will
see its way clear to give more protection to the property
contained therein.
We have accomplished the routine work in this park as
usual, mowing the grass, repairing benches, vaults, etc. '
The grass plats are overrun with a growth of garlic,
which must be removed if we expect to keep the grass plats
in good condition, and as this work must be done by hand it
will require much tedious work to accomplish its eradication, but we are determined that it must be done at any
cost.
The laying of the new artificial stone walk on Oglethorpe Avenue was much needed, and is a decided improvement.
Damn Park
Other than the completion of the grading of the center
mall, that is, at the western end of same, a portion of the
mall near center of park not yet having been completed, no
work of great importance has been done.
In January of the past year, we called Council's attention to the necessity of disposing of the buildings on Daffin
Park, as they were in danger of being destroyed by *:rc.
3________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
and then, too, they were depreciating in value; but before
Council took definite action in the matter the large grandstand was totally destroyed by fire, as was the water tower,
tank, pump-house, and pumping outfit; the origin of the
fire was never discovered, but it was either the work of
careless tramps or of an incendiary.
The pumping station was restored, and we are now
equipped to take care of the trees, etc.
The County Commissioners were requested to grade
the four approaches to Daffin Park, and consented to do
this, but as yet no work has been done by them; we are,
however, still in communication with them relative to the
said matter, and trust ere long to have them commence the
work.
We are particularly anxious that these approaches be
graded, as the planting of trees in them can be completed,
and then, too, it puts the Park in much better shape to be
used.
Miscellaneous
During the past year we delivered 26 double wagon
loads of wood to the various charitable institutions and to
the worthy poor, and would have delivered more but did
not have time to split same up so that it could be hauled,
many of the trees cut down being hauled out with our timber cart to save time of working them up.
We were called upon during the visit of President Taft
to our city, to decorate the Casino, where a luncheon for
President Taft was served, said decorations having been
done by our own force, and expense of same being borne by
our regular appropriation. The decorations were much
admired.
I desire at this time to respectfully call Council's attention to the fact that the territory under the care and super-
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________343
vision of the Park and Tree Commission is so large, and
the distance so great, that it is a physical impossibility to
cover the territory with a horse and buggy, except by great
loss of time.
The distance to Laurel Grove Cemetery, Bonaventure
Cemetery, the new parks in the Granger and Lattimore subdivisions, are all far distant, and as trips have to be made
there very often, sometimes, two trips a day having to be
made to Bonaventure Cemetery, and then there is Daffin
Park and the other vast territory to be covered, and the
horse which we now have being incapacitated, we deem it
to be economy to purchase for the use of this department a
runabout automobile, as the territory can be covered more
often, and the work of this department facilitated and made
more efficient.
Laurel Grove Cemetery, White
The continued application for lots in Laurel Grove
Cemetery by families who object to distance, and other
reasons, against going to Bonaventure Cemetery, suggests
to us the idea of improving certain portions of Laurel Grove,
notably that of the ravine, which will give a great many
lots. We have under consideration a plan to make this a
beauty spot. As soon as we have had surveys made, will
bring the matter to the attention of Council, showing not
only the beautrfication of this portion of the Cemetery, but
how it will provide considerable profit to the city.
The Commission have kept this Cemetery in good condition the past year, the lawns being well mowed, flowers
planted, roadways raked and kept clean, and the usual work
of burials, etc., having been carried on.
The iron fence on Magnolia Street, which had rusted
down, was replaced with one of concrete posts and iron
railings, with wire net stretched to prevent people, animals,
etc., going into the Cemetery, except by means of the en-
344________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
trance gate at the keeper's residence; this was a badly
needed improvement, and one that will afford better protection to the Cemetery.
The Commission desires .to call your attention to the
fact that the bond of $300.00, which the city accepted in
trust for the perpetual care of the Mary . Williams lot
in Laurel Grove Cemetery, expired in February, 1909, and
no provision has been made as yet by Council for the re-investment of this money, so the Commission are, therefore,
taking care of the said lot temporarily, until some provision
is made, which we trust Council will do at once. This
money should be invested, and the revenue from such investment being devoted to the care of the said lot.
The Commission is called upon, time and time again,
to pave more roadways in this Cemetery, but as the present
appropriation is inadequate to even carry on the actual routine work and burials, we are, therefore, unable to make this
necessary improvement; but if Council would allow the
Commission the money received from the sale of lots in
this Cemetery we would then be able to prosecute this work
and afford greater comfort to the lot owners and to persons
who visit this Cemetery.
Laurel Grove Cemetery, Colored Portion
The present keeper of this Cemetery has kept the'Cemetery in a very satisfactory condition the past year.
We must again call your attention to the pressing need
of new ground for burial purposes, as the present Cemetery
is practically filled up, and something should be done at once
in regard to the above matter.
I attach to this report the mortuary statistics of the
keepers of the Cemeteries.
Yours respectfully,
PHILIP D. BAFFIN,
Chairman.
o.
n
tit o
o n
j; |v>

' "' """""

in !
1 %
; 8
Deaths in City
Stillborn and Premature Births
Other Interments
Total.
Free Burials
Deaths in City
Stillborn and Premature Births
Other Interments
Total
Total Interments in
Both Cemeteries I
346 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Mortuary Report of Bonaventure Cemetery, White
January 1,1909, to January 1, 1910.
February - -
March _
April
May _____ - __
June
July _-.
August '-
September
^F ovc mbcr
Grand total
Deaths
in
City
6
6
5
2
4
2
5
7
3
8
7
55
Stillborn
and
Premature
Births
-
1
1
2
Other
Interments
5
1
2
1
4
2
4
1
2
3
2
27
Total
11
7
3
9
2
9
8
5
11
9
84
Respectfully,
B. C. THORPE,
Keeper.
Report of Glerk of the Market
Savannah, Ga.,'January 7, 1910.
Hon. George W. Tiedeman,
Mayor of Savannah.
Dear Sir:Herewith" I am pleased to hand you my
annual report of receipts for the Market, for the year 1909,
as follows:
Amount collected for fees from Butchers '$ 5,688.00
Amount collected for fees from Fish 1,248.00
Amount collected for fees from Poultry. 628.00
Amount collected for fees from Vegetables_ 555.00
Amount collected for fees from Bakers 204.00
Amount collected for fees from Shrimps, Crabs 210.00
Amount collected for fees from Basement Vaults 148.00
Amount collected for fees from Wagons, Hucksters, and
other collections _____-_: 3,259.28
Total Collections ___________________..$11,940.28
This does not include nearly $3,000 collected by the
City Marshal, which would swell the collections to over
$14,000. Every possible effort has been made and maintained by the Clerk on the inside of the Market, with the
assistance of the Assistant Clerk on the outside of the Market, each watching every cent of income as closely as possible, to bring about the most perfect collections, and this
has run our receipts up for 1909 to the highest figures collected in any year, so far as I have examined, for the past
fifteen years. I wish to commend to your consideration the
efficient and co-operative administration of the Market com-
348 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
mittee, each and every one of whom has stood behind me
in my work for the year just past, and enabled me to perfect
the present encouraging management of our Market; and,
with the contemplated repairs, I hope to render to your
Honor a much more favorable report foi the year 1910.
Respectfully submitted,
T. B. GRACEN,
Market Clerk.
Annual Report of the Harbor Master
Savannah, Ga., January 3, 1910.
Hon. George W. Tiedeman, Mayor
Savannah
Dear Sir:I hand you herewith a tabulated statement
showing the number of vessels arriving at this port during
the year 1909, together with their net tonnage; as also the
amount of harbor fees collected. There are also a number
of inland steamers and small local coastwise vessels handled
which are not included in this statement.
Valuable assistance has been rendered by those connected with the shipping business of the city, and especially
by the Southern Bell telephone operator at Tybee; all of
which is duly appreciated.
This report shows a. gratifying increase over previous
years, and with the handling of all these vessels no accident
of any kind to vessel or crew happen?''.
Respectfully submitted
JOHN CARR.
Harbor Master.
350 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Foreign Steamers Arriving at Savannah During the Year
1909, Giving Number According to Nationality
Austrian ___________________ 14 32,686 net tons
Belgian _________________ 3 6,330 "
British ____________i_____175 405,774 "
Danish _________________ 4 8,466
Dutch _________________ 12 21,583 "
German _________________ 25 57,479 "
Italian _________________ 3 7,849 "
Norwegian _______________ 15 26,144 "
Russian ________________ 1 1,855 "
Spanish ________________ 5 10,481
Total ______________257 578,647 "
Vessels Arriving at Savannah, Showing Net Tonnage and Harbor Pees Collected During*
the Year of 1909
Month
1909
January
February _ March __
April
May
June
July ......
August
September
October
November
December -
Total _
American | Foreign
Steamers | Steamers
d
2
46
42
44
41
44
45
57
55
58
58
62
60
612
Tonnage
116,319
100,031
109,136
106,683
110,208
107,679
136,231
132,970
126.325
128,169
141,043
124,884
1,439,678
d *
25
14
20
16
12
12
13
13
35
33
39
25
257
&a
B
1
54,837
28,221
44,316
35,783
24,992
26,418
27,607
28,094
82,582
78.9'0
S7,3S9
59,438
578,647
American
Sail
1
20
18
36
12
25
10
26
21
17
20
20
19
244
V
11
12,636
11,367
21.560
8,509
14,284
6,506
14,581
14,518
11,033
11,164
13,107
11,730
150,995
Foreign
Sail
o'
55
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
9
V
!?
B
1
580
322
658
1,724
494
182
95
4,055
Tugs
A
3
1
1
3
1
1
10
&
a
1
H
781
254
250
758
250
418
2,711
Oil Barges
d
S5
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
14
i
j
5,716
1,310
3,044
1,402
7,490
4,446
3,044
3.044
3,939
33,435
II

$ 619.00
364.00
516.00
398.00
332.00
345.06
370.00
405.60
693.66
673.69
824.68
603.29
$6,144.98
gg09
s
s
869 steamers, 2,018,325 tons; 253 sailing vessels, 155,050 tons; 10 tugs, 2,711 tons; 14 oil barges,
33,435 tons. Making a grand total of 1,146 vessels, with 2,209,521 net tons.

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
CITY ATTORNEY
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH. GA.
FOB THE YEAR
KNDING
DECEMBER 31, 19O0
SAM'1. B. ADAMS
CITT ATTORNEY

Report of the City Attorney
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910.
Hon. George W. Tiedeman
Mayor
Dear Sir:I beg to submit this my report as City Attorney for the year 1909:
As to the suits, to which the city is a party, on hand
at the date of my last report, I beg to report as follows:
1. The suit against Messrs. Lubs and Kuck, sureties,
mentioned in my last report, was met by a demurrer to a
part of the bill, as stated in my last report. This demurrer
has been in part sustained, upon the ground that, for certain
items, the sureties were not responsible. The probabilities
are that this suit will be amicably adjusted.
2. The case of A. R. Stewart against the Savannah
Contracting Company and other defendants, including the
City of Savannah, has been dismissed, and no liability accrued to the city therein.
3. The suit of James A. Burke, by next friend, against
the city, was first dismissed, and has since been renewed;
the renewal suit has not yet been tried.
4. The case of W. D. Cooper, agent for the Armour
Packing Company, involving a tax on agents of packinghouses, has not been re-heard since the decision of the
Supreme Court referred to. The decision was adverse to
the city upon the ground that Cooper claimed that the tax
356 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
was payable by him personally, and was, therefore, excessive.
When the Ordinance was framed against agents, it was not
expected that the agents would pay personally, but the tax
was regarded as a part of the business expenses of the Company, like assessments against agents of insurance companies. We have taken issue with the Armour Company
as to whether the agent does really pay the tax.
5. As stated in my last report, Judge Charlton sustained the demurrer of the city in the case of the Atlantic
Postal Telegraph-Cable Company, involving the validity and
amount of the tax assessed against companies of this character. Upon appeal to the Supreme Court, Judge Charlton
was reversed, upon the ground that the petition set forth
that the tax was unreasonably large, and gave reasons for
this position, and as a general demurrer admitted, for the
purposes of a demurrer, the allegations in the petition to be
true, the petition should not have been dismissed. The Court,
however, held with the city and against the Atlantic Postal
Telegraph-Cable Company on the constitutional and .other
points assailing the validity of the tax. It was claimed that
the tax was upon the interstate as well as intrastate business,
and that it was void for a number of reasons. The Supreme
Court, however, as I say, held against all of these points,
and the only question now left in the case is whether the
tax for the year involved is so unreasonably large as to
justify the setting aside of the discretion of the municipal
authorities in assessing the tax. The city has not suffered
from any delay in this case because the tax was actually
paid into the City Treasury.
6. The suit of Henry M. Bergen, in the City Court
of Savannah, brought against the city and the Savannah
Electric Company, in which the plaintiff claimed damages
in the sum of $15,000.00 because of injuries alleged to have
been received on the corner of Thirty-eighth and Montgomery Streets, as mentioned in my former report, has
been since dismissed, and thus has been finally disposed of.
liAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
7. The case of J. V. Dadin against the city, pending
in the City Court of Savannah, in which the plaintiff claims
damages for personal injuries, is pending on demurrer by
the city. I think the demurrer will probably be sustained.
8. The case of Grdene & Co., mentioned in my former
report, has been settled by direction of the Mayor and the
Finance Committee.
As to new cases, I report as follows :
1. R. F. Kennedy, an ex-policeman, sued the city, in
the City Court of Savannah, for $5,000.00 damages, claiming
personal injuries on account of what he alleged were defective steps from The Strand to Factors' Walk, he being, as
he claims, on duty at the time. A nonsuit was granted,
upon motion of the city, and an appeal was taken by the
plaintiff to the State Court of Appeals. The case was
argued some months ago, but no decision has been an-
nounced by the Court of Appeals.
2. J. F. Rawls has brought suit against the city, in
the City Court of Savannah, claiming damages in the sum
of $10,000.00 for personal injuries. A demurrer has been
filed by the city, which is now pending in the City Court.
3. Mrs. Agnes Shivers brought suit in the City Court
against the city, claiming personal injuries in the sum of
$10,000.00. A demurrer was filed by the city, and this demurrer has been sustained.
4. A suit was filed by her husband at the same time,
based on the same cause of action, and claiming damages
to him in the sum of $5,000.00. A like demurrer by the
city has also been sustained in his case.
Since the sustaining of the demurrers, these two suits
have been renewed in the City Court of Savannah, damages
in the case of Mrs. Shivers being now laid at $20,000.00, and
the case of Mr. Shivers in the sum of $10,000.00. Demurrers
3_____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
and pleas in abatement have been filed in both of these suits,
and which have, up to this time, not been disposed of.
5. Mrs. J. H. Barrett, Jr., has filed, in the City Court
of Savannah, a suit against the city, laying her damages in
the sum of $10,000.00, for personal injuries alleged to have
been.sustained by her. This suit is how pending.
6. There is pending in the Superior Court of Chatham
County the suit growing out of the condemnation of property belonging to Mr. John T. Chapman, the issue being as
to the amount to be paid. Mr. Chapman appealed from the
decision of the Assessors.
7. There is also pending in the Superior Court the
attachment case brought by the city against the Barnum
& Bailey Show Company, based upon injuries to the streets.
8. There is also pending the case of Abraham Hazzard
against the city, in which he claims injuries to a horse and
wagon, the city having certioraried this decision.
The foregoing notices all the litigation now on hand to
which the city is a party.
During the year, I have drawn a large number of papers,
advised the city and its officials, and attended to the usual
routine work of the office of City Attorney. My letter-book
indicates that, 'during the year, I have given (in addition to
verbal opinions) not less than eighty written opinions, and
I assume that the city officials, to whom they were given,
have kept these opinions. I suggest that it would be well
to have all of the written opinions kept by some city official,
and so indexed that they could be referred to readily.
Yours very truly,
SAMUEL B. ADAMS,
City Attorney.
REPORTS
OF
Public Institutions
OF THE
City of Savannah
19O9

Annual Report of St. Joseph's Hospital
19O9
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910
To Dr. Craig Barrow,
Chairman of the Board of Health:
Honored Sir:I beg to submit herewith the Annual
Report of St. Joseph's Hospital, for the year 1909. Report
of city and county patients treated, nursed, fed, supplied
with medicines, operation-outfits, surgical dressings, bedding, laundry, etc., from January 1 to December 31, 1909.
Cost, per capita, per annum, to city __ $6.70%
Cost, per capita, per annum, to county_______ 4.48%
Cost, per capita, per annum, combined ____
Moribund on admission, 6.
Births, 7.
Respectfully submitted, ,
SISTER M. EUPHRASIA
Superintendent
Summary of Reports Submitted Each Month to Health Officer
MONTHS
January _ .
February __.. .
March
April
May
June
July ............
August
October
November
December
Total ....
Treated
32
33
37
30
30
38
35
44
50
49
3f
31
446
Discharged
14
10
16
14
13
17
11
18
25
22
18
11
189
1
1
3
1
1
1
4
2
2
0
3
2
1
21
Remaining
17 on January 31
20 on February 28
<!0 on March 31
15 on April 30
16 on May 31
17 on June 30
22 on July 31
24 on August 31
25 on September 30
24 on October 31
17 on November 30
19 on December 31
in (A V

M
M
O
1
591
532
680
520
527
575
590
689
723
726
639
555
7347
Q&
1 :
4
18 1-2
16
18 1-4
17 1-3
17 1-2
IS
16 5-7
IS 1-2
14 2-5
14 3-4
17 1-4
17 2-3
16 1-2
Cost per Capita per Diem
Appropriations

City
Cents
.42 1-5
.47
.36 5-6
.48
.47 2-5
.43 2-5
.42 2-5
.36 1-6
.344-7
.34 3-7
.39
.45
.41 1-3
County
Cents
.28 1-5
.31 1-5
.24 1-2
.32
.31 3-5
.29
.28 1-5
.24 1-6
.23
.226-7
.26
.30
.27 1-2
Combined
Cents
.70 2-5
.78 1-5
.61 1-3
.80
.79
.722-5
.70 3-5
.60 1-3
.574-7
.57 2-7
.65
.75
.685-6
K
$ O
Animal Report of the Charity Hospital
Savannah, Ga., February 5, 1910.
Hon George W. Tiedeman, Mayor
City of Savannah
Sir:I submit herewith the report of Charity Hospital
for the year ending December 31, 1909:
Charity Patients Pay Patients!
i
January
February
March
April __ _____
May _
June ______
July -_.-.
August _
September --
October
November
December
Total
City
No.
19
17
18
17
20
20
29
19
23
20
18
18
238
No. Hospital
D_n
228
218
247
231
222
225
285
212
319
342
208
327
3064
County
No.
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
14
No.
Ho.
piUl
Days
2
44
48
30
31
30
31
31
2
17
326
No.
31
24
19
24
23
16
14
11
22
18
29
27
258
No*.
Hospital
Davs
271
314
265
167
368
184
191
176
231
204
285
191
2847
Total
No.
51
43
39
42
44
37
44
31
48
39
47
45
510
No. Hospital
Dy
501
576
560
428
621
439
507
419
612
563
493
518
6237
364 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of patients in hospital January 1, 1909___ 17
Numb'er of patients admitted during year 1909___ 510
Number of patients discharged daring year 1909___ 450
Number of patients died during year 1909____ 77
Number of patients brought to hospital in dying
condition, 1909 ____________________ 41
Number of patients remaining in hospital January
1, 1910 (of which number, eight are city patients) _____________________ 14
Number of births_____________________ 10
Total number of hospital days, charity patients, city 3,064
Total number of hospital days, charity patients,
county ______ 326
Total number of hospital days, pay patients_ 2,847
Total number of hospital days, all patients____ 6,237
Total expenses for the year______________$3,571.10
Average cost of patient, per diem __________ .5726
Average cost of city charity patient to city, per
diem _________________________ .2937
Receipts
Appropriation from city ___$ 900.00
From employment of our nurses_____ 118.50
From pay patients______________ 2,032.62
From donationschurches, societies,
and individuals _____ 300.55
Total _______________________$3^51.67
Bkpenses
Salaries ___________-_____$ 724.80
Groceries, bread, and milk ____ 603.10
Meats, vegetables, etc. ___ 369.29
House supplies 354.63
Medical and surgical supplies-___ 707.78
Undertakers _________ 73.20
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 365
Electric light, coal, wood, and oil____$ 270.94
Insurance, telephone, and printing _ 96.85
Repairs and improvements________ 370.43
Total_____________._$3,571.10
Deficit, January 1, 1909________.. 96.90-^$3,668.00
Deficit, January 1, 1910_________________$ 316.33
Respectfully submitted,
E. E. DES VERNEY, President.
N. WM. ESTE, M. D., Secretary.

Annual Report of Park View Sanitarium
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910.
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor
Sir:The directors of the Park View Sanitarium have
the honor to submit to the Mayor and Aldermen of the. City
of Savannah the annual report for the year ending December, 1909. '
The care at the Sanitarium includes treatment, lodging,
nourishment, medicines, surgical operations, surgical! appliances, and the care of obstetrical cases.
The Sanitarium has received, without limitation, all patients sent in by the City Physicians of Savannah, Ga.
Very respectfully,
RALSTON LATTIMORE, M. D.
Secretary.
M. R. 0. 8.24
368 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ed Cause of Death
January
February ________
March
April ____________
May ___ _ ____ -
July _
August __________
Total _____ -
'5.
o
a
152
192
751
744
787
775
424
36?
217
199
301
3142
1
16
13
?0
16
74
31
4?
TO
76
74
76
799
"3
to
6
3
7
4
10
13
18
75
17
15
10
10
138
JO

10
10
13
12
14
9
13
17
22
11
14
16
161
V*
JS
5
0
0
0
0
1
0
3
1
2
0
0
0
7
a
0
0
1
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
7
0
7
1
Ooium Habit
K Tetanus
Marasmus (Infant)
1 Undecided
1 Marasmus (Infant)
/Typhoid Fever
I Pernicious Malaria
rate.
Especial attention is called to the remarkably low death
RALSTON LATTIMORE, M. D.
Secretary
Annual Report of Savannah Hospital
Savannah, Ga., January 31, 1910.
Number of patients in Hospital, December 31, 1909 39
Number of patients admitted during 1909 1,105
Number of patients in Hospital during 1909__ 1,144
Number of patients discharged during 1909_ 1,099
Number of patients remaining January 1, 1910_ 45
Number of patients who died during 1909_ 58
Number of patients moribund, 1909-_______. 25
Number of patients born during 1909_:_ 37
Number of hospital days, pay patients, 1905 _ 8,561
Number of hospital days, city and county
patients, 1909 ___________________ 5,750
Total number of hospital days, 1909 ________ 14,311
Average daily number of patients, 1909 ______39 76/365
Total number of pay patients, 1909__ 677
Total number of city and county patients, 1909_ 428
Number of surgical operations, 1909________ 494
Mortality, total deaths, 1909 _____________ 5 1/14%
Mortality, less moribund, 1909-_z________ 3%
Income from pay patients______________$15,501.29
Income from other sources_____________ 10,928.26
Total income ________,.____________ 26,429.55
Increase of income pay patients, 1909, over 1908 1,713.60
Decrease of income other sources, 1909, over 1908- 622.95

Report of the Georgia Infirmary
for the Year 19O9
Number of patients in Infirmary, January 1,1909 35
Number of patients admitted during 1909 542
Number of patients cared for during 1909 577
Number of patients discharged during 1909 462
Number of patients died during 1909 83
Number of patients remaining, January 1, 1910 32
Largest number of patients in Infirmary at one time 53
Smallest number of patients in Infirmary at one time 30
Daily average of patients in Infirmary during the
year __^_ 40.07
Brought to Infirmary in dying condition '.. 24
Mortality 14.3&%
Mortality, exclusive of brought to Infirmary in
dying condition __ 1023%
.Number of births _ 8
Number of attendants and help, including two white
nurses _ 17
Total number of hospital days of charity patients 13,205
Total number of hospital days of pay patients 1,421
Total number of hospital days of all patients___ 14,626
Expenses during the year ____________$9,780.64
Daily average1 cost per patient ___ 66.87c
Appropriation from city and county would average,
per charity patient, per diem __ 60.58c
Receipts
Balance, January 1, 1909 ______________$ 8.04
Received from city ______________ 4,500.00
Received from county _________________ 3,500.00
372 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Received from pay patients __-_$ 920.38
Received from interest on investments ___ 1,161.24
Donation from Savannah Benevolent Association 200.00
Donation from Independent Presbyterian Church 29.76
Total _______________________$10,319.42
Expenses
Salaries __________________________$ 3,632.50
Provisions _______________________ 2,308.35
Drugs and surgical supplies _ 1,067.90
Repairs, plumbing, and painting ______ 2,008.80
Household supplies __________________ 340.75
Electric light and gas _________________ 127.92
Coal and wood _____________________ 120.50
Undertaker's account _______________ 95.00
Telephone _______________________ 30.00
Insurance : 26.60
Interest _________________________ 22.32
Balance, January 1, 1910 _______________ 538.78
Total _.____.________________$10,319.42
CHAS. M. GILBERT
President for 1909
Savannah, Ga.
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
FOR THE YEAR
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 19O9
WILLIAM HARDEN
LIBRABIAN
I

Report of the Board of Managers of
the Public Library
Savannah, Ga,, January 1, 1910.
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah
And to the Georgia Historical Society
Gentlemen:I have the honor to submit the seventh
annual report of the Board of Managers of the Savannah
Public Library, which is demanded by the agreement between the City of Savannah and the Georgia Historical
Society, in order that the people of Savannah may be informed concerning the benefits of the Public Library to this
community.
Membership of the Board
The terms of Mr. N. B. F. Close and Dr. T. J. Charlton
expired on December 31, 1908. Mr. Close was re-appointed
by the Mayor and Aldermen to represent the city, and Dr.
Charlton was re-appointed by the President of the Georgia
Historical Society to represent that body. During the year,
Mr. Henry C. Cunningham resigned, and Mr. Horace P.
Smart was appointed on behalf of the Georgia Historical
Society to fill his unexpired term.
The terms of Mr. H. W. Witcover and Mr. Horace P.
Smart expiring on December 31,1909, the City of Savannah
and the Georgia Historical Society have been duly notified.
376 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The membership of the Board at the end of the year is
as follows:
Term Expires
December 31, 1909
December 31, 1910
December 31. 1911
December 31, 1912
December 31, 1913
Appointed by
City of Savannah
H. W. Witcover
John M. Thomas
Neyle Colquitt
P. A. Stovall
N. B. F. Close
Appointed by Georgia
Historical Society .
H. P. Smart
George J. Baldwin
Otis Ashmore
R. J. Nunn
T. J. Charlton
The list of officers for the year is as follows:
George J. Baldwin_Chairman
Otis Ashmore Vice-Chairman
Neyle Colquitt _____Secretary
John M. Thomas____________Treasurer
The Special Library Committee is: Mr. Otis Ashmore,
Chairman, with Dr. T. J. Charlton and Dr. R. J. Nunn.
The Committee on Finance and Auditing' is Mr. H. W.
Witcover, Chairman, with Mr. H. P. Smart and Mr. N. B.
F. Close.
The creation of the Children's Department rendered certain changes necessary in the list of salaried officials of the
Library, and the following is the present list:
Mr William Harden___^___Librarian
Miss Maude Heyward_Assistant Librarian
Miss Elizabeth McLawsLibrarian of Children's Dept.
Miss Selina HeywardDesk Assistant
John Noisette _____Janitor
Changes in By-laws
There have been no changes in these during the year.
__________MAYcK'S ANNUAL REPORT________377
i
Insurance
Ten thousand dollars is continued upon the building,
and $15,000.00 upon the contents, these amounts having been
duly approved during the year.
Public Interest and Co-operation
Since the establishment of.the Library, no year in its
history has shown so great and encouraging an interest on
the part of the public as has been the case during the past
year. The total number of books taken from the Library
was 85,961, as compared with 77,507 during 1908; while the
total number of visitors to the Library rooms was 91,012,
against 86,510 for the previous year; 30,088 of these visitors
being children under 14 years of age, and 60,924 being adults.
Publicity
It is evident that the continued work on the part of the
Library Board and all of its officials, in seeking to place
before the public the true value of the Library, is meeting
with a most gratifying response.
This publicity takes the shape of notices upon the
bulletin boards in the Library building; publications in the
newspapers of the city, of which there have been forty-nine
during the year; complete bulletins of all new books added
to the Library, three of which have been prepared and
published; and by special bibliographies of subjects of importance or interest to the public during the year.
These bibliographies, and the constant use of them by
reason of their publication, have aroused very considerable
interest, and been of service to a great many earnest people
who are utilizing the Library more than ever because of the
care in placing before them the information they want; and
the subjects of these lists follow closely upon the public
thought, and in some cases actually lead it.
378________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
In addition to supplying a list of the new books, several
lists have been made up on account of the lecture course
given by Mr. Edward Howard Griggs, a noted educator;
one of these being a complete bibliography of everything in
the Library pertaining to Dante. When the tuberculosis
exhibit was made in Savannah, and public interest thereby
aroused, a bibliography referring to it was published. Then
came the subject of Arctic exploration, caused by the discovery of the North Pole by Commander Peary, and the
claims of Dr. Cook; this being recently followed by bibliographies concerning Nicaragua at a time when it appeared
that this country might have to take an active hand in settling the local warfare in that Central American State. The
blind were not forgotten in these lists; nor were the children, the latter being served by a publication of Christmas
books.
Children's Department
The overcrowding of the main room in the Library
.made it necessary to provide increased facilities, which could
best be done by devoting a room in the basement to the
use of the children. Permission to make the necessary
changes in the building was obtained from its owner, the
Georgia Historical Society, and the matter was laid before
the City Council by a Special Committee; and perhaps for
the first time the Aldermen realized more fully than ever
before that the city had a public library, and that it was
their duty to fully support and stand by it in every way.
They responded to the request for a special appropriation
of $1,400.00 to supply the necessary outfit of furniture and
books and the necessary alterations of the room. They also
appropriated $940.00 for one year's maintenance of the same.
The matter of rearranging the room, and placing it in
a modern and attractive shape, with the very best public
library conveniences, was turned over to a Special Committee of the Chairman of the Library Board with Mr.
Witcover and Mr. Smart, and this Committee has now pracJ
_________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________379
tically finished its work, and the Children's Department will
very shortly be opened.
This will somewhat relieve the overcrowding of the
upper room, and permit more extended attention to the
needs of our children. The Board has plans in view for
enlarging the work in this department.
New Library Building
In spite of the additional room described above, the demands upon the Library are becoming so great that attention must again and continuously be called to the necessity
for a large and properly designed public library building for
the City of Savannah.
During the year, in order to make room for the Children's Department, it was necessary to ask the Georgia
Medical Society to remove its books to other quarters, a
thing which the Board of Managers regretted, but which
was absolutely necessary on account of lack of space. Fortunately, this library has been attached to the newly organized
bacteriological Department of the city, and placed in a
room in the City Hall adjoining that laboratory.
At one time during the year, it seemed possible that a
public-spirited gentleman mght offer to the City of Savannah funds for the erection of a building, but nothing has
resulted, and the matter still remains in the hands of the
people of Savannah, who should provide their own building
for their own people.
If the City of Savannah desires to thrive, and keep
pace with its modern competitors, the ideals of its people
must be uplifted, and they must have every possible educational advantage. Progress in other parts of this country
demands an equal progress in this community, or we shall
fall far behind in the struggle.
380 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
There is no better way to stimulate a community than
by supplying it with good books to read and a proper and
adequate building in which to keep them and where they
may be used. It should be the policy of this city to erect
a building which shall be an ornament to the town and
of use to every inhabitant; and we earnestly request the
prompt and serious consideration of the City of Savannah
concerning this matter.
Librarian's Report
The very full report of the Librarian is hereto attached,
giving the usual statistics concerning the acquisitions during
the year, and other data of interest.
Treasurer's Report
It will be noted that, during the year, the city appropriated S500.00 to replace the annual contribution of the
Georgia Historical Society, in addition to the city's previous
appropriation, this Society having been compelled to discontinue its appropriation.
A careful perusal of the Treasurer's report since the
o >ening of the Public Library, will show that in each and
every year a most careful, accurate, and painstaking effort
has been made to publish the fullest details of expenditure,
and to properly account for every dollar entrusted to the
care of the Board of Managers. It will be particularly noted
that every dollar available in each year has been expended
during that year, but that, in no case, has the Board of
Managers ever exceeded the funds on hand. For this purpose, at the beginning of each year, a carefully thought out
budget is prepared, covering the total amount of funds available during the year, and this budget is strictly adhered to.
This has been its fixed policy, and will continue to be so.
The Treasurer's vouchers are carefully bound in a volume
at.the end of each year, and the statements of account which
are attached to this report are made public.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 381
A larger annual appropriation should be made to the
Library, as the amount available for the purchase of new
books actually does not replace the wear and tear on the
books already in the Library. The amount appropriated is
less than that supplied to any simitar public library in this
country of which we have any knowledge, and it has only
been possible to maintain it upon this small allowance by
the use of the utmost economy, and by the fact that through
the generosity of the Georgia Historical Society so large a
number of books were turned over to the Public Library
at its inception. This is a matter which has been brought
before the city in almost every annual report which has been
made, but which each year increasingly demands attention.
Respectfully submitted, by order of the Board of Managers.
GEORGE J. BALDWIN
Chairman Board of Managers,
Savannah Public Library.

Report oi Librarian
Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1910.
To the Board of Managers of the Savannah Public Library
Gentlemen:With the passing of 1909, we enter upon
a new year in the history of our Library, and I submit, with
gratification, my sixth annual report.
In concluding my report for the year 1909, I expressed
the regret, which was shared by your honorable body, that
there was, at that time, no certainty that the establishment
of a separate department for the children would soon become
a reality. That was a matter which, to all of us, appeared
then to be of the greatest importance, and one which, for
that reason, now receives my first attention. Special efforts
were made to obtain from City Council an appropriation for
that purpose, and the Committee appointed by your body
to make the appeal showed so clearly the necessity for
prompt and favorable action that the appropriation was
made without delay. It was then thought that the installation of that department would be complete before the beginning of another year, but several things, not then foreseen,
have retarded the progress of the work; yet it is more than
probable that it will be in full and successful operation before the end of this month. In view of the expected early
opening of that department, your body elected Miss Elizabeth McLaws as its Librarian, and, in my opinion, the choice
was a wise one. At the same time, you gave to Miss Selina
Heyward the position of Desk Assistant, and your choice of
her was also for the good of the Library. In the month
of October, it became necessary for Miss McLaws to give
her entire time and attention to work preliminary to the
opening of her new field of operation, and, in consonance
with her invariable conduct, she has so thoroughly done
M. R. 0. 8.2K
3M________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
that work that when her department opens nothing will
be required there in consequence of any after-thought. Miss
Selina Heyward began her service with us about the second
week in October, and her work is satisfactory in every
respect. Miss Maude Heyward continues to give us the
benefit of her thorough knowledge of and practical experience in library work.
The "duplicate collection" plan, authorized one year
ago, was put into operation early in January, and its success
became manifest at once. The circulation of books is given
in a table annexed to this report, and shows a total for the
year of 13371. The charges collected as rent for these
books amounts to the pleasing sum of $673.26. No dissatisfaction has been caused by the inauguration of this system,
and its'patronizers are generally outspoken in praise of its
adoption. Nor is that all that may be said in its favor. After
a book in that collection has been in circulation a certain
number of times, it is then transferred to the free collection,
and in that way the free collection has, in twelve months,
received from that source 264 volumes, without one cent of
cost.
Having drawn your attention to matters of special interest, I now turn to the ordinary work, and will show what
has been accomplished, asking you to note the gains which
have been made at every point. \
The usual number of books for the blind have been
included in our monthly purchases, and our efforts to serve
that class of readers is highly appreciated. One of their
number, Mr. Thomas Kreeger, has added to the section,
from his private library, some books which, if not coming
to us as gifts, would have caused us to supply them at considerable cost. This reminds me that we are indebted to
other friends for liberal contributions in the way of gifts
of books which have been very useful, and it is possible
that others would do the same, if they knew their gifts
would be acceptable. We can make use of any books given
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 385
to us, and it is hoped that accessions to our collection during
the coming year from that source .will be frequent and
liberal.
The growth of the Library is shown by the following
statement:
Number of volumes at beginning of year 30,897
Number of volumes added by purchase 1,936
Number of volumes added by gift 119
Number of volumes added by government _ 189 2,244
33,141
Withdrawals
Number of volumes worn out and condemned25
Number of volumes missing _00
Number of volumes lost and paid for 14
Total withdrawals for the year _ 39
Total volumes, at beginning of 1910 _________ 33,102
In addition to the accessions already referred to, we
have received from the United States Government 2,106
pamphlets, sent to this Library, and 48 to the Georgia Historical Society.
The Library has done more than usual in giving
information concerning matter to be found on our shelves,
which might be helpful to those pursuing special studies,
and dealing with current events of the day. Three bulletins
have been issued, containing lists of books recently
purchased, and extra lists have been printed giving the
names of books in the Library on topics discussed in the
newspapers, and otherwise before the people at the time of
publication. The subjects of the lists were: "Arctic
Explorations," "Tuberculosis," "Nicaragua," "Dante,"
"Christmas," "Books for the Blind," "New Fiction," and a
"Bibliography for the Griggs Course of Lectures."
386 _____MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Your special attention is invited to the large increase
in the circulation of books. The total for the year, as will
be seen in the table accompanying this report, was 85,961,
or 8,454 more than in 1908.
The list of periodicals taken remains the same as last
year. In this connection, I call your attention to the fact
that subscriptions to 20 periodicals on our list are gifts to
the Library.
Since my last report 1,015 volumes have been bound, of
which 63 were magazines; and 583 volumes were mended
in the Library.
With the exception of three holidays, we have kept
open every day of the twelve months. Fortunately, we did
not have to close for the purpose of having repairs made to
the building, as we did in 1908.
While it is true that the books acquired by the Library
are on a variety of subjects, and seem to call for no special
mention, I cannot refrain from mentioning a few which
have proven to be good material, and which have been frequently consulted. These are the "Dictionary of National
Biography," edited by Sir Leslie Stephen and Sidney Lee;
"History of Portrait Miniature," by G. C. Williamson; and
"History of English Furniture (Age of Mahogany)," by
Percy MacQuoid.
In conclusion, I feel that I must say a -Word in reference to the crowded condition of our building. That we
need a new home for the books we now have, and for the
proper placing of what we are constantly adding to our
collection, no one will deny, and no one feels the necessity
for a new building more than your Librarian.
Respectfully submitted,
(Signed) WM. HARDEN
Librarian >
Monthly Circulation of Books1909
January
_
February __ ____
March ________
April __________
June __________
July __________
August ________
September _____
October ___
_
December
_
Totals
1909 _________
1908 _________
1907 _ _____
1906 __._. __
1905 _________
1904 _________
Children
1557
1585
1299
1090
1078
1146
1691
1716
1559
1018
1071
934
15744
17380
______
General I
Philosophy
66
60
66
59
64
44
57
56
52
57
51
36
668
510
342 "379"
_-__.|3 | 156
22
Religion
26
30
30
35
39
15
23
22
18
32
25
34
329
357
9
[3
39
33
44
36
35
31
25
28
22
33
26
25
377
Philology
5
1 21
5 2
T
2
5
1 1
27
379 |37
272 | 294 |23
236 | 454 |26
122 294 |13
40 | 42
3
Science Natural
1
31
19
34
36
32
24
30
40
35
46
42
30
399
337
t1
t5
30
28
40
35
30
29
42
39
35
29
27
26
390
339
264 | 283
302
279
62
185
162
24
10
44
34
33
36
20
30
21
26
20
23
20
28
335
347
170
223
189
36
Literature
223
237 233 '
194
182
141
185
187
140
172
161
147
2202
2372
1985
1998
1170
225
IK
249
200
242
187
163
168
177
157
177
229
227
165
2341
2473
2347
2787
3424
1048
GoS
5425
5097
5285
5058
5132
5201
5317
5734
5423
5550
5471
4656
63349
52976
68201
59223
60382
16384 |
7695
7124
7308
6767
6780
6831
7568
8007
7483
7194
7122
6082
85961
77507
74188
65821
66294
17886
Curds Issued, Visits, Pines, Reserves, Etc. .
January
February .....
March .... .....
April .............
May .... . .. ...
June -.___...__
July
August ._ ...
September .....
October .._.....__
December ........
1909 ____ . ....
1908 _.. .....
1907 ____ ".-..
1906 ___ ......
1905 --.-_.......
1904 ............
i & ** *a ti
(3s
99
88
82
56
51
38
76
70
102
79
83
71
895
928
"IMS
955
1245
1913
Cards IssuedChildren to
21
21
25
33
34
15
41
32
33
19
23
26
323
345
291
337
*'S
5 i *2
B "t "a 0.2-S
S><
4991
5416
5161
5283
4848
5170
3972
5301
51SO
5743
5448
4441
Monthly Visits ofChildren
2638
2436
2466
2256
2299
2532
2639
2793
2934
2395
2425
2275
60924 30088
91012
53586 32924
86510
56240 34798
91038
89783*
Monthly Visits
of Library Committee
14
11
21
22
15
16
10
16
16
12
17
7
177
529
644
1
714
Duplicate Collection Circulation
424
820
1096
1074
1207
1266
1322
1286
1398
1297
1453
1228
13871
.S' *
5 " *
S3 5 put*
$ 23.21
30.86
50.27
50.50
59.15
56.10
61.41
64.80
59.50
67.26
77.48.
72.72
$673.26
640 | 89969 | 662 | |
No record
78117 668
Fines andReserves
$ 42.14
46.02
48.62
48.98
50.50
46.10
48.44
43.82
41.38
44.78
47.72
50.76
$559.26
646.38
711.94
M
1
$ 65.35
76.88
98.89
99.48
109.65
102.20
109.85
108.62
100.88
112.04
125.20
123.48
$1232.52
665.17 |
552.30
439.85
*Prior to 1907 no separate record of the monthly visits of children was kept, the figures given show ing the total of both adult and children visitors.
Duplicate collection plan not in operation before 1909.
_____ x ft|AYOR'9 ANNUAL REPORT______ 389
Classified List of Periodicals Subscribed For
Literary "Reviews:-- 7
Popular Literature --24
Historical _ 4
Fine Arts _ 6
Useful. Arts _.____--10
Bibliography 3
Religion 4
Domestic Economy 4
Juvenile - 6
Language 1
Music __, 1
Horticulture 2
Humor _____ 3
Science __11
Medical 2
Sociology ___ 3
Trade _______________________ 2
Technical ___*' 4
Total periodicals ::.97
Classified List of Books Purchased in 1909, Showing"
Percentage of Each Class
Fiction ___________ 68.9
History _____________________ 10.9
Literature _________________ 3.8
Fine Arts _____________________ 3.8
Useful Arts ___________________ 3.0
Natural Science __________________ 2.5
Philology _______________ .1
Sociology :_ 1.4
Religion _______________________ .8
Philosophy _____________________ .7
General ___________1_________ .9
Books for the Blind _______________ 3.2
100 per cent.
390 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Classified List of Card-Holders
Architects -'- 4
Artists _______ 12
Authors __ 3
Bakers _______ 8
Bankers ______ 23
Blacksmiths ____ 13
Boiler Makers __ 9
Bookbinders ___ 6
Brewers ______ 3
Brokers _______ 29
Butchers ______ 6
Cabinet Makers _ 7
Carpenters _____ 33
Chemists ______ 6
Civil Engineers __ 23
Clergymen _ 24
Clerks _______ 2,300
Conductors ____ 21
Contractors __ 12
Dairymen _ 5
Dressmakers ____ 8
Druggists 23
Editors ______ 6
Electricians 24
Engineers, Railroad 26
Exporters 11
Firemen ____ 60
Grocers ______ 22
Hairdressers _ 2
Inspectors ___ 13
Insurance Agents _ 35
Iron Workers. 4
Jewelers _ 7
Journalists 14
Kindergarten
Teachers ___ 44
Lawyers ___ 60
Letter Carriers 4
Machinists ___ 102
Managers __ 125
Merchants __ 231
Milliners 6
Musicians :__ 49
Painters ______ 17
Paperhangers 4
Pawnbrokers 5
Photographers 8
Physicians - 14
Pilots ________ 7
Planters _____ 8
Plumbers _ 11
Policemen _ 21
Port Wardens ___ 1
Printers 35
Real Estate Agents. 30
Railroad Officials 16
Reporters 15
Secretaries, Private 25
Steamship Officials 17
Stenographers 156
Students ______ 4,318
Teachers _____ 170
Telegraph Operators ________ 17
Tinners ______ 9
Trained Nurses 37
Upholsterers 10
Watchmen _____ 18
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________391
Wheelwrights 10 Males, no employWood Dealers___ 4 ment _______ 970
Females, no em-
ployment ____ 1,844 Total _______11,220

Public Library, Treasurer's Report
January 1, 1909, to January 1, 1910
Receipts
Cash on hand, January 1, 1909_____________$ 300.11
From City of Savannah_______- 6,804.93
From Duplicate Collection book rent 600.54
From fines and reserves _ 566.20
From books lost and paid for ____ 11.51
$8,283.29
Expenditures
Salaries __________________________$2,460.81
New books _____r ___________-___ 2,534.61
Periodicals, etc. _ 256.65
Fuel _____________. ____________ 98.35
Lighting __________.____________ 196.43
Stationery __________________ 91.45
Printing _________________________ 47.25
Improvements _____________________ 516.00
Furniture ____ 37.20
Insurance _______________________ 25.00
Miscellaneous __________________ 606.83
$6,872.58
Cash on hand, January 1, 1910_____$1,410.71
The December, 1909, unpaid bills, not yet presented for
payment, will about cover cash balance on hand.
Respectfully submitted
(Signed) JOHN M. THOMAS.
Treasurer Public Library.
394 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
I have examined the accounts and books of the Treasurer of the Public Library, from the first of January, 1909,
to the first of January, 1910, and find the same correct, with
proper vouchers produced, and a balance in the hands of the
Treasurer of one thousand, four hundred, and ten dollars
and seventy-one cents ($1,410.71).
(Signed) H. W. WITCOVER,
Chairman Finance Committee
Public Library.
Annual Report of the Colored Library
Savannah, Ga., February, 1910.
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor, City of Savannah:
Sir:Please find as follows my report to the Board of
Curators of the Colored Public Library for the year ending
December 31, 1909:
Another year has come to an end in the life of our
Library, and more and more the Library seems to be growing in favor, and like a tender 'plant it is striking its roots
deeper and stronger into the earth that it may stand more
easily the demands and responsibilities of the coming years.
The management, control, and direction of the Library,
by colored men, is an experiment, and just in proportion to
its success will come credit to the Board and good to the
colored citizens of Savannah. Just in proportion to the
results we achieve from our limited resources and cramped
conditions; just exactly in proportion as we stir in the colored citizens of Savannah a desire for books, communion
with the greatest and best minds of all ages, will come
reward and commendation to the management.
It is a credit, and is noted with pride, that the Library,
according to figures in the Librarian's report, is growing
each year in the number of good books acquired, in number
of regular and responsible borrowers, number of visitors,
and in the number of young children who are more and more
learning to avail themselves of the advantages of such an
institution.
396 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
It is also noted that with all classes the Library is
becoming more and more one of the institutions of Savannah.
With so many things to be more or less proud of, there
is still one thing to be regretted, and that is the few meetings the Board has been able to have during the past year
for want of a quorum. It is to be hoped, and it is urged,
that this be remedied the following year, by each one making greater efforts to be present and to do his full share in
pushing the Colored Public Library to the front.
During the year, the Board has lost two of its members,
in the persons of Dr. S. P. Llojrd, who died, and in whose
place the Board has been fortunate in securing as his successor by election, Mr. L. G. Middleton, and in the resignation
of Dr. J. H. Bugg, who has removed to another State, and
whose place thus far has not been filled.
I desire to note, too, that the Board has been in communication with Mr. Carnegie, with reference to a library
which it is hoped he will give, and in which correspondence
there seems to be some spark of hope of success.
I also desire to call attention to signs which have been
placed over the door, advertising and introducing the
Library- to the public.
Now, with the above and with other points of which
we should be proud, I desire to call your attention to a few
recommendations and suggestions which I think would be
of benefit to the Library. We ought to raise some little
money each month for the purpose of purchasing new and
current books and keeping the interior of the Library and
furniture in good condition; hence I suggest that there be
formed or authorized a committee on ways and means, in
whose hands this and other money matters should be placed.
I think that there should be a committee of visitation to
see after the conduct, care, and keeping of the Library, and
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 397
report to the Board at its direction or suggestion. The
Library still needs children's books, and a few more race
papers. The Library needs more and better chairs. It
ought to have, by all means, as they are printed and are
accessible and reputable, all the books by colored authors.
The Library, I think and suggest, ought to be kept open
until nine o'clock. Hence, to do these and other things that
would increase the efficiency of the Library, widen its sphere
of good, and intensify its benefits, I suggest that the Board
make a request to Council for an increase in appropriation
to the extent of $300.00 per annum, at least, and to this end
appoint a committee to present the matter, if necessary, to
Council.
With congratulations for the past, and with hope for
the future, these few suggestions are respectfully submitted.
A. L. TUCKER,
Chairman Board of Curators, Colored Public Library.

Report of the Librarian
Hon. Geo. W. Tiedeman, Mayor, City of Savannah:
SirI respectfully submit my report for the year ending
December 31, 1909:
Receipts
Appropriation by the city ____-_-___$360.00
Donations __ 16.06
Total _._.______________-___ $376.06
j
Expenditures
Salary of Librarian ______________$180.00
Rental _______________________ 120.00
City Dailies ___________________ 13.20
Books and Periodicals __ 23.10
Light and Fuel _________________ 29.79
Repairs and Improvements _________ 13.28
Total ______________.___.__ $379.37
Deficit for the Year ______________ $ 3.31
January 1, 1909, total number of books _________ 2319
Number of books added during the year______ 229
2.548
W. R. C. S.20
400 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Number of cards issued to borrowers__________ 501
Number of books drawn__________________ 1285
Number of visitors _________________ 1359
Magazines by subscription
Weekly papers ___________
Daily papers ____________
The library hours are as follows:
Week days10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 5 p. m. to 8 p. m.
Sundays10 a. m. to 11 a. m.
Respectfully submitted,
A. L. TUCKER, President.
CHAS. A. R. McDOWELL, Librarian.
Our Board of Curators are:
Dr. F. S. Belcher,
L. G. Middleton,
George W. Jacobs,
C. A. R. McDowell,
Librarian.
E. E. DesVerney.
3
2
2
1
Sol C. Johnson,
Duncan Scott,
A. L. Tucker,
Henry Pearson,
Secretary.
City
Appointment
ANNUAL REPORT
OP THE
KATE BALDWIN FREE
KINDERGARTEN ASSOCIATION
SAVANNAH, GA.
FOR THE YEAR
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1909
GEO. J. BALDWIN
PRESIDENT

Kate Baldwin Free Kindergarten
Association
Savannah, Ga., December 31, 1909
Mr. George J. Baldwin, President
Kate Baldwin Free Kindergarten Association
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Sir:The report that is herewith submitted
records the completion of ten years of free Kindergarten in
the City of Savannah, supported by the Association of which
you, sir, have the honor to be president. The occasion seems
a fitting one for a brief statement of the principles that have
inspired so small an Association to maintain at great expense
a system of education that not only is little understood by
the community at large, but that has frequently met with
much public discouragement.
In outline, these principles are:
I. A belief in a teacher specially trained for her work
a teacher who is a guide, interpreter, comrade, friend, rather
than a mere instructor.
II. A belief in the child as a living, growing, sentient
being, with a distinct personality of his own that can only
be brought to the highest degree of perfection by being first
understood and then given the right environment and nurture to foster his own self-active development.
We would point out that this conception is radically
different from the prevailing one which regards the child as
raw material to be shaped into a stereotyped pattern.
404 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
III. A belief in establishing the closest possible relation
between the home and the school; in enlisting the co-operative sympathy and understanding of the parents in every
step of the child's growth and education; with a chance for
the teacher to be what she should be, the closest friend of
the home, while the parents become the closest friends of
the school. With the Kindergarten as the combining
medium, this ideal is not a theory; it is a practical reality,
as a further examination of this report will prove.
We would point out that this conception is widely
removed from the point of view which regards education as
a concern for the school alone.
IV. A belief in the fundamental importance of a sound
physical basis for education; in the fine healthy body as a
prerequisite to a fine mind and an exalted spirit. In the support of this belief, the Kindergarten gives to the child,
through selected plays, activities which make, his body
readily responsive to the best of his ideas, the highest elements in his personality.
We would point out that again this conception of education is the complete antithesis of the system that seeks to
repress and eradicate the natural play and motor impulses
of the child.
V. A belief in the child as a social being.-an organic
part of the human brotherhood, and in the necessity of helping him to feel the interdependence and mutual responsibility that such relationships imply.
We would point out that the definite and systematic
training of the Kindergarten on these lines is far removed
from the current instruction that teaches the child-that he
stands or falls alone by the test of his knowledge of prescribed academic facts.
VI. A belief in the dynamic power, for character and
conduct, of ideals, aspirations, high hopes and desires, and
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 405
in the practical training of such ideals and desires by surrounding the child with the beautiful in all forms of art,
music, literature, pictures; harmony of environment both in
the physical and in the spiritual and moral world as well.
We would point out that such careful and intentional
training of the ideals is radically different from the chance
instruction on this line that commonly prevails in our systems of education,
VII. Finally, a belief that no service is so fundamental
and far-reaching for the good of the world as that rendered
to a little child in the terms of education. It is giving
the child, and the family of which the child is a part,
help by means of opportunity and training. It is saving the
individual and society from incompetence, weakness, and
evil, and if is doing this by the nurture of the best in the life
of each child, developing character in the terms of industry,
virtue, power, and happiness.
These, then, are the convictions that have sustained and
encouraged an Association, numbering only four people, to
maintain three Kindergartens.
But the Association holds that it has a further obligation
upon it, an obligation born of knowing by the proof of ten
years of practical work what the Kindergartens can do for
little children. With this knowledge, it becomes the duty of
the Association to work not simply for three Kindergartens,
caring for less than two hundred children, but for an extension of the Kindergarten through the public school system
until every child of Kindergarten age in the City of Savannah shall be given his rightful opportunity. Can Savannah
afford such a system of public Kindergartens? Does the
protest "economy" come, meaning the economy of money?
We ask you to consider that larger economy of human intellect, human power, and human character, that in the end
serve the State more profitably than any fiscal scheme, how-
406 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
ever shrewd and far-reaching. The real question of economy
is, can Savannah afford to deprive her little children of a
Kindergarten training?
Number of Kindergartens
The number of free Kindergartens in Savannah at present is four, maintained as follows:
Three supported and maintained by the Association,
namely :
South Side Kindergarten, Montgomery and Thirty-first
Streets. Jessie Anderson, Principal ; Clara H. Jussely,
Assistant. Number of children on register, 58.
Chatham Kindergarten, East Broad and Taylor Streets.
Carol P. Oppenheimer, Principal ; Henrietta A. Palk, Assistant. Number of children on register, 42.
East Side Kindergarten, Habersham and Congress
Streets. Clara B. Vaughan, Principal ; Loretto McCarthy,
Assistant. Number of children on register, 40.
Total number of children on register in the Kate Baldwin Free Kindergarten Association, 140.
One, supported by the Council of Jewish Women :
The Kindergarten of the Council, Ann and West
Broughton Streets. Catherine Putzel, Principal; Ella
O'Mara, Assistant. Number of children on register, 38.
Total number of children in Free Kindergartens,
Number of Private Kindergartens whose principals
attend the Kate Baldwin Free Kindergarten Association
conferences, two, namely :
Miss Hardee, Kindergarten 10 West Taylor Street;
Miss West. Kindergarten Pape School.
_ _ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _ 7
These Kindergartens cannot even meet the demand for
Kindergartens in the sections of the city where they are
established. Each of the Free Kindergartens has always a
long waiting list.
Boys' and Girls' Clubs
The number of Boys' and Girls Clubs has increased
since our last report was rendered from three to seven. The
list is as follows:
The Recreation Club; Leader, Miss Oppenheimer.
Place of meeting, Chatham Kindergarten.
Time of meeting, Tuesday afternoon at 3.45 o'clock.
Membership, 24 (girls and boys).
Age of members, 12 to 15.
The American Girls' Club; Leader, Miss Falk; Assistant,
Miss- Broughton.
Place of meeting, Chatham Kindergarten.
Time of meeting, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock.
Membership, 20.
Age of members, 9 to 12.
The Happy Hour Club (girls) ; Leader, Miss Vaughan.
Place of meeting, East Side Kindergarten.
Time of meeting, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock.
Membership, 20.
Age of members, 9 to 12.
The Merry Makers (girls) ; Leader, Miss Anderson.
Place of meeting, South Side Kindergarten.
Time of meeting, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock.
Membership, 15.
Age of members, 10 to 14.
The Tomochichi Club (boys); Leader, Miss Judge.
Place of meeting, South Side Kindergarten.
Time of meeting, Friday evening, at 8 o'clock.
Membership, 12.
Age of members, 12 to 15.
408 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
The object of this Club, as stated in its constitution, is:
"It shall be formed of boys living in the neighborhood of
South Side Kindergarten, who, by meeting together as Club
members for work and games, shall become better friends,
and by the study of city history with their leader shall
become better citizens of Savannah and better patriots."
There are also two clubs in connection with the Kindergarten of the Council:
A Girls' Club, Leader, Miss Putzel; and a Boys' Civic
Club, Leader, Mr. Fiedelson.
In the removal of Mr. Edward Steel from Savannah,
the Club work sustained a great loss. The members of the
Jolly Boys' Club, of which he was the leader, have accepted
temporarily the hospitality of the Recreation Club, but they
are anxious to reorganize as a separate club as soon as a
leader can be secured for them.
The self-governing Club is one of the very best and
happiest mediums that educators have discovered for training youth in citizenship, and for developing character and
leadership. The Kindergarten rooms make admirable meeting places for such Clubs, and it is gratifying to the Association to know that the Kindergarten equipment is used for
so many educational purposes other than the Kindergarten.
Other organizations that meet in the Kindergarten
buildings are:
The Mothers' Clubs,
The Parents' Associations,
The Domestic Science Classes,
The Young People's Social Meetings,
The Teachers' Conferences,
Normal Classes, and
The Savannah Kindergarten Club.
______MAYOR'S ANNUAL; REPORT______409
Mothers' Clubs
The value of the work of the Mothers' Clubs cannot be
overstated. These Clubs supplement in every possible way
the work of the Kindergartens.
The mothers study with the Kindergartners problems
of education, discipline, health, hygiene, food, gardening;
simplicity, wholesomeness and beauty in-environment, both
in the home and in the Kindergarten. By annual sales of
their own handiwork they earn money which they spend
for beautifying the Kindergarten grounds, contributing to
the Kindergarten festivals, purchasing pictures, and similar
supplementary work.
A Mothers' Club is established in connection with each
of the Free Kindergartens.
South Side Mothers* Club; membership, 57. President,
Mrs. Sullivan; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Sutlive.
Chatham Mothers' Club; membership, 50. President,
Mrs. Oliver; Secretary, Mrs. Cooney; Treasurer, Mrs.
Davis.
East Side Mothers' Club; membership, 30. President,
Mrs. Robider; Secretary, Mrs. Daly; Treasurer, Mrs. Goldrick.
The Council Mothers' Club; membership, 30. President. Mrs. Lipsitz.
Domestic Science
Miss Martha Sasnett devotes three afternoons a month
to Domestic Science work with the members of South Side,
East Side, and Chatham Mothers' Clubs. This is the second
year of tVr's work, and the gain both in the knowledge and
practice of wholesome and economic cookery is incalculable.
The study and discussion of Domestic Science problems has
helped also to relieve the drudgery of household labor.
410 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Parents' Meetings
The evening Parents' Meetings, organized last year at
Chatham Kindergarten, have also become a feature of South
Side Kindergarten. At these meetings, both the fathers and
the mothers of the children assemble. The first half of the
meeting, educational child problems are discussed, and the
last half is given to social enjoyment.
Festivals
Three Festivals have been celebrated by the Kindergartens this year:
The first one in honor of the coming to Savannah of the
President of the United States; the second one to celebrate
Thanksgiving, and the third one the Festival of Christmas.
The following account of the Thanksgiving Festival, as
reported in the Savannah Morning News, is written with
such true appreciation of the educational value of the Festival that it seems desirable to incorporate a part of it in this
report:
"A Thanksgiving party of a very genuine and happy
kind was enjoyed by something over 200 children under six
years of age, of the Kate Baldwin Free Kindergartens, the
Council Kindergarten, the Pape Kindergarten, and Miss
Hardee's Kindergarten, with the Kindergarten directors and
assistants, and an interested group of mothers and friends
looking on. It was held in the Regimental Armory, to which
effective decoration of harvest products gave the proper
holiday air and carried the spirit of the occasion. The tables
for the children were drawn up at first under the galleries,
and here they were seated as they arrived, depositing apples,
oranges, and other good things that they had brought as a
Thanksgiving gift for children less fortunate than themselves, for each had been asked to contribute a single piece
of fruit or some one thing to a Thanksgiving basket. When
these were piled up in the center of the floor, after the
'morning circle,' they made a great mound of bright color.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 411
"All the exercises were purposely simple, and the usual
hymns and songs of the 'morning circle' opened the program. The children marched with their chairs to the center
of the hall, forming three concentric rings when seated. Miss
Jessie Anderson, director of South Side, took charge of the
circle, and as the two hundred little children with their
directors gathered about her, eager and responsive, and as
unconscious of the audience as if on the small circle of their
own Kindergartens, there was a quality of earnestness, at
once joyous and serious, in their breathless attention, that
was very moving. The piano had previously given the
morning signal for quiet, when they were still at the tables,
and there had not been a sound while a soft little melody
was played. Now, as the familiar chords were struck, all
the little heads were bowed, hands clasped, and eyes closed,
and the morning hymn of thanksgiving, with which the
Kindergarten day always opens, was sweetly sung. After
some other songs, the morning greeting was given, the children coming one at a time into the center of the circle,
selecting other children," and greeting each other with
curtsey and handshake. The charming unconsciousness
with which they did this, bowing in turn to the children
whom they chose to greet with as much deliberation as if
there were no spectators, was one of the prettiest episodes of
the morning.
"After the fruit and Thanksgiving gifts had been
heaped up in the middle of the floor, the children returned
with their chairs to the tables, and putting the chairs down,
marched to the circle for some rhythm play. This was so
well done that it was difficult to realize that here were six
different groups of children, accustomed to the rhythm play
daily in their own Kindergartens, but meeting for the first
time to give it together. Through the entire morning, their
keen interest was evident in the close attention with which
Miss Anderson was followed.
412 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
"The idea underlying the Thanksgiving Festival was
that underlying all Festivals when used educationally. Its
purpose was to give to the children a real experience of
Thanksgiving, to let them actually share in the traditional
customs of the day, and, as it has been put by educators,
'feel' Thanksgiving, not hear about it or merely learn the
facts of history concerning it. In no other way does the
meaning of a Festival, its spiritual significance, and the
needs of the human spirit in which it had its origin, and
which have perpetuated it, become a personal possession and
a factor in personal growth. Through such a celebration,
race consciousness is developed in the child, and a deeper
sense of fellowship with his kind.
"An impressive aspect of the fete was the Thanksgiving
luncheon, when the tables were set in the form of a hollow
square, and two hundred children sat around them, with
heads bowed and hands clasped, while the Thanksgiving
prayer was said. There was a moment of absolute silence
and stillness, and the sight was a "very touching one.
"The tables were gay with oranges, orange-colored baskets which the mothers had made to hold candies, and pretty
mats with orange-colored borders that the children had
painted. Adding a final touch of gayety, there were big
pumpkin Jack o' lanterns at intervals along the tables.
"In the afternoon, the different Clubs of boys and girls
which are part of the community work of the Kindergartens
met at the armory with the club leaders, and enjoyed the
happiest possible two hours, playing games together, with
refreshments to close the afternoon."
Medical Inspection
The medical inspection of the Kindergartens has been
supplemented this year by the weekly visit of a trained
nurse to each Kindergarten, when a personal inspection of
every child is made. The nurse in charge of this work is
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________413
Mrs. Lucy B. Young, visiting nurse supported by the Parsons Fund, whose headquarters are in Chatham Kindergarten Building, where the Kindergarten Association gives
a room, rent free, for a dispensary and for nursing headquarters. From June to November of this year a free dispensary was maintained there in charge of Dr. Lewis Warfield. In November, Dr. Warfield moved from Savannah,
and since that time this work has been entirely in charge
of Mrs. Young. Mrs. Young also visits the children in their
homes, gives simple talks to the mothers at their club meetings, and has certain hours at each Kindergarten for the
treatment of any case in the neighborhood for which her
services are desired.
With all this work in connection with the Kindergartens, Mrs. Young still finds time for a great deal of other
nursing, not in any way connected with the Kindergartens.
By following a very carefully planned system, the actual
time spent by her in the Kindergartens is small, and the
results accomplished are large.
We are now reaping a ri<jh reward for all the work that
has been done in the last three years to better the health of
the Kindergarten children. This year there have been many'
cases of diphtheria and scarlet fever in town, and in the sections of the city where the free Kindergartens are situated,
and yet there has been only one case of scarlet fever among
the Kindergarten children, and no case of diphtheria. We
are certain that this is the result of careful and systematic
medical inspection and care to keep the general health and
vitality of each child in excellent condition. In this connection, it is significant that the one case of scarlet fever is that
of a child who has adenoid growths, and whose parents have
for two years persistently refused to have the adenoids
removed.
There were the usual number of adenoid cases, between
twenty-five and thirty, among the children who entered the
Kindergarten for the first time this year. Dr. H. H. Martin
414 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
again volunteered his services for the relief of all such cases.
The success of Dr. Martin's work among the Kindergarten
children has been such that the attitude of the parents of
the children has changed,from fear of the operation to such
complete belief and trust that they ask that their older
children as well as the Kindergarten children may be
brought to Dr. Martin for relief.
The work this year of Dr. John K. Train, in connection
with South Side Kindergarten, has been of very marked
service.
Conclusion
To the understanding reader of this report, it will be
clear that the many kinds of activities that are herein delineated are but the natural accompaniments of the true Kindergarten. We believe that the child was put in our midst as
much for our education as for his education.
"The conception of child life as the normal, and adult
life to be conformed to it, emerges slowly, but it emerges.
Painfully and incredulously, but none the less really, the
world is waking up to the fact that it is for man to play, as
the child plays; also to work as the child plays, with zest
and intensity and eagerness; to be responsive as the child is
responsive; to show his emotions as the child shows his;
that so his spirit may light the circle in which he moves, as
the smile of a child illumines the day for a downcast man.
In a dim way we are coming to understand what was meant
by the revolutionary saying, 'Except ye repent and become
as little children ye cannot enter the Kingdom.' "*
Respectfully submitted
HORTENSE M. ORCUTT
Supervisor of the Kate Baldwin Free Kindergarten
*WM. D. PAHKIN8ON,
(ton at the American Institute of Education, Castfaw, Maine.
STATISTICS
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
ITS TRADE AND COMMERCE
FOR THE YEAR
19O9
WITH COMPARATIVE TABLES
OF PREVIOUS TEARS
COMPILED BY
NEYLE COLQUITT
S*er**nr to tha ttmror
K. K.C.8.-27
BANK CLEARINGS AT SAVANNAH FOR FOURTEEN TEARS
January
March _____
Mav
June
Jnly ._--_
September
Octofter
December
Total
1909
$ 19,115,000 32
14,585,606 77
13716.264 40
16.479,392 77
14,071,988 53
11,903.491 07
11,994,546 82
14,238,533 69
34314.484 21
37775,113 01
25,030,763 12
I 26,552.650 98
$240.277335 69
1908
|$ 19,069.484 46
12.765,307 36
12,521383 71
11,337341 38
12;583.009 27
12.132,566 18
11,544.085 66
12,150,317 96
22J63373 55
26.259,90260
21706,016 80
19335,238 57
$194,279,527 50
1907
________
$24,127,225
16,604,958
15,551,230
13,706,744
15,231,042
12.669.398
12,307,118
12,006.009
23,107,734
30,270.450
25,790,147
23,259,664
$224321.619 '
1906
$19,563^08 41
17,619,627 21
16,182488 23
16^97351 04
19,504211 24 14,17^074 80 15,126335 64 15,223,797
20327,539 33
32,764^47 79
29,203/142 1 6
25,929,504 04
$242,603,427 oo
1905
$15,836,784 70
12,327,773 95
12,592,307 10
J3,556,467 78
14^45,151 40
16.287.206 03
18,847,000 43
15,958,349 74
28,638,449 23
2~,7i.3S4 34
31,576,095 55
24,044.199 72
$232,521,039 97
1904
$17,571,663 46
13,284^52 02
12,474,609 13
10,933,238 51
11,584,530 25
12,374,34398
11,888,614 54
13,255,577 99
27,089,912 91
27,455,967 17
22,539,708 83
21,344,153 35
1903
$19,542,420 26
15,531,205 99
14,903,183 03
12,720,753 27
11,148,444 32
11,397,25094
",375,012 47
16,666,300 14
19.689,811 62
25350,735 86
22,476,266 59
13.963,277 99
$201,796,751 64 $195.265,562 4?
1
1902
$16,388341 19
n,6o;M78 86
11,462^399 12
i3,oa<MD475
14*433,208 12
",453,595 66
11,492,579 06
11,690,495 61
18,093,746 38
19,588,972 60
21,456,663 83
20,400^9271
$181,069,677 89
1901
$21,294,003 99
17,372,890 25
14,067,862 47
13,529,275 78
12,869,446 15
10.392.722 67
10,453,007 29
9,466,585 27
12,983,638 oi 21,884,303 23
19,925,528 33
18,020,090 95
$182,261,154 39
1900
$10^203,700 54
22,492,04204
22,792,462 29
16^44,541 80
13,511,250 54
13,088,557 45
16,742^67 05
13.172,194 58
30,580,047 63
30,413,424 76
24,388.524 75
22,865,400 oa
$245,594,512 45
1899
$12,664448 92 8,852,776 36 8.133,136 78
8,546,058 45
9,061,071 36
9,134,356 16
9.033,495 52
9,265.668 95
12,232,879 16
15,878,009 76
17,799,296 21
17,013,416 61
$138,514,714 24
1898
$13,104,180 88
10,043,845 12
9,654,926 57
8,270330 94
7,871,082 50
7,425,404 17
6375,786 72
7,054,579 42
11.028365 37
17,594375 82
15,780,046 35
14,544,531 08
$129,248354 94
1807
$12,063,089 02
8,456.510 04
8,480,045 10
8323,353 II
7,581323 81
6383,168 IT
7,773,990 40
6,685,563 5
'3,366.012 18
17,661,581 48
15,809395 4
14,192,369 19
$127,777,401 99
1806
$12^68,716 17
10352,586 17
8,403,36842
7.367,729 82
7,091495 38
6,339-421 67
6,231,868 02
6,810,073 oo
14.006,350 13
16^38^53 21
14,603,548 45
13,441,025 74
$124,756,337 80
(M. R. C. S.27. 416-417)
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 417
L
418__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Savannah's Traffic and Transportation Facilities
The quantity of freight handled by vessels visiting this
port during 1909 (January 1 to December 31) was over
3,500,000 tons.
There are six railroads centered at Savannah, with
tracks covering twelve States with the population of over
24,000,000.
They are the Central of Georgia Railway, with mileage
of 1,915 miles; Seaboard Air Line, with mileage of 2,992
miles; Atlantic Coast Line Railway, with mileage of 4,129
miles: Southern Railway, with mileage of 7,293 miles; Brinson Railway, with mileage of 100 miles; Savannah and
Statesboro, with mileage of 53 miles. Total mileage, 16,482
miles.
Application has been made for charter for the Savannah and Southwestern Railway, with the intention of building from Savannah to Fort Gaines, Ga. According to the
charter petition, the length of the road when finished will
be 275 miles. The counties through which the road will
run are Chatham, Bryan, Liberty, Telfair, Ben Hill, Irvin,
Turner, Worth, Dbugherty, Calhoun, and Clay.
The Central of Georgia Railway is owned by the Illinois
Central Railway, the latter having a total mileage of more
than 6,000 miles, and connecting with the Central of Georgia Railway at Birmingham. Ala.
The Atlantic Coast Line Railway is controlled by the
same interests as the L. & N., with mileage of 4,678. These
lines have a direct connection at Montgomery, Ala., and
River Junction, Fla., also via Augusta and Georgia Railroad
at Atlanta. The Georgia Railway has a mileage of 331
miles, and is leased jointly by the Atlantic Coast Line and
L. & N.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 419
BANK CLEARINGS AT SAVANNAH, GA., IN COMPARISON WITH TEN OTHER CITIES
CITY
Savannah, Ga. __-
Memphis. Tenn. _____
Atlanta. Ga. _
Norfolk, Va. __ ....
Charleston, S. C. ____
Chattanooga. Tenn. _
Jacksonville. Fla. ____
Nashville. Tenn. .__
Clearings
1909
$240,277,835 69
286,665,540 21
336,270,170 08
147,279,269 00
108,538,294 88
108,807,162 26
79,021,517 65
76,877,444 93
92223,437 00
48.482,189 05
191,341,462 00
Clearings
1908
$194,279,527 50
252,991,081 53
230,067,592 55
111,078,245 00
83^38,140 86
93,635,311 16
67,674,899 30
69,746,353 49
73,194,127 54
36237,694 00
155,675,903 00
Clearings
1907
$224,821,619 oo
248,871,040 43
254,965,803 94
138,032419 oo
04,358,811 29
"3,769,35747
71,704316 64
73,270,107 82
76,046,049 49
35,466,698 oo
206,698,405 00
Clearings
1906
$242,603427 oo
247,584435 42
235,997,806 oo
124,551,553 00
85,756416 oo
100,536,990 oo
68,303,295 64
67486,782 27
74,018,826 oo
31.916,293 oo
Clearings
1905
$232,522,039
273,422,557
185,625,645
103,888,208
93,521,142
72,109,311
64,809,794
51,781,090
59,962,427
40,661457
.............
Clearings
1904
$201,796,751
260,665,326
158,022,103
00,401,368
75,617,866
66,145,876
50,491,116
40,515,550
38304,871
35,9<S6,79i
Clearings
1903
$195,265,662
214,009,563
144,994,034
84,921,740
72,526,926
63,445,853
37,112,105
26,071,912
40,782,000
Clearings
1902
$181,069,678
179,199,927
131,200,453
72,391,020
28,021,693
22,605,305
37,343,000
Clearings
1901
$182,261,154
154482,940
116,855,848
67,186451
23,371,778
16,757,775
34,560,600
Clearings
1900
$245,594,512
146,981,043
97,982^47
68,142460
20428,740
12,763,028
34,767,000
(If. R. C. B.27. 418-410)
420________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
There are terminals here covering about 2,900 acres, and
a railroad trackage of 146 miles.
Two steamship lines ply regularly between Savannah
and Northern ports. They are the Ocean Steamship Company, operating nine steamships, with three ships each way
weekly between Savannah and New York, and two between
Savannah and Boston.
The Merchants and Miners Transportation Company
operates nine steamships, with total tonnage of 19,213 tons,
with three ships each way weekly between Savannah and
Baltimore, and two ships each way between Savannah and
Philadelphia. This Company has recently inaugurated service between Savannah and Jacksonville, Pla., with three
ships each way weekly.
The ships of these two lines carry passengers as well
as freight. In addition to this there are many other coastwise and sailing vessels and steamships, and direct steamship service is maintained between Savannah and all the
important points of the United Kingdom and the Continent
of Europe, with frequent sailings.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 421
DOMESTIC EXPORTS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES OF UPLAND COTTON FROM THE PORT OF SAVANNAH FOR NINE YEARS, IN ROUND BALES
OF 500 LBS. AVERAGE*
COUNTRY
Belgium ______________
England _____________
France ______
Italy _________________
Netherlands __ ____
Spain ________________
Sweden _______________
Other Countries ______
Totals _______ 1909
Totals _______ 1908
Totals ___ ___ 1907
Totals __ ____ 1906
Totals - ____ 1905
Totals _______ 1904
Totals _____ 1903
Totals - ______ 1902
Totals _______ 1901
V->ln*e 1Qf>O
Values- _____ 1908
Values _______ 1907
Values ___ 1906
Values _______ 1905
Values _______ 1904
Values- ___ 1903
Values-- ____ 1902
Values _______ 1901
January
2.200
625
34.230
11.773
37.669
450
375
100
4.372
7,050
2.200
125
% 101.169
124,101
131^21
59,958
99,273
107,334
136,216
115.046
58,123
$4.670,209
6384,764
6,906,787
, 3.135.545
, 3;477;S13
7,204,387
5,786,279
4,565.688
2,805,885
February
2.150
200
5,144
31,746
700
400
100
1,252
5.875
1,200
48.767
49,137
44,987
39,810
54,732
45,190
90.956
70,376
78,474
$1.950,164
2;759340
2,307,460
2,349,314
2,059,015
3,255.297
4,079,111
2.864,010
3,766,838
March
500
8,197
5.534
26,617
415
200
100
751
2,550
850
45,714
34,847
70;028
58.D51
49,309
15,736
77,821
23,901
45,200
$1,989,499
1.860,878
3;567,999j
2,050,700
1,936,838
1,230,314
3341,766
1,035,327
1,962,350
April
800
400
5,141
200
39.523
500
650
400
1,775
1,050
50,43?
29.376
40,427
38,646
33,020
26,759
54,473
32,932
53,985
$2,402.262
1,406.098
2.097,188
3;i67,08S
1,261,918
1.881,547
2.704,728
11465,572
2,245,474
May
700
538
8,966
3,160
15,415
2,000
50
200
1,772
1,250
34,051
13,917
29,880
22,587
11,392
6,861
15,196
26,802
40,689
$1,449,434
721,163
1,569,792
2,122,821
4,316,804
450,465
789,052
947,751
1,688,676
June
850
4~643
31,212
752
276
I::::::::::
867
600
25
38.625
19,208
19,708
28,779
40,066
7,397
7,034
14392
14,046
$1,740,878
1,027,323
1.158,119
2^42^64
1.622,840
386,850
397.205
617,615
581,427
July
I
3,462
1,095
71
:::::::":
4,628
2.493
9,994
22.587
35,734
4.203
3.328
7,566
18,367
$245.830
74,945
547,935
i 1,147.051
1,853,185
221,820
213,052
308.996
757,220
August
689
___.
25
100
325
1,139
3,774
1,549
29,779
39,158
310
$67,875
112,371
64.617
1,479,766
2.006,125
16,043
Septemb'r
2,59!
3,650
32,817
35,842
90,232
2.4SO
100
550
5,525
1,100
175.865
118.670
80,537
42,774
142,434
165.676
73.913
122,729
49,366
$11.533,083
5,524,361
4,976,815
2.072.341
7,388,770
9.124.311
4,005,527
5.253,308
2,019.208
October
2,1
2,120
73,297
17,798
84,676
4,250
Y.665
7.100
650
100|
194,091
190.502
178,597
198225
160;361
257,382
187,871
144.068
148,584
$13,356.264
8.776:016
9,954,166
10,919,400
8,244.117
13,425,636
8,732,440
6,185,289
6,036,784
November
4.55C
830
50,014
27.737
62,339
2,250
50
3,225
900
1(X
151,99=
150,754
165,190
167,983
172,237
181380
183,020
133,269
166,583
$10,887,012
6,690,098
9,030,020
8,818,292
9,545,536
9,083,201
9,701,136
5,511,585
6,351,009
December

20,174
63,838
4,025
800
88337
129,071
172,864
155,265
142,402
181,627
139,118
167,946
146,313
$6,337246
5.667,013
9,506,499
8,012388
8,317,465
7,304^76
8,370,590
7,003281
5,766,094
Total
16,449
8.363
242^99
105,506
484,387
13,767
2,072
500
16,775
33.414
10,125
250
934.307
865.852
945,582
881,462
980,131
1,000,355
961,946
855,527
819,737
$51,629.756
51.687,397
47,517.467
52,030;426
53,584,453
48.620,886
35,758,422
33,980,965
*Does not include Sea Island Cotton.
(M. B. C. S.27, 420-421)
422 MAYOR'S AWNUAI, REPORT
Table of Comparative Railway Distances
Portland, Ore. ________
Omaha, Neb. _________
Salt Lake City, Utah _______
Kansas City, Mo. __________
St Louis, Mo. ______________
Nashville, Tenn.
Chattanooga, Tenn. _________
Atlanta. Ga. ___ - __ __
!
5: ' CO '
s
'
I i

Miles
3,302
3,289
1,503
2 54fl
1,426
1,194
1,397
1,165
1,209
1,201
1,219
1,088
>
1?.
x
0
>
V
Miles
3,230
3,188
1,402
2,439
1,310
1 1 054
1,156 <)S1
995
988
1,005
874
Baltimore, Md,
Miles
3,088
3075
1,789
J"\Vi
1.209
93?
1022
764
727
856
896
688
Norfolk, Va.
Miles
3,212
3,222
1,421
2,482
1.241
970
960
755
650
764
771
596
Savannah, Ga.
Miles
3,125
3,019
1,318
2,33?
1,159
887
67?
581
43?
4?1
340
760
At 88 I J*
. O i_
0 0
g*
o 2 ^
*JS |
H*<
Miles
95
169
84
107
151
167
484
368
563
567
665
614
From the above table of railway distances it will be
seen that St. Louis, Kansas City, Omaha, and other centers
for the distribution of food products, as well as Chattanooga,
Birmingham, and other important points in the mineral section of the South, are many miles nearer to Savannah than
to any of the Northern seaports.
The comparison in favor of the Gulf Ports from some of
the points named is still more favorable, but the greatly increased water mileage from ports on the Gulf Coast* to
Europe or to the North Atlantic ports, and the heavy marine
insurance around the dangerous capes of Florida have already favored the commerce of the South Atlantic ports,
and the tendency in that direction is likely to increase.
*The average run from Savannah to Liverpool by sailing vessel is ten days less than from New Orleans.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 423
DOMESTIC EXPORTS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES OF ROSIN FROM SAVANNAH IN BARRELS OF 280 POUNDS1909, 1908,1907, 1906,1905, and 1904.
COUNTRY
Belgium ___________
Brazil - - _____
Chili _________________
Cuba _ .
England _____________
Germany _____________
India (Br.) ______ _
Italy
Peru
January
2,660
178
92
21,411
24784
4,107
10,682
Portugal _ __________
Russia __________
Spain __________
Sweden j__
Totals ____ -__.-1909
Values _____ 1909
Totals _______ 1908
Values ______ -1908
Totals _______ 1907
"Values _______ 1907
Totals _______ 1906
Values 1906
Totals ______ -1905
Values _______ 1905
Totals _______ 1904
Values _______ 1904
63,914
$213320
88,082
$333,589
81386
$349,926
45,202
$172,920
26,395
$ 83.812
53.592
$144,189
February
888
180
1.660
4.606
4737
-12,071
$47702
64321
$260,989
37,672
$157,762
78743
$319,317
43,652
$136,005
86,772
$249782
March
174
3,703
10,466
7,533
7,491
7,359
36,725
$135,224
33,162
$122,684
46,276
$205,480
43,783
$180,452
35,012
$109734
45,458
$119,381
April
3,067
1*91
39,012
3,746
881
~36736
83,133
$288,455
82,402
$304,334
53,337
$251,098
14,163
$48,644
18.099 $Je;468
34,337
$92,896
May
713
336
4.C98
2,589
437
3,347
12,120
$50,795
52,562
$153,920
9,009
$ 43,767
26,756
$122779
32,654
$102,633
22,052
$ 62,495
June
7,668
. July
8,882
17~7~7 22,025
14,428 16,421
5*386
1,497
1785
47,981
$194,023
49,280
$158,849
27,111
$140,329
32,926
$134,384
19,191
$ 76,364
3.444
$ 9721
jf&ny
51,274
$194,809
36,769
$135783
54,640
. $267,769
37,792
$166,010
48,055
$176^65
9,821
$28,130
August
3,1%
179
4,763
1~8~314
10,078
6,320
________
42350
$177,942
71337
$207,454
51373
$238^70
35,753
$2307-13
* 20711
$ 74.988
19,769
$ 51..569
Septemb'r
4754
1,955
19.120
7,435
5,095
441
23,553
222
62,075
$265,686
October
14,177
13,456
4,747
9,585
9,823
51,788
$218779
117,829 48740
$326,812 $143,507
49,467
$224,605
38712
$169,324
75,780 65,327
$238,332 $292,363
80,786
$342,939
41,595
$114781
28784
$138,881
57,050
$157,834
November
6,113
60,176
7,348
5,971
9,678
1,771
91,057
$409764
71,608
$207,775
54,864
$211,433
40731
$176,492
71,923
$335,251
43,610
$130705
December
5,352
2,181
180
23,556
10,322
128
896
42,615
$176,303
97,059
$318,090
73,483
. $254789
88.913
$407,513
57.423
$204,422
56744
$187,001
Total 1909|Total 1908|
17,430
25,537
2,828
24324
272
194,473
149,306
41.818
58,313
36,364
25,338
222
2,667
597,603
$2,371302
23,340
54,584
5,783
ff.696
171,913
291,396
315
77,842
148,706
352
14,356
5,457
2,734
5,706
814,580
$2,673736
::::::::::
Fotal 1907|Total 1906)
50,082
5,294
24,129
1,066
2,102
161,140
144,079
44,321
113,622
402
480
25,251
3,916
______
575384
$2,514,552
10,711
30,633
7,306
63,633
2,357
138,750
195,639
1,917
29,956
86.613
513
714
10,088
4,466
3,452
1
1
_______
[-
586.769
$2,489,425
. ......i-._ _. L_... __f___L___
Total 1905
32,131
13,385
21,646
2,633
3,393
12,163
117,502
176,990
2,468
13,624
62,818
2,269
534
9,579
3746
4,915
1,439
481,685
$1,832,762
Total 1904
11,975
33,252
7,669
25,450
111,674
167,058
3,153
18,684
78,166
4~654
9,923
2,677
473,744
$1,347,984
(M. H. C. 3.27. 422-423)
424 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Total Value Imports and Exports for Fiscal Year
June 30, 1909
South Atlantic Ports
1909 1910
Savannah _____________$53,052,597 $67,283,528
Wilmington ____________ 21,708,717 23,277,679
Newport News __________ 8,969,856 6,807,452
Brunswick ____________ 14,756,596 14,665,192
Norfolk and Portsmouth ____ 11,135,934 9,679,431
Fernandina ____________ 4,995,168 6,004,639
Charleston __________-__ 7,675,033 13,332,874
Savannah's exports are almost as large as those of all
other South Atlantic ports combined. Her combined exports and imports are also nearly as large as all others combined. This is because Savannah is the natural outlet of
the Southeast.
Savannah's exports are as large as those of Philadelphia
and larger than those of San Francisco.
II
t:
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 425
DOMESTIC EXPORTS TO FOREIGN PORTS OF SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE FROM SAVANNAH (IN GALLONS)1909, 1908, 1907, 1906. 1905, 1904
COUNTRY
Austria-Hungary
Belgium
Germany
Italy
Netherlands
T~**.1. 1OAO
Values _______ 1909
Totals ___ _____.1908
Values _______ 1908
Totals _______ 1907
Values. ___ - _ -1907
Totals ______ -1906
Values _______ 1906
Totals _______ 1905
Values _______ 1905
Totals _______ 1904
Values _______ 1904
January
7.994
12,973
666,385
34,370
7.820
270
729,812
$309,154
714.121
$341,045
457,987
$317,037
188,186
$101,699
58,246
$ 30,574
215,191
$137,434
February
7,80;
20,750
51,506
30,695
110.754
$ 471631
134,926
$69,329
214.586
$157,553
110,316
$ 74,228
140,814
$ 75,4%
143,995
$ 81,633
March
7,m
26.072
23.062
10,372
21,032
88,338
$ 35,242
98,838
$ 53,421
43,412
$ 31,382
54,728
$ 37,771
213,730
$114,817
19,245
$ 11,585
April
| ___ _
10",365
33.380
5,200
48,945
$ 19,560
531,316
$242,825
148,157
$98,763
75,842
$48,832
59,946
$ 35,767
180,397
$98,164
May
"31,223
62^61
85,129
5,220
87,080
10,375
281,288
$112,862
755,614
$332,946
311,051
$204,325
162343
$99335
380,462
$233,407
231,664
$125,622
June
5,175
306,175
82,438
15,547
61.961
118;724
590,020
$244,455
820,453
$363,614
500,695
$299,385
599,275
$343,068
379,481
$234,570
500,339
$264,187
July
28,588
741,066
35,804
190,931
46,879
1,043,268
$481,452
909.580
$ 380,856
872,621
$ 508,135
263,619
$ 152..213
1,801,000
$1,029,221
264,624
$ 139,513
August
5,090
499.684
35,790
27,568
566.132
$296,391
782,160
$324,421
716.725
$ 412,443
753,063
$440,571
115,500
$ 69,302
769,304
$408,357
Septemb'r
16)206
426,951
22,967
13~1,451
591,569
$348,607
885,817
$ 332,529
515,468
$290,306
707,678
$ 438,443
1,014,318
$ 656,438
347,219
$ 186,515
October
158,487
177,001
65,019
7,794
48,426
456,727
$279,104
249,438
$ 91,731
412,210
$217,607
516,001
$347,568
235,013
$167,563
324305
$170,275
November
12,997
2,571
107,161
51,359
56.097
5,204
235,389
$135,439
426,461
$172,873
590,475
$272,517
340,614
$231,208
468,471
$298,474
170,226
$ 88,674
December
435,304
59,228
498,532
$318,567
227.114
$ 89,187
600,821
$269,415
239,734
$160,751
549.097
$352,345
410.285
$201,375
Total 1909
65,382
225,719
3,479,175
580,052
46,753
658,711
181,182
5,240,774
$2,628,464
Total 1908
25,760
459,454
3.858,380
830.201
140,964
1,215.845
5,234
6.536,238
$2,794,777
Total 1907
2,575
133.833
2.54S;217
1,144.178
178.490
1,429;915
5,434,20*
$3,083,764
Total 1906
500
3,102
2.157,836
644,406
68,504
1,140.700
1,849
4,016399
$2,476,187
Total 1905
691,825
3,056,416
816,653
90,876
760,308
5,416,078
$3,297,974
Total 1904
36.214
328,500
2,237,075
644,530
112.857
218,118
3,577,294
$1,919,33^
(M. B. C. 8.27. 424-425)
43* KAYOS'* ANNUAL REPORT
Domestic Exports to Foreign Countries from Savannah During 1909,
1908,1907,1906,1905. and 1904 of Sea Island Cotton, Cottonseed Oil, Cottonseed Meal, Cottonseed, and Staves
5 _ ^ 2 S.S
MONTH j* J S Sg
OT C " ' C ^ C 5* C **
O **. O ** Q j-ii ^ O C
mt O N"-' 1 QHV* v' i O a*J^/' O ^"^ MU : oo i uS o
March ________
April _______________
May _________ -
July ..______..
August ______________
October - _ __ _______
December ___________
Totals ______ 1909
Totals 1908
Totals ___ ___ 1907
Totals _______ 1906
Totals _______ 1905
Totals _____ 1904
1.055
190
180
51
238
136
930
3,120
3,011
3,328
12.239
12,031
16.570
16,554
10.941
16,507
517,006
274.459
47.967
125,751
418,933
107.098
621,119
1,366.035
1,243,525
2,488313
4,765>34
18.036,594
2,374,153
4,670,591
4.511.413
2,457.171
968.245
16,059,475
3366.140
7,484.155
3,248,277
2,076.560
224,009
12,973.140
12,687,300
4,677.565
63.296,612
105,827,480
25,317.420
53,628,641
88,600,172
18.635.450
. 6,203,184
8,687,800
4,056,478
2,477,038
1,559,195
269.930
531,974
1.707,280
2,686,406
3.857,150
32,036,435
31,480,906
9,032,760
9.768,379
13,063,054
9,028,641
JS
~ll
co
1,200
74,370
12,960
5,788
47,350
1,200
1,993
19,680
164,541
249,902
181,284
515,025
374,692
319,776
* After July 1, cottonseed oil was reported by pounds, instead
of gallons.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 427
DOMESTIC EXPORTS TO BOREIGN PORTS OP LUMBER PROM SAVANNAH IN RUNNING FEET1909,1908,1907,1906, 1905. 1904
COUNTRY
Argentine Republic
Austria-Hungary
Azores and Madeira
Bermuda
January
47,000
Canada
Chili __ _ . ___
Cuba ____ - _ - _
England ;
France <
Italy
Netherlands <B*lgr.)-~
310,000
280,000
Pern
So Africa (Br ) . - .
Spain -
Sweden
422,000
Uruguay >
West Indies (Br.) ___ _._
Other Countries
Totals 1,059,000
February
"l9,66o
258,000
110,000
387,000
March
140,OOC
12,000
. 40,000
216,000
135,000
146"006
689,000
April May
______ f_
219,000
161,666
209,666
589.00C
81.000
230,000
38,000
294,000
643,000
June
172,000
498,000
"26,000
234*000
930,000
July
352,000
127,666
168,000
202,000
$2,000
881,000
August
1,257,000
169,000
55,000
66,000
27,666
1,574,000
Septemb'r
320,666
240,000
7"5,666
lo'ooo
645,000
October
|_ ..... .
|
52,666
57,000
25,666
20.00C
154.0CK
November
206,666
8a666
83,000
89,666
!-____
452,000
December Total 1909
352,OOG
47,000
23,000
98,000
15,000
28,000
164,000
1,257,000
340,000
1,055,000
40.000
2,122,000
310,000
1,222,000
1,362,000
32,000
28.00C
8,167,000
Total 1908
752.00C
83,000
878,000
2,285,000
464,000
9,000
4,859,000
99,000
2,559,000
868,000
1,924,000
551,566
829,666
229,000
267,001
16,656,000
Total 1907
1,740,OOC
8,000
3,000,000
4,644,000
39,000
178,000
2,?53,666
32,000
2,217,000
2\364~666
440,000
2,905,000
3,689,000
24,209,000
Total 1906
1047666
690,000
3,819,000
2,323,000
62,000
143,000
2,305,666
514,000
2,165,000
430,000
2,732,000
621,000
376,000
1,560,0001
303,000
44,000
18,184,000
Total 1905
490,200
86,000
752,000
50,000
951,000
290,000
3,833,000
3,848,000
639,000
6,972,000
359,000
15,867,000
1,955,000
531,000
758,000
7,000
105,000
37,738,000
Total 1904
1977666
322,000
157,000
928,000
4,861,000
740,000
100,000
842,000
240,000
2,416.000
2,480,000
2,524,000
3,035,000
513,000
256,000
19,521,000
The above table is exclusive of timber logs, joists, scantlings, shingles, etc.
(M. R. C. 8.27. 428-427)
428 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Assessments for Taxation at Savannah, Ga- for Fifteen
Yean
YEARS City Real
Estate
City
Personalty
1
Total*
January 1, 1909_____|$35,501,860|$13,188,015|$48,689,875
1908_____ 34736799) 12,806,028) 47,542,827
1907_____ 34,049,925) 13,342,126) 47,391,051
1906_____ 31,000,593) 14,215.475) 45,216.068
1905_________ 29,970,933) 13,226,564) 41,851,342
1904_____ 28,975,057) 11,791,620) 40,766,677
1903_____ 28,044,040) 11,007,880) 39,051,920
1902_____ 27,290,022) 11,070,935) 38,360^57
1901_____ 26-^30742| 10377-335) 37,108,077
1900_____ 25^65,076) 10,617,783) 36,582,859
1899______ 24^20,795) 10,560,052) 35,480,847
1898______ 24,425,620) 10,629^58) 35,054,987
1897_____ 24,360,457) 10,409,018) 34,769,475
1896_____ 24,163,380) 9,160,522) 33,323,902
1895_____ 24,763,080) 9,160,522) 33,923,602
The net City tax rate is $125 on the $100. The City
government's income is, in round figures, $1,000,000 a year,
of which a large amount is spent yearly on public improvements of a permanent nature.
The increase in taxable values for the year 1909 was
$1,147,048.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 429
SAVANNAH'S CLIMATE
(1871-1*09 Inelivt>)
Temperature, Rainfall, and MlicHln Datm
Compiled from United States Weather Bureau Records at Savannah,
Ga., Thirty-Nine Years
TBMPERAT0RE
A^MUl
Mean
8TDaf.
Highest Maximum
on Beeord
105 Dec.
Date
July 12.
1879
Lowest Minimum
on Record
8 Dec.
Date
Feb. 13,
1899
Absolute
Range
97 Dec.
SEASONAL TEMPERATURE MEANS
February
Mean .
Dec.
. ... 62
. ... 61
. ... 58
.... 82
March
April
May .....
Mean ..
Dec.
...60
...66
... 74
... 67
June
Jnl7 ....
Mean .
Dec.
. . . . 79
on
. . . . 83
. . . . 81
October . . .
Mean ...
Dec.
. . 78
AT
. . 59
.. 67
PRECIPITATION (Amount of Rainfall in Inches and hundredth.)
Annual Mean Greatest Yearly Tear Leaat Yearly. Year
49.02 I 78.94 1886 J_ 86.84 1901
SEASONAL RAINFALL (Average fat Inches)
Sea'able Avc.9.25
March
April .
May ..
Bern-able
.....3.55
.....8.04
. . ...8.01
Avg.9.60
July .
Bea-ble
.....5.94
.....6.19
7 44
ATf.lB.5T
September ..5.62
October ....3.31
November . . .2.27
Bea'ble Avg. 11.20
MISCELLANEOUS DATA
MONTH
January .....
February ....
March ......
Amril ........
Way ........
July ........
September ....
Nomnber ....
December ....
Total .....
Average number of days
with .01 of an
inch or more
of precipitation.
10
10
9
8
9
12
18
14
11
7
7
9
119
Average number of clear
days
10
9
12
18
12
8
8
8
10
14
12
12
128
Average number of partly
cloudy days
11
10
11
11
18
15
16
15
11
10
10
29
143
Average number of cloudy
days
10
10
95
Average date on which first "kHlinf" frost occurred (in autumn), November 25.
Average date on which last "kfllint" frost occurred (In iprlnj), February 27.
H. B. BOYXR, Local Forecaster,
Savannah, Ga.

ORDINANCES
OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH, GA.
TOGETHER WITH
IMPORTANT
RESOLUTIONS, COMMUNICATIONS
AND REPORTS
ADOPTED DURING
THE TEAR
19O9
COMPILED BT
N. P. CORISH
CUrk
M. It. 0. S-28

ORDINANCES
Brinson
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to permit the Brinson Railway to cross
Magazine Street and Feeley Avenue, as herein provided:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
Brinson Railway, a corporation of the State of Georgia, be
and it is hereby permitted to build a connecting track
between its line and the Seaboard Air Line Railway, in the
City of Savannah, by crossing Magazine Street and Feeley
Avenue, as per sketch attached to its petition of December
5, 1908, and before Council December 16, 1908, which said
sketch is entitled "Brinson Railway; map showing crossing
of Magazine and Feeley Avenues;" provided always that
these streets be so crossed a"s not to in any way impede
travel, and to the satisfaction of the City Engineer and
Director of Public Works, and that no work be done looking
to the crossing of either street or avenue, except after the
approval of the City Engineer and the Director of Public
Works, and under their direction.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed. i
Ordinance passed January 13, 1909.
Revocation of LicensesNear-Beer
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to provide for the revocation of a license
to parties authorized to sell malt liquors, commonly referred
to as "near-beer."
434________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that hereafter
all licenses and permits of every character to sell, in the City
of Savannah, malt liquors, commonly known as near-beer,
and like beverages, shaJJ be subject to revocation by the
Mayor of the City of Savannah whenever, in his judgment,
such places become disorderly or violate the law, and such
revocation can be made by the Mayor without a hearing;
should he see fit to do so.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed January 13, 1909.
Near-Beer License
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to amend the tax ordinance passed December 30, 1908, providing for the assessment and levying of
taxes for the year 1909, by providing that before a license
shall be granted to dealers at retail in non-intoxicating substitutes for beer, same shall first be passed upon by Council.

Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
general tax ordinance passed December 30, 1908, providing
for the assessment and levying of taxes for the year 1909, be
amended by adding to section four, after the words: "Dealers at retail in non-intoxicating substitutes for beer, two
hundred and twenty-five dollars, with ten per cent, discount
if paid on or before January 15, 1909," the words "provided
that before such licenses are issued they shall be passed upon
and approved by Council."
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________435
Section 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict .with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance passed January 13, 1909.
Fir* Department
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to amend the ordinance adopted September 16, 1903, entitled: "Fire Department; of whom and
what it shall consist."
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
above entitled ordinance be and the same is hereby amended
by striking from paragraph three of section two the words,
"Clerk and Superintendent Fire Alarm Telegraph," and substituting therefore the words, "and Clerk," and by adding to
said paragraph three of section two the words: "The Superintendent of Fire Alarm Telegraph shall be appointed by the
Mayor, upon recommendation of the Superintendent of the
Fire Department and Chief of Police, approved by the Committee on Fire and Police"; so that said paragraph three of
section two, as amended, shall read: "The Assistant Superintendent and Clerk shall be appointed by the Mayor, upon
recommendation of the Superintendent of the Fire Department, approved by the Committee on Fire. The Superintendent of Fire Alarm Telegraph shall be appointed by the
Mayor, upon recommendation of the Superintendent of the
Fire Department and Chief of Police, approved by the Committee on Fire and Police, and shall be under the joint supervision and control of the Fire and Police Committee."
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed January 13, 1909.
436_______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
Messenger of CouncilOffice Abolished
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to abolish the office of Messenger of Council, and to provide for the appointment of a Clerk by the
Mayor.
*
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the office
of Messenger of Council be and the same is hereby abolished.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that the Mayor of the
City of Savannah shall be authorized to appoint a Clerk in
the office of the Clerk of Council, such appointment to be
subject to the approval of the Finance Committee, and such
Clerk shall discharge such duties as may be assigned him by
the Mayor.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed January 25, 1909.
Mayor's Salary
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to fix the salary of the Mayor of the City
of Savannah at thirty-six hundred dollars ($3,600) per
annum.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
Mayor of the City of Savannah shall hereafter be paid a
salary at the rate of thirty-six hundred dollars ($3,600) per
annum, the same to be paid as are other salaries of city
officials.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______43?
Section 2. Be it further, ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed January 25, 1909.
Office Consulting Engineer
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to provide for the office of Consulting
Engineer of the Water Works.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
office of Consulting Engineer of the Water Works, in and
for the City of Savannah, is hereby created, to be filled by
election as are other offices of the City of Savannah, for the
term which applies to other officers, and for the compensation fixed by resolution. The Consulting Engineer shall
have complete supervision and management of the Water
Department and the Water Works, and shall be under the
control and jurisdiction of the Committee on Water.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed January 25, 1909.
Improvement Portion Ogeechee Road
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to amend the ordinance adopted June 8,
1908, and entitled "An ordinance for the improvement of a
438.________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
portion of the Ogeechee Road, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887."
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of
the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that section 1
of the above entitled ordinance be and the same is hereby
amended, so that the roadway from the south property line
of Thirty-seventh Street to the south side of the first culvert
shall be paved with vitrified brick, and from the south side
of the first culvert to the city limits with Augusta gravel.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that section 3 of the
said ordinance be and the same is hereby amended, so that
it shall read as follows, namely: "That after the improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed, the
Director of Public Works for the City of Savannah and the
said Committee on Streets and Lanes shall prepare and submit to the Council of the City of Savannah two statements,
one showing the cost of the improvement from Thirtyseventh Street to the south side of the first culvert, paved
with vitrified brick, and another showing the cost of the
improvement from the south side of the first culvert to the
city limits, paved with Augusta gravel; and also two assessment rolls, showing as to two-thirds of the cost, how it is
apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and giving
the sum chargeable to each parcel, with the name of the
owner, so as to separate the cost of the improvement for
which vitrified brick is used and the cost of the improvement
for which Augusta gravel is used, and to assess the cost
separately.
"Upon the consideration and adoption of the said two
statements and assessment rolls by the Council of the City
of Savannah, it shall then become the duty of the City
Treasurer to send to the abutting property owners their
proper bill for the same, as it may be ascertained by the said
City Council, and if such bill, so sent, be not paid within
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 439
thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the
same, it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer
to issue an execution for the amount, together with costs,
against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out of the property described
therein as are executions for city taxes."
Section 3. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 6, 1909.
Electrical Theaters
By the Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to amend the tax ordinance as to the tax
on electrical theaters or moving picture shows.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that so much
of the tax ordinance adopted December 30, 1908, as provides
for the taxation of electrical theaters or moving picture
shows, charging 10 cents or less, be and the same is hereby
so amended that hereafter this portion of the tax ordinance
shall read as follows: Electrical theaters or moving picture
shows, charging 10 cents or less, one hundred and fifty dollars ($150) per annum,'without discount.
Section 2. That all ordinances and parts of ordinances
in conflict with this ordinance are hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 10, 1909.
440 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Improvement of Cohen Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Cohen Street,
under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature,
of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887,
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct, on Cohen
Street, in the City of Savannah, from the eastern property
line of Wilson Street to the eastern property line of West
Boundary Street, a roadway twenty-five (25) feet in width,
of granite block; and they are also authorized and directed
to enclose the said roadway with stone curbings, and to do
all the work in the way of grading, and placing of catchbasins, drains, crossings, and all other things incident to the
construction and completion of the said roadway on said
"Cohen Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of the said work shall have been ascertained, one-third
of such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and
the other two-thirds from the persons owning, at the date
of the adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on
said Cohen Street to be improved under this ordinance,
according to frontage, and the pro rata amount of the cost
of such work is hereby assessed against the said abutting real estate, and its owners as aforesaid, according to
frontage. The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is
assessed as real estate abutting upon said Cohen Street to
be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of this
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL. REPORT________441
ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall
pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such owner of
the cost of said work according to frontage, in addition to its
one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the Director of Public Works for the City of Savannah and
said Committee on Streets and Lanes shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement hereinbefore provided
for, and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of
the cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting
parcels, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel, with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue an execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
442 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Fortieth Street, Maupas Avenue, Forty-First Street, and
Estill Avenue
By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
An ordinance to amend Section 1432 of the Municipal
Code of Savannah, touching Eleventh Street, South;
Twelfth Street, South ; Thirteenth Street, South: and Fourteenth Street, South.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that so much
of the above mentioned section, which deals with the
Eleventh Street, Twelfth Street, Thirteenth Street, and
Fourteenth Street, south of Anderson Street, be and the
sajne is hereby amended, so that the provisions touching
these streets shall hereafter read as follows:
The Eleventh Street, South, shall be known as Fortieth
Street, and shall be 187.4 feet south of Thirty-ninth Street,
at center of Habersham Street, and 183.3 feet south of
Thirty-ninth Street at west side of Waters Avenue, and shall
be 50 feet wide.
The Twelfth Street, South, shall be known as Maupas
Avenue, and shall be 185.15 feet south of Fortieth Street at
center of Price Street, and 169.7 feet south of Fortieth
Street at west side of Waters Avenue, and shall be 50 feet
wide.
The Thirteenth Street, South, shall be known as Fortyfirst Street, and shall be 183.4 feet south of Maupas
Avenue at center of Price Street, and 169.1 feet south of
Maupas Avenue at west side of Waters Avenue, and shall
be 50 feet wide.
The Fourteenth Street, South, shall be known as Estill
Avenue, and shall be 314.5 feet south of Fortv-First Street
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 443
at center of Price Street, and 289.8 feet south of Forty-first
Street at west side of Waters Avenue, and shall be 100 feet
wide.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
Assessment RollThirty-sixth Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the'correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Thirty-sixth
Street, from the west property line of Florence Street to the
east property line of the Ogeechee Road, made under an
ordinance of the City of Savannah adopted October 21, 1908.
Section 1. Be it ordained, by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah, and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed October 21,
1908, and entitled: "An ordinance for the improvement of a
portion of Thirty-sixth Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be the
official statement and assessment roll of the said improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement and
assessment roll being that entitled: "Statement showing
the cost of improvements- to Thirty-sixth Street, in the City
V
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the west property line of
Florence Street, and extending to the east property line of
Ogeechee Road, as under an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed October 21, 1908; with an assessment roll showing as to two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned
among the se.veral abutting parcels, and giving the sums
chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the owners."
And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby
directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed
as of this date, and to enter the same on the minutes of the
Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective
amounts due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance.
Should the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of
the Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
Assessment RollCuyler Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement ana assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Cuyler Street,
from the south property line of Henry Street to the south
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________445
property line of Anderson Street, made under an ordinance
of the City of Savannah, adopted June 8, 1908.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed June 8, 1908,
and entitled, "An ordinance for the improvement of a portion of Cuyler Street, under the terms and provisions of an
Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October
1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be the
official statement and assessment roll of the said
improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement
and assessment roll being that entitled "Statement showing
the cost of improvements to Cuyler Street, in the City of
Savannah, Ga., beginning at the south property line of
Henry Street, and extending to the south property line of
Anderson Street, as under an ordinance of the City of
Savannah, passed June 8, 1908; with an assessment roll
showing as to two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned
among the several abutting parcels, and giving the sums
chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the owners."
And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby
directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll
filed as of this date, and to enter the same on the minutes of
Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners, including the street railroad
company, a bill for the respective amounts due by them, as
provided for by the said ordinance. Should the said bills
be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the Treasurer to issue
executions as provided for by the said ordinance, which shall
be made and levied as are executions for city taxes.
446_______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______ _
Section 3. Be it further provided, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
Assessment RollThirty-Sixth Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
. assessment roll touching the improvement of Thirty-sixth
Street, from the west property line of Jefferson Street to the
west property line of Burroughs Street, made under an ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted October 21, 1908.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah, and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed October 21,
1908, and entitled "An ordinance for the improvement of a
portion of Thirty-sixth Street, under the terms and provisions
of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October
1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be the official
statement and assessment roll under the said ordinance,
the said statement and assessment roll being that entitled,
"Statement showing the cost of improvements to Thirtysixth Street, in the City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the
west property line of Jefferson Street, and extending to the
west property line of Burroughs Street, as under an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed October 21, 1908;
with an assessment roll showing as to two-thirds of this
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________447
cost, how it is apportioned among the several parcels abutting, and giving the sums chargeable to each parcel, with
the names of the owners." And the Clerk of Council of the
City of Savannah is hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this date, and to enter
the same on the minutes of Council for due authentication
and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that the Treasurer of
the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners, including the street railway
company, a bill for the respective'amounts due by them, as
provided for by the said ordinance. Should the said bills be
not paid, then it shall be the duty of the Treasurer to issue
executions as provided for by the said ordinance, which
shall be made and levied as are executions for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
Police
By Committee on Police:
An ordinance to amend paragraph three (3), of section
470, of the Code of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that paragraph three (3) of section four hundred and seventy (470)
of the Code of Savannah, be and the same is hereby so
amended that hereafter the said paragraph shall read as
follows: "No person shall be appointed a policeman of the
said city who shall be, at the date of such appointment, over
forty (40) years of age."
M. B. o. s.29
448________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
Section 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with tlus ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
PoliceThird Lieutenant
By Committee on Police:
An ordinance to provide for Third Lieutenant of the
Police Force, and for his compensation.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that there
shall be appointed by the Mayor of the City of Savannah,
upon the recommendation of the Chief of Police and the
approval of the Committee on Police, an officer to be known
as the Third Lieutenant of the Police Force of the City of
Savannah. He shall be clothed with such powers and duties
as may belong to the office of Third Lieutenant, and may
be provided for by the rules and regulations of the Mayor
of the City of Savannah and the Committee on Police.
The said officer shall receive compensation at the rate
of fourteen hundred dollars ($1,400) a year, payable as are
other salaries; shall hold his office during good behavior;
and shall be subject to discharge under existing ordinances
with reference to Sergeants of the Police Force. He shall
take the oath of office required by other police officers.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
arfd parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________449
Retirement of Police
By the Committee on Police:
An ordinance to authorize the retirement of members of
the Police Force of the City of Savannah, who have served
faithfully for thirty-five (35) years or longer, on two-thirds
of the pay received at the time of their retirement.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that hereafter members of the Police Force of the City of Savannah,
who have served faithfully for thirty-five (35) years or
longer, may be retired on a pension, which shall be the
equivalent of two-thirds of the compensation received by
them at the time of their retirement.
Section 2. That' all ordinances and parts of ordinances
in conflict with this ordinance are hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
PensionsW. H. Smith and R. E. DavisPolice Force
By Committee on Police:
An ordinance to retire, with pensions, William H.
Smith and Richard E. Davis, of the Police Force of the City
of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That William H. Smith, a Sergeant of the Police Force of the City of
Savannah, who has served the City of Savannah faithfully
as a member of its police force for forty-one years and five
months, and Richard E. Davis, another Sergeant, who has
served the City of Savannah faithfully as a member of said
force for thirty-nine years and two months, in consideration
450________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
of their long and honorable service, be and they are hereby
retired with pensions, to be payable during their lives, the
said pension in each case to be the equivalent of two-thirds
of the compensation now paid a Sergeant of the Police
Force of the City of Savannah, and the same to be payable
as are salaries of city officers.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
Assessment RollOgeechee Road
Before the passage of this ordinance. Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same:
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll, touching the improvement of the Ogeechee
Road from the south property line of Anderson Street to the
south property line of Thirty-seventh Street, made under an
ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted June 8, 1908.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed June 8, 1908,
and entitled: "An ordinance for the improvement of a
portion of the Ogeechee Road under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be the official statement and assessment roll of the said improvement,
ANNUAL REPORT 451
under the said ordinance, the said statement and assessment
roll being that entitled: "Statement showing the cost of
improvements to the Ogeechee Road in the City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the south property line of Anderson
Street, and extending to the south property line of Thirtyseventh Street, as under an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed June 8, 1908; with an assessment roll, showing
as to two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned among
the several abutting parcels, and giving the sums chargeable
to each parcel, with the names of the owners." And the
Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby directed
to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of
this date, and to enter the same on the minutes of Council
for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that the Treasurer of
the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners, including a street railway
company, a bill for the respective amounts due by them, as
provided for by the said ordinance. Should the said bills be
not paid, then it shall be the duty of the Treasurer to issue
executions as provided for by the said ordinance, which shall
be made and levied as are executions for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed February 24, 1909.
To Amend Tax Ordinance
By committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to amend the tax ordinance with reference
to the appropriation for Bonaventure Cemetery.
452________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
appropriation of five thousand dollars for Bonaventure Cemetery be and the same is hereby increased to eight thousand
dollars.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed March 10, 1909.
Fenders Upon Street Cars
By Alderman Perritt:
An ordinance to require the use of fenders upon street
railway cars operated in the City of Savannah, to prescribe
the style of said fenders, to provide for a penalty for failure
to so use, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That on and
after the expiratfon of six (6) months from the passage of
this ordinance, it shall be the duty of all persons or
companies operating street railways in the City of Savannah,
to equip and maintain in proper condition and in a suitable
working order, upon every passenger car, except trailers, of
said street railway, used on the streets of said city, one of
the fenders or wheel guards mentioned in the next section
of th?s ordinance, for the protection of life and property:
Provided no wheel guard shall be placed uoon any car unless
such wheel guard be equipped with a buffer; and provided,
further, no wheel guard shall be put on any car when the
distance between the front of the car and the front of the
truck is less than four feet and six inches.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 453
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the fender or
wheel guard to be so used shall, at the option of the street
railway company, be either Hunter, Parmenter, American,
Pfingst, Providence, or Sterling Meaker.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That, for a failure to
equip and maintain one of the fenders provided for in the
foregoing section, upon every car other than a trailer or
work car, used within the limits of the City of Savannah,
every person or company so operating said car, without said
fender, shall be fined, on conviction in the Police Court of
the City of Savannah, in the sum of one hundred dollars
($100), or imprisoned thirty (30) days; either or both in the
discretion of the court, for each and every violation.
Each day's refusal or failure shall be held and regarded
as a distinct and separate offense.
If the fender or wheel guard of a car is out of repair, it.
shall be a violation of this ordinance for a car, with such a
fender or wheel guard, to make more than one round trip
while the fender or wheel guard is out of repair and before
the repair of the same.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed March 10, 1909.
To Amend Tax Ordinance
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to amend the tax ordinance with reference
to the allowance of a discount in the payment of a tax based
upon an assessment made through the office of the Controller-General.
454 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That section
7 of the tax ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted
December 30, 1908, be and the same is hereby amended by
striking therefrom the provision at the conclusion of said
section, reading: "Provided no discount is to be allowed on
the payment of any tax based on an assessment made
through the office of the Controller-General of the State,"
and substituting therefor the following: Any company or
person required to pay a tax based upon an assessment made
through the office of the Controller-General of the State of
Georgia may obtain the benefit of the discount herein provided for b}' paying to the City Treasurer, within the times
herein mentioned, quarterly installments, payable on the
basis of the last assessment of the said Controller-General,
less the discount, and subject to adjustment after the assessment is made; and within fifteen days from notification of
the said assessment the last payments due under the adjustment shall be paid to the City Treasurer, less the discount.
Sqction 2. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed March 26, 1909.
Pulmonary TuberculosisAn Infectious Disease
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordmance to declare pulmonary tuberculosis an
infectious disease, and to provide regulations to prevent the
spread of the same.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled,. That pulmonary tuberculosis be and the same is hereby declared to
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 455
be subject to municipal regulation as an infectious disease;
and it is hereby made the duty of the physician or person in
charge of a patient afflicted with pulmonary tuberculosis to
report the case to the Health Officer of the City of Savannah
promptly after the fact is known.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That it is hereby
made the duty of the Health Officer of the City of Savannah
to distribute sanitary rules bearing upon the sanitation of
pulmonary tuberculosis to all reported cases, unless the
attending physician requests that this be not done.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That, upon the death
or removal from the premises of a patient afflicted with pulmonary tuberculosis, it shall be the duty of the attending
physician or person in charge to report promptly to the said
Health Officer the said death or removal, and, after the said
death or removal, the room occupied at the time of the death
or removal by the patient shall be disinfected at the expense
of the City of Savannah, and under the supervision of the
Health Officer.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the
duty of a patient afflicted with pulmonary tuberculosis, and
of every person in attendance upon such patient, to observe
and enforce all sanitary rules of the Sanitary Board of the
City of Savannah bearing upon the disease, and it shall be
the duty of the attending physician to report to the said
Health Officer all cases of pulmonary tuberculosis that may
be cured.
Section 5. Be it further ordained. That any person
violating any provision of this ordinance shall be subject,
upon conviction before the Police Court of the City of Savannah, to a fine not to exceed one hundred dollars ($100),
and to imprisonment not to exceed thirty (30) days; either
or both at the discretion of the Court.
456 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Section 6. Be it further ordained That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed April 7, 1909.
Streets South of Anderson Street
Ordinance read in Council for the first time March 26,
1909; read a second time April 7, 1909; placed upon its passage, adopted, and approved.
By Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance entitled an ordinance to amend an
ordinance passed February 3, 1904, providing for streets
south of Anderson, between Waters Avenue and the east
corporate limits. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that
section 7 of that certain ordinance passed July 4, 1904, to be
found in MacDonell's Code of Savannah, 1907, as section
1433, and providing for streets south of Anderson, between
Waters Avenue and east corporate limits, be and the same is
hereby amended as follows:
Anderson Street extended shall be eighty (80) feet wide,
and center of same well defined by stone monuments from
Wraters Avenue to said east corporate limits, from which as
a base the other streets of this section shall be laid out; that
is to say. the first street south shall be two hundred and
twenty-five (225) feet from and parallel with said Anderson Street, sixty (60) feet wide, and shall be known as
Thirty-first Street, and extending from Waters Avenue to
said east corporate limits.
The second street south shall be two hundred and
twelve (212) feet from and parallel with Thirty-first Street,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 457
sixty (60) feet wide, extending from Waters Avenue to
said east corporate limits, and shall be known as Thirtysecond Street.
The third street south shall be two hundred and twelve
(212) feet from and parallel with Thirty-second Street,
sixty (60) feet wide, extending from Waters Avenue to said
east corporate limits, and shall be known as Thirty-third
Street.
The fourth street shall be one hundred and thirty-two
(132) feet from and parallel with Thirty-third Street, forty
(40) feet wide, extending from Waters Avenue to said east
corporate limits, and shall be known as Thirty-fourth Street.
Be it further ordained, that all ordinances or parts of
ordinances in conflict herewith be, and the same are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance passed April 7, 1909.
Assessment RollYork Street Lane
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same:
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of York Street
Lane, from the east side of Bull Street to the west side of
Drayton Street, made under an ordinance of the City of
Savannah, adopted December 19, 1906.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
458 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed December 19,
1906, and entitled: "An ordinance for the improvement of
portions of certain streets and lanes in the City of Savannah,
Ga., that is to say" etc., (naming a number of streets and
lanes), "York Street Lane, from the east side of Bull Street
to the west side of Drayton Street," etc., "all under the terms
and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be
the official statement and assessment roll of the said
improvement, under the said ordinance, the said statement
and assessment roll being that entitled: "Statement showing
the cost of improvements to York Street Lane, in the City of
Savannah, Ga., beginning at the east side of Bull Street, and
extending to the west side of Drayton Street, as under an
ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed December 19,
1906; with an assessment roll showing as to two-thirds of
this cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting
parcels, and giving the sums chargeable to each parcel, with
the names of the owners." And the Clerk of Council of the
City of Savannah is hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this date, and to enter
the same on the minutes of Council for due authentication
and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 459
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed April 7, 1909.
Assessment RollBay Street Lane
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same:
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll, touching the improvement of Bay Street
Lane, from the east property line of Bull Street to the west
property line of Drayton Street, made under an ordinance of
the City of Savannah, passed November 7, 1906, and
amended June 8, 1908.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the ,City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah passed November 7,
1906, as amended by the ordinance of said city passed June
8, 1908, and entitled: "An ordinance to amend an ordinance
entitled 'An ordinance for the improvement of Bay Street
Lane, from the east property line of Bull Street to the west
property line of Drayton Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887,' the said ordinance having been passed
November 7, 1906," be and it is hereby declared to be the
official statement and assessment roll of the said improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement and
assessment roll being that entitled: "Statement showing
460______' MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
the cost of improvements to Bay Street Lane, in the City of
Savannah, Ga., beginning at the east property line of Bull
Street, and extending to the west property line of Drayton
Street, as under an ordinance of the City of Savannah,
passed June 8, 1908; with an assessment roll showing as to
two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and giving the sums chargeable to
each parcel, with the names of the owners." And the Clerk
of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to
mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this
date, and to enter the same on the minutes of Council for
due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed April 7, 1909.
Assessment RollOgeechee Road
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same:
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll, touching the improvement of the Ogeechee
Road, from the south property line of Thirty-seventh Street
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________461
to the south side of the first culvert, made under an ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted June 8, 1908, and
amended February 6, 1909.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed June 8, 1908,
as amended by the ordinance of said city, passed February
6, 1909, and entitled: "An ordinance to amend the ordinance adopted June 8, 1908, and entitled: 'An ordinance for
the improvement of a portion of the Ogeechee Road, under
the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of
Georgia, approved October 1, 1887,'" be and it is hereby
declared to be the official statement and-assessment roll of
the said improvement, under the said ordinance, the said
statement and assessment roll being that entitled: "Statement showing the cost of improvements to the Ogeechee
Road in the City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the south
property line of Thirty-seventh Street, and extending to the
south side of the first culvert, as under an ordinance of the
City of Savannah, passed February 6, 1909; with an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of this cost, how it is
apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and giving
the sums chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the
owners." And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah
is hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this date, and to enter the same on the
minutes of Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that the Treasurer of
the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
462________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed April 7, 19(39.
Electrical TheatersRegulations
By Committee on Fire:
An ordinance to regulate electrical theaters or moving
picture shows in the City of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that every
electrical theater or moving picture show, in the City of
Savannah, shall, in addition to the tax required by the Tax
Ordinance, be subject to the following regulations:
A. No licenses shall be issued until there has been a
thorough inspection of the place made by the Building
Inspector, the Superintendent of the Fire Department, and
the Electric Inspector of the City of Savannah.
B. All operators of moving picture machines must be
licensed, and of a legal age. Before issuing a license to an
operator, his habits shall be carefully looked into, and an
examination of him shall be had before the Superintendent
of the Fire Department and the Electric Inspector or Chairman Fire Committee as to his qualifications and fitness for
such position.
C. Operators of machines shall be held strictly
accountable for the safety of the establishment where
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 463
employed, and for the people who attend the performances.
The machines must be in first-class condition, and must not
be operated except in a fireproof booth, equipped with sand,
water, and fire extinguisher. Faulty films are not to be
used, and extra films are to be kept in metal boxes. Smoking
is absolutely prohibited. No one shall be allowed in the
operator's booth except assistants, the operator being held
responsible for the action of his. assistants while absent from
the booth.
D. It shall not be lawful to re-wind one film while the
operator is showing another. In case of an accident, the
operator shall throw over the lamphouse, and then throw on
the house lights, and shall not read while cranking the
machine. Before showing a film publicly, he shall carefully
examine it. If the sprocket holes are torn or worn, he shall
mend the film. If the film is in poor condition, it shall be
discarded altogether. All loose pieces of celluloid film shall
be kept in a tin box, and carbons thrown in the sand pail.
E. An operator's license shall be immediately revoked
if he is caught smoking, or shall have a fire or an accident
due to his carelessness. Rheostats or rheostaticides must
rest en asbestos, stone, or brick, at least six inches above
the floor; the wires from the switch to the lamp-house to be
kept covered wth serviceable asbestos. Under no circumstances shall less than 35 amperes of electricity be used, and
the fuses never heavier than 50 amperes.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that every violation
of any regulation or provision of this ordinance shall be
punishable, upon conviction before the Police Court of the
City of Savannah, by a fine not to exceed fifty dollars ($50),
imprisonment not to exceed thirty (30) days, either or both
in the discretion of the Court.
M. K. C. B.SO'
464______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
Section 3. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed May 19, 1909.
Hospitals or Sanitariums
By Alderman Barrow:
An ordinance to provide for representation of the
municipal administration on all governing boards of all hospitals or sanitariums supported wholly or in part by the City
of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah in Council assembled, That each
and every board of governors, trustees, or directors of each
and every hospital or sanitarium supported wholly or in part
by the City of Savannah shall, within thirty (30) days after
the passage of this ordinance, elect, as members of each and
every such board of governors, trustees, or directors, three
(3) members of the municipal administration, namely: the
Mayor, Health Officer, and the chairman of the Committee
on Public Health, to serve on such boards, with rights,
powers, and privileges equal to other members of such
boards, during the entire terms of these officers in these
respective offices in the municipal administration.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That in case any of
the hospitals or sanitariums supported wholly or in part by
the City of Savannah has no board of governors, trustees, or
directors, the Mayor, Health Officer, and the chairman of
the Public Health Committee shall be named and recognized"
by the owners or controllers of such hospitals as a board of
trustees for the money appropriated by the City of Savannah for such hospital, with all the rights and privileges
granted a board of trustees under the laws of Georgia.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________465
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the
duty of these representatives of the municipal administration
(the Mayor, Health Officer, and Chairman of Public Health
Committee) to inquire diligently into the administration of
the affairs of the various hospitals or sanitariums supported
wholly or in part by the City of Savannah, with a view to a
strict economy in their fiscal affairs, the maintenance of a
capable medical and surgical staff, and a just distribution of
the money appropriated by the city among the city's poor,
and the prevention of a diversion of these appropriations to
the care or treatment of pay patients. It shall also be their
duty to require each institution to render to the municipal
administration a complete and comprehensive annual report,
setting forth exactly the cost of the city per patient per day,
and to submit a monthly statement whenever called upon to
do so showing the cost to the city per patient per day.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the
duty of the above-mentioned representatives of the municipal
administration on the governing boards of the various hospitals or sanitariums to tender their resignations as members
of such boards immediately upon their retirement as Mayor,
Health Officer, and chairman of the Public Health Committee, respectively, and it shall be the duty of these hospital boards to accept these resignations, and to elect on
their respective boards within thirty days thereafter the
Mayor, Health Officer, and Chairman of the Public Health
Committee succeeding to those officers in the municipal
government.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That in case of the
death of either of the above-named representatives of the
municipal administration on the various hospital or sanitarium boards of the city, his successor in the municipal government shall be elected to fill his place on the several hospital boards within thirty days thereafter.
466 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Section 6. Be it further ordained, That any hospital or
sanitarium failing to comply with any of the provisions of
this ordinance shall be deprived of its appropriations from
the city.
Section 7. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed May 19, 1909.
Tax OrdinanceAmendment
By the Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to amend the general tax ordinance, in
reference to the tax on electrical theaters or moving pictures,
by providing a tax for such exhibitions operated in open-air
amusement places, and for other purposes.
Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen, in Council
assembled, that the general tax ordinance be amended by
adding to the section in reference to the tax on electrical
theaters or moving picture shows, to be found on page 12,
lines 31 to 34 of the printed ordinance, the following, to be
inserted in line 34, just before the words "without discount:"
Such exhibitions as are given in open-air theaters, not
operated during the entire year, shall pay a tax for each
month, or fraction thereof, during which they are in operation, of $25 per month for such performances charging for
admittance more than ten cents, and of $12.50 per month for
such performances charging ten cents or less.
Ordinance passed May 19, 1909.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 467
Streets, Lanes, and Wards
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to amend sections 1427, 1428, 1430, and
1438 of the Municipal Code of Savannah, touching the laying
out of that part of the city lying between Lincoln Street on
the west, Estill Avenue on the north, Waters Avenue on the
east, and the corporate limits on the south.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
ol the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That so much
of the above mentioned sections which deal with the laying
out of the streets and lanes in the above mentioned territory,
and in the laying out of Granger, Watson, Schroder, and
McKenna wards, is hereby amended so that the provisions
touching these streets, lanes, and wards shall hereafter read
as follows:
"''f*
Habersham Street shall be 60 feet wide, and shall be
extended south to the city limits on the same lines as it is
now laid out.
The first street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as Battey Street; it shall be 592.8
feet distant from and parallel to Habersham Street; it shall
extend from Estill Avenue to the city limits, and shall be 50
feet wide.
The second street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as Reynolds Street; it shall be 592.8
feet distant from and parallel to Battey Street; it shall
extend from Estill Avenue to the City limits, and shall be
50 feet wide.
The third street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as West Atlantic Street; it shall be
213.5 feet distant from and parallel to Reynolds Street from
Forty-ninth Street to Forty-seventh Street; and from the
468_______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
north side of Forty-seventh Street to Forty-sixth Street on
the arc of a circle, the radius of the eastern side being 206
feet, and the center being located at a point on the northern
side of Forty-seventh Street, 469.5 feet east of Reynolds
Street, and shall be 50 feet wide.
The fourth street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as Atlantic Street; the center line
thereof shall be 603.5 feet east of Reynolds Street, and it
shall extend from Estill Avenue to Forty-sixth Street with a
width of 200 feet, and from Forty-ninth Street to the city
limits with a width of 50 feet.
The fifth street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as East Atlantic Street; it shall be
340 feet distant from the center line of Atlantic Street, and
shall be 50 feet wide. It shall extend in a straight line,
parallel to Atlantic Street, from Forty-ninth Street to Forty- '
seventh Street; and from the north side of Forty-seventh
Street to Forty-sixth Street on a circular arc, whose, radius
is 206 feet on the west side, and whose center is on the north
side of Forty-seventh Street, 134 feet east from the center
line of Atlantic Street.
The sixth street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as Paulsen Street; it shall be 704.4
feet distant from the center line of Atlantic Street, and
parallel thereto. It shall extend from Estill Avenue to the
city limits, and shall be 50 feet wide.
The seventh street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as Harmon Street. It shall extend
from Estill Avenue to Forty-fourth Street Lane, at a distance of 450 feet from the east line of Paulsen Street, and
from Forty-fifth Street Lane to the city limits, at a distance
of 585.6 feet from the east line of Paulsen Street, and shall
be 50 feet wide.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________469
The eighth street east of Habersham Street shall be
known and designated as Waters Avenue; it shall be parallel
to and distant from the east line of Paulsen Street 1,221.2
feet, and shall extend from Estill Avenue to the city limits,
and shall be __ feet wide.
Forty-fifth Street shall be parallel to Forty-second
Street west of Bull Street, and 798 feet south thereof, as
described in Sec. 1428, MacDonell's Code of 1907, and shall
be 60 feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to
Waters Avenue, with the exception of the park spaces hereinafter mentioned.
Forty-fifth Street Lane shall be south of Forty-fifth
Street, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be
16 feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue, with the exception of the park spaces hereinafter
mentioned.
Forty-sixth Street shall be south of Forty-fifth Street
Lane, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 60
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Forty-sixth Street Lane shall be south of Forty-sixth
Street, parallel to and distant from it 95 feet. It shall be 16
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to West Chatham Crescent, and from East Chatham Crescent to Waters
Avenue.
Forty-seventh Street shall be south of Forty-sixth Street
Lane, parallel to and distant from it 95 feet, and shall be 100
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Forty-seventh Street Lane shall be south of Fortyseventh Street, parallel to and distant from it 95 feet. It
shall be 16 feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street
to West Atlantic Street, and from East Atlantic Street to
Waters Avenue.
470 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Forty-eighth Street shall be south of Forty-seventh
Street Lane, parallel to and distant from it 95 feet. It shall
be 60 feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to West
Atlantic Street, and from East Atlantic Street to Waters
Avenue.
Forty-eighth Street Lane shall be south of Forty-eighth
Street, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 16
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to West
Atlantic Street, and from East Atlantic Street to Waters
Avenue.
Forty-ninth Street shall be south of Forty-eighth Street
Lane, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 60
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Forty-ninth Street Lane shall be south of Forty-ninth
Street, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 16
feet wide and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Fiftieth Street shall be south of Forty-ninth Street
Lane, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 60
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue, with the exception of the park spaces hereinafter
mentioned.
Fiftieth Street Lane shall be south of Fiftieth Street,
parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 16 feet
wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue. *'
Fifty-first Street shall be south of Fiftieth Street Lane,
parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 60 feet
wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Fifty-first Street Lane shall be south of Fifty-first
Street, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 16
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______ 471
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Fifty-second Street shall be south of Fifty-first Street
Lane, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 60
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Forty-fourth Street Lane shall be north of Forty-fifth
Street, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 16
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue, with the exception of the park spaces hereinafter
mentioned.
Forty-fourth Street shall be north of Forty-fourth Street
.Lane, parallel to and distant from it 105 feet. It shall be 60
feet wide, and extend from Habersham Street to Waters
Avenue.
Estill Avenue Lane shall be north of Forty-fourth
Street, parallel to and distant from it 110 feet, and extend
from Habersham Street to Waters Avenue.
Chatham Crescent (West Section) shall be 100 feet
wide, laid out so that the center line is a perfect circular arc,
beginning at the point where the center line of Price Street
extended intersects the south side of Estill Avenue; thence
it shall pass through the intersections of center lines of
Battey Street and Forty-fifth Street and also through the
intersections of the center lines of Forty-seventh Street and
West Atlantic Street.
Chatham Crescent (East Section) shall be 100 feet
wide, laid out so that the center line is a perfect circular arc,
beginning at the point where the center line of Ott Street
intersects the south side of Estill Avenue, and from there
passing through a point on the center line of Forty-fifth
Street, 517.8 feet east of Paulsen Street, and also through
the intersection of the center lines of Forty-seventh Street
472 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
and East Atlantic Street. The two above sections, taken
together, shall be known and designated as Chatham
Crescent.
WARDS
That portion bounded north by Forty-seventh Street,
south by the corporate limits, east by Paulsen Street, and
west by Reynolds Street, shall be known and designated as
Schroder Ward.
That portion bounded north by Estill Avenue, south by
Forty-seventh Street, east by Paulsen Street, and west by
Reynolds Street, shall be known and designated as Granger
Ward.
That portion bounded north by Estill Avenue, south by
Forty-seventh Street, east by Reynolds Street, and west by
Lincoln Street, shall be known and designated as Watson
Ward.
That portion bounded north by Forty-seventh Street,
south by the corporate limits, east by Reynolds Street, and
west by Lincoln Street, shall be known and designated as
McKenna Ward.
Be" it further ordained, That all ordinances and parts of
ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance passed June 2, 1909.
Water Works
By Committee on Water:
An ordinance to require all premises in the City of
Savannah to be supplied with a stop-cock and stop-cock
box, and for other purposes.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 473
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That on and
after the passage of this ordinance, all persons or companies
owning real estate in the City of Savannah, and plumbers
making connection with the water works system of said city,
shall be required to place on the sidewalk, and within the
curb line of the premises, a stop-cock and stop-cock box on
each service pipe.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That every person
failing to comply with the provisions of this ordinance, for
each violation shall be fined, on conviction in the Police
Court of the City of Savannah, in' an amount not exceeding
twenty-five dollars ($25.00), or imprisonment for thirty
(30) days, either or both in the discretion of the Court.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 2, 1909.
Uniformity in Sidewalks
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to secure uniformity in the sidewalks,
roadways, grass plats, etc. Be it ordained by the Mayor and
Aldermen of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled,
That the width of the sidewalks, grass plats, and roadways
in that section of the city bounded north by Fortieth Street,
south by the corporate limits, west by Habersham Street,
east by Waters Avenue, shall be as follows:
1. Streets 50 feet wide shall have a roadway in the
center of 30 feet, grass plats next to the property line of 5
feet, and sidewalks next to the curb of 5 feet wide.
474 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
2. Streets 60 feet wide shall have a roadway in the
center of 32 feet, grass plats next to the property line of 9
feet, and sidewalks next to the curb of 5 feet wide.
3. Streets 100 feet wide shall have a grass plat in the
center 20 feet wide, with a roadway on either side thereof of
25 feet wide, and a grass plat on either side thereof of 9 feet
wide next to the property line, and a sidewalk next to the
curb line of 6 feet wide.
4. Streets 200 feet wide shall have a paved walk 20 feet
wide in the center thereof, with a grass plat of 50 feet on
either side, and a roadway 25 feet wide next to the grass
plats, and a grass plat next to the property line of 9 feet
\vide. and a sidewalk next to the curb line of 6 feet wide.
5. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and parts
of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance passed June 2, 1909.
Streets
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to amend section 1431 of the Municipal
Code of Savannah, touching the laying out of that portion
of Atlantic Street, from the north line of Estill Avenue to
the south roadway of Baldwin Park; and also that portion
of Reynolds Street, from the north line of Estill Avenue to
the south line of Fortieth Street.
Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City
of Savannah, in Council assembled, That so much of the
above mentioned section which deals with the laying out
of Atlantic and Reynolds Streets, is hereby amended, s~ that
the provision touching these streets shall hereafter read as
follows:
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 475
Section 1. That the center of Atlantic Street shall be
603.5 feet east of Reynolds Street, and it shall extend from
Estill Avenue to the south roadway of Baldwin Park, with a
width of 200 feet.
Section 2. That Reynolds Street shall be 290.7 feet
east of East Broad Street, and shall extend from Estill Avenue to the south line of Fortieth Street, with a width of 50
feet.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 2, 1909.
Describing, Locating, and Naming Certain Plats of Land,
Dedicated to City for Parks
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance describing, locating, and naming certain
plats of land dedicated to the city for parks.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That
those certain plats of land conveyed to the city by Mr.
Harvey Granger, and located in that section of the city now
known as Garrard, Watson, Granger, Dixon, McKenna, and
Canty Wards, are hereby dedicated for public uses as parks;
that is to say:
Section 2. All that circular plat of ground, drawn with
a radius of 116 feet, whose center concides with the intersection of the centers of Forty-first and Atlantic Streets,
together with a roadway 35 feet wide outside of and around
said plat, shall be known and designated as Baldwin Park.
476________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
Section 3. All that circular plat of ground, drawn with
a radius of 116 feet, whose center coincides with the intersection of the centers of Battey Street and Forty-fifth Street,
together with a roadway 35 feet wide outside of and around
said plat, shall be known and designated as Guckenheimer
Park.
Section 4. All that circular plat of ground, drawn with
a radius of 116 feet, whose center is a point on the center of
Forty-fifth Street, distant 517.8 feet east of Paulsen Street,
together with a roadway 35 feet wide outside of and around
said plat, shall be known and designated as Theus Park.
Section 5. All that circular plat of ground, drawn with
a radius of 116 feet, whose center coincides with the intersection of the center of Battey and Fiftieth Streets, together
with a roadway 35 feet wide outside of and around said plat,
shall be known and designated as McCauley Park.
Section 6. All that circular plat of ground, drawn with
a radius of 116 feet, whose center coincides with the intersection of the center of Harmon and Fiftieth Streets, together
with a roadway 35 feet wide outside of and around said plat,
shall be known and designated as Solomons Park.
Section 7. All that plat of ground laying between
Forty-sixth Street on the north, Forty-seventh Street on the
south, East Atlantic Street on the east, and West Atlantic
Street on the west, shall be known and designated as Tiedeman Park.
Section 8. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 2, 1909.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________477
Prohibiting the Use of Siren Whistle
By Fire Committee:
An ordinance to amend the ordinance prohibiting the
use of the rotary gong, by prohibiting also the use of the
siren whistle, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen,
in Council assembled, That the ordinance prohibiting the
use of a "rotary gong" on the streets by all except the Fire
Department, be amended by adding at the end of section 1
of said ordinance, as it appears in section 643 of MacDonell's
Code, the words "or siren whistle," so that said ordinance
shall likewise prohibit the use of a siren whistle, with the
same penalty now provided in Sec. 2 of said ordinance, for a
violation of this portion of said ordinance.
Ordinance passed June 2, 1909.
To Regulate the Use of Street Car Transfers
By the Committee of the Whole:
To regulate the use of street car transfers.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That every
street railroad company doing business in the City of Savannah shall cause to be printed on the transfer tickets
issued by it to passengers the conditions under which such
tickets must be used.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That whoever wilfully uses a transfer ticket in violation of any reasonable
condition printed on said transfer ticket, and whoever uses
or attempts to use a transfer ticket not issued to him, or
whoever, for value, disposes or attempts to dispose of a
478 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
transfer ticket issued to him to any other person, or whoever,
for value, delivers or attempts to deliver a transfer ticket not
issued to him to any other person, shall be subject, upon
conviction before the Police Court of the City of Savannah,
to a fine not to exceed twenty-five dollars ($25) or imprisonment for a term not to exceed thirty (30-) days, either or
both, in the discretion of the Court; provided nothing in this
Ordinance shall abridge or alter the contract now existing
between the City of Savannah and the Street Railway
Company, under the terms of which the street car company
agrees to carry a passenger to any place between an}' points
within the City limits upon the payment of a five-cent fare.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be
and the same are hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 16, 1909.
Improvement of Randolph Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Randolph Street,
from the north property line of Liberty Street to the south
property line of Bay Street, under the terms and provisions
of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October
1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of
the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the terms
and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of Public Works
for the City of Savannah and the Committee on Streets and
Lanes for said city, be and they are hereby authorized and
directed to build and construct on Randolph Street in the
City of Savannah, from the north property line of Liberty
Street to the south property line of Bay Street, a roadway of
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT_____ 479
asphalt block forty (40) feet in width between the curbing,
and they are authorized and directed to lay the necessary
curbing, and to do all the work in the way of grading, the
placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings, and all other
things incident to the construction and completion of said
roadway on said portion of Randolph Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that a street railroad
company having tracks running through said portion of
Randolph Street to be improved under this ordinance, is
hereby required to pave the width of its tracks and two (2)
feet on each side of every line of the tracks of said street
railway company with asphalt blocks, as the work progresses; and in the event this is not done by said company
the said Director of Public Works and the said Committee
shall see to its being done at the expense of said railroad
company.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, that after the total
cost of said work, exclusive of that done for a street railroad
company, shall have been ascertained, one-third of such total
cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the other twothirds by the persons owning, at the date of the adoption of
this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the said portion
of Randolph Street to be improved under this ordinance,
according to frontage, and the pro rata amount of the cost
of such work is hereby assessed against the said abutting
real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes
is assessed as real estate abutting on said portion of Randolph Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as
such owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage,
in addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided.
M. B. C. S31
480________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Section 4. Be it further ordained that, after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after the
presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become the
duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs,'against the persons and the
property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out of the property described therein, as are executions
for city taxes. The said statement and assessment roll shall
also show the amount payable by any railroad company, and
should such company fail or refuse to pay a bill for the same,
thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the
same, it shall be the duty of the City Treasurer to issue
execution against said company and its property for said
bill, together with costs, which shall be made and levied as
are executions for city taxes.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________481
Improvement Barnard Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Barnard Street,
from the south property line of Gaston Street to the north
property line of -Fortieth Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on Barnard
Street, in the City of Savannah, from the south property
.line of Gaston Street to the north property line of Fortieth
Street, a roadway of asphalt blocks forty-five (45) feet in
width between the curbing, and they are authorized and
directed to lay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work
in the way of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains,
crossings, and all other things incident to the construction
and completion of said roadway on said portion of Barnard
street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That a street railroad
company having tracks running through said portion of
Barnard Street to be improved under this ordinance, is
hereby required to pave the width of its tracks and two (2)
feet on each side of every line of the tracks of said street
railroad company, with asphalt blocks, as the work progresses, and in the event this is not done by said company
the said Director of Public Works and the said Committee
shall see to its being done at the expense of said railroad
company.
482 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work, exclusive of that done by or for a street
railroad company, shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the persons owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of Barnard Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount of
the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is
assessed as real estate abutting on said portion of Barnard
Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of
this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and
shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such
owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in
addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement hereinbefore provided
for, and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of
the cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send to
the abutting property owners their proper bill for the same,
as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if such bill
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________483
so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become the
duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the amount,
together with costs, against the persons and the property
aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein as are executions for city
taxes. The said statement and assessment roll shall also
show the amount payable by any railroad company, and
should such company fail or refuse to pay a bill for the same
thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the
same, it shall be the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution against said company and its property for said bill,
together with costs, which shall be made and levied as are
executions for city taxes.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement Montgomery Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Montgomery
Street, from the south property line of Broughton Street to
the north curb line of Liberty Square, under the terms and
provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of Public Works
for the City of Savannah and the Committee on Streets and
Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby authorized and
484________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
directed to build and construct on Montgomery Street, in
the City of Savannah, from the south property line of
Broughton Street to the north curb line of Liberty Square,
a roadway of asphalt blocks forty-five (45) feet in width
between the curbing, and they are authorized and directed
to lay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work in the
way of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings, and all other things incident to the construction and
completion of said roadway on said portion of Montgomery
Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the person owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on said
portion of Montgomery Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount
of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is
assessed as real estate abutting on said portion of Montgomery Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as
such owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage,
'n addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
- Improvement Broughton Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Broughton Street,
from the east property line of East Broad Street to the west
property line of Randolph Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
486 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city,- be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on Broughton
Street, in the City of Savannah, from the east property line
of East Broad Street to the west property line of Randolph
Street, a roadway of asphalt blocks thirty-two (32) feet in
width between the curbing, and they are authorized and
directed to lay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work
in the way of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains,
crossings, and all other things incident to the construction
and completion of said roadway on said portion of
Broughton Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the person owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of Broughton Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount of
the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of Broughton Street
to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the City
of Savannah shall be, for the intents and purposes of this
ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall
pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such owner of
the cost of the work, according to frontage, in addition to
its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _______487
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the .sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer1 to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement of Fortieth Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Fortieth Street,
from the west property line of Jefferson Street to the east
property line of West Broad Street, under the terms and
provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of
488________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
Georgia, approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of Public Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on Fortieth *
Street, in the City of Savannah, from the west property line
of Jefferson Street to the east property line of West Broad
Street, a roadway of asphalt blocks thirty-two (32) feet in
width between the curbing, and they are authorized and
directed to lay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work
in the way of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains,
crossings, and all other things incident to the construction
and completion of said roadway on said portion of Fortieth
Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that a street railroad
company having tracks running through said portion of
Fortieth Street to be improved under this ordinance, is hereby
required to pave the width of its tracks and two (2) feet on
each side of every line of the tracks of said street railroad
company, with asphalt blocks, as the work progresses, and
in the event this is not done by said company the said
Director of Public Works and the said Committee shall see
to its being done at the expense of said railroad company.
Section 3. Be it further ordained that after the total
cost of said work, exclusive of that done by or for a street
railroad company, shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the persons owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of Fortieth Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount
of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is
assessed as real estate abutting on said portion of Fortieth
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 489
Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of
this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and
shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such
owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in
addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided. -
Section 4. Be it further ordained that after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street^ and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then beCome the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after the
presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become the
duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein as are executions for city
taxes. The said statement and assessment roll shall also
show the amount payable by any railroad company, and
should such company fail or refuse to pay a bill for the same,
thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the
same, it shall be the duty of the City Treasurer to issue
execution against said company and its property for said
bill, together with costs, which shall be made and levied as
are executions for city taxes.
490 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Section 5. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement of Paulsen Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Paulsen Street,
from the north property line of Henry Street to the south
property line of Gwinnett Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, that the Director o.f Public Works
for the City of Savannah and the Committee on Streets and
Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby authorized and
directed to build and construct on Paulsen Street, in the City
of Savannah, from the north property line cf Henry Street
to the south property line of Gwinnett Street, a roadway of
asphalt blocks thirty (30) feet in width between curbing,
and they are authorized and directed to lay the necessary
curbing, and to do all the work in the way of grading, the
placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings, and all other
things incident to the construction and completion of said
roadway on said portion of Paulsen Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the persons owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 491
said portion of Paulsen Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount
of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is
assessed as real estate abutting on said portion of Paulsen
Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes
of this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting,
and shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such
owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in
addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel, with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and prop-
492 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
erty aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement of Jones Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Jones Street,
from the east property line of Drayton Street to the west
property line of East Broad Street, under the terms and
provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
aproved October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under
the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of
Georgia, approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of
Public Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are
hereby authorized and directed to build and construct on
Jones Street, in the City of Savannah, from the east property line of Drayton Street to the west property line of
East Broad Street, a roadway of asphalt blocks forty (40)
feet in width between the curbing, and they are authorized and directed to lay the necessary curbing, and to do
all the work in the way of grading, the placing of catchbasins, drains, crossings, and all other things incident to
the construction and completion of said roadway, on said
portion of Jones Street.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________493
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That a street railroad company having tracks running through said portion of Jones Street to be improved under this ordinance,
is hereby required to pave the width of its tracks and
two feet on each side of every line of the tracks of said
street railroad company, with asphalt blocks, as the work
progresses, and in the event this is not done by said company the said Director of Public Works and the said
Committee shall see to its being done at the expense of
said railroad company.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
total cost of said work, exclusive of that done by or for a
street railroad company, shall have been ascertained, onethird of such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the other two-thirds by the persons owning, at
the date of the adoption of this ordinance, the real estate
abutting on the said portion of Jones Street to be
improved under th;s ordinance, according to frontage, and
the pro rata amount of the cost of such work is hereby
assessed against the said abutting real estate and its
owners, as aforesaid, according to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is
assessed as real-estate abutting on said portion of Jones
Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of
the City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and
purposes of this ordinance, the owner of the real estate
so abutting, and shall pay from the city treasury its just
pro rata as such owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in addition to its one-third of the entire
cost as hereinbefore provided.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
494 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel, with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions for city
taxes. The said statement and assessment roll shall also
show the amount payable by any railroad company, and
should such company fail or refuse to pay a bill for the same,
thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the
same, it shall be the duty of the City Treasurer to issue
execution against said company and its property for said bill,
together with costs, which shall be made and levied as are
executions for city taxes.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Alderman Battey made the following motion, and same
was adopted: That it is sense of Council that the Streets
and Lanes Committee prepare ordinance for paving of
Thirty-seventh Street, from Bull to Habersham Street.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 495
Alderman Wilson made the following motion, and same
was adopted: That the Streets and Lanes Committee be
requested to have prepared ordinance for improvement of
western end of Bay Street, and such portion of West Broad
Street as they think advisable.
Improvement of Thirty-Seventh Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Thirty-seventh
Street, from the west property line of Bull Street to the east
property line of the Ogeechee Road, under the terms and
provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on Thirtyseventh Street, in the City of Savannah, from the west property line of Bull Street to the east property line of the
Ogeechee Road, two (2) roadways of asphalt blocks twentyfive (25) feet in width each between the curbing, with a grass
plat twenty (20) feet in width between the said two
roadways, and they are authorized and directed to lay the
necessary curbing, and to do all the work in the way of
grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings, and
all other things incident to the construction and completion
of said roadways on said portion of Thirty-seventh Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That a street railroad
company having tracks running through said portion of
Thirty-seventh Street to be improved under this ordinance,
M. R. c. s.32
496________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
is hereby required to pave the width of its tracks and two
(2) feet on each side of every line of the tracks of said street
railroad company, with asphalt blocks, as the work progresses, and in the event this is not done by said company
the said Director of Public Works and the said Committee
shall see to its being done at the expense of said railroad
company.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work, exclusive of that done by or for a street
railroad company shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the persons owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of Thirty-seventh Street to be improved under
this ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata
amount of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against
the said abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid,
according to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of Thirty-seventh
Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of
this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and
shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such
owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in
addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the sev-
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________497
eral abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with the
name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting .property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after the
presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions
for city taxes. The said statement and assessment roll
shall also show the amount payable by any railroad company, and should such company fail or refuse to pay a bill
for the same, thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the same, it shall be the duty of the City Treasurer to
issue executions against said company and its property for
said bill, together with costs, which shall be made and levied
as are executions for city taxes.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement West Broad Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the imorovemetit of West Broad
Street, from the south prooerty line of Thirty-first Street to
the south property line of Fortieth Street, under the terms
498 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on West
Broad Street, in the City of Savannah, from the south
property line of Thirty-first Street to the south property line
of Fortieth Street, two (2) roadways of asphalt blocks
twenty (20) feet in width each between the curbing, with a
grass plat, thirty (30) feet in width between the said two
roadways, and they are authorized and directed to lay the
necessary curbing, and to do all the work in the way 01
grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings, and
all other things incident to the construction and completion
of said roadways on said portion of West Broad Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the person owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of West Broad Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount of
the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of West Broad Street
to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the City ofSavannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of this
ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________499
pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such owner of
the cost of such work, according to frontage, in addition to
its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the'City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement Harmon Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Harmon Street,
from the north property line of Gwinnett Street to the south
500______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______
property line of Wheaton Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887. .
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on Harmon
Street, in the City of Savannah, from the north property line
of Gwinnett Street to the south property line of Wheaton
street, a roadway of asphalt blocks thirty (30) feet in width
between curbing, and they are authorized and directed to
lay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work in the way
of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings,
and all other things incident to the construction and completion of said roadway on said portion of Harmon Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the person owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of Harmon Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount
of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of Harmon Street to
be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of this
ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall
pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such owner
of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in addition
to its one-third of the entire cost.as hereinbefore provided.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________501
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement of Henry Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the "improvement of Henry Street,
from the west property line of West Broad Street to the
502 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
west property line of Cuyler Street, under the terms and
provisions of an Act of,the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on Henry
Street, in the City of Savannah, from the west property line
of West Broad Street to the west property line of Cuyler
Street, a roadway of asphalt blocks thirty (30) feet in width
between curbing, and they are authorized and directed to
lay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work in the way
of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings,
and all other things incident to the construction and completion of said roadway on said portion of Henry Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the person owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of Henry Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount of
the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of Henry Street to be
improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of this
ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall
pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such owner of
the cost of such work, according to frontage, in addition to
its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore provided.
._ _______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______503
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein, as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it fur-ther ordained. That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 22, 1909.
Improvement of East Broad Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of East Broad Street,
from the South property line of Bay Street to the south
property line of Oglethorpe Avenue, under the terms and
504________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be, and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on East
Broad Street, in the City of Savannah, Ga., from the south
property line of Bay Street to the south property line of
Oglethorpe Avenue, two (2) roadways of asphalt blocks,
twenty-two (22) feet in width each between the curbing,
with a graso plat twenty-six (26) feet in width between the
said two roadways, and they are authorized and directed to
slay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work in the way
of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings, and
all other things incident to the construction and completion
of said roadways on said portion of East Broad Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That a street railroad
company having tracks running through said portion of
East Broad Street to be improved under this ordinance, is
hereby required to pave the width of its tracks and two (2)
feet on each side of every line of the tracks of said street
railroad company, with asphalt blocks, as the work
progresses, and in the event this is not done by said company the said Director of Public Works and the said Committee shall see to its being done at the expense of said railroad company.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work, exclusive of that done by or for a street
railroad company, shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the persons owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 505
said portion of East Broad Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount
of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of East Broad Street
to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of this
ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and shall
pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such owner
of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in addition
to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore provided.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel, with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after the
presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become the
duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the amount,
together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out of the
property described therein, as are executions for city taxes.
The said statement and assessment roll shall also show the
506 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
amount payable by any railroad company, and should such
company fail or refuse to pay a bill for the same thirty (30)
days after the presentation or sending of the same, it shall
be the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution against
said company and its property for said bill, together with
costs, which shall be made and levied as are executions for
city taxes.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
herey repealed.
Ordinance passed June 30, 1909.
Improvement of Waldburg Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Waldburg Street,
in the City of Savannah, from the east property line of Drayton Street to the west property line of East Broad Street,
under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature
of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of Public Works
for the City of Savannah and the Committee on Streets and
Lanes of said city be and they are hereby authorized and
directed to build and construct on Waldburg Street, in the
City of Savannah, from the east property line of Drayton
Street to the west property line of East Broad Street, a
roadway thirty (30) feet in width of asphalt blocks (except
on the intersecting streets, Abercorn and Habersham, which
said two streets have already been paved with vitrified
brick), and they are also authorized and directed to enclose
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 507
the said roadway with stone curbings, and to do all the
work in the way of grading, the placing of catch-basins,
drains, crossings, and all other things incident to the construction and completion of the. said roadway on the said
portion of Waldburg Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that after the total
cost of the said work shall have been ascertained, one-third
of such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and
the other two-thirds by the persons owning at the date of
the adoption of this ordinance the real estate abutting on
said portion of Waldburg Street to be improved under this
ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata amount of
the cost of such work is hereby assessed against the said
abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid, according
to frontage. The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes
is assessed as real estate abutting upon said portion of Waldburg Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and
purposes of this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so
abutting, and shall pay from the city treasury its just pro
rata as such owner of the cost of the said work, according
to frontage, in addition to its one-third of the entire cost as
hereinbefore provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, that after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the Director of Public Works for the City of Savannah and
said Committee on Streets and Lanes shall prepare and submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement hereinbefore provided
for, and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of
the cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting
parcels, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel, with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savan-
508________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
nah, it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to
send to the abutting property owners their proper bill for
the same, as it may be ascertained by the Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue an execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 30, 1909.
Sprinkling Streets
By Committee on Water:
An ordinance to prescribe hours when water shall be
used for sprinkling streets and lawns, and watering gardens,
in the City of Savannah, and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That hereafter it shall be unlawful for any person to use the water
from the water department of said city for the purpose of
sprinkling streets and lawns, and watering gardens, except
between the hours of 6 and 9 o'clock a. m. and 5 and 9
o'clock p. m., this prohibition not to include sprinkling
wagons owned by the City of Savannah.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That any person
violating the provisions of this ordinance shall be subject to
a fine, upon conviction in the Police Court of the City of
Savannah, in any sum not exceeding $10, and imprisonment
for any time not more than ten days.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________509
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be
and the same are hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 30, 1909.
Improvement of Thirty-Sixth Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Thirty-sixth
Street, in the City of Savannah, from the west property line
of Burroughs Street to the west property line of Florence
Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the
Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of Public Works
for the City of Savannah and the Committee on Streets and
Lanes of said city be and they are hereby authorized and
directed, to build and construct on Thirt3'-sixth Street, in
the City of Savannah, from-the west property line of Burroughs Street to the west property line of Florence Street,
a roadway thirty-two (32) feet in width of vitrified brick,
and they are also authorized" and directed to enclose the
said roadway with stone curbing, and to do all the work in
the way of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains,
crossings, and all other things incident to the construction
and completion of the said roadway on the said portion of
Thirty-sixth Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that after the total
cost of the said work shall have been ascertained, one-third
of such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and
the other two-thirds by the persons owning at the date
510 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
of the adoption of this ordinance the real estate abutting on
said portion of Thirty-sixth Street to be improved under
this ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata
amount of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against
the said abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid,
according to frontage. The frontage of intersecting streets
and lanes is assessed as real estate abutting upon said portion of Thirty-sixth Street to be improved, and the Mayor
and Aldermen of the City of Savannah shall be, for all the
intents and purposes of this ordinance, the owner of the
real estate so abutting, and shall pay from the city treasury
its just pro rata as such owner of the cost of the said work,
according to frontage, in addition to its one-third of the
entire cost as hereinbefore provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, that after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the Director of Public Works for the City of Savannah and
said Committee on Streets and Lanes shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement hereinbefore provided
for, and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of
the cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting
parcels, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel, with
the name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the Council, and if such
bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become the
duty of the City Treasurer to issue an execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied
out of the property described therein as are executions for
city taxes.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________511
Section 4. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 30, 1909.
Fenders Upon Street Railway Cars
By Alderman Wilson:
An ordinance to amend an ordinance passed March 10,
1909, entitled "An ordinance to require the use of fenders
upon street railway cars operated in the City of Savannah,
to prescribe the type of said fenders, to provide for a penalty
for failure to so use, and for other purposes," by omitting
the requirement that wheel guards be equipped with buffers,
and by allowing the use of the Hudson-Bowring Wheel
Guard.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That an ordinance passed by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, March 10,1909, entitled "an
ordinance to require the use of fenders upon street railway
cars operated in the City of Savannah, to prescribe the style
of said fenders, to provide for a penalty for failure to so use,
and for other purposes," be amended, by striking from section 1 of said ordinance the following words, to wit: "No
wheel guard shall be placed upon any car unless such wheel
guard be equipped with a buffer, and provided further," so
that said section when so amended shall read as follows:
"Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That on and
after the expiration of six months from the passage of this
ordinance it shall be the duty of all persons or companies
operating street railways in the City of Savannah to equip
M. R. o. 8.SB
512________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
and maintain in proper condition and in suitable working
order, upon every passenger car, except trailers, of said
street railway, used on the streets of said city, one of the
fenders or wheel guards mentioned in the next section of
this ordinance, for the protection of life and property; provided no wheel guard shall be put on any car when the distance between the front of the car and the front of the truck
is less than four feet six inches."
Be it further ordained, That Section 2 of the above
recited ordinance be amended by adding at the end thereof:
"Or Hudson-Bovvring," so that said section when so
amended shall read as follows:
"Section 2. Be it further ordained that the fender or
wheel guard to be so used shall, at the option of the street
railway company, be either Hunter, Parmenter, American,
Pfingst, Providence, Sterling, Weaver, or Hudson-Bowring."
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be
and the same are hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed June 30, 1909.
Naming a Certain Street
By Alderman Guckenheimer:
An ordinance to provide for the designation and naming
of a certain street within the corporate limits of the City of
Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
street running north and south from Thirty-fifth Street to
Thirty-seventh Street with a width of 20 feet, and from
Thirty-eighth Street to Fortieth Street with a width of 52
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 513
feet, lying between Whitaker and Barnard Streets, shall be
known and designated as Howard Street, South, and that
portion of Howard Street lying between Gaston Street and
Park Avenue shall be known as Howard Street, North.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed July 28, 1909.
Keeping Cows and Sale of Milk
By Alderman Barrow:
An ordinance to provide regulations touching the keeping of cows, stables for cows, dairies, milk, and the sale of
milk: to provide for the election of an Inspector of Milk,
and for other purposes designed to secure purity in the milk
consumed in the City of Savannah.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that it shall
not be lawful for any person, persons, or corporation to keep
or possess within the corporate limits of the City of Savannah any cow or cows, either for the conduct of dairy
business, or for his or her personal use, unless and except
that a permit shall have been first obtained from the Health
Officer permitting such cow or cows to be located within the
corporate limits of the City of Savannah, as by this ordinance prescribed; which permit must designate upon its face
specially the location for the keeping of such cow or cows.
And all owners of cows must register with the Health Officer
the places where said cows are kept, and the number of cows,
and the Health Officer shall keep a complete register
thereof.
514________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ______
Section 2. Be it further ordained, that no building or
shed shall be used for stabling cows kept within the city
limits which is not well lighted, ventilated, and drained, provided said cows are kept in a stall or stalls having windows
or doors on at least two sides, all stalls to. be not less than
four (4) feet in width by six (6) feet in length, and provided,
further, that said stalls and premises shall be kept in absolutely perfect sanitary and hygienic condition, and free from
all offensive odors.
Section 3. Be it further ordained that no building shall
be used for stabling cows for dairy' purposes which is not
provided with a suitable floor, laid with grades and channels
to carry off all drainage; if a public sewer abuts the premises
upon which such building is situated, they shall be connected therewith.
Section 4. Be it further ordained that no building shall
be used for stabling cows which is not provided with good
and sufficient feeding troughs or boxes, and with a covered
watertight receptacle outside of the building for the reception of dung or other refuse.
Section 5. Be it further ordained, that no watercloset,
privy, cesspool, urinal, Jnhabitated room, or workshop shall
be located within any building or shed used for stabling
cows for dairy purposes, or for the storage or sale of milk or
cream; nor shall any fowl, hog or horse, sheep or goat, be
kept in any room used for such purposes.
Section 6. Be it further ordained that it shall be the
duty of each person using any premises for keeping cows for
dairy purposes to cause the building in which cows are kept
to be thoroughly cleaned daily, and to remove all dung from
the premises at least once every twenty-four hours, so as to
prevent its accumulation in great quantities.
Section 7. Be it further ordained that every person
keeping cows for the production of milk shall cause every
__ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________515
such cow to be cleaned every day, and to be properly fed and
watered.
Section 8. Be it further ordained that every person
using any premises for keeping cows shall cause the yard
used in connection therewith to be provided with a proper
receptacle for drinking water for such cows, none but fresh,
clean water to be used in such receptacles.
Section 9. Be it further ordained that any enclosure
in which cows are kept shall be graded and drained so as to
keep the surface reasonably dry, and to prevent the accumulation of water therein, except as may be permitted for
the purpose of supplying drinking water. No garbage, urine,,
fecal matter, or other similar substances shall be placed or
allowed to remain in such enclosure, and no open drain shall
be allowed to run through it.
Section 10. Be it further ordained that any person
using any premises for keeping cows for dairy purposes
shall provide and use a sufficient number of receptacles,
made of non-absorbent materials, for the reception, storage,
and delivery of milk, and shall cause them at all times to be
cleaned and purified, and shall cause all milk to be removed
without delay from the room in which the cows are kept.
Section 11. Be it further ordained that it shall be the
duty of any person having charge or control of any premises
upon which cows are kept to notify the Health Officer in
writing of the existence of any contagious or infectious
disease among such cows, immediately upon the discovery
thereof, and to thoroughly isolate any cow or cows affected,
or which may reasonably be believed to be affected, and to
exercise such other precautions as may be directed by the
Health Officer.
Section 12. Be it further ordained that it shall be the
duty of any person having charge or control of any premises
upon which milk or cream is produced, handled, stored, or
$16________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _
distributed, or sold, to notify the Health Officer immediately
upon the discovery of any case of croup, diphtheria,
measles, scarlet fever, smallpox, typhoid fever, typhus fever,
or any other contagious or infectious disease upon such
premises. No milk or cream shall be sold, exchanged, given
away, or in any other manner distributed from such infected
premises until all danger of spread of disease has been
removed, and the Health Officer certifies to that effect. No
person who attends cows or milks them, or who has the care
or handling of vessels for the sale, storage, or distribution of
milk or cream, shall enter any place or premises wherein
exists any of the diseases mentioned herein, nor shall any
such person have any communication, direct or indirect, with
any person who resides in or is an occupant of such infected
place.
Section 13. Be it further ordained that every person or
corporation desiring to sell, offer for sale, expose for sale,
dispose of, exchange, or deliver milk or cream in the City of
Savannah shall make application to the Health Officer for a
permit so to do. Such application shall be made on a printed
form, to be furnished by the Health Officer upon demand,
and the applicant, if an individual, shall state therein his
full name and residence, and if a corporation, shall state
therein full name and residence of each of its officers. Such
application shall also state the location of the place at which
it is proposed to carry on the business. It shall also contain
a statement of the number and character of wagons or other
vehicles to be used by the applicant in or about his or its
business; also the number of cows, if any, owned or controlled by the applicant, and such other data concerning the
conduct of such business as the Health Officer may require.
The Health Officer, upon receipt of such application, shall
cause to be investigated the place of business described in
*] r such application, and the wagons and other vehicles, if any,
!> I intended to be used by such applicant. If such place of busi-
' I ness and such wagons or other vehicles are found upon such
________MAYOR'S ANNUAL. REPORT________517
investigation to be in a sanitary condition, and fit for the
uses and purposes to which they are intended to be put, said
Health Officer shall forthwith register said applicant in a
proper record to be kept for the purpose, and issue a permit
authorizing such applicant to carry on, engage in, and conduct the business of vendors of milk in the City of Savannah
at the place designated in such application. All permits
granted pursuant to this ordinance may at any time be
revoked by the Health Officer, subject to the approval of
the Board of Sanitary Commissioners, for the persistent, repeated, or wilful violation of any law or ordinance, or of any
regulation of the Health Officer governing the sale of milk
in the City of Savannah; provided, however, that no such
permit shall, at any time, be revoked by the Health Officer
unless he shall first have given the holder of the same not
less than ten days' notice in writing of his intention to
revoke such permit, and an opportunity to be heard by the
Board of Sanitary Commissioners as to why such should
not be done, this proviso not to be taken to apply to cases
where the sale of milk or cream may be temporarily prohibited by the Health Officer because of disease on the
premises, temporary insanitary condition, or similar causes.
Such permits shall not be transferable, and no permit issued
hereunder shall entitle or authorize the holders thereof to
carry on, engage in, or conduct the business of vendor of
milk in any place or places other than that designated and
set out in such permit. If any person, having a permit to
vend milk as aforesaid, shall change the location of his or
its place of business, notice of such proposed change shall
be given to said Health Officer, and his consent in writing
received to conduct such business at such new location; and
no business shall be conducted or carried on at such new
location until such consent has been received.
Section 14. Be it further ordained that every vendor of
milk, having a permit aforesaid, shall, whenever so required,
furnish the Health Officer a statement of all changes in the
f!
\,
518 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
data and information provided for in the preceding section,
and shall also, whenever so required, furnish him a list of
all persons from whom he or it receives milk or cream for
use in his said business, whether said shipments be Irom
within or outside the City of Savannah; and said Health
Officer shall have power, by regulation, to require that
changes or additions in said lists of shippers shall be furnished him from time to time as they occur. Said Health
Officer shall keep a record of such shippers, when furnished
as aforesaid, for the use of his office, but the same shall not
be open to the inspection of other persons.
Section 15. Be it further ordained, that the permit to
engage in the vending of milk, hereinbefore referred to, shall
be posted conspicuously in the applicant's place of business,
at a point to be designated by the Health Officer or a Health
Inspector. Each vendor of milk shall, before engaging in
the sale of milk or cream, cause his name or the name of the
dairy, and the permit number, the former in letters of a readable size, and permit number in figures not less than three
inches in height, to be placed and remain on each outer side
of all wagons or other vehicles used by such vendors in .the
conveyance or sale of milk or cream.
Section 16. Be it further ordained, that the Health
Officer shall have power to adopt such regulations as he
may deem proper and necessary to insure all milk and cream
intended for consumption in the City of Savannah being produced, transported, stored, kept, distributed, retailed, and
delivered, under conditions rendering them suitable for consumption as human food, and to compel perfect hygienic and
sanitary conditions of all cow stables, creameries, and dairies
from which milk and cream so intended for consumption in
the City of Savannah are produced; copies of the same to be
printed and kept for free distribution to the public; and said
Health Officer shall have power to prohibit the sale within
the corporate limits of the City of Savannah of milk or cream
produced, transported, stored, kept, distributed, retailed, or
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 519
delivered contrary to such regulations, whether said milk or
cream be produced within or outside the corporate limits of
the City of Savannah; and to the end that said regulation
may be enforced in the case of milk or cream produced outside the corporate limits of the City of Savannah, but
intended for consumption therein, said Health Officer may
require such of the City Milk Inspectors as he may designate for the purpose to make inspections at such intervals
and times as he may deem expedient of all dairy farms,
stables, and other places outside the City of Savannah from
which milk or cream is shipped for consumption in the City
of Savannah. In case full access to such premises, or a full
opportunity to investigate all the conditions under which
milk is there ptoduced or kept, shall be denied said Inspectors,
or in case, upon such inspection, the conditions are found
such as in the opinion of said Health Officer render such
milk or cream unsuitable or unsafe for human food, and warrant the exclusion of said milk or cream from sale in the
City of Savannah, said Health Officer shall have power to
absolutely prohibit the sale thereof, at any place in the City
of Savannah, until such time a"s the reason for their exclusion shall, in his opinion, have ceased; and he shall adopt
such means of identifying such milk and cream as to him may
seem proper and expedient. In case of the exclusion of any
milk or cream as aforesaid from sale within the City of
Savannah, said Health Officer shall immediately make a
record of such fact in a properly indexed book, kept for that
purpose, said book to be open to the inspection of all vendors
of milk who may desire to inspect the same. The action of
the Health Officer hereunder to be subject to the approval
of the Sanitary Board.
Section 17. Be it further ordained that the Health
Officer and all other officers of the Health Department, and
any Inspector or Police Officer authorized by the Health
Officer, shall have the right and power to enter and have
full access to any building, structure, or premises where any
K
| 520____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
milk and cream, or either of them, is stored or kept for sale,
and shall have the right of access to all wagons, railroad
cars, or other vehicles of any kind for the conveyance or
delivery of milk and cream, or either of them, and to any
building, structure, or premises where he believes or has
reason to believe milk and cream, or either of them, is stored
or kept for sale; and shall have the right to take samples of
milk and cream therefrom (such samples not to exceed one
quart), for the purpose of inspecting, testing, or analyzing
the same.
Section 18. Be it further ordained that every sample
of milk delivered to any Officer of the Health Department,
or Inspector, shall have a label attached to the vessel containing such sample, upon which shall be written at the
time of the delivery of such sample the number of the dealer's permit, the number of the sample, the date of collection,
and the name of the Inspector or Officer taking the same;
and a memorandum shall be made by the Officer or Inspector collecting such sample of the number of the sample and
the name of the owner and driver from whom collected; and
no conviction shall be had of any person for selling or having
in his possession adulterated milk, as in this ordinance
defined, unless at the time of taking the sample, upon the
evidence of which conviction is asked, a duplicate sample,
properly sealed and marked for identification, shall have
been delivered to the person from whose possession such
original sample was taken.
Section 19. Be it further ordained, that the violation
of any provision or regulation of this ordinance, and any
failure to comply therewith, and the refusal or failure to
comply with any direction or order of the Health Officer
hereunder, shall be subject, upon conviction before the
Police Court of the City of Savannah, to a fine not exceeding fifty dollars ($50.00), and to imprisonment not to exceed
ten (10) days, either or both in the discretion of the Court,
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________S21
and each day's failure or neglect to comply shall be held and
deemed to be a separate and distinct offense, and punishable
accordingly.
Section 20. Be it further ordained that the provisions
of this ordinance shall become effective thirty (30) days
from date of passage.
Section 21. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed August 11, 1909.
Improvement West Boundary Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of West Boundary
Street, from the north property line of Cohen Street to a
point one hundred and eighty-five (185) feet south of the
south" property line of Cohen Street, under the terms and
provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887, That the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby authorized and directed to build and construct on West Boundary Street, in the City of Savannah, from the north property line of Cohen Street to a point one hundred and eightyfive (185) feet south of the south property Hne of Cohen
Street, a roadway of granite blocks twenty-five (25) feet in
width between the curbing, the intersecting street (Cohen
K
522 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Street) to be paved to the property line, and they are authorized and directed to lay the necessary curbing, and to do
all the work in the way of grading, the placing of catchbasins, drains, crossings, and all other things incident to the
construction and completion of said roadway on said portion
of West Boundary Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the persons owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion.of West Boundary Street to be improved under
this ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata
amount of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against
the said abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid,
according to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of West Boundary
Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of
this ordinance, the owner of the real estate so abutting, and
shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such
owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in
addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the
f f several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel with
the name of the owner.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_____ 523
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after the
presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become the
duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the amount,
together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out of the
property described therein as are'executions for city taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed September 8, 1909.
To Retire Fireman W. B. Jones
By Committee on Fire:
An ordinance to retire Fireman W. B. Jones:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That W. B.
Jones, a member of the Fire Department of the City of
Savannah, who has served the city faithfully as a fireman for
more than eleven years, and has become paralyzed, and no
'onger able to render service, be and he is hereby retired on
a pension of half pay, that is half of the pay of a fireman,
payable monthly, as are paid the salaries of firemen in the
service of the city.
Section 2. That all ordinances and parts of ordinances
in conflict with this ordinance be and they are hereby
repealed.
Ordinance passed September 8, 1909.
524 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Milk
By Alderman Wilson:
An ordinance to provide that the ordinance commonly
known as the "Milk" Ordinance, adopted by Council on the
eleventh day of August, 1909, shall not go into effect until
November 1,1909.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
ordinance commonly known as the "Milk" Ordinance, which . provides regulations touching the keeping of cows, stables
for cows, dairies, etc., adopted by the Council of the City of
Savannah on the eleventh day of August, 1909, shall not go
into effect or be enforced until November 1, 1909.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed September 8, 1909.
Fender Ordinance
By the Committee of the Whole:
An ordinance to postpone the operation and enforcement of the fender ordinance, adopted March 10, 1909, and
amended June 30, 1909.
First. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of
the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the ordinance known as the Fender Ordinance, adopted March 10,
1909, and amended June 30, 1909, be postponed as to its
operation and effect until December 1, 1909.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________525
Second, Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and
parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be, and
they are hereby, repealed.
Ordinance passed September 8, 1909.
To Abolish Position Assistant Keeper of the City Dispensary
By Committee on Public Health:
An ordinance to abolish the position of Assistant Keeper
of the City Dispensary.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled. That section
972 of the Code of the City of Savannah be amended by
striking therefrom the words "Assistant Keeper," wherever
they may appear, the object of this ordinance being to
abolish the office of "Assistant Keeper of the City Dispensary.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance be and
they are hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed September 22, 1909.
Assessment RollHull Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard
evidence touching the correctness of the statement and
assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Hull Street
526________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_____
(formerly New Street), from the west property line of West
Broad Street to the west property line of Fahm Street, made
under an ordinance of the City of Savannah adopted June 8,
1908.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah passed June 8, 1908,
and entitled: "An ordinance for the improvement of a
portion of Hull Street (formerly New Street), under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1,1887," be and it is hereby declared to be
the official statement and assessment roll of the said
improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement
and assessment roll being that entitled: "Statement showing the cost of improvements to Hull Street (formerly New
Street) in the City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the west
property line of West Broad Street and extending to west
property line of Fahm Street, as under an ordinance of the
City of Savannah, passed June 8, 1908; with an assessment
roll showing as to two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and giving the
sums chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the owners." And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah is
hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment
roll filed as of this date, and to enter the same on the minutes of Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________527
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed October 20, 1909.
Statement and Assessment RollCohen Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard
evidence touching the correctness of the statement and
assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee" on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the'improvement of Cohen Street,
from the eastern property line of Wilson Street to the
eastern property line of West Boundary Street, made under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted February 24,
1909.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to Council
by the Director of Public Works for the City of Savannah
and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under an ordinance
of the City of Savannah, passed February 24, 1909, and
entitled "An ordinance for the improvement of Cohen Street,
under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature
of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby
declared to be the official statement and assessment roll of
the said improvement under the said ordinance, the said
statement and assessment roll being that entitled "Statement
showing the cost of improvements to Cohen Street, in the
if. R. C. S.34
528 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the eastern property
line of Wilson Street and extending to the eastern property
line of West Boundary Street, as under an ordinance of the
City of Savannah, passed February 24, 1909; with an
assessment roll showing as to two-thirds of the cost, how it
is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and
giving the sums chargeable to each parcel, with the names
of the owners." And the Clerk of Council of the City of
Savannah is hereby directed to mark the said statement and
assessment roll filed as of this date, and to enter the same on
the minutes of Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. 13e it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed October 20, 1909.
RegulationsKeeping of Cows and Sale of Milk
By Alderman Barrow:
An ordinance to provide rules and regulations for the
purpose of carrying out and effecting the ordinance adopted
September 8. 1909, entitled: "An ordinance to provide
regulations touching the keeping of cows, stables for cows,
dairies, milk, and the sale of milk; to provide for the election
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________529
of an Inspector of Milk, and for other purposes designed to
secure purity in the milk consumed in the City of Savannah," and for other purposes.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
following rules and regulations, for the purpose ot carrying
out and effecting the ordinance passed September 8, 1909,
entitled: "An ordinance to provide regulations touching the
keeping of cows, stables for cows, dairies, milk, and the sale
of milk; to provide for the election of an Inspector of Milk,
and for other purposes designed to secure purity in the milk
consumed in the City of Savannah," be and they are hereby
adopted, to become effective and of force on and after
November 1, 1909, to wit:
WHOLE OR PURE MILK
is milk that shall conform to the following standard:
Not less than fat, 3.5 per cent.; solids (not fat), 8.5 per
cent.; total solids, 12.00 per cent. Specific gravity, 1030.
Water (not more than) 88.00 per cent.
The removal of cream, addition of water or any foreign
substances to be considered adulterations. Milk so altered
will be condemned and confiscated, and on third offense
revocation of license will result. Milk drawn from cows
within fifteen (15) days before calving, or within seven (7)
days afterwards, is not whole or pure milk, and will be condemned and confiscated as above stated.
CREAM
shall conform to the following standard:
18 per cent. fat.
530________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
SKIMMED MILK
may be sold, provided each container holding said milk be
distinctly marked on the outside "SKIMMED MILK", in
letters not less than one (1) inch in length.
BACTERIAL STANDARD
Milk shall not contain more than (from April 1 to
November 1) 500,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter; November 1 to April 1 of each year, not more than 300,000 bacteria
per cubic centimeter; and shall be entirely free from any
bacteria of transmissible diseases.
CREAM
shall not contain more than (from April 1 to November 1)
1,000,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter: November 1 to April
1, 500,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter; and shall be
entirely free from any bacteria of transmissible diseases.
COW STALLS
Requirements of Dairy Cows Within Corporate Limits;
No cow or cows shall be kept stalled or milked within
fifty (50) feet of a building used as a residence; of a water
closet, privy vault, or garbage receptacle, unless said
receptacle be of metal with tightly fitting top. No cow or
cows shall be milked while standing on the ground, but all
barns, stables, or sheds must be floored, preferably of cement
or similar material; if of wood, to be so constructed as to
shed all urine. Floors shall be flushed daily with water.
No bedding shall be used containing dirt or dust. Manure
must be removed from barns, stables, or sheds twice a day,
and from the premises every day, as prescribed by ordinance.
No loose food products shall be stored above apartment
where cows are milked, unless the ceiling of said apartment
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________531
is of tongued-and-grooved boards, so that dirt or dust will
not fall into said apartment. No horses or mules shall be
kept in stables, barns, or sheds with cows.
FOOD

Cows shall not be fed on slops, swill, or any refuse,
decaying or fermented material.
WATER
For all purposes, artesian, and it is recommended that it
be from tap for its detailed use.
PASTURES
No cows shall be pastured where there is any garbage
deposit or dumping ground for refuse matter nor1 where they
have access to any stagnant or polluted surface water, either
for drinking purposes or where cows may lie down in said
water.
MILKING
Cows shall at all times be kept free from manure and
other filth, and before being milked all long hairs on flanks
and udders shall be removed. Udders should be washed and
dried before milking.
THE MILKER
should cleanse his hands with soap and water, and dry
them. Foremilk should not go into milking pail. Clean
clothes, preferably of cotton stuff, are recommended, and
the same are requisite for a perfect score on the score card.
UTENSILS
Each time before use all milk containers, beginning at
the milking pail and ending with receptacle in which milk is
delivered to consumer or retailer, must be immaculately
5?2________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______
cleaned and sterilized by exposure inside and outside to a
temperature of not less than 212 degrees Fahrenheit for five
minutes.
MILKING PAILS AND CONTAINERS -*
should be narrow-mouthed, 'metal containers, free from
dents and sharp angles, rust, seams not properly soldered.
As soon as filled, they should be covered and removed to
milk-house or -room for straining, aeration, and lowered to a
temperature of less than 50 degrees Fahrenheit. This house
or room must not be used as a residence, nor must any other
food product be stored there. The wall, ceiling, and floor
must be kept immaculately clean, and all doors and windows
screened to exclude flies and dirt. Bottling and canning
tables, stands, or racks should be kept immaculately clean,
and exposure to atmosphere in this process to be as short
as possible.
TRANSPORTATION
All vehicles used for transporting milk shall be free
from dust and dirt, and kept so at all times. They shall be
covered. The name of the proprietor or name of dairy must
be on such vehicle in large, plain letters.
If milk is transported by hand, in wire racks or by other
devices, the container must be covered to exclude dirt and
dust. No milk container shall be returned from any house
where there is any contagious or infectious disease, but the
milk must be delivered to such a house by transferring it to
a receptacle from the house.
DAIRIES OUTSIDE OF CORPORATE LIMITS
In addition to the regulations laid down for dairy cows
in the corporate limits the following requirements are promulgated :
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _____ 533
The use of surface water is prohibited. Manure shall be
removed from barns, stables, and sheds before each milking,
in a watertight vehicle, to a point not less than one hundred
(100) yards from barn, stable, or shed; urine deposits to be
treated in the same manner. Cow yards must be free from
stagnant pools of water, and shall be cared for so that the
footing for cows shall be free from quagmires. Surface
walls are forbidden. Water closets or privies shall not be
less than one hundred (100) yards from milking stable, barn,
or shed.
MILK DEPOTS
Milk shall be kept at a temperature below 50 degrees
Fahrenheit. No milk, nor any of its products, save butter,
shall be handled, stored, or sold from any building used as
a residence. All surfaces, floors, walls, and ceilings shall, at
all times, be kept immaculately clean. Windows and doors
shall be screened, for the prevention of flies and dirt. Refrigerators and ice boxes shall have their inner surfaces lined
with porcelain or metal. No other food products shall be
stored in refrigerators or ice boxes. Utensils must be clean,
free from rust and rough surfaces, and must be sterilized on
inner and outer surfaces by exposure to a temperature of
not less than 212 degrees Fahrenheit before receiving milk.
PASTEURIZATION OF MILK AND CREAM
First. No person, either himself or his agent, shall offer
for sale pasteurized milk or pasteurized cream, unless the
same shall have been produced, transported, stored, pasteurized, and handled in accordance with the rules of the Board
of Sanitary Commissioners.
Second. Any person or corporation desiring to pasteurize milk or cream for sale in the City of Savannah shall make
application to the Health Officer for a permit, said permit
to be issued on proof that the rules and regulations of this
Board are and can be complied with.
534 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Third. Raw milk and cream containing more than five
million bacteria per cubic centimeter, or showing an
abnormal fermentation, shall be considered insanitary and
unfit for consumption as human food, even when pasteurized.
Fourth. Pasteurized milk or cream shall contain not
more than 50,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter, nor more
than one per cent, of the number of bacteria contained in the
product before pasteurization, and shall contain no pathogenic bacteria. Pasteurized products shall otherwise conform to the usual tests for efficiency of pasteurization.
Fifth. Pasteurized milk and cream shall be sold only
in bottles sterilized in live steam for 30 minutes; the packages shall be plainly marked to indicate the contents.
THE CONSUMER
The responsibility of the producer ends with the
delivery to the consumer. Immediately after the delivery of
milk it should be refrigerated in the original package, and
when taken from it for use should be placed in a serving
vessel of simple design, with rounded bottom and with covered top, which after being used should always be washed in
hot water with either soap or washing powder, and rinsed
with hot water, and so placed that it will be safeguarded
from flies. The same procedure should be followed with
containers in which the milk is brought by the producer
before their return. Bottled milk is the best form of milk
containers.
CERTIFIED MILK
While, at this time, it is not deemed advisable to legislate on this subject, certified milk will, in time, be a necessity, and the following statements should be embodied in
the regulations.
MAYOR'S ANNUAt, REPORT________535
The term "Certified Milk" shall mean milk produced,
stored, handled, and sold in accordance with special rules of
the Board of Sanitary Commissioners, for the control of certified milk, in general accordance with the methods of the
American Association of Medical Milk Commissions. The
sale of milk under the term "Certified Milk," not produced,
stored, handled, and sold in accordance with these rules shall
be subject to penalty, as provided by ordinance for violation
of the rules of the Board of -Sanitary Commissioners.
The following score cards, on which results of inspections of dairies and milk depots, are to be used to educate
the producer and handler of milk, to protect the consumer,
and to systematize the work of milk inspection:
DAIRY SCORE CARD
Division 1Health, comfort, and protection of cows:
1. Health of cows _____________________ 25
2. Isolation during sickness and calving 10
3. Comfort, bedding, etc. 10
4. Location of stable __' 11
5. Construction of stable 12
6. Lighting of stable 4
7. Ventilation, cubic space, etc. 8
8. Food __________________________ 10
9. Water _____________________-___ 10
Total score _______________________100
Division 2Cleanliness of cows and their surroundings:
10. Cleanliness of cows _ 45
11. Cleanliness of stable, freedom from odor and dust 45
12. Condition of barnyard 8
13. Condition of pasture _ 2
Total score _________100
536 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Division 3Construction, cleaning, and care of utensils :
14. Construction of utensils ________________ 25
15. Cleaning of utensils ____________________ 30
16. Water supply for cleaning _____________ 25
17. Care of utensils after cleaning _____________ 20
Total score ___________________100
Division 4Health of employees, and their methods of
milking:
18. Health of employees _________ _ 45
19. Cleanliness of milkers _ 15
20. Milking with clean, dry hands _ 15
21. Quiet milking ___ 5
22. Cleaning of udder ____________________ 12
23. Rejection of foremilk ___ 8
Total score ________________________100
Division 5Handling of milk:
24. Cleanliness of attendants 5
25. Prompt removal from stable ___ 8
26. Promptness of cooling and aeration _________ 8
27. Efficiency of cooling _ 22
28. Method of straining __________ 10
29. Sanitary milk-room _______ 25
30. Methods of storage _____________ 11
31. Methods of transportation ____-___ 11
Total score _____100
Total of all scores _____________________500
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 537
SPECIAL DEDUCTION FOR CAUSE
Final score ___
Sanitary, rating
SCORE CARD FOR MILK DEPOT
1.Location and cleanliness of plant:
Perfect.
1. Location _________________ 10
2. Arrangement _________ 10
3. Construction 14
4. Light and ventilation 3
5. Screens _______ 15
6. Cleanliness _____________________-__ 48
Total score _____________-100
2.Machinery and utensils. Water supply:
7. Construction 20
8. Cleanliness ________________________ 50
9. Water supply _______________________ 30
Total score ________-________-100
3.Handling and storage of milk:
10. Handling of milk ___________________ 70
11. Storage of milk _________________I_ 30
Total score ___________________-100
538 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
4.Wagons and salesrooms:
12. Wagons (construction) 8
13. Wagons (conditioncleanliness) __________ 18
14. Wagons (protection of product) ___________ 18
15. Salesrooms (location) _______________ 20
16. Salesrooms (ordercleanliness) ___________ 36
Total score _________________________100
5.Health, cleanliness of employees:
17. Cleanliness and neatness of employees ___ 40
18. Health of employees ___________________ 60
Total score __________________________100
Grand total score _____________________500
Rating
FirstA total score of 480 per cent., and each division
of 90 per cent., excellent.
SecondA total score of 450 per cent., and each division
of 80 per cent., good.
ThirdA total score of 400 per cent., and each division
of 60 per cent., medium.
FourthA total score of 350 per cent., and each division
of 55 per cent., poor.
FifthA total score of 300 per cent., and each division
of 50 per cent., lowest score passable.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all of the provisions of the said ordinance of September 8, 1909, known
as the "Milk Ordinance," for the purpose of enforcing and
carrying out the said rules and regulations, and providing
for a punishment for a failure to comply therewith, be and
they are hereby adopted and ratified.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 539
Section 3. Be it further ordained. That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed October 20, 1909.
Uniformity in the Sidewalks
By Alderman Entelman:
An ordinance to secure uniformity in the sidewalks,
roadways, grass plats, etc., in the streets covered by this
ordinance.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, that the
widths of sidewalks, roadways, and grass plats in that
section of the City of Savannah which is bounded on the
north by the southern property line of Thirty-seventh Street,
on the south by the southern property line of Estill Avenue,
on the east by the eastern property line of Habersham
Street, and on the west by the eastern right-of-way line of
the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, not already provided for by
ordinance, and of Maupas Avenue and of Forty-first Street
from Bull Street to the western right:of-way line of the
Atlantic Coast Line Railway; Barnard and Montgomery
Streets from Forty-second Street to Best Street; Best Street
from Montgomery Street to the intersection of the western
right-of-way line of the Savannah Electric Company, near
Bull Street, shall be as follows, to wit:
1. Streets forty (40) feet in width shall have a roadway
in the center thereof of twenty-eight (28) feet in width,
and sidewalks on either side thereof of six (6) feet in width.
2. Streets forty-five (45) feet in width shall have a
roadway in the center thereof of thirty (30) feet in width,
grass plats on either side thereof (next to curb) of two and
540 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ___
one-half (2>) feet in width, and sidewalks on either side
thereof (next to property line) of five (5) feet in width.
3. Streets fifty (50) feet in width shall have a roadway
in the center thereof of thirty (30) feet in width, grass plats
on either side thereof (next to curb) of three (3) feet in
width, sidewalks on either side thereof of five (5) feet in
width, and grass plats on either side thereof (next to
property line) of two (2) feet in width; with the exception
of Fortieth Street, which shall have a roadway in the center
thereof of thirty-two (32) feet in width, grass plats on
either side thereof (next to curb) of three (3) feet in width,
sidewalks on either side thereof of five (5) feet in width, and
grass plats on either side thereof (next to property line) of
one (1) foot in width.
4. Streets sixty (60) feet in width shall have a roadway
in the center thereof of thirty-two (32) feet in width, grass
plats on either side thereof (next to curb) of four (4) feet in
width, sidewalks on either side thereof of five (5) feet in
width, and grass plats on either side thereof (next to property line) of five (5) feet in width; with the exception of
Habersham Street, which shall have a roadway in the center thereof of forty (40) feet in width, grass plats on either
side thereof (next to curb) of three (3) feet in width, sidewalks on either side thereof of five (5) feet in width, and
grass plats on either side thereof (next to property line) of
two (2) feet in width.
5. Streets seventy-five (75) feet in width shall have a
roadway in the center thereof of forty-five (45) feet in width,
grass plats on either side thereof (next to curb) of five (5)
feet in width, sidewalks on either side thereof of five (5) feet
in width, and grass plats on either side thereof (next to property line) of five (5) feet in width.
6. Streets one hundred (100) feet in width shall have a
grass plat in the center thereof of twenty (20) feet in width,
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 541
a roadway on either side thereof of twenty-five (25) feet in
width, sidewalks on either side thereof (next to curb) of six
(6) feet in width, and grass plats on either side thereof (next
to property line) of nine (9) feet in width.
Section 2. Be it further ordained that, whenever sidewalks are laid, granite curbing shall be used to enclose the
same, and the said curbing shall be four (4) by eighteen
(18) inches.
Section 3. Be it further ordained that, all sidewalks
mentioned in section one (1) of this ordinance shall be paved
with artificial stone by the abutting property owners within
three (3) months from the passage of this ordinance, materials, etc., to be satisfactory to the Committee on Streets and
Lanes. Should the sidewalks not be paved within the time
mentioned, then the City of Savannah shall proceed to pave
the said sidewalks at the expense of the abutting property
owners.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed November 17, 1909.
Fines Paid by Members Fire Department
By the Committee on Fire:
An ordinance to set aside the fines paid by members of
the Fire Department of the City of Savannah to the Order
of American Firemen of Savannah :
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the fines
hereafter collected from the members of the Fire Department of the City of Savannah shall be and they are. hereby
542________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
set aside to the Order of American Firemen of the City of
Savannah, and they shall be payable out of the city treasury,
after their deposit therein, to the proper officer of said Association, upon the orders of the Chief of the Fire Department
of the City of Savannah.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed November 17, 1909.
Assessment RollBroughton Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Broughton
Street, from the east property line of East Broad Street to
the west property line of Randolph Street, made under an
ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted June 22, 1909.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled. That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under an
ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed June 22, 1909, and
entitled: "An ordinance for the improvement of Broughton
Street, from the east property line of East Broad Street to
the west property line of Randolph Street, under the terms
and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be
the official statement and assessment roll of the said
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 543
improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement
and assessment roll being that entitled: "Statement showing the cost of improvements to Broughton Street, in the
City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the east property line
of East Broad Street and extending to the west property line
of Randolph Street, as under an ordinance of the City of
Savannah, passed June 22, 1909; with an assessment roll
showing as to two:thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned
among the several abutting parcels, and giving the sums
chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the owners.*'
And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby
directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed
as of this date, and to enter the same on the minutes of
Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the'property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 1, 1909.
Assessment RollWayne Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evi-
. dence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
M. R. c. s.35
544________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
By the Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Wayne.Street,
from the west side of Bull Street to the east side of Whitaker Street, made under an ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted December 19. 1906.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah, and the Committee on Streets and Lanes,
under an ordinance of the City of Savannah,
passed December 19, 1906, and entitled, "An ordinance for the improvement of portions of certain streets
and lanes in the City of Savannah, Ga., that is to say," etc.
(naming a number of streets and lanes) "Wayne Street,
from the west side of Bull Street to the east side of Whitaker Street," etc., "all under the terms and provisions of an
Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1,
1887," be and it is hereby declared to be the official statement and assessment roll of the said improvement under the
said ordinance, the said statement and assessment roll being
that entitled, "Statement showing cost of improvements to
Wayne Street, in the City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at
the west side of Bull Street, and extending to the east side
of Whitaker Street, as under an ordinance of the City of
Savannah, passed December 19, 1906; with an assessment
roll showing as to two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and giving the
sums chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the
owners." And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah
is hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this date, and to enter the same on the
minutes of Council for due authentication and preservation.
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________545
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 1, 1909.
Shutting Off of Water for Non-payment of Water Rent
By Committee on Water:
An ordinance to provide for the shutting off of water for
the non-payment of water rent:
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That, on
expiration of time allowed for payment of water rents under
existing ordinance, or at any time thereafter, water may be
shut off, without further notice, without regard to any
change of ownership in the property for which water rent
may be due, and all sales and purchases of property in the
City of Savannah shall be made subject to this right to shut
off for non-payment of water rent.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 1, 1909.
546 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Assessment RollGordon Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Gordon Street,
from the west side of Bull Street to the east side of Whitaker Street, and from the east side of Bull Street to the west
side of Drayton Street, made under an ordinance of the City
of Savannah, adopted December 19, 1906.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, T^hat the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed December 19,
1906, and entitled, "An ordinance for the improvement of
portions of certain streets and lanes in the city of Savannah,
Ga., that is to say," etc. (naming a number of streets and
lanes), "Gordon Street, from the east side of Bull Street to
the west side of Drayton Street, and from the west side of
Bull Street to the east side of Whitaker Street," etc., "all
under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature
of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby
declared to be the official statement and assessment roll of
the said improvement under the said ordinance, the said
statement and assessment roll being that entitled, "Statement showing cost of improvements to Gordon Street, in the
City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the west side of Bull
Street, and extending to the east side of Whitaker Street,
and from the east side of Bull Street to the west side of
Drayton Street, as under an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed December 19, 1906; with an assessment roll
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_____ 547
showing as to two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned
among the several abutting parcels, and giving the sums
chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the owners."
And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby
directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed
as of this date, and to enter the same on the minutes of
Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 1, 1909.
Assessment RollRandolph Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Randolph
Street, from the north property line of Liberty Street to the
south property line of Bay Street, made under an ordinance
of the City of Savannah, adopted June 22, 1909.
548 ______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT _______
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed June 22, 1909,
and entitled "An Ordinance for the improvement of Randolph Street, from the north property line of Liberty Street
to the south property line of Bay Street, under the terms and
provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be the
official statement and assessment roll of the said improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement and assessment roll being that entitled "Statement showing the cost of
improvements to Randolph Street, in the City of Savannah,
Ga., beginning at the north property line of Liberty Street,
and extending to the south property line of Bay Street, as
under an ordinance of the City of Savannah,' passed June 22,
1909; with an assessment roll showing as to two-thirds of
this cost, how it is apportioned among the several abutting
parcels, and giving the sums chargeable to each parcel, with
the names of the owners." And the Clerk of Council of the
City of Savannah is hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this date, and to enter
the same on the minutes of Council for due authentication
and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
.send to the property owners, including the railroad companies, a bill for the respective amounts due by them, as
provided for by the said ordinance. Should the said bills be
not paid, then it shall be the duty of the Treasurer to issue
executions as provided for by the said ordinance, which shall
be made and levied as are executions for city taxes.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 549
Section 3. Be it further ordained that all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 1, 1909.
Assessment RollJones Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same.
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Jones Street,
from the east property line of Drayton Street to the west
property line of East Broad Street, made under an ordinance
of the City of Savannah, adopted June 22, 1909.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah passed June 22, 1909,
and entitled: "An Ordinance for the improvement of Jones
Street, from the east property line of Drayton Street to the
west property line of East Broad Street, under the terms
and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887," be and it is hereby declared to be
the official statement and assessment roll of the said
improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement
and assessment roll being that entitled: "Statement showing the cost of improvements to Jones Street, in the City of
Savannah, Ga., beginning at the east property line of Drayton Street, and extending to the west property line of East
550 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Broad Street, as under an ordinance of the City of Savannah,
passed June 22, 1909; with an assessment roll showing as to
two-thirds of this cost, how it is apportioned among the
several abutting parcels, and giving the sums chargeable to
each parcel, with the names of the owners." And the Clerk
of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to
mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this
date, and to enter the same on the minutes of Council for
clue authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners, including the street railroad
company, a bill for the respective amounts due by them, as
provided for by the said ordinance. Should the said bills be
not paid, then it shall be the duty of the Treasurer to issue
executions as provided for by the said ordinance, which shall
be made and levied as are executions for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 1, 1909.
Assessment RollTaylor Street
Before the passage of this ordinance, Council heard evidence touching the correctness of the statement and assessment roll, and duly verified the same:
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll touching the improvement of Taylor Street,
from the west side of Bull Street to the east side of Whitaker
Street, and from the east side of Bull Street to the west
side of Drayton Street, made under an ordinance of the City
of Savannah, adopted December 19, 1906.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 551
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the *Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah, passed December 19,
1906, and entitled "An Ordinance for the improvement of
portions of certain streets and lanes in the City of Savannah,
Ga., that is to say," etc., (naming a number of streets and
lanes) "Taylor Street, from the west side of Bull Street to
the east side of Whitaker Street, and from'the east side of
Bull Street to the west side of Drayton Street," etc.,
"all under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887," be and it is
hereby declared to be the official statement and assessment
roll of the said improvement under the said ordinance, the
said statement and assessment roll being that entitled
"Statement showing cost of improvements to Taylor Street,
in the City of Savannah, Ga., beginning at the west side of
Bull Street, and extending to the east side of Whitaker
Street, and from the east side of Bull Street to the west side
of Drayton Street, as under an ordinance of the City of
Savannah, passed December 19, 1906; with an assessment
roll showing as to two-thirds of this cost, .how it is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and giving the
sums chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the
owners." And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment roll filed as of this date, and to enter the same on the
minutes of Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by the said ordinance. Should
the said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
552_________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Section 3. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 1, 1909.
Improvement of Thirty-Seventh Street
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance for the improvement of Thirty-seventh
Street, from the east property line of Bull Street to the west
property line of Habersham Street, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
October 1, 1887.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved October 1, 1887, that the Director of Public
Works for the City of Savannah and the Committee on
Streets and Lanes of said city, be and they are hereby
authorized and directed to build and construct on Thirtyseventh Street, in the City of Savannah, from the east property line of Bull Street to the west property line of Habersham Street (excluding Abercorn Street, which has already
been paved with vitrified brick), two (2) roadways of asphalt
blocks, twenty-five (25) feet in width each between the
curbing, with a grass plat twenty (20) feet in width between
the said two roadways, and they are authorized and directed
to lay the necessary curbing, and to do all the work in the
way of grading, the placing of catch-basins, drains, crossings, and all other things incident to the construction and
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 553
completion of said roadways on said portion of Thirtyseventh Street.
Section 2. Be it further ordained That, after the total
cost of said work shall have been ascertained, one-third of
such total cost shall be paid out of the city treasury, and the
other two-thirds by the persons owning, at the date of the
adoption of this ordinance, the real estate abutting on the
said portion of Thirty-seventh Street to be improved under
this ordinance, according to frontage, and the pro rata
amount of the cost of such work is hereby assessed against
the said abutting real estate and its owners, as aforesaid,
according to frontage.
The frontage of intersecting streets and lanes is assessed
as real estate abutting on said portion of Thirty-seventh
Street to be improved, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah shall be, for all the intents and purposes of
this ordinance, the owner of -the real estate so abutting, and
shall pay from the city treasury its just pro rata as such
owner of the cost of such work, according to frontage, in
addition to its one-third of the entire cost as hereinbefore
provided.
Section 3. Be it further ordained That, after the
improvement hereinbefore provided for has been completed,
the said Director and the said Committee shall prepare and
submit to the Council of the City of Savannah a statement
showing the cost of the improvement herein provided for,
and also an assessment roll, showing as to two-thirds of the
cost to be apportioned, how it is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, including the street and lane intersections, and giving the sum chargeable to each parcel, with the
name of the owner.
Upon the consideration and adoption of said statement
and assessment roll by the Council of the City of Savannah,
it shall then become the duty of the City Treasurer to send
to the abutting property owners their proper bill for the
554________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_______
same, as it may be ascertained by the City Council, and if
such bill so sent be not paid within thirty (30) days after
the presentation or sending of the same, it shall then become
the duty of the City Treasurer to issue execution for the
amount, together with costs, against the persons and property aforesaid, which execution shall be made and levied out
of the property described therein as are executions for city
taxes.
Section 4. Be it further ordained, That all ordinances
and parts of ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are
hereby repealed.
Ordinance passed December 15, 1909.
RESOLUTIONS
Land for Opening Barnard Street Between Forty-Second
and Best
. By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, under the terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia, approved
December 18, 1894, the City of Savannah being unable, by
contract, to procure the land herein mentioned, that the following lots or parcels of land in the City of Savannah be,
and they are, hereby condemned, for the opening of
Barnard Street, between Forty-Second and Best Streets,
they being needed for the public purpose mentioned, to wit:
Lot number twenty-six (26), King's subdivision, Norwood
Ward, and improvements, having a frontage on FortySecond Street of forty (40) feet, and a depth of ninety (90)
feet, containing thirty-six hundred (3,600) square feet;
owner, J. T. Chapman. The western portion of lot number
twenty-four (24), King's subdivision, Norwood Ward, having a frontage on Forty-Second Street of thirty-three (33)
feet, and a depth of ninety (90) feet, containing two thousand nine hundred and seventy (2,970) square feet, the
owner being W. G. Gnann; and Walter Woledge of the City
of Savannah, is hereby selected as the assessor to represent
the City of Savannah, and the City Attorney of Savannah
is hereby directed to give proper notices to the owners of
the property mentioned, and to take the steps pointed out by
the said Act of the Legislature for the condemnation of
private property for public use.
Adopted and approved January 13, 1909.
556 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Near-Beer License Committee
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, that the Mayor be authorized to appoint a
standing committee of Council, t6 be known as the NearBeer License Committee, whose duties it shall be to pass
upon the applications of all persons desiring to sell what is
commonly called prohibition or near-beer.
Adopted January 13, 1909.
In accordance with the above resolution, the following
committee was appointed by His Honor, the Mayor:
Aldermen Gordon, Kavanaugh, and Entelman.
Sinking Fund Commissioners
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the following citizens
of Savannah be and they are hereby elected as Sinking Fund
Commissioners, namely: George J. Mills, Samuel Herman,
Charles G. Bell, John Lyons, and Edward W. Bell; and that,
upon their qualification, they shall compose the Sinking
Fund Commission, and have all the powers and duties contemplated by an ordinance of the City of Savannah, adopted
August 12, 1908, entitled, "An Ordinance to refund the
bonded indebtedness of the City of Savannah, maturing on
the first day of February, 1909," and also those contemplated
by the ordinance of December 17, 1878, referred to in the
ordinance just mentioned.
Adopted and approved, January 25,1909.
And George J. Mills, Samuel Herman, Charles G. Bell,
John Lyons, and Edward W. Bell, were elected Sinking
Fund Commissioners, in accordance with the above resolution.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 557
Reward
By Alderman Battey:
Resolved, That the sum of two hundred dollars is
hereby offered as a reward for the arrest, with evidence sufficient to convict, of the party or parties who stretched a wire
across the White Bluff Road on the night of January 25,
1909.
Adopted and approved January 27, 1909.
Savannah Electric CompanyTransfers to Passengers
By Alderman Wilson,:
Resolved, that the Mayor is hereby requested to appoint
a committee of three, of which he shall be chairman, to confer with the Savannah Electric Company in regard to the
issuing of transfers to passengers, as required by resolutions
of this Council, accepted by the said Company.
Adopted and approved February 10, 1909.
In accordance with the above resolution, His Honor,
the Mayor, appointed the following committee: The Mayor,
Aldermen Wilson and Hull.
Inspection of Rosin
By the Committee of the Whole:
Whereas, certain resolutions in regard to the inspection
of arrivals of rosin, adopted by the Savannah Board of
Trade, at a meeting held on February 2, 1909, have been
brought to the attention of this Board, and
558_____ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
Whereas, this Board believes that it is important that
as much prominence and indorsement as possible be given
said resolutions; therefore, be it
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, that they do hereby
express their approval of the mode of inspection of rosin
which prevails at this port, as set forth in said Board of
Trade resolutions; and
Resolved, further, that Council has confidence in the
Inspectors of Naval Stores at this port, which Inspectors
are elected by City Council, and are sworn and bonded
officials of the City of Savannah.
Adopted and approved February 10. 1909.
Savannah Realty CompanyOpening Streets
By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the Committee on
Opening Streets of the City of Sava-nnah be and it is hereby
authorized to enter into a contract with the Savannah
Realty Company, embodying the provisions set forth in the
letter of Messrs. Lattimore & Lattimore to the chairman of
said Committee, dated February 19, 1909that is to say:
First. The city will adopt a plan of extension, extending Fortieth Street eastward through the property of the
said Savannah Realty Company, commencing at the center
of the tract at Habersham Street, and extending eastward
through the center of the tract to its eastern limits.
Second. The city will at once open and grade Fortieth
Street, from Habersham Street to the eastern limits of the
property of the Savannah Realty Company.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 559
Third. The city will extend its water mains through
Fortieth Street eastward from Habersham Street to the
eastern limits of the property of the Savannah Realty
Company, within two years from February 15, 1909. If in
the meantime the Savannah Realty Company desires to
have the water mains extended, the city will do this at the
expense of the Savannah Realty Company, this company
paying for the work and receiving from the city its note for
the amounts so paid, payable not later than February 15,
1911, without interest.
Fourth. The city will provide storm sewerage neccesary and adequate for house drainage for twelve (12)
buildings to be erected by the Savannah Realty Company,
with the understanding that this said drainage will take
care of the house drainage as to these twelve (12) buildings
until such time as the regular house sewerage system is
extended by the city through its property.
Fifth. The city is to make the agreement herein indicated, upon condition that the said Company will convey to
the city the necessary streets through the tract known as a
part of Teynac Farm lots No. five (5), in Teynac, Garrard,
and Harden Wards, for the extension of Fortieth Street,
requiring approximately 97,570 square feet; for the extension of Reynolds Street, requiring approximately 7,240
square feet; for the extension of Atlantic Street, requiring
approximately 9,000 square feet, and for the extension of
Paulsen Street, requiring approximately 8,950 square feet;
making a total of approximately one hundred and twentytwo thousand, seven hundred and sixty (122,760) square feet,
without charge to the City of Savannah.
i
Adopted and approved February 24, 1909.
M. R. c. s.se
560 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Monument to General Oglethorpe
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled:
Whereas, the State of Georgia has appropriated the sum
of $15,000 toward the erection in Savannah of a monument
to General Oglethorpe, the founder of the Colony of
Georgia, the sum of $7,000 has been pledged for the same
purpose by private subscriptions, and the City of Savannah
desires to appropriate whatever sum may be necessary for
the completion of the memorial; therefore, be it
Resolved, That the sum of not exceeding $15,000 be and
it is hereby appropriated by the Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah as follows:
Not exceeding $12,000 for the erection of the monument.
Xot exceeding $3,000 for the expenses of the ceremonies
of unveiling and preparation of a site for the monument,
including the removal of the fountain and other monuments
in the square, and all other expenses incident to this preparation.
Adopted and approved March 10. 1909.
Death Hon. Herman Myers
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, that this Council has
learned, with deep regret, of the death of Hon. Herman
Myers, who for years served the city as its Mayor;
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________561
That, in respect to his memory, the Council now take a
recess subject to the call of the Mayor;
That the body of the deceased lie in state in the City
Hall from 12 o'clock, noon, tomorrow, until the same hour
the next day;
That the Council attend the funeral in a body;
That the public offices of the city be closed during the
hours of the funeral, and the flag be placed at half-mast; and
City Hall be draped.
And that the Mayor appoint a committee of five, of
which the Mayor shall be chairman, to prepare and report at
a subsequent meeting of the Council suitable resolutions
concerning this sad event.
Adopted and approved by a rising vote of Council
March 24, 1909.
In 'accordance with above resolution, His Honor, the
Mayor, appointed the following committee: His Honor the
Mayor, chairman; Aldermen Guckenheimer, McCauley,
Gordon, Kavanaugh.
Public Library
By the Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, that the sum of twentyeight hundred and forty dollars ($2,840), be and it is hereby
appropriated out of the City Treasury, to be paid to the
Board of Managers of the Savannah Public Library, to be
used as follows: $1,400 for the inauguration of a children's
department; $940 for the first year's maintenance of same,
562________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
and $500 to replace the amount heretofore subscribed by the
Georgia Historical Society, which subscription has been discontinued.
Adopted and approved March 26, 1909.
Resignation Alderman Perritt
By Alderman Battey:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled,
That we deeply regret that his removal to another city
makes it necessary for our colleague, Mr. J. Frank Perritt,
to resign as an Alderman of the City of Savannah, and to
sever his relations with us.
It gives us pleasure to record the fact that he has always
discharged the duties of his office with fairness, courtesy,
and efficiency, with an eye single to the good of our people,
and that his resignation involves a distinct loss to this Board,
and to the community of which he is a valued citizen.
Mr. Perritt will carry with him to his new home the
good will, respect, and good wishes of every member of this
Board.
The Clerk of Council is directed to present to Mr. Perritt a certified copy of this action, under the seal of the city.
Adopted and approved by a rising vote of Council
March 26, 1909.
Bacteriological Laboratory
By Committee on Water:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, that a sum not to exceed
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 563
three hundred dollars ($300) be appropriated for the purpose
of equipping the Bacteriological Laboratory with facilities
necessary for analyzing coal.
Adopted and approved March 26, 1909.
Assessment RollOgeechee Road
Ordinance read in Council for the first time March 26,
1909; read a second time April 7, 1909; and not passed. See
resolution by Committee on Streets and Lanes:
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
An ordinance to establish the official statement and
assessment roll, touching the improvements of the Ogeechee
Road from the south side of the first culvert to the city
limits, made under an ordinance of the City of Savannah,
adopted June 8, 1908, and amended February 6, 1909.
Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the
statement and assessment roll prepared and submitted to
Council by the Director of Public Works for the City of
Savannah and the Committee on Streets and Lanes, under
an ordinance of the City of Savannah passed June 8, 1908, as
amended by the ordinance of said city passed February 6,
1909, and entitled, "An ordinance to amend the ordinance
adopted June 8, 1908, and entitled 'An ordinance for the
improvement of a portion of the Ogeechee Road, under the
terms and provisions of an Act of the Legislature of Georgia,
approved October 1, 1887,"be and it is hereby declared to be
the official statement and assessment roll of the said
improvement under the said ordinance, the said statement
and assessment roll being that entitled, "Statement showing
the cost of improvements to Ogeechee Road in the City of
Savannah, Ga., beginning at the south side of the first cul-
564 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
vert and extending to the city limits, as under an ordinance
of the City of Savannah, passed February 6, 1909; with an
assessment roll showing as to two-thirds of this cost, how it
is apportioned among the several abutting parcels, and giving
the sums chargeable to each parcel, with the names of the
owners." And the Clerk of Council of the City of Savannah
is hereby directed to mark the said statement and assessment
roll filed as of this date, and to enter the same on the
minutes of Council for due authentication and preservation.
Section 2. Be it further ordained, That the Treasurer
of the City of Savannah is hereby directed to make out and
send to the property owners a bill for the respective amounts
due by them, as provided for by said ordinance. Should the
said bills be not paid, then it shall be the duty of the
Treasurer to issue executions as provided for by the said
ordinance, which shall be made and levied as are executions
for city taxes.
Be it further ordained, That all ordinances and parts of
ordinances in conflict with this ordinance are hereby
repealed.
The following resolution is relative to the above ordinance :
Resolution
By Committee on Streets and Lanes:
Resolved, That the ordinance just read to establish the
statement and assessment roll for the improvement of the
Ogeechee Road, from the south side of the first culvert to
the city limits, covering a gravel pavement, be not passed,
and the assessment of $326.03 be not insisted on; the
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______ 565
property owners surrendering all claim to the strip of land
taken by the city, and now in its possession, in connection
with the improvement of the Ogeechee Road.
Adopted April 7, 1909.
Opening Streets
By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, that the Committee on City
Lots and Opening Streets be and is hereby authorized to
purchase (titles being satisfactory), from the estate of the
late Gen. A. R. Lawton, a strip of land, to be fifty (50) feet
in width, on the south side of Estill Avenue, between Bull
Street and the Granger Tract, needed by the City of Savannah for widening Estill Avenue, the number of feet needed
for the purpose being estimated to be fifty-nine thousand, five
hundred and eighty-five (59,585) square feet, at and for the
price of twenty (20) cents per square foot, with twelve
hundred dollars ($1,200), added as the estimated cost for
removing the buildings by the owners, and upon such terms
as to payment, etc., as may be agreed upon by the committee ; payment to be covered by notes of the city, one, two,
and three years, bearing interest at rate of five per cent.,
payable semi-annually.
Adopted and approved April 7, 1909.
Chatham Land and Hotel Company
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the Mayor of the
566________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
City of Savannah be and he is hereby authorized and
empowered to enter, in the name and behalf of the Mayor
and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, into a contract with
the Chatham Land and Hotel Company, a corporation of
Savannah, Ga., embodying the following features, to wit:
First. The said Chatham Land and Hotel Company is
to convey to the City of Savannah all area necessary for
streets and lanes, as shown by the map of the City Engineer,
submitted with its propositionthe said area amounting,
approximately, to the figures stated in the proposition of the
Land Company, submitted to the City of Savannah.
Second. The said Chatham Land and Hotel Company
will pay all bills for any and all work for which the city is to
be obligated under the contract, as the bills are submitted
by the city, covering work actually done, and for which payments the said Company is to be reimbursed by the City's
notes, running from two to six years from the date of the
notes, without interest.
Third. The said Company will make provisions for the
donation to the city of a suitable site and the payment to
the city for the cost of erecting a pumping station up to the
sum of seven thousand dollars ($7,000), at such time and in
the event the city may determine to establish a house drainage system over the property involved;
' Fourth. The Company will deed to the city the hotel
site as shown on the said map, under the following conditions: If the site is not used in five years from the date of
contract for a hotel costing not less than three hundred and
fifty thousand dollars ($350,000), then it will become
incumbent upon the city to turn the same into a park,
and improve it; at any time within twenty years
from the date of contract that a company may build such a
hotel, the site will become available for hotel purposes; after
the lapse of said twenty years it shall then become optional
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 567
with the City of Savannah whether it shall devote the same
as a hotel site or continue it as a park.
In consideration of the foregoing, the City of Savannah
First. Will adopt the said map as prepared by the City
Engineer for the subdivision of the property.
Second. Will open Estill Avenue the full width of 100
feet, from Bull Street to Waters Avenue.
Third. Will lay out a doubfe roadway, and park the
centers, at such times as are stated in this resolution.
Fourth. Will lay out Forty-seventh Street in the same
manner as Estill Avenue, and curb the center parking; this
work to be begun as hereinafter specified.
Fifth. Will also lay out The Crescent in the same manner, curbing the center parkway; this work to be begun as
hereinafter specified.
Sixth. Will open up Atlantic Street from Fortyseventh Street to the south side of the park contemplated at
Forty-first and Atlantic Streets, to the width of 200 feet,
with twenty-five-foot roadways; a twenty-foot cement walk
from the park at Forty-first and Atlantic Streets to Fortyseventh Street to be laid at the expense of the Company,
leaving two parkways or grass plats on each side of a cement
walk, sixty-five feet wide each, the curbing necessary for
parkways in this street to be laid by the city at such time
as is herein specified.
Seventh. Will open and grade all streets in the entire
tract, as called for by the said Company.
Eighth. Will construct an adequate storm sewerage
through the property, as indicated by the City Engineer on
the map prepared by him, sufficient in his judgment to care
for the drainage for some time to come.
568________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
Ninth. Will lay water mains as follows: Estill
Avenue, from Abercorn Street main to center of Atlantic
Street; Atlantic Street, from center of Estill Avenue to
Forty-seventh Street; Estill Avenue, from center of Atlantic
Street to center of Waters Road; Atlantic Street, from
center of Estill Avenue to center of Fortieth Street.
Tenth. The laying out of Estill Avenue is to begin
when the said Company is prepared and ready to go ahead
with its curbing and paving on that avenue.
Eleventh. The city is not to do any work of curbing of
streets for which it is obligated until the Company begins
with its curbing on the same streets.
Twelfth. The system of storm sewerage and water
mains is to be completed from Forty-seventh Street north
within a period of two (2) years, and the storm sewerage
south of Forty-seventh Street is to be completed within four
years from the date of the contract.
Thirteenth. The Mayor is authorized to execute proper
releases to the Company, looking to the substitution of the
land covered by this resolution for that heretofore conveyed
to the city for parks and streets by Harvey Granger.
Adopted and approved April 7, 1909.
Appropriation Street Paving
By the Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, that the sum of $548.59, be
and it is hereby donated to the Cathedral Congregation and
the Sisters of Mercy, to be used in the paying of the bills of
the City of Savannah for the paving of Abercorn Street.
Adopted and approved April 7,1909.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 569
Hon. Herman Myers
Report of committee appointed to submit resolutions
concerning the late Hon. Herman Myers.
Savannah, Ga., April 21, 1909.
To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah.
The committee appointed by resolution of your Board
to prepare and submit for your consideration suitable resolutions touching the late Hon. Herman Myers, and his
recent death, beg to report as follows:
Mr. Myers was born in Bavaria, Germany, on the eighteenth day of January, 1847, and died in this city on the
twenty-fifth of March, 1909. He was the son of Sigmund
and Fannie Myers. His parents removed from Germany to
the state of Virginia when Mr. Myers was a child of tender
years, and he resided in that State, continuously, until his
removal to this city. He was educated at the public schools
of Virginia, and in that State learned the tanner's trade.
Mr. Myers removed to this city from Lynchburg, Va.,
in the year 1867, becoming a member of the tobacco house
of H. Myers & Bro. From this time until his death he was
an active, prominent, and influential member of the business
community, and met with great success as a business man.
Mr. Myers had taste and capacity for public service. In
the year 1885 he was elected a member of the Board of
Aldermen of this city, and served as a member of Council
continuously for ten years. During this long term of service, he was vice-chairman for two years and chairman of
Council for the same period. He was on the Finance Committee for ten years. For five years he was a member of the
Sanitary Board.
Mr. Myers was elected Mayor of the City of Savannah
in 1895, and from this time until 1907, except one term of
L
570 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
two years, served continuously as Mayor of the city; that is
to say, he was Mayor of the city five different terms of two
years each. This is unprecedented. We believe that no
other citizen has filled the office so long. During his service
as Mayor, the city expended for betterments the sum of
$1,890,746, distributed as follows:
Paving streets ______________________$562,241
Opening streets and new parks ____________ 407,608
New City Hall and furnishings ____________ 207,050
Sidewalks _______________________ 143,308
House drainage system ____ 263,657
Extension of waterworks, air lift, and payments on
new waterworks ______ 138,345
Gwinnett Street Subway ________________ 36,398
Fire department, new buildings, and new apparatus 31,552
New sewers _______________________ 37,587
Notwithstanding these expenditures, the tax rate was
reduced. This is true, notwithstanding the fact that the
total appropriations for the different departments were
$140,000 greater at the end of his last term than they were
at the beginning of his first term. In 1895, the total mileage of the city's paved streets was eighteen, a good deal of
which consisted of shell and other unsatisfactory substances, a part of which was removed and better materials
put in its place. At the end of his last term, the entire mileage of paved streets was forty-one miles, of which nineteen
were laid during the ten years of his administration.
4
The new City Hall, which has always been regarded as
a very great success from a financial and architectural standpoint, was erected without additional taxation, and without
injury to the departments of the city, or the retarding of the
city's general progress. During his administration the city
was relieved of the burden and expense of maintaining the
Quarantine Station, which cost the city an annual outlay of
from $10,000 to $15,000, and was turned over to the United
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 571
States Marine Service, which has since maintained the Quarantine without expense to the city, and to the satisfaction of
our people.
During his service, he lost no opportunity to advertise
the City of Savannah, and advance its material interests. It
is but simple justice to say of Mr. Myers that he was
capable, active, diligent, and efficient. He was also conscientious and honest in the discharge of his duties. He carefully guarded the city's interests, and discharged his duty as
he saw it with strict regard to the advancement and upbuilding of those interests.
In his death, Savannah has lost a valuable and. progressive citizen, and a public servant of ability and
efficiency.
This Council has, by appropriate action, paid him
deserved respect and honor.
We now recommend, as an additional tribute, that this
report be adopted and spread upon the minutes of Council,
and that a copy be sent by the Clerk of Council to the
widow of the deceased. Respectfully submitted,
GEORGE W. TIEDEMAN
ABE S. GUCKENHEIMER
W. F. McCAULEY
G. A. GORDON
M. J. KAVANAUGH
Committee
Adopted and approved by a rising vote of Council,
April 21, 1909.
572 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Froebel Circle of King's DaughtersFresh Air Home at
Tybee
By the Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be and the same is hereby appropriated
for the Froebel Circle of King's Daughters, to be used in
prosecuting their work at the Fresh Air Home at Tybee, said
amount to be paid in three installments, on the first day of
June, July, and August, 1909.
Adopted and approved May 5, 1909.
New Electric Lighting Contract
By the Committee on Streets and Lanes:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) be and it is hereby appropriated for the
purpose of employing an electrical engineer to draw up
specifications for a new electric lighting contract.
Adopted and approved May 5, 1909.
Camp for Charity Tubercular Patients
By Alderman Barrow:
Be it resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen, in Council
assembled, That a committee of three be appointed by the
Mayor to confer with a committee to be appointed by the
County Commissioners in reference to the establishment and
maintenance of a camp for charity tubercular patients in this
county; and be it further resolved that this committee be
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______ 573
authorized to do all things necessary in their discretion for
the establishment of such a camp, said committee being
authorized to contract and make expenditures not to exceed
the sum of two thousand dollars ($2.000) on the part of the
city.
Adopted and approved May 19, 1909.
Tubercular Exhibit
By Alderman Battey:
Be it resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City
of Savannah, That the sum of $250 be appropriated to help
pay the expenses of the tubercular exhibit, such sum to be
available in the event this exhibit is brought to the city.
Adopted and approved May 19, 1909.
Central of Georgia Railway
By Alderman Hull:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That out of the fund
derived from money paid by the Central of Georgia Railway
in settlement of certain back taxes, the sum of $15,027.14, or
so much thereof as may be necessary, be and the same is
hereby appropriated for the improvement of that portion of
Bay Street known as The Strand, for the entire work, as per
plan and estimate of the City Engineer, the portion of The
Strand to be improved lying between Abercorn and Lincoln
Streets, between Whitaker and Barnard Street's, and
between Barnard and Jefferson Streets.
Be it further resolved, That the said sum, or so much
thereof as may be necessary, is to be expended upon the said
574 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
improvement under the joint supervision of the Committee
of City Council known as the Committee on Streets and
Lanes and the Park and Tree Commission of the City of
Savannah.
Adopted and approved May 19, 1909.
Issue of Bonds
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled:
First. That an election be had by the qualified voters
of the City of Savannah, on the twenty-ninth day of June,
1909, and under the terms and provisions of an Act of the
Legislature of Georgia, approved August 13,1904, to be found
on pages 85 and 86 of the Georgia laws for the year 1904,
for the purpose of authorizing an issuance of bonds by the
City of Savannah to the amount of three hundred and fifty
thousand dollars ($350,000) face value, the proceeds of the
sale of said bonds to be used for the extension and completion of the sewerage system of the City of Savannah. Said
election shall be held at the Courthouse, and under the rules
and regulations governing elections of Mayor and Aldermen
of the City of Savannah, and under the provisions of law
relating to said municipal elections.
Second. That the following notice, to be signed by the
Mayor or Acting Mayor and the Clerk of Council, under the
seal of the Clerk, of the said election, shall be published for
the space of thirty days next preceding the day of election in
the Savannah Press, a public gazette published in the City
of Savannah, County of Chatham, and State of Georgia, in
which the sheriff's advertisements for the said county are
published, to wit:
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 575
"Notice is hereby given to the qualified voters of the
City of Savannah that an election will be held at the County
Courthouse, on the twenty-ninth day of June, 1909, between
the hours of 7 o'clock in the morning and 6 o'clock in the
afternoon, sun time, to determine the question whether a
debt shall be incurred by the City of Savannah, to be represented by an issuance of bonds in the sum of three hundred
and fifty thousand dollars ($350,000), face value, to be
divided into bonds of five hundred dollars ($500) each, face
value, the proceeds of which shall be used by the City of
Savannah for the extension and completion of its sewerage
system.
"The said bonds shall be payable within thirty years
from their date, shall bear interest at the rate of four (4) per
cent, per annum, said interest being payable semi-a.rtnually,
and shall be paid and retired as follows: By the expiration
of the first year of their life, four of said bonds shall be paid
and retired; by the expiration of the second year, ten additional bonds; and each and every year thereafter, an increase
of one bond over and above the previous number of bonds
retired shall be paid and retired; that is to say, the third
annual payment shall include and retire eleven bonds, the
fourth annual payment shall include and retire twelve bonds,
the fifth annual payment shall include and retire thirteen
bonds, the sixth annual payment shall include and retire
fourteen bonds, the seventh annual payment shall include
and retire fifteen fionds, and so on, the payments adding
each year one bond to the number last paid and retired, thus
retiring all the bonds by their maturity. A sinking fund
shall be established for the purpose of carrying out this plan
of payment.
"The said bonds, in the event their issue is authorized,
shall be sold for not less than their face value.
"The following shall be the form of the ballots to be
used: 'For incurring a debt of $350,000 by the City of
M. R. C. S.37
576 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Savannah for the extension and completion of its sewerage
system.' 'Against the incurring of a debt of $350,000 by the
City of Savannah for the extension and completion of its
sewerage system/
"This ele'ction shall be governed and controlled and
managed as are elections for Mayor and Aldermen of the
City of Savannah, and voters qualified to vote at the last
election for Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah
are qualified to vote at the election hereby provided for.
"Witness the official signature of the Acting Mayor, and
the official signature of the Clerk of Council, under the seal
of the Clerk, and under resolution of the Council of the City
of Savannah.
"This May 26. 1909."
Adopted and approved May 26, 1909.
Hon. Joseph M. Brown
By Committee of the Whole:
Whereas. The Hon. Joseph M. Brown will, on June 26,
be inaugurated Governor of the State of Georgia; and.
Whereas, he has manifested the most cordial interest in
Savannah, and, on the occasion of his recent visits to this
city, has expressed a desire for her proper recognition; and,
Whereas, it is both appropriate and desirable that the
City of Savannah be represented at the inauguration ceremonies : therefore, be it
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That a delegation, consisting of the Mayor as chairman, and such other members of
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 577
Council as may be able to attend, go to Atlanta to represent
the City of Savannah on that occasion; and, be it further
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded
to the Hon. Joseph M. Brown, Governor-elect, by the Clerk
of Council.
Adopted and approved June 2, 1909.
Opening Streets
By Alderman J. H. H. Entelman:
Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the offer of Mr. C.
H. Schroder to sell to the city the eastern portion of lot No.
28 (King's subdivision), Norwood Ward, needed for the
opening of Barnard Street, containing 180 square feet, at 40
cents per square foot, amounting to $72, and also $40 for outbuilding on same, making a total of $112, is hereby accepted,
improvements to be removed within sixty days from consummation of sale, titles to be satisfactory to the City
Attorney.
Adopted and approved June 2, 1909.
Bond Election
By Alderman Guckenheimer:
Resolved, That a public meeting of the voters of Savannah be called for Tuesday night, June 22, 1909, at 8.30
o'clock, Park Extension, for the* purpose of explaining to the
voters the importance of the bond election to be held on
June 29, and urging that the requisite vote be then cast in
favor of the issuance of bonds; be it further
578 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Resolved, That the Mayor ami Clerk of Council he
requested to arrange the details of the meeting.
Adopted June 2,1909.
Sanatorium
By Committee on the Whole:
Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, that they do hereby endorse
and approve the Act proposed for passage by the General
Assembly of the State of Georgia, known as "an Act to
authorize the municipal authorities of any city of Georgia
that now has a population of not less than fifty-four
thousand nor more than seventy-five thousand inhabitants,
to establish and maintain, either alone or in connection with
the county authorities of the county in which such a city
may be located, a sanatorium, for the care, treatment, and
maintenance of inhabitants of such county afflicted with
tuberculosis or consumption; to authorize the making of
rules and regulations touching such sanitorium, and the
care, custody, and treatment of persons sent there; to
authorize the creation of a board of trustees for such a
sanatorium; and for other purposes."
Adopted and approved June 30, 1909.
Construction of Bridge Over Back River
By the Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, By the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the Hon. A. O. Bacon
and the Hon. A. S. Clay, Senators from Georgia, and the
Hon. Charles G. Edwards, Congressman from this District,
_ ___ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________579
are hereby requested to secure the passage of a bill by
Congress authorizing the construction of a suitable bridge
from Hutchinson Island to the South Carolina shore, over
what is known as Back River.
Adopted and approved July 14, 1909.
Streets
By Alderman Entelman: __
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the proposition of
Eldred Simkins, made in his letter of July 1, 1909, to His
Honor, George W. Tiedeman, Mayor, proposing to dedicate
as streets to the city the streets set forth as Reppard and
Bolton Streets, in lots 68 and 69, Springfield Plantation, as
will more fully appear by a plan in the office of the City
Engineer, upon condition that the City of Savannah will
accept these streets and grade them immediately, be and the
same is hereby accepted, and the said Committee is authorized to carry the contract into effect, and to receive for the
city a proper conveyance.
Adopted and approved July 28, 1909.
Opening Streets
By Committee on City Lots and Opening Streets:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the offer of Platshek
& Co., agents for the estate of John C. Rowland, to sell the
city so much of a triangular lot at the eastern Intersection of
Rockefeller and Harmon Streets, in Johnston Ward, as the
city will need to open Rockefeller Street (containing approx-
580 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
imately 875 square feet), for the sum of seventy-five dollars
($75), is hereby approved and accepted, titles to be satisfactory to the City Attorney.
Adopted and approved July 28, 1909.
Asphalt Blocks
By the Committee on Streets and Lanes:
Resolved, That thetDbmmittee on Streets and Lanes be
and it is hereby authorized to purchase from the Barber
Asphalt Paving Company 50,000 additional square yards of
asphalt blocks, under option in contract of June 16, 1909, at
the price of $1.159 per square yard, delivered at Savannah.
Adopted and approved August 11, 1909.
Panama Canal
By Alderman Guckenheimer:
Whereas, it is fitting and proper that the completion of
the Panama Canal, in the year 1915 A. D., should be celebrated in a manner that will do justice to the great achievement by which the waters of the eastern and western oceans
will be united in a great commercial waterway through the
efforts and skill of our government; and
Whereas, the attention of the entire world has been centered upon this great Isthmian waterway since the inception
of the gigantic undertaking; and
Whereas, the City of Savannah will be directly and
intimately concerned in the revolution in the-world of commerce contingent upon the opening of the Panama Canal,
her commercial activity immeasurably increased, her import-
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________581
ance as a seaport greatly enhanced, and her position among
the shipping centers of the world vastly emphasized and
magnified; and
Whereas, the City of Savannah, by reason of her incomparable and salubrious climate, her centralized location, hec
matchless harbor, her ample and extended railroad facilities, her adequate and modern hotel accommodations, her
pleasant surroundings and wonderful beauty, as well as the
dominant spirit of American progress evinced by the energy
and enterprise of her citizens, her rapid growth and development in the field of business and commercial industry,
affords a place that is peculiarly suitable for the purpose of
holding an Exposition; and
Whereas, the Board of Directors of the Savannah Chamber of Commerce, composed of representative citizens of
acknowledged high standing and financial probity, have seen
fit to place upon the project of holding such an Exposition
the stamp of their pronounced approval; therefore be it

Resolved, that the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, do hereby signify their
unqualified approval of the commemoration of the opening
of the Panama Canal in the year 1915 A. D., as set forth in
these resolutions. ,
Resolved, further, that the holding of such an Exposition will be of lasting and inestimable benefit to the City of
Savannah, and that the Mayor and Aldermen of the city give
all lawful encouragement and support, therefore, toward the
holding of such Exposition.
Resolved, further, that in taking this course the Mayor
and Aldermen of the City of Savannah are influenced by a
natural desire to further the success of a project which they
are convinced will redound greatly to the fame, credit, and
future glory and prosperity of their city and its citizens.
Adopted and approved August 25, 1909
582________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Bonaventure Cemetery
By the Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the sum of five
thousand dollars ($5,000) for the extension of water mains
in the City of Savannah, and the sum of fifteen thousand
dollars ($15,000) for the improvement of the Bonaventure
Cemetery, be and they are hereby appropriated out of the
tax collected by the City of Savannah from the Central of
Georgia Railway Company, now held by the city as a special
fund.
Adopted and approved October 20, 1909.
Atlantic Coast Line Railway
By the Committee of the Whole:
*
Be it resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City
of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the proposition of
the Atlantic Coast Line Railway Company, as contained in
the letter of its third vice-president, Mr. J. R. Kenly, to
George W. Tiedeman, Mayor, dated October 5, 1909, be and
the same is hereby accepted, the said proposition being that
the railway company shall move, at its expense, the coal
chute, and that the city open Waldburg Street across the
railroad tracks at grade; that East Broad Street, Price
Street, and Lincoln Street be opened across the railroad
tracks at grade; that there be a subway at Henry Street, and
either a subway or bridge at Habersham Street, and that the
railroad company bear one-half of the cost of the subway at
Henry Street and one-half of the cost of the subway
or bridge at Habersham Street. That the above mentioned work be commenced not later than January 1, 1910,
and completed within six (6) months from that date, except
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________583
the subway or bridge at Habersham Street, which shall be
commenced not later than January 1, 1911, and completed
within six (6) months from that date.
Be it further resolved, Tht the Mayor be and he is
hereby authorized and empowered to enter into a formal contract with the railroad company, in the name and behalf of
the city, covering the above matters.
Adopted and approved October 5, 1909.
City Map
By Alderman Guckenheimer:
Whereas, in and upon a map prepared by John W.
Howard and A. M. Bell, and adopted by the Mayor and
Aldermen of the City of Savannah on May 2, 1900, a certain
lane is delineated on said map as lying between certain property located in Heyward Ward, which said property is
bounded on the north by Gwinnett Street, on the east by
Paulsen Street, on the south by Bolton Street, and on the
west by what was formerly the Bilbo Canal; and
Whereas, the City of Savannah, at the time said map
was adopted held no title to the lane delineated on said map
as extending through the middle of the said tract of land,
and so delineated on the said map aforesaid, and claimed no
title to said lane, and has and holds no title or claim of title
or right of Ingress or egress in and over the said lane so
delineated as a lane; Now, therefore, for the purpose of correcting said error in said map, in manner aforesaid, be it
resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled, That the approval by the Mayor
and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, on May 2, 1900, of
the said map, prepared by Messrs. Howard and Bell, be and
the same is hereby amended, and the said map is hereby
L
584 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
amended so as to eliminate therefrom the delineation of the
said lane, located as aforesaid; and the said Mayor and
Aldermen of the City of Savannah, in Council assembled,
hereby recognize that no lane exists in and through the tract
of land described aforesaid, and so delineated upon the said
map.
Adopted and approved November 3, 1909.
Dr. William F. Brunner
By Alderman Kavanaugh:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That Dr. William F. Brunner, the Health Officer of the City of Savannah, is earnestly
recommended to His Excellency, the Governor of Georgia,
for appointment as a member of the Board of Trustees of
the State Sanitarium, and his appointment is requested by
the members of this Council.
The Clerk of Council is directed to send to the Governor
a copy of this resolution.
Adopted and approved November 3, 1909.
Donations
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled:
That the sums set opposite the names of the institutions
herein mentioned be and they are hereby donated to these
respective institutions, to be used in the payment of city
taxes and assessments, due by them, respectively, that is to
say:
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 585
To the Charity Hospital _______________$ 42.70
To the St. Paul's Colored Methodist Episcopal
Church ______________________ 65.94
To the Orphans' Home of Protestant Episcopal
Church ______________________ 341.00
To the Georgia Infirmary ___________________ 526.03
To the Woman's Home Mission Society ____ 513.62
To the Union Society _________________ 1,600.89
To the Westminster Church _____________ 80.25
To the Epworth Methodist Episcopal Church ___ 26.41
To the Julia McLeod Chapter ____________ 49.65
To the Kate Baldwin Free Kindergartens _____ 64.94
To the Savannah Hospital _ =_____________ 1,947.00
To the Savannah Institution Sisters of Mercy ___ 918.40
To the Woman's Christian Temperance Union__ 392.98
To the Woman's Home Mission Society ______ 181.70
Adopted and approved December 15, 1909.
Condemnation Proceedings
By Aldernvm Entelman:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled:
Whereas, This municipal corporation has been unable,
by contract, to procure the land hereinafter specified, or to
agree with the owner thereof upon the compensation to be
paid; therefore, be it
Resolved, That the necessary and proper steps be taken
by the Mayor of the City of Savannah and the City Attorney
looking to the condemnation, for streets, of the property
herein mentioned, belonging to the estate of the late Randolph Axson, now represented by B. P. Axson and Randolph
Axson, as executors of the will of Randolph Axson.
586________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
The land needed, and to be condemned, is for the opening of Forty-ninth Street Lane (for which 1,600 square feet,
more or less, is needed), Fiftieth Street (for which 3,000
square feet, more or less, is needed), Fiftieth Street Lane
(for which 2,400 square feet, more or less, is needed), Fiftyfirst Street (for which 20,700 square feet, more or less, is
needed), Harmon Street (for which 9,700 square feet, more
or less, is needed), Solomons Park and street around the
same (for which 71,631 square feet, more or less, are needed),
under the plan heretofore adopted by the Council of the City
of Savannah for the improvement of this section of the city,
and the said areas so needed for the lanes, streets, and park
mentioned are parts and parcel of the following property
belonging to the said estate, and situate in the extended
limits of the City of Savannah and County of Chatham,, to
wit: That tract or parcel of land known as lot number
three (3), Barstow subdivision, Canty Ward, bounded on
the north by an unnamed street between the Goerz and
Barstow Tracts or subdivision; on the east by tract or lot
number two (2) ; on the south by an unnamed street between
Barstow and McClusky Tracts or subdivision, and on the
west by tract or lot of land number six (6). Be it further
Resolved, That Jordan F. Brooks, of the City of Savannah, be and he is hereby selected as the assessor to represent this municipal corporation in the said condemnation
proceedings. And the Mayor of the City of Savannah is
hereby directed, with the assistance of the City Attorney,
to give the proper notice to the representatives of the estate,
as required by the statute, and to take all other and further
steps necessary to the completion of the condemnation proceedings herein provided for.
Adopted and approved December 15, 1909.
___ MAYORS ANNUAL REPORT _587
Land for Streets
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the Committee on
City L/ots and Opening Streets be and it is hereby authorized to purchase from Col. A. R. Lawton, as executor and
trustee under the will of the late Gen. A. R. Lawton, certain
portions of the tract of land on the southeast corner of Bull
Street and Estill Avenue, for street purposes, under the
terms set forth in the letter of Colonel Lawton, as executor
and trustee, to the Mayor of the city, dated December 20,
1909, provided the title is satisfactory to the City Attorney.
Adopted and approved December 29, 1909.
Proposition of Messrs. Lattimore and Lattimore
By Committee of the Whole:
Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, in Council assembled, That the proposition of
Messrs. Lattimore & Lattimore, relative to opening streets
through and improving the Rivers & Garmany Tract and the
Culver Tract, as. outlined in their communication to the
Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, of date
December 13, 1909, original of which proposition is hereto
attached and forms part of this resolution, be and the same
is hereby accepted, with the following exceptions and amendments, to wit:
That all of the houses on Sunnyside Tract are to be
removed beyond the limits of the Culver and Sunnyside
Tracts, as shown on the map of that area submitted by the
Messrs. Lattimore;
588 _____MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______ ___
That all grading, drainage, water supply, and street
lines shall be under the supervision and control of the City
Engineer of the City of Savannah, whose opinion in such
matters shall control;
That a formal contract between the parties is to be properly executed before the work contemplated shall commence.
Adopted and approved December 29, 1909.
COMMUNICATIONS AND REPORTS
Granger Tract
The following report from the special committee, and
letter from Mr. Harvey Granger, president Chatham Land
and Improvement Company, was read and referred to Committee of the Whole; meeting March 10, 1909:
To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah:
Gentlemen:The special sub-committee of Council
having under advisement- the proposition of the Chatham
Land and Hotel Company, beg leave to submit the following
report:
They recommend the acceptance by the city of the proposition contained in the attached letter of Mr. Harvey
Granger, president, of date March 3, 1909 (which proposition was the result of numerous conferences between representatives of the Chatham Land and Hotel Compan)' and
this Committee), with the following changes, which said
changes will be acceptable to the said Company, to wit:
First. The city is to do none of the work of curbing
until the Chatham Land and Hotel Company is prepared to
go ahead with its curbing on the same streets.
Second. In the matter of interest, the same is eliminated ; the city to give its notes on the payment basis stated,
without interest.
Third. Provision to be made by the Chatham Land
and Hotel Company for the donation of a suitable site and
the payment to the City of Savannah of $7,000 for the erec-
590 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
tion of a pumping station, at such time as the house drainage
is put over their property.
Respectfully submitted
Abe S. Guckenheimer
Chairman Special Committee.
Mr. Abe S. Guckenheimer
Chairman Special Committee, City
Dear Sir:Having gone over carefully the proposition of the Chatham Land and Hotel Company, as
submitted previously to your special committee, I have
revised same, and herewith submit a proposition which I
trust will appeal to your committee as being extremely fair
and equitable.
If the city will adopt the present plan covering the subdivision of the Chatham Land and Hotel Company as prepared by your City Engineer;
Will open Estill Avenue its full width of 100 feet from
Bull Street to Waters Avenue; lay out double roadways, and
park the center;
Also lay out Forty-seventh Street in the same manner
as Estill Avenue, and curb the center parking;
As also the Crescent in the same manner, curbing the
center parkway.
As well as open up Atlantic Avenue; it is our desire to
make this avenue 200 feet wide with two 25-foot roadways;
A 20-foot cement walk from Estill Avenue to Fortyseventh Street, the site of the proposed new hotel, leaving
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________591
two parkways or grass plats on each side of the 20-foot1
cement walk of 65 feet, the curbing necessary for the parkways in the center of this street to be laid by the city, the
walks to be laid by our Company;
To grade the entire tract, and open up all other streets
in the entire tract:
This Company will deed to the city its entire street holdings, amounting approximately to 443,000 square feet in the
Estill Tract, 1,387,000 square feet in the Goerz and Barstow
Tracts, and about 250,000 square feet excess streets in the
-Granger subdivision, which the city would secure under this
new subdivision as against the old, making in all about
2,080,000 square feet of streets that this Company would
deed to the city, with the understanding, of course, that the
parks and streets as laid out in the old Granger Tract shall
be deeded back to our Company, and our Company in turn
will give the city deed for the new streets and parkways as
laid out by the new subdivision in the Granger Tract, as
well as a deed for all the additional streets as indicated
above.
We would also be willing to deed to the city the necessary lanes through the Estill, Goerz, and Barstow Tracts
that our Company owns, which the city now doesn't own,
amounting to approximately 500,000 square feet, making a
total deed of nearly 2,600,000 square feet of streets and lanes
under this agreement to the city, which at the very lowest
estimate of three cents per square foot, would amount to in
round figures about $78,000.
It is also understood that the city will lay an adequate
storm sewerage system through this property, as indicated
by the City Engineer on one of the Company maps, and
which is sufficient in his judgment to care for this feature
for some time to come, and will also lay water mains
through the property as follows:
M. R. C. S.38
592_______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT__________
Estill Avenue, from the western boundary of the
Granger Tract to the center of Atlantic Street.
Atlantic Street, from the center of Estill Avenue to
Forty-seventh Street.
Estill Avenue from the center of Atlantic Street to the
center of Waters Avenue.
Atlantic Street, from the center of Estill Avenue to the
center of Fortieth Street, at the approximate cost of
$7,835.70, per a letter of the City Engineer to me on this
subject under date of December 30.
The cost to the city of these improvements through
this property will be as follows: About $5,000 for curbing
parks and parkways; about $30,000 for storm sewerage;
about $14,000 for grading the entire tract; about $7,835.70
for water, as indicated above, making a total outlay to the
city of $56,835.70, for which the city will get in return about
$78,000 worth of street rights, as indicated above.
If this meets with your approval, it is understood that
the laying out of Estill Avenue is to begin within sixty days
from the date of acceptance of same, and the entire improvement, from Forty-seventh Street north, is to be completed
within a period of two years, and the improvements south of
Forty-seventh Street, as indicated, are to be completed
within a period of two years thereafter, making four years
for the completion of this work.
If the city will accept this proposition, this Company
will agree to pay all bills submitted by the City Engineer
covering this work, this Company to be reimbursed by city
notes running from two to six years, with interest at six per
cent. In this manner, the city will not be forced to put
actually any cash in this proposition for at least two years.
It will only be a question of the interest accruing on the
necessary amount of money advanced in carrying out this
contract.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 593
You gentlemen can certainly see at a glance the enormous benefit to the city that this improvement will mean,
as it is our purpose to develop this property on a very high
plane, realizing that it is practically the only section where
a high class of development can take place in the present city
limits; and, controlling the avenue which will be the direct
route to your main park in a few years to come, you can
understand that it is desirable that this avenue be laid out
on a beautiful plan, which is our intention if this proposition
is accepted.
It is also our intention to give the citizens of Savannah
an opportunity to help this company to build a first-class
tourist hotel on the site which this Company expects to
donate to a hotel company.
Trusting this will meet with your acceptance, I am,
Yours truly
Harvey Granger, President.
Resignation Alderman Perritt
Savannah, Ga., March 24, 1909.
To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah.
Gentlemen:I beg to submit herewith my resignation
as a member of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Savannah. This action is taken as a result of my prospective
removal from the City of Savannah, and I need not say with
the profoundest regret.
With ever best wishes for the members of the Board
and for the city, I am,
Very respectfully
J. F. PERRITT
Accepted with regret.
1
594 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Tax ClaimCentral of Georgia
Savannah, Ga., March 26, 1909.
To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah.
The committee composed of the Mayor and Finance
Committee, appointed with power to act, report that they
have settled the tax claim of the City of Savannah against
the Central of Georgia Railway Company, involving the taxation of the stock of the Western Railway of Alabama and
certain bonds, for the net sum of $114,133.34, and that this
sum has been paid into the City Treasury.
George W. Tiedeman,
Mayor.
Ratified in Council March 26, 1909.
House Drainage System
A communication from His Honor, the Mayor:
May 12, 1909
To the Board of Aldermen of the City of Savannah:
Gentlemen:I wish to call your attention to the urgent
necessity of the extension and completion of the house drainage system, so as to cover the entire city. My conclusion as
to this necessity is based upon opinions and recommendations of the Health Officer, and my personal observations
of the sanitary conditions as they prevail in sections of the
city not equipped with the system. This work would cost
about $300,000. There are about three ways in which it
could be financed.
______MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________595
First. There could be used $100,000 of the funds
derived from the Central Railroad tax case, and the balance
could probably be arranged with the city's notes extending
over a period of two years, at five per cent, interest.
Second. You can use $100,000 of the tax fund, sell at a
discount the ground rent contracts of $101,613.98 due the
city, and which earn $6,200 per annum, or over six per cent,
per annum, and finance the balance for one and two years,
at five per cent, per annum.
Third. You can issue $300,000 of four per cent, bonds
at par, extending fifty years, and, under a sinking fund, pay
them off by date of maturity.
I suggest that the back tax fund of $114,000 should be
spent in repairing and improving such properties and departments belonging to the city that may need it; under that
may be included water mains, good sidewalks, improvement
of Bonaventure Cemetery, additions and improvements, if
actually necessary, to the Fire and Police Departments,
improvement of Massie School, and such other expenditures
along these lines as you, in your judgment, may deem
proper.
Therefore, I am opposed to the use of the fund as outlined in plans one and two.
Another objection -to the first plan is the assumption of
an obligation to pay, out of the annual receipts of the city,
$100,000 per year, and to that extent curtail varied improvements for those years.
The second plan is objectionable because it contemplates the use of $200,000 that should be expended in needed
improvements of varied character, and in addition the sale or
discontinuing of the ground rent balance due the city. In
my judgment, to discount these ground rents for the purpose of raising money for any purpose, except a calamity, is
596________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT __
very unwise financing, for they are gilt-edged securities, and
I would oppose selling such a security at 25 to 30 per cent,
discount in order to raise money, when the money can be
obtained at four per cent.
In my judgment, the third plan is the most practical,
for the nature of the work is such that its payment should
be extended over a long period, so that posterity may pay its
share of it. A sinking fund of $3,000 per annum, beginning
after the first year 'of the date of the bond, and increasing
$120 per annum, would practically liquidate the issue in fifty
years, and the annual appropriation for interest and sinking
fund would not increase, as the interest saving of $120 on the
$3,000 of bonds retired would provide the $120 increase in
the sinking fund appropriation. The cost per annum of the
bond issue would be $12,000 interest and $3,000 sinking fund,
or $15,000 per annum, including the gradual liquidation of
the debt, so that it would be practically paid by the end of
the period.
With this amount of $15,000, the interest and sinking
fund obligation of the city will not be as great as they were
in 1908 and prior to that time.
The last issue of bonds reduced the interest charge of
the city $18,765 per annum, which is $3,765 more than the
annual appropriation necessary to pay the interest and sinking fund on the proposed $300,000 issue.
It would not be practical to use a sinking fund accretion
of $120 annually, as the increase is too small to be used in
the purchase of a bond, but the bond could provide that the
sinking fund be arranged to equal an increase in its amount
of $120 per annum.
Based upon the value of property as assessed for taxation, the city may legally have bonds outstanding to the
amount of $3,371,620, and, as the total amount now out-
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT______ 597
standing is $2,716,650, there can be legally issued an additional amount up to about $650,000.
Respectfully submitted
GEORGE W. TIEDEMAN
Mayor
Received as information meeting May 19, 1909.
Report of the Police Committee on Industrial Farm
The Superintendent of Industrial Farm shall take and
subscribe an oath to faithfully, honestly, and humanely discharge the duties of his position, and shall give a bond, with
good security, for such performance, in the sum of $500.
The Superintendent shall have control of the guards, the
public property, and the prisoners at said farm. He may in
cases of emergency employ and discharge guards, subject to
the approval of the County Commissioners.
He shall safely keep the prisoners committed to the
farm, rigidly enforce discipline, and, when necessary, inflict
corporal punishment, which in no case shall be unreasonable.
Punishment with a strap shall only be used as a last resort,
when all other milder means have proven ineffectual.
He shall keep a record, in which shall be recorded the
punishment inflicted upon each prisoner, with the name,
date, and character of the punishment, and shall make a
report thereof, under oath, twice a week, with the daily
reports, to the County Commissioners.
He shall require the performance of good and faithful
labor during work hours. He shall daily inspect the food
and clothing, and see that the food is wholesome and properly prepared and served, and that the clothing is clean and
in good order.
598 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
He shall keep a diet record, in which shall be recorded
the number of prisoners at the farm each day, with the
amount and variety of food furnished, which record he shall
exhibit to the County Commissioners monthly and at such
other times as he may be called upon to do so.
He shall keep a permanent record of all prisoners
received, give name, color, age, crime, term of sentence, date
of reception, date of discharge, death, escape, and recapture,
and shall send a copy of such record to the County Commissioners on the first day of each month for the month next
preceding. On the reception, discharge, death, escape, or
recapture of the prisoner, he shall immediately make out and
forward to the County Commissioners a complete description of the prisoner.
In connection with the County Physician, he shall carefully inspect and rigidly enforce sanitary regulations in and
about the farm, and permit nothing of a filthy or dirty nature
to exist in or about the premises.
He shall keep the buildings and their surroundings clean
and in wholesome condition, and shall see that bedding and
clothes of the prisoners are kept as clean as practicable.
The bedding shall be sunned at least twice a week.
Each prisoner shall be required to bathe his or her entire
person twice each week, and to bathe his or her hands and
face before each meal.
He shall require each prisoner to wear a regulation uniform; to sleep within the buildings; to be respectful to
officers, guards, and to each other. A guard shall not be
permitted to strike a prisoner except to prevent escape, or in
his own defense, or in the defense of another. In no case
shall any guard be permitted to curse a prisoner.
He shall use his best efforts to build up and maintain a
high state of morals at the farm, and shall not permit the
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________599
drinking of intoxicating liquors, gambling, swearing, or foul
language or blackguarding, by himself, the guards, or the
prisoners.
He shall require attendance and good order at all
religious services which may be held at the farm.
He shall not permit relatives, or other visitors, to talk
with the prisoners, except on the Sabbath, and then only
upon written order of the County Commissioners.
He shall not permit any mail or other written communication to be delivered to any prisoner, unless it is addressed
in an envelope to the Superintendent, who shall read the
same before delivering it. Should such communication be
found to contain matter objectionable or subversive of discipline it shall not be delivered to the prisoner, but shall be
returned to the writer. No letters written by the prisoners
shall" be mailed, or delivered, until they shall have been read
by the Superintendent, unless they are addressed to the
County Commissioners. All letters addressed to the County
Commissioners, no matter what their contents, shall be
delivered to the County Commissioners.
In all cases of sudden death, by violence, accident, or
otherwise, he shall cause an inquest to be held, and immediately forward to the County Commissioners a certified copy
of the evidence and verdict of the jury.
When a prisoner is pronounced sick by the County
Physician, his name shall be placed on the hospital record.
No sick prisoner shall be kept in the sleeping quarters with
well prisoners. When a prisoner is found to be permanently
impaired or diseased so as to incapacitate him or her for
labor, the facts shall be certified to the County Commissioners.
600________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
He shall frame in glass, and hang up in a conspicuous
place in the buildings and about the grounds, a copy of these
rules.
Respectfully submitted
G. A. GORDON
Chairman Police Committee
Received as information May 19. 1909.
Issue of BondsReport of Committee
Honorable Mayor and Aldermen, City:
The Finance Committee beg to make the following
recommendations relative to the proposed bond issue: That
the election be held on June 29, proximo, and the amount
of bonds to be issued placed at $350,000, in denominations
of $500 each, 4 per cent, coupons payable semi-annually, and
to be retired as set forth in the resolution of the Committee
of the Whole.
That they also recommend, the Finance Committee be
authorized to negotiate for the printing of bonds, provided
the election is favorable, and the sale of same to be left in/
the hands of the Mayor and Finance Committee.
Respectfully
W. F. McCAULEY
Chairman Committee on Finance
Received as information May 26, 1909.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 601
Cost of Sewerage System
Savannah, Ga., May 25, 1909
Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah:
Gentlemen:The Streets and Lanes Committee beg
leave to report that they have investigated the matter of cost
of extending and completing the sewerage system of the city,
and find that the work contemplated will cost approximately
$350,000.
Respectfully submitted
ABE S. GUCKENHEIMER
Chairman Streets and Lanes Committee
Received as information May 26, 1909.
Acknowledgment
Savannah, Ga., May 31, 1909.
Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah:
Gentlemen:I take this opportunity of writing to
express my heartfelt appreciation of the prompt and considerate action taken by you on the occasion of the recent
death of my husband. The resolutions of your honorable
body which were forwarded to me shall be retained as a
cherished possession. It is a great comfort in the hour of
bereavement to receive such assurances, and it is superfluous
for me to say that I appreciate them profoundly.
Very sincerely.
VIRGINIA G. MYERS
Received as information June 2, 1909.
602 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Savannah Electric Company
The Special Committee appointed to confer with representatives of the Savannah Electric Company relative to
street car transfers, begs leave to report that the following
transfer conditions have been agreed to with the Savannah
Electric Company:
Transfer Conditions
First. Transfers are to be issued as early as practicable
after being asked for. The passenger shall be privileged to
surrender a transfer before leaving a car at the point named
on said transfer, and receive in exchange a transfer for some
other connecting point embraced in this agreement.
Second. Transfers are to be issued at any intersecting
point, good at that point only for use on connecting car to
destination.
Third, (a). Transfers will be issued on transfers from
Liberty Street cars to or from any line except between
parallel lines, running within two blocks of each other.
. (b). Transfers will be issued on transfers from E. and
W. Belt Line cars to and from Indian Street, Mill Haven,
or West End cars, such transfers however not to be issued
for use from Duffy Street intersections north.
(c). Transfers will.be issued on transfers from E. and
W. Belt Line cars to enable patrons to travel between Daffin
Park section and that part of the city south of Duffy Street.
(d). No transfers will be issued between parallel lines
. anning within two blocks of each other.
Fourth. Mill Haven patrons will be allowed to use, at
Louisville Road and Railroad Streets, transfers punched
for Margaret and West Broad Streets, if within the time
limit.
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 603
Fifth. Transfers will be good on any car from intersection and in direction punched, when used within the time
limit.
Sixth. Conductors who run out of and are unable to
secure transfers will not collect fare from those needing
transfers.
Seventh. Transfers will not be issued from one car to
another running over the same track and in the same direction.
Eighth. Transfers will not be good for passage on
issuing lines.
GEORGE W. TIEDEMAN
Chairman Special Committee.
Adopted and approved June 16, 1909.
Report of CommitteeFiremen and Policemen Riding on
Street Cars Without Paying
June 29, 1909
The committee to which was committed the duty of conferring with the Savannah Electric Company relative to
firemen and policemen riding on the cars without paying for
the privilege, beg to report as follows:
First. It was discovered that the Railroad Commission
had declined to authorize the street railway companies to
carry any class of city employees without charge.
Second. It was learned that, in Augusta and Atlanta,
city employees were carried by the street railway companies
under a contract whereby the city made a cash payment, or
the equivalent thereof, for the service rendered by the street
railway company.
604 MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Third. Your committee conferred with the officials of
the Savannah Electric Company, who suggested that the
city pay $1,200 per annum for this service.
Fourth. Your committee took the position that the
amount demanded by the Savannah Electric Company was
excessive, and the officials of the Company then sent a communication from their attorney stating that in their opinion
it would be illegal for the Savannah Electric Company to
enter into a contract with the city to carry city employees at
any reduction from the regular tariff rates. This, in spite of
the ruling of the Railroad Commission on this point.
Fifth. Your committee stated to the officials of the
Savannah Electric Company that the danger of litigation
was remote, in view of the fact that the decision of the Railroad Commission would probably be accepted as final without any further test as to the legality of the contract, and
suggested that the city pay $400 for the service rendered;
and later suggested that the city pay $600 for the service
rendered.
Sixth. The Savannah Electric Railway made a check
of the amounts being actually received at present from the
riding of the policemen and firemen, and estimated this
amount at $800 to $1,000 per annum. The officials refused
to accept the view that $600 would be fair compensation for
the service rendered, but suggested that the entire matter be
deferred until the city lighting contract came 'up for consideration, stating that, at that time, they would probably be
prepared to offer the city a better proposition with regard
to the riding of policemen and firemen, than they were at
present able to offer.
Seventh. Your committee feel that they have done all
in their power to secure permission for policemen and firemen to ride at reduced rates, and, in view of the facts above
stated, and the further fact that a bill has been introduced
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 605
in the Legislature requiring street railway companies to
carry policemen and firemen free of charge, we suggest that
the committee be discharged, and the matter left in abeyance
until the outcome of the pending bill is determined.
Very respectfully
G. A. GORDON
Chairman
Adopted June 30, 1909.
Proposition of Atlantic Coast Line Railway Company
The following communication from Mr. J. R. Kenly,
third vice-president of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
Company, was read:
Savannah, Ga., October 5, 1909
Hon. George W. Tiedeman, Mayor, Savannah, Ga.
My Dear Sir:Referring to our recent correspondence
and conference with regard to the opening of certain streets
across the tracks of our railroad in the City of Savannah.
The matter has had our careful consideration, and I
respectfully submit for your consideration the following
proposition, which I believe to be reasonable and fair alike
to the railroad company and to the city:
The following streets to be opened at grade:
Waldburg, East Broad, Price, Lincoln.
The railroad company to remove at its own cost its coal
chute, which now occupies a portion of the land which will
be needed to open Waldburg Street. A subway to be constructed for the passage of Henry Street under the railroad
606________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
tracks, the cost of this construction to be borne equally by
the railroad company and the city. All of these improvements to be commenced not later than January 1, 1910, and
to be completed within six months thereafter.
A subway or elevated bridge to be constructed for the
passage of Habersham Street, either above or beneath the
railroad tracks, as may be determined after a careful survey
of the location. The cost of this construction also to be
borne equally between the railroad company and the City of
Savannah. This improvement is not to be started later than
January 1, 1911, and to be completed within six months
thereafter.
Yours very truly
J. R. KENLY
Third Vice-President
Milk Ordinance
The following communication from the Georgia Medical
Society was read:
Savannah, Ga., October 6, 1909
To the Honorable Mayor and Council, Savannah, Ga.
Sirs:At a special meeting of the Georgia Medical
Society, held last evening, the following resolutions were
adopted: We, the Georgia Medical Society, having read and
carefully considered the ordinance "to provide regulations
touching the keeping of cows, stables for cows, dairies, milk,
and the sale of milk, to provide for the election, of an Inspector of Milk, and for other purposes designed to secure purity
in the milk consumed in the City of Savannah," do herewith
express our approval of the same, and urge that the ordi-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 607
nance as passed by Council, and the regulations as presented
by the Health Officer and Sanitary Board, be ratified by
Council without modification, and we especially commend
that part of the regulations which prohibits the housing of
cows within fifty feet of any building used as a residence, a
water closet, or a privy vault.
That the president be authorized to appoint a committee of as many members as he thinks best, of which he shall
be chairman, to present these resolutions to Council, and
express the society's views.
The committee is composed of Dr. Thomas J. Charlton,
chairman; Drs. H. H. Martin, Ralston Lattimore, H. H.
McGhee, and George R. White.
Yours very truly
THOMAS J. CHARLTON, President
J. M. SIGMAN, Secretary
Received as information October 6, 1909.
Commissioners of Pilotage
The following communication from the Commissioners
of Pilotage was read, and same was approved by Council,
meeting October 20, 1909:
Savannah, Ga., October 7, 1909
''To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah.
"Gentlemen:At a meeting of the Commissioners of
P: lotage, held this day, it was unanimously decided to
change rule 8 by striking out the words 'for over ten days,'
which appear in the first sentence thereof, thus making,
amended rule read:
M. B. c. s.SB
608________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
"Hereafter when any pilot is absent from duty, his place
shall be supplied by an apprentice appointed for that purpose
by this board until return to ditty of said pilot. The apprentice acting for said absentee shall be paid the same as an
18-foot pilot"
A resolution was also passed adding Rule 30 to those
already in force. This rule reads as follows:
"To enable the pilots to comply with rule 8, as changed
this day, it is ordered that at least one past apprentice be
kept on duty or within call at all times to fill vacancies and
maintain the quota of active pilots on duty."
I am instructed to request that you sanction the change
in rule 8, and the addition of rule 30 to existing rules.
Respectfully
J. C. HARRIS
Secretary Commissioners of Pilotage
Approved October 20, 1909.
City Lighting
Alderman Guckenheimer. chairman ol the Streets and
Lanes Committee, made the following report on the city
lighting contract:
Bids had been opened by Committee on Streets and
Lanes, in accordance with previous advertisement, November 8. 1909.
He also verbally stated that decision of the Committee
as to the conclusion on the details had just been finally
reached in the meeting of the Committee of the Whole pre-
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 609
viously held. He explained the inability to prepare a complete written report at the meeting, but assured Council that
a detailed report would be made at next meeting.
Upon motion of Alderman Gordon, the Mayor and the
chairman of the Streets and Lanes Committee were authorized to have prepared contract embodying features suggested
by Alderman Guckenheimer, and the Mayor was empowered
to execute such contract.
Adopted November 17, 1909.
Park and Tree Commission
The following communication from His Honor the
Mayor was read:
Savannah, Ga., December 6, 1909
To the Honorable Board of Aldermen of the City of
Savannah:
Gentlemen:I have the honor to report that I have
appointed Mr. T. H. McMillan a member of the Park and
Tree Commission of the City of Savannah, vice Mr. George
J. Baldwin, resigned. The appointment is for the unexpired
term of Mr. Baldwin. I ask your approval of the appointment.
Very respectfully
GEORGE W. TIEDEMAN
Mayor
Action of the Mayor confirmed December 15, 1909.
610________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT________
Commissioners of Pilotage
The following communication from the Commissioners
of Pilotage was read and referred to Committee of the
Whole December 15, 1909:
December 14, 1909
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen, City of Savannah:
Gentlemen:At a meeting of the Board of Pilot Commissioners, held yesterday afternoon, it was determined to
change Rules 24 and 25, and I was instructed to ask the sanction of your honorable body to these changes. For your
guidance, I enclose a book of rules, showing Rules 24 and
25 as in force as present, and also a memorandum of the
amended rules to which your approval is asked.
Respectfully
(Signed) J. C. HARRIS
Secretary Commissioners of Pilotage
Amended Rule No/ 24
Notice shall be given by all the pilots, to this Board, of
apprentices bound to them to learn the business of a pilot.
No apprentice shall receive a certificate until he has served
three years as an apprentice to the business, as provided for
in Rule No. 25, and has reached the age of 21. If satisfactory evidence of character and competency for the duty of
taking vessels safely from sea to the city and from city to
the sea is then produced, such applicant shall be entitled to
a certificate for eighteen feet.
Amended Rule No. 25
Each pilot apprentice, after the completion of two years
of service on pilot boat at the bar and mouth of the river,
shall accompany the pilots on their trips to and from sea for
MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT 611
a further period of one year, that they may become familiar
with the channel and the handling of vessels. To this end,
it shall be the duty of the pilot in charge of the boats stationed off the bar to have an apprentice accompany pilot
who takes a vessel to Savannah as often as it is practicable,
and it shall be the duty of such pilots to instruct the apprentice in their charge in the art of pilotage. The apprentice,
on arrival at the city, shall report to the secretary of the
Pilots' Association, and the secretary shall send the apprentice back to the pilot boat on duty at the bar in charge of a
pilot on the first outgoing vessel. It shall be the duty of
the secretary of the Pilots' Association to keep a record of
the number of trips made by the several apprentices, and to
report same monthly to the Board of Pilot Commissioners.
Improvement Rivers & Garmany and Culver Tracts
Letter from Messrs. Lattimore & Lattimore, read in
Council December 29, 1909.
December 13, 1909
To the Honorable, the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Savannah, Ga.:
Gentlemen :Referring to the negotiations between the
city and Messrs. Lattimore relative to opening streets
through and improving the Rivers & Garmany Tract and the
Culver Tract, I beg to advise that having acquired control of
these properties Messrs. Lattimore are now in position to
conclude the agreement Detween the city and themselves, as
follows:
In consideration of the agreements and undertakings of
the city, as hereinafter set out, Messrs. Lattimore are to
remove from the Rivers & Garmany Tract the negro tenements known as "Sunnyside." The houses obstructing the
612_______ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________
opening of the proposed streets and lanes and the progress
of the city's work, hereinafter detailed, to be promptly
removed upon demand of the city, and the balance of the
houses to be moved away by Messrs. Lattimore within three
years of January 1, 1910.
Messrs. Lattimore are to convey to the city
1. All of the land on the east side of Bull Street necessary to widen that thoroughfare as it at present exists, from
the northern line of the Rivers & Garmany Tract south
through the .Rivers & Garmany Tract and Culver Tract to
the city limits at Fifty-second Street, a uniform width of
seventy-five feet. We estimate the land necessary for this
purpose at 91,520 square feet.
2. The land necessary to open Forty-fifth Street, 60
feet; Forty-sixth Street, 60 feet; Forty-seventh StreA, 100
feet; Forty-eighth Street, 60 feet; Forty-ninth Street, 60
feet; Fiftieth Street, 60 feet; Fifty-first Street, 60 feet, and
Fifty-second Street 60 feet, from the east side of Bull Street
to the eastern limit of the Rivers & Garmany Tract and the
Culver Tract, these distances being about 1,400 feet. We
estimate the land necessary for this purpose at 642,760 square
feet.
3. The land necessary to open Abercorn Street from
the southern boundary line between the Lawton and Rivers
& Garmany Tracts, south through the Rivers & Garmany
Tract and through the Culver Tract to Fifty-second Street,
a uniform width of 75 feet. We estimate the land necessary
for this purpose at 172,220 square feet.
4. The land necessary to open lanes through these
tracts, as delineated on a plat prepared by Percy Sugden,
City Engineer, which has, been submitted to the city. We
estimate this land at 195,520 square feet.
__________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT ________ 613
5. The land necessary to open the park streets, as
delineated on the plat submitted, which we estimate at
58,440 square feet.
6. Five tracts, each containing about one acre, and
being about 200 feet by 226 feet, and called upon the plat
submitted "Entelman Park," "Barrow Park," "Lattimore
Park," "Vetsbttrg Park," and "Battey Park," for park
purposes, as delineated upon the submitted plat; these
parks containing an area of about 220,000 square feet.
Reference is had to the submitted plat, prepared by
Percy Sugden, C. E., showing the extension of streets
through the Rivers & Garmany and Culver Tracts, showing the park locations, and plans of streets and lanes.
In consideration of the removal of the negro tenement
houses from the Rivers & Garmany Tracts, and the conveyance to the city, in fee simple, of the streets, lanes, and parks, .
the city is to
1. Adopt by proper ordinance the extension of the
city's streets, with lanes and parks, in accordance with the
plans submitted by Messrs. Lattimore, through the Rivers
& Garmany Tract and the Culver Tract south to the city
limits.
2. Grade all streets and lanes through said tracts, in
accordance with the plans submitted, and curb with granite
curbing the parks and the parkway through the center of
Forty-seventh Street. The work called for under this
section shall be commenced during January, 1910, and shall
be completed by July 1, 1911.
3. Without unnecessary delay, purchase or otherwise
acquire from the estate of Lawton, or its proper owners,
such portion of the Lawton property as is located south of
the northern line of Forty-fourth Street, extended east from
Bull Street, to the eastern limit of the Lawton property, as
614________ MAYOR'S ANNUAL, REPORT__________
shown on the submitted map; open and grade this street,
and convey to Messrs. Lattimore, in fee simple, for the same
consideration paid therefor by the city, the southern strip of
the Lawton land south of the southern line of Forty-fourth
Street extended: this strip varying in width from about ten
feet at its Bull Street extremity to about twenty feet at its
eastern extremity. And also purchase or otherwise acquire
from the estate of Lawton, or its proper owners, the land
necessary to open Abercorn Street from Estill Avenue to the
northern line of the Rivers & Garmany Tract, a uniform
width of seventy-five feet, and open and grade this street.
4. Extend the city's water mains and house drainage
through the tracts, so as to promptly furnish necessary and
.adequate water service, drainage, and sewerage, as may be
required; it being understood that until such time as regular
separate sewerage is extended through said tracts the house
and surface drainage system will be adequate for and will
take care of the sewerage. The work called for under this
section shall be commenced during the month of January.
1910. and shall be completed on or before the first day of
July. 1911.
5. Co-operate with us for the purpose of effecting the
prompt removal of the right-of-way of the Savannah Electric
Company, as at present located, to Forty-fourth Street;
I thence south on Abercorn Street to Forty-ninth Street:
thence through Forty-ninth Street; or, if preferable to the
' street railway company, to continue south on Abercorn
Street to the southern limit of the property at Fifty-second
Street, and from thence east through Fifty-second Street;
the city to grant the railway company a franchise to lay its
said tracks through the streets designated; the city to incur
no expense in connection with the removal of said ra:lway
tracks as at present located to the streets as above indicated.
6. Messrs. Lattimore to finance the city's expenditures
fnr said improvements through the Rivers & Garmany and
__________MAYOR'S ANNUAL REPORT_________615
the Culver Tracts, in accordance with the terms of this proposal, by taking the city's notes as the work progresses;
these notes to mature two, three, four, and five years after
date, as follows: One-fourth of the amount two years from
the respective dates of the notes; one-fourth of the amount
three years from the respective dates of the notes; onefourth of the amount four years from the respective dates of
the notes; and the balance, one-fourth of the amount, five
years from the respective dates of the notes.
The notes herein referred to are to cover the city's
expenditures for grading, curbing, water mains, house and
surface drainage through the tract, necessary and adequate
for house and surface drainage and sewerage, which is to be
installed by the city, and which is to be used until the
installation of the city's separate house sewerage system.
The notes provided for are to bear interest from their respective dates to their respective maturities at the rate of 2/l 2 per
centum per annum.
This embodies our proposition of September 28, with
the amendment dated October 6, which was submitted to the
Committee of the Whole at its meeting Wednesday, October
6, and which met the approval of Council as per your favor
of October 9.
Please give this matter proper direction, that the proposals may be properly concluded.
Very respectfully
LATTIMORE & LATTIMORE

Locations