Competency-based development guide: creating a world-class workforce Georgia state government [Jan. 2012]

Competency-Based Development Guide

Creating a World-Class Workforce Georgia State Government

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Table of Contents
How to Use This Guide .....................................................................................................................3
Overview of Development Planning ..................................................................................................4
Individual Development Plan (IDP) Sample Worksheet.....................................................................7
External Training...............................................................................................................................9
Development Activities & Resources
Statewide Core Competencies Customer Service ....................................................................................................10 Teamwork & Cooperation ........................................................................................12 Results Orientation .................................................................................................14 Accountability ..........................................................................................................16 Judgment & Decision Making ..................................................................................18
Leadership Competencies Talent Management.................................................................................................21 Transformers of Government ...................................................................................25
Other State Competencies Communication ........................................................................................................ 29 Conflict Management...............................................................................................34 Creativity & Innovation .............................................................................................36 Cultural Awareness..................................................................................................38 Flexibility .................................................................................................................. 40 Initiative ...................................................................................................................42 Negotiation & Influence............................................................................................44 Professional Development .......................................................................................46 Project Management................................................................................................49 Teaching Others ......................................................................................................51 Team Leadership.....................................................................................................53
Individual Development Plan (IDP) Blank Worksheet......................................................................55

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How to Use This Guide

This Development Guide has been designed specifically to engage state employees in learning activities geared towards achieving established goals and improving performance of state competencies. The Development Guide contains suggested activities that will help employees and managers develop any of the 18 competencies contained in the state's competency framework.

Statewide Core and Leadership Competencies

Core Competencies

Leadership Competencies

Customer Service

Accountability

Talent Management

Teamwork and Cooperation Judgment and

Results Orientation

Decision Making

Transformers of Government

Additional Behavioral Competencies

Communication

Flexibility

Project Management

Conflict Management

Initiative

Teaching Others

Creativity and Innovation Negotiation and Influence Team Leadership

Cultural Awareness

Professional Development

The activities in this guide can be used for a variety of reasons. Typically, they are used to develop competencies that are needed in the current job by establishing an Individual Development Plan (IDP) aimed at addressing the competencies that have been targeted for the employee. However, the activities may also be used to develop competencies that are needed in a future job, or to build upon competencies that are required to fulfill an organizational need. The guide can be used as a tool by both employees and managers for professional development.
Although the guide contains suggestions for on and off-the-job activities, it should not be viewed as a complete listing of every possible activity that can develop skills in a particular area. The activities can be modified to suit learning needs, and they may also serve to stimulate ideas about additional activities. The guide also contains a listing of books employees could consider to aid in the development process.

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An Overview of Development Planning
Development planning typically involves creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP). An IDP is a uniquely tailored action plan that contains developmental activities aimed at enhancing proficiency in specific competencies to meet established goals. The manager and the employee have a joint responsibility for developing and implementing the IDP. The role of the manager is to ensure that the employee has the support and the resources needed for successful development. Below is a 6-step development process.
Six-Step Development Process

1

Gather Feedback

2 Select Areas of Focus

3 Select Activities

4 Develop the Plan

5 Implement the Plan
6 Assess Progress

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Step 1: Gather Feedback Before creating a development plan, you need to gather feedback to determine what you are doing well and where you might need to focus development. You can conduct an assessment of your current competency levels to determine where opportunities for growth may exist through a selfassessment or an assessment conducted with the participation of managers, peers, customers, or any combination of these people. The results of customer surveys, as well as direct feedback from your manager, customers and/or peers can also provide valuable information about specific strengths and development needs.
Step 2: Select Areas of Focus Once you have identified the various opportunities for development, you need to identify the one or two competencies where development will provide the most benefit. It is important to remember that not all competency issues can be effectively addressed through training and development. Factors such as the lack of motivation, resources, or opportunity to demonstrate a competency can impact a person's assessment rating or feedback in a particular area.
Step 3: Select Activities Selecting the right activities to include in the IDP is essential for successful development. Developmental activities may include on-the-job training, classroom training, or self-managed learning, such as, reading, e-learning, and off-the-job activities. A variety of development activities should be included.
When selecting developmental activities, the manager and employee should consider the availability of resources in the organization. Some activities such as attending a training session or joining a professional organization may involve both time and money. Whereas, on-the-job activities such as delivering a presentation or facilitating a focus group session may involve fewer resources and be just as effective.
Learning styles should also be considered when selecting activities. Some people learn best by observing, some learn by doing, others learn by listening, reading, or by engaging in a combination of these learning styles. Choose the approach that works best for you.

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Step 4: Develop the Plan IDP's are typically developed once a year. Most managers include discussions of the IDP as part of the annual performance evaluation process, although it does not have to be done at that time. The IDP should include the specific areas to be developed, desired outcomes, developmental activities, and realistic timeframes for completing the activities.

The IDP should include the learning goals or specific performance outcomes to be achieved. The goals should be written in measurable terms, and the employee and manager should have a clear idea about what successful achievement of goals looks like. It is also very important to identify how progress towards achieving the goals will be measured.

Keep in mind that the IDP should be viewed as a living document and reviewed periodically to ensure that the activities continue to support established goals.

Step 5: Implement the Plan To ensure that development takes place, the employee and manager should establish a system for tracking and measuring progress towards the goals created. This includes identifying how to measure progress, who will measure progress, and how often progress should be measured. When evaluating progress, it is helpful to seek feedback from others about any changes in performance. This will determine if modifications to the development process are needed.

Step 6: Assess Progress After the employee and manager have completed the IDP and the employee has engaged in several developmental activities, the employee and manager should assess progress toward the development goal. Based on the results of this assessment, the IDP may need to be adjusted accordingly.

Keys to Successful Development Ask for feedback. Make the most of individual strengths. Set reasonable goals. Identify a learning partner. Be willing to take risks. Keep the plan visible and current. Ensure continued and specific development activities take place.
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Individual Development Plan Worksheet (Sample)

Name Jane Doe

Title

Date 7/15/20XX

Development is a partnership between the agency, the employee, and the manager. One of the key steps of development is to establish a development plan. There are three components to consider when creating this plan:

Development in current role Expand skill set and knowledge areas Prepare for future roles
Considering the three components, complete the sections below. After the development plan is completed, meet with your manager to review the plan.

Strengths Strengths can be based on your current job performance or your career aspirations.
1. Customer Service Strong focus on meeting the needs of internal customers 2. Teamwork and Cooperation Open to input from others and considers others' opinions before
moving forward 3. Results Orientation Very focused on achieving agreed upon results 4. 5.

Development Needs Development needs can be based on your current job performance or your career aspirations.
1. Presentation Skills 2. Influence Skills 3. I am moving into a more cross functional role where I won't have authority over others. I need to
be able to influence others to see my perspective and accept my recommendations for moving forward. 4.

Development Focus Select two or three areas from the lists above to focus on for the current year.
1. Presentation skills 2. Influence skills 3.

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Individual Development Plan Worksheet (Sample)

Employee Development Plan: Identify and list activities that will support the identified focus areas

On-The-Job Learning
Before next presentation, practice in front of mgr. Incorporate feedback.
Conduct a stakeholder's analysis at beginning of next project
Classes / Workshops / Conferences Join Toastmasters. Participate in at least 5 sessions this year.

Use a wide variety of development approaches

Timeframe Completed Self-Directed Learning (Books, Articles, Job

Shadowing, etc.)

By

Read Presentation Skills

12/20XX

201. Summarize key

(mid-yr)

points and share with

team.

By

Read Influence Without

12/20XX

Authority. Summarize

(mid-yr)

key points and share with

team.

Timeframe Completed Professional/Community Activities

By 6/20XX

(year end)

Timeframe
By 12/20XX (mid-yr) By 6/20XX (year end)
Timeframe

Completed CompletedTimefram

Mentoring
Ask XXX, who is a master presenter, if I can observe her next presentation.

TeimfraemfraemCeomCpolemtepdleted Assessments

By 12/20XX (mid-yr)

Take the DiSC profile to get a better understanding of my own communication style.

Timeframe Completed
By 6/20XX (year end)

Formal Education

Timeframe Completed Other

Timeframe Completed

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External Training
In addition to the on-the-job development activities and books that are provided for each individual competency below, external training opportunities may be available to help if skill development is the issue. The vendors/organizations listed below offer a variety of training and development programs that may address your particular development need.
American Management Association www.amanet.org/training/ama-seminars.aspx
Emory University Professional Learning Programs http://ece.emory.edu/programs.htm
Franklin-Covey www.franklincovey.com
Fred Pryor Seminars http://www.fredpryor.com
The Leaders' Institute http://www.leadersinstitute.com/
The University of Georgia Continuing Education Center http://www.georgiacenter.uga.edu/ppd

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Customer Service
Definition: Understands that all State employees have external and/or internal customers that they provide services and information to; honors all of the State's commitments to customers by providing helpful, courteous, accessible, responsive, and knowledgeable service.
Suggested Activities for Development
Ask your manager about an especially difficult or complicated client problem. Ask to work with her or him in resolving the issue. Conduct interviews with customers to determine their needs and satisfaction with current services. Contact organizations that pride themselves on service or contact your competitors. Visit them as a customer and observe the customer contact person providing service. Evaluate the contact person's knowledge, interactive style, ability to meet customer needs, and follow-up. Create a board for employees to write down the `the most asked about' or `most frequent issue' facing (internal or external) customers. For a group activity, brainstorm for creative solutions. Develop a FAQ and post for information. Examine everything you do against this criteria: "Does this contribute to meeting customer needs?" Or "what value does this add to the customer?" Hold a department meeting to focus on top issues that impact your customers. Help the team come up with ways to focus on the top three things that will make the biggest impact/difference. Develop a plan to accomplish those three things. Keep a log of customer problems. Track whether they have been resolved and how they have been resolved. Review the log once a week to see if there are any unresolved problems. Devise a strategy to solve these problems. Keep track of how long it takes to solve customers' problems. Work to decrease the time. Keep a log that demonstrates improvements in response time. Learn terms that are unique to your customers. Keep a log of terms. List customers (internal and external) with whom you have had negative encounters. Review any patterns. Note situations, types of people, etc., that are difficult to handle. List the requirements you believe your customers have. Then ask your customers what their requirements are. Note the differences. Listen to the questions new employees ask about your work processes, services, etc. These may be clues to improvement opportunities. Make a flow chart to show how team issues affect customers. Take the lead in working with your team to help solve internal issues. Spend the day with a manager or director who is recognized for having great customer service. Observe and model her or his behavior.

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Books
Exceptional Service, Exceptional Profit: The Secrets of Building a Five-Star Customer Service Organization by Leonardo Inghilleri, Micah Solomon, Horst Schulze (AMACOM, 2010). Learn the Loyalty-Building Secrets of Distinguished--and Exceptionally Successful--Service Companies. A must-read guide on how to apply five-star service techniques to every industry and every price point. This book will guide managers and anyone interested in transforming their interactions with clients. Leonardo Inghilleri and Micah Solomon cover considerable ground--from the finer details of greeting customers or giving directions to larger strategies for training employees or maintaining customers' trust online.
Getting Naked: A Business Fable About Shedding The Three Fears That Sabotage Client Loyalty (J-B Lencioni Series) by Patrick Lencioni (Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated, 2010). Getting Naked tells the remarkable story of a management consultant who is trying desperately to merge two firms with very different approaches to serving clients. One relies on vulnerability and complete transparency; the other focuses on proving its competence and protecting its reputation for intellectual prowess. In the process of managing the merger, the consultant is forced to learn lifechanging lessons that prove to be as relevant as they are painful. As he does in his other books, Lencioni provides readers with concepts that are accessible and compelling. Here, he explains the three fears that provoke service providers--whether they are internal consultants, sales people, financial advisors, or anyone else serving long-term clients--to unknowingly sabotage their ability to build trust and loyalty. And, as always, Lencioni provides a practical approach for overcoming those fears.
Customer Service: Career Success Through Customer Loyalty / Edition 5 by Paul R. Timm (Prentice Hall, 2010). Customer Service: Career Success through Customer Loyalty, provides a systematic process for building service skills that all business people need. Presented in a friendly, conversational manner, the text is filled with examples that demonstrate the link between service skills and career achievement. This edition is reorganized so it is easy to see how key concepts fit together. New information is included on internal customers, emerging technologies, and stressreducing techniques. Throughout the text, there is an emphasis on transforming good service intentions into a workable plan that exceeds customer expectations and creates loyalty and success.

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TEAMWORK AND COOPERATION
Definition: Cooperates with others to accomplish common goals; works with employees within and across his/her department to achieve shared goals; treats others with dignity and respect and maintains a friendly demeanor; values the contributions of others

Suggested Activities for Development

As a team building exercise, have each team member describe how each person contributes to the team uniquely. Make a list for each person to show the differences and likenesses of all team members.
Ask someone you trust and respect to observe your interactions with others for a day. Ask for feedback on the way you interact with others.
Clearly communicate to peers and team members: procedural changes or innovations, upcoming projects affecting them, team's role, mission, etc.
Consistently meet with all direct reports monthly no exceptions.
Create a system where employees can recognize each other for good work.
Develop a reward and recognition program for your team/department.
Develop a short list of `values' with your department or unit to guide decision-making and interpersonal behavior. Get your team involved in making the list. Review the list at meetings.
Develop effective give-and-take relationships with key individuals in the organization, both vertically and laterally. Keep in touch with people on an on-going basis.
Devise a plan to create team spirit in your work unit or department (e.g., organize informal team get-togethers, contests, parties, team chants, impromptu celebrations or participate in community service activities, etc).
Each week, volunteer to help at least one person in your work unit or department.
Facilitate a group discussion with team members to solve a problem in your work unit or department.
Identify a critical issue within your organization. Volunteer to lead a task force to solve the problem that involves people from different departments.
Identify a current obstacle that is impeding your team from working effectively. Determine the root causes and possible solutions. Share your ideas with your manager. Develop a plan to implement the solutions you have identified. Monitor the results.
If you are a manager, meet with peers from other work units or departments to find how your team can work more effectively with other work units. Devise a plan to implement some of their suggestions.
Keep a record of all your involvement in committees, meetings, and informal team activities for a period of time. Work to increase the involvement and keep track of your progress.
Make a habit of asking people who do not normally work together to work on projects together.
Once a month, pass along an interesting article to someone in your work unit or department that would benefit from the information.
Recognize team members' contributions at each team meeting.
Return phone calls and e-mails in a timely manner.

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Seek feedback from your manager and staff regarding your team management techniques. Work to improve problem areas. Volunteer to participate on a project that will require a high level of cross-functional teamwork. Volunteer to summarize notes from team meetings and send them to all team members. Work with a manager or co-worker who has effectively managed teams to develop your skills in this area. Work with people you do not normally work with or do not know very well. Work with team members to create or refine the team's mission statement.

Books

Team Players and Teamwork: Working with Personalities to Develop Effective Teams by Glenn M. Parker (Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated, 2008). In this book, leaders and members identify their team player style. Parker explains how each style contributes to five key leadership functions. With guidelines for personal development and team-building strategies, this book shows how effective teamwork ultimately leads to increased productivity, reduced costs, improved quality, innovation, better customer service, and more rapid commercialization of products.
The Big Book of Team-Motivating Games: Spirit-Building, Problem-Solving and Communication Games for Every Group by Mary Scannell, Edward Scannell (The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2009). Keeping your team motivated and challenged, especially during tough economic times, can be difficult. But this collection of high-energy, play-anywhere games, provides you with all the fun, inspiring material you need to build team spirit, communication, and trust among coworkers-day in and day out.
The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable by Patrick M. Lencioni (Jossey-Bass, 2002). In keeping with the parable style, Lencioni begins by telling the fable of a woman who, as CEO of a struggling Silicon Valley firm, took control of a dysfunctional executive committee and helped its members succeed as a team. Story time over, Lencioni offers explicit instructions for overcoming the human behavioral tendencies that he says corrupt teams (absence of trust, fear of conflict, lack of commitment, avoidance of accountability and inattention to results). Succinct yet sympathetic, this guide will be a boon for those struggling with the inherent difficulties of leading a group.
The Gold Standard: Building a World-Class Team by Mike Krzyzewski, Jamie K. Spatola (Grand Central Publishing, 2010). Half a book on basketball, half a book on management techniques, THE GOLD STANDARD captures Coach K's personal style and approach to getting different (and sometimes difficult) people to work hard and succeed in reaching a common goal.
The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams by Ken Blanchard, Donald Carew, Eunice Parisi-carew (HarperCollins Publishers, 2009). This book explains how all groups move through four stages of development on their way to becoming a high performing team -- Orientation, Dissatisfaction, Integration, and Production.
The Speed of Trust: The One Thing that Changes Everything by Steven Covey (Free Press, 2006). Trust is so integral to our relationships that we often take it for granted, yet in an era marked by business scandals and a desire for accountability this book is a welcome guide to nurturing trust in our professional and personal lives. Drawing on anecdotes and business cases from his years as CEO of the Covey Leadership Center, the author effectively reminds us that there's plenty of room for improvement on this virtue. Covey outlines 13 behaviors of trust-inspiring leaders, such as demonstrating respect, creating transparency, righting wrongs, delivering results and practicing accountability.
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Results Orientation
Definition: Consistently delivers required business results; sets and achieves achievable, yet aggressive, goals; consistently complies with quality standards and meets deadlines; maintains focus on Agency and State goals

Suggested Activities for Development
Explain and show your employees how their efforts contribute to the bottom line and to organizational success. Discuss organizational results and what you and your team are or can be doing to impact those results.
Keep others informed about what you and your team are doing.
List the long-term goals of the work unit. Establish short-term goals that will help to achieve the long-term goals. Monitor the achievement of both short and long-term goals. Make sure that your goals are clearly aligned with your organization's strategic goals and business requirements.
Make sure you and your teams have measurable goals and objectives. Then focus on results, not activity.
Recognize that you need quality processes to attain quality results.
Refrain from saying it can't be done. Instead focus on how you can make it happen.
The priority you place on people, accuracy, quality, etc. may be seen as not putting a priority on getting results. Ask for feedback about this. Ensure that all your priorities are compatible with achieving strong results.
Take responsibility for results. Adopt a "results" mind-set rather than an "activity" mindset. Ask yourself, "Will what I'm doing now lead to the results I want, or am I just staying busy?"
Translate broad, longer-term goals into specific milestones. Then manage to these milestones.
With your team, develop a set of criteria for effective performance. Include necessary accomplishments and make sure your reward system is aligned with the results you want to achieve.

Books

Eat that Frog! 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time by Brian Tracy (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2007). There just isn't enough time for everything on our "To Do" list and there never will be. Successful people don't try to do everything. They learn to focus on the most important tasks and make sure they get them done. There's an old saying that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you'll have the satisfaction of knowing that it's probably the worst thing you'll do all day. Using "eat that frog" as a metaphor for tackling the most challenging task of your day the one you are most likely to procrastinate on, but also probably the one that can have the greatest positive impact on your life Eat That Frog! shows you how to zero in on these critical tasks and organize your day.

Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done by Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan, and Charles Burck (Crown Business, 2002). Execution is "the missing link between aspirations and results," and

as such, making it happen is the business leader's most important job. While failure in today's

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business environment is often attributed to other causes, the authors argue that the biggest obstacle to success is the absence of execution. They point out that without execution, breakthrough thinking on managing change breaks down, and they emphasize the fact that execution is a discipline to learn, not merely the tactical side of business. The authors describe the building blocks leaders with the right behaviors, a culture that rewards execution, and a reliable system for having the right people in the right jobs that need to be in place to manage the three core business processes of people, strategy, and operations. The authors present experiencetested insight into how the smooth linking of these three processes can differentiate one company from the rest.
Getting Results: Five Absolutes for Getting Performance by Clinton O. Longenecker and Jack L. Simonetti (Jossey-Bass, 2001). This book offers concrete advice on how leaders produce sustainable results. Any leader wanting to improve performance will be well-served to use the ideas as well as the tools in this book.
Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't by Jim Collins (HarperBusiness, 2001). Five years ago, Jim Collins asked the question, "Can a good company become a great company and if so, how?" In Good to Great Collins concludes that it is possible, but finds there are no silver bullets. Collins and his team of researchers began their quest by sorting through a list of 1,435 companies, looking for those that made substantial improvements in their performance over time. They finally settled on 11 including Fannie Mae, Gillette, Walgreens, and Wells Fargo and discovered common traits that challenged many of the conventional notions of corporate success. Making the transition from good to great doesn't require a high-profile CEO, the latest technology, innovative change management, or even a fine-tuned business strategy. At the heart of those rare and truly great companies was a corporate culture that rigorously found and promoted disciplined people to think and act in a disciplined manner. Peppered with dozens of stories and examples from the great and not so great, the book offers a well-reasoned road map to

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ACCOUNTABILITY
Definition: Accepts full responsibility for self and contribution as a team member; displays honesty and truthfulness; confronts problems quickly; displays a strong commitment to organizational success and inspires others to commit to goals; demonstrates a commitment to delivering on his/her public duty and presenting oneself as a credible representative of the Agency and State to maintain the public's trust

Suggested Activities for Development
Ask your team members to set their own milestone dates and then hold to these dates, except on rare occasions when slippage is clearly justified.
Create a personal set of guiding principles for handling confidential information.
Find an executive whose values and principles you admire. Invite that person to address your employees in a meeting. Ask the executive to cover topics such as the importance of ethics in business and how to make principled decisions.
Identify someone whom you believe is trustworthy. Talk with this person to find out what they do to earn trust from others and model their behavior.
Keep a log of each commitment that you make. Review the promises that you made and whether or not you followed through on them and why. Devise a plan to work on specific issues.
Negotiate realistic deadlines the next time you receive a project and choose your commitment carefully. Hold yourself accountable to the agreed deadline.
Review policies related to ethics, privacy, and confidentiality. Discuss with team members how these policies may apply in your work unit.
Whenever faced with a tough decision, ask yourself these three questions: 1) Is it legal? Will you be violating either company policy or law? 2) Is it fair and balanced? Are all people involved being treated fairly in both the long term and short term? 3) How will you feel when it's done? Will you be proud of what you did? If it was published in the newspaper, would you feel comfortable with your family and friends reading it?

Books

Accountability: Freedom and Responsibility Without Control by Rob Lebow and Randy Spitzer (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2002). Accountability shows how to get people in organizations to be more personally accountable for high performance in their work and for the success of the organization without resorting to the traditional management systems that rely on control and manipulation. Contrasted with three other commonly used accountability models, the authors recommend Personal Accountability over all others. The authors show that by gaining a higher sense of self-worth and autonomy, the quality of employee decision-making skills is greatly improved. They then outline the seven steps needed to attain Personal Accountability, including: surroundings, seeds of change, and style of leadership.
Ethics: Theory and Practice, 10th Edition by J. Thiroux (Prentice Hall, 2008). With a clear presentation, Ethics: Theory and Practice educates readers about ethical theory and has them apply what they learn to specific classic and contemporary moral problems (lying, cheating, establishing ethical business practices, honoring ethical obligations in medicine, etc.).

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Managing Business Ethics by K. Nelson and L. Trevino (Wiley, 2010). While most business ethics texts focus exclusively on individual decision making (what should an individual do) this resource presents the whole business ethics story. Highly realistic, readable, and down-to-earth, it moves from the individual to the managerial to the organizational level, focusing on business ethics in an organizational context to promote an understanding of complex influences on behavior. The new Fifth Edition is the perfect text for students entering the workplace, those seeking to become professionals in training, communications, compliance, in addition to chief ethics officers, corporate counsel, heads of human resources, and senior executives.
Moral Intelligence 2: Enhancing Business Performance and Leadership Success in Turbulent Times by F. Kiel and D. Lennick (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2011). A dramatic erosion of trust in our business, financial, and government leaders has provided even stronger evidence of the links between moral intelligence and optimal business and personal performance. In Moral Intelligence 2.0, Douglas Lennick and Fred Kiel thoroughly update their best-seller to demonstrate those linkages--and to guide leaders in measuring, developing, and applying moral intelligence throughout their organizations
The Accountability Revolution: Achieve Breakthrough Results in Half the Time by Mark Samuel (Facts on Demand Press, 2001). This book is very readable and is filled with practical strategies and tools to create a more accountable work environment. The personal and work examples bring the concepts to life. Mark's definition of accountability is right on target, "accountability means that people can count on one another to keep performance commitments and communication agreements."

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JUDGMENT AND DECISION MAKING
Definition: Analyzes problems by evaluating available information and resources; develops effective, viable solutions to problems which can help drive the effectiveness of the department and/or State of Georgia

Suggested Activities for Development
Ask for feedback from your manager, colleagues, and/or employees regarding your decisionmaking skills. Devise a plan to work on problem areas.
Ask your manager to increase the scope of your decision-making authority. This will enable you to learn more about other areas of the business.
Become a certified mediator.
Consider at least two alternatives for solving a problem.
Develop a short list of `values' with your department or unit to guide decision-making and interpersonal behavior. Get your team involved in making the list. Review the list at meetings.
Get ideas and suggestions about the root cause of the problem from someone who is successful at solving similar problems or from someone who will be impacted by the problem.
Get into the habit of identifying and challenging the assumptions and beliefs that underlie your thinking, conclusions, and decisions.
Identify a problem that could not be resolved. Take some time to reconsider the issue. Write down solutions that could have been used to solve the problem and use them in similar situations.
Identify someone who is successful at solving problems and ask if there is a problem that you can think through with her or him to enhance your problem solving skills. Discuss the problem with the person. Look for casual relationships. Develop a response to the problem, then compare your response to the other person's response. Discuss similarities and differences in your responses.
In an effort to identify the root cause of the problem, try to examine the problem from another perspective. For example, how would the manager or a colleague with excellent problem solving skills handle the problem?
Look for a significant problem in the department. Examine the background of the problem. Have similar problems been encountered in the past? If necessary, break down the problem into pieces. Determine the factors that must be addressed and develop a plan to address the issue. Think through why the plan will be successful. Evaluate and modify the plan as appropriate.
Make a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis when facing a dilemma to make the proper decision.
Over a two or three week period, keep a journal of all of the major decisions you made and how long it took to make each decision. Analyze journal entries to gain insight into any obstacles that may have impeded decision-making. Work to overcome obstacles. Monitor progress in this area.
Over the next month, identify problems brought forth by customers that were unexpected. See if there is a trend. Determine the root cause of the problem. Also, determine what could have been done to prevent the problem from occurring? Identify the cost to the organization if the problem is not solved and identify the impact of the alternatives that were identified.
Play games that increase problem solving skills (e.g., Bridge, Bid Whist, Spades, Risk, etc.).

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Present a problem to a group of people. Have the group brainstorm about possible causes of the problems. Determine which factors are symptoms of the problem and which factors are causes of the problem.
Read about companies that were facing major issues (market change, bankruptcy, etc.) and the decisions their senior management made. Try to understand the reasons behind the decisions that were made.
To help discover problems from different perspectives, engage in a new activity. Identify any new approaches or ideas gained that may be useful in generating ideas to solve problems.
Track each time information is collected before making a decision. Compare the results of decisions when information was collected about the problem versus the results of the decisions when information was not collected.
Upon facing a situation that needs immediate attention, recognize similarities from past dilemmas to help make the appropriate decision with ease.

Books

Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking by Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley (Prentice Hall, 2009). This book helps readers bridge the gap between simply memorizing or blindly accepting information and the greater challenge of critical analysis and synthesis. It teaches them to respond to alternative points of view and develop a solid foundation for making personal choices about what to accept and what to reject. Specific chapter topics include the benefit of asking the right questions, issues and conclusions, reasons, ambiguous words or phrases, value conflicts and assumptions, descriptive assumptions, fallacies in reasoning, measuring the validity the evidence, rival causes, deceptive statistics, omitted significant information, and possible reasonable conclusions.

Blink: The Power of Thinking without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell (Back Bay Books, 2007). This book looks at how we make snap judgments about people's intentions, the authenticity of a work of art, even military strategy. Gladwell's conclusion, after studying how people make instant decisions in a wide range of fields from psychology to police work, is that we can make better instant judgments by training our mind and senses to focus on the most relevant facts and that less input (as long as it's the right input) is better than more. Each case study is satisfying, and Gladwell imparts his own evident pleasure in delving into a wide range of fields and seeking an underlying truth.

businessThink: Rules for Getting it Right Now, and No Matter What! by Dave Marcum, Steve Smith and Mahan Khalsa (2002). In businessThink, the authors propose eight rules that create a framework for cultivating this different thought process. "Most people are just going through the motions of doing (not thinking) business merely practicing their comfortable old routines. Others, the really successful ones, are getting killer results through changing their thinking to become more disciplined, rigorous, creative, and sound." Applicable to any position, from staffer to senior executive, the principles are: check your ego at the door (to develop an open, united atmosphere); create curiosity (to uncover new options); move off the solution (to clarify the issue); get evidence (to clarify the problem); calculate the impact (to weigh investment against return); explore the ripple effect (to view the big picture); slow down for yellow lights (to watch for obstacles); and discover the cause (to understand underlying truths). Each element is fleshed out in one or more chapters that showcase them in identifiable, real-world situations.

Step-by- Step Problem Solving: A Practical Guide to Ensure Problems Get (and Stay) Solved by Richard Chang and Keith Kelly (Practical Learning Press, 1993). This book helps the reader to define problems, analyze causes, identify solutions, develop action plans, implement solutions, and evaluate progress. It takes a common-sense approach to problem solving and provides a wealth of practical examples.

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Think Again: Why Good Leaders Make Bad Decisions and How to Keep It From Happening to You by Sydney Finkelstein, Andrew Campbell, Jo Whitehead (Harvard Business Press, 2009). Why do smart and experienced leaders make flawed, even catastrophic, decisions? Why do people keep believing they have made the right choice, even with the disastrous result staring them in the face? And how can you be sure you're making the right decision--without the benefit of hindsight? Sydney Finkelstein, Jo Whitehead, and Andrew Campbell show how the usually beneficial processes of the human mind can become traps when we face big decisions. The authors show how the shortcuts our brains have learned to take over millennia of evolution can derail our decision making. Think Again offers a powerful model for making better decisions, describing the key red flags to watch for and detailing the decision-making safeguards we need. Using examples from business, politics, and history, Think Again deconstructs bad decisions, as they unfolded in real time, to show how you can avoid the same fate.

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TALENT MANAGEMENT
Definition: Clearly establishes and communicates expectations and accountabilities; monitors and evaluates performance; provides effective feedback and coaching; identifies development needs and helps employees address them to achieve optimal performance and gain valuable skills that will translate into strong performance in future roles

Suggested Activities for Development

Actively coach individuals and teams to strengthen their performance.
Ask employees what you can do to improve the way you delegate tasks. Listen to their suggestions and integrate them into your style of delegation.
Ask your team members to set their own milestone dates and then hold to these dates, except on rare occasions when slippage is clearly justified.
Coach someone on how to do something with which he/she has little familiarity.
Complete performance appraisals. Highlight and emphasize areas for positive feedback and recognize contributions individually. Have a two-way discussion on ideas for improvement.
Conduct monthly one-on-one meetings with each direct report to assess progress toward performance plan, and to solicit feedback.
Connect people with role models and mentors who possess the skills they are trying to develop.
Delegate one responsibility you have never been comfortable delegating before. Whether large or small, stretch your comfort level. But be sure to limit the risk and monitor the process not the results. Notice your own reactions. Remember, it is a learning experience for you as well!
Design your staff meetings so you are not the sole source of information. Ask other people to give updates and share relevant information.
Develop a tracking system to ensure achievement of work unit or departmental goals.
Establish departmental and individual goals; Clearly communicate departmental and individual goals and accountabilities.
Hold weekly team meetings to clarify work unit deliverables and priorities.
Identify someone in your organization who delegates responsibility well and meet with her/him, or shadow the person for a day.
If a delegated assignment does not meet your expectations, don't redo it yourself. Explain why it is not up to standard and what needs to be changed. Then have your employee rework it.
Keep a "delegation diary." Keep a written record of which projects you've delegated to which employees. Once you realize how effective and uplifting proper delegation can be, you'll want to do it more often.
Let employees take turns running staff meetings. This does three things: It shows that you respect and trust their abilities, it builds their confidence and leadership skills, and it gives you a chance to see how someone handles a group.
Maintain a development file on each member of your team tracking successes, failures, development needs, and follow through with appropriate feedback.
Make sure and retain your key employees. Spend time reminding good employees about the positive things the State and your agency offers and why it's a good place to work.

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Meet regularly with direct reports asking them what they need to complete their jobs more effectively and discussing what is needed from them. Develop accountabilities.
Monitor the "right" performance measures; Give frequent and candid performance feedback on how employees are doing their jobs.
Notice and show appreciation when expected results and behaviors are realized; Retain high performers through recognition of accomplishments and development/career opportunities.
Over the course of a week, keep track of the tasks you work on and the issues you get involved in. At the end of the week, your list should be representative of the things you typically work on. On that list, put a checkmark next to the items that could easily be done by someone else on your team. Then, put a star next to the items that could be handled by someone after they have been trained. Make a goal of delegating your checkmarks within a month and all of your stars within six months.
Pair new employees with a "buddy" to ease their transition into the organization. A buddy can give them information that's not generally available from traditional orientation programs how to get things done, what to avoid, etc.
Partner with your direct reports to create development plans and encourage them to do the same for their staffs.
Personalize your approach. You may be coaching many employees and be tempted to adopt the same style with each. Instead, get to know them as individuals so you can tailor your coaching efforts appropriately. One employee may need reassurance, while another may respond to being challenged. Learn how to reach each one.
Provide adequate resources for employees to accomplish their goals; remove barriers as needed to help accomplish team goals.
Rather than automatically replacing a position that becomes open, consider whether the job duties associated with the role can be divided among others in the department. This could save the agency the cost of a new hire while giving other employees a chance to broaden their skills and enhance their future marketability.
Schedule feedback sessions with employees after they complete a major assignment. Discuss what went well and what did not go well.
Set aside time on a regular basis (weekly, biweekly or monthly) to meet with employees and review progress on work.
Set clear expectations by building goals and objectives with each member of your team individually. Communicate the process with each team member so that they are able to prepare effectively and provide input.
Spend 20 minutes a day "checking in" with four of your employees for five minutes each . . . every single day. No conference rooms or formal agendas just stop by somebody's desk and check in. You can accomplish a lot in those five minutes: sharing information on project updates, burning questions, industry trends, important customer issues, etc.
Take responsibility for identifying individual employee development needs and find ways to address them.
Take time to contact employees periodically, particularly those you do not see daily. Taking time to talk informally with people conveys a message of support.
When an employee comes to you with a work problem, first ask how he or she plans to approach it.
When hiring, focus on the skills needed for the current position as well as the qualities needed to be successful in future roles within the organization.
When you attend a conference, bring it back with you. Whenever you attend an industry conference, take detailed notes and turn them into a presentation for your direct reports. Bring them up-to-speed on hot topics, what they should read up on, and so on.

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Books

151 Quick Ideas for Delegating and Decision Making by Robert E. Dittmer, Stephanie McFarland (Career Press, Incorporated, 2007). Research and experience demonstrate two areas with which many new managers are completely unfamiliar: delegating tasks and work, and making decisions. Some struggle with this for years. But it doesn't have to be hard. 151 Quick Ideas for Delegating and Decision Making combines 50 years' experience of two managers, and the experiences of other managers who have been interviewed and observed. And even if you are already in a supervisory position, this book can help you do a more effective and efficient job at managing people and tasks.

Busy Manager's Guide to Delegation by Richard A. Luecke, Perry McIntosh (AMACOM, 2009). Delegation amounts to a lot more than just passing work off onto your subordinates. When handled correctly, it gives you a chance to strengthen your department by developing the skills and organizational competencies of your people. Filled with quick tips, exercises, self-assessments, and practical worksheets, this book presents an easy-to-master five-step process for effective delegation. The Busy Manager's Guide to Delegation shows you how to set the stage for excellent results, what to do if things go wrong, and how to ensure that everyone benefits from the experience. This is a quick, comprehensive course on an essential-and sometimes overlookedmanagement competency.

Developing the Leaders Around You by John C. Maxwell (Thomas Nelson, 2005).The basic premise of this book is that you can multiply the efficiency of your organization by devoting time to developing the potential leaders around you. The book provides guidelines as to how to identify those individuals who have the potential for leadership, and then gives instruction on how to develop them. The guidelines and instruction the author gives can be summarized as follows: choose the individuals who are the most willing to grow and learn new things as your potential leaders, and grow them by investing time in them, empowering them for success by delegating wisely and providing counsel.

First Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman (Simon and Schuster, 1999). The authors explain how the best managers select an employee for talent rather than skills or experience, set expectations for them, build on their unique strengths instead of trying to fix their weaknesses, and develop them.

If You Want It Done Right, You Don't Have to Do It Yourself: The Power of Effective Delegation by Donna M. Genett (Linden Publishing, 2004). This is a very clever and entertaining story that teaches simple, important steps for more effective time, work, and life management. Delegation is difficult for many successful people, but Dr. Genett inspires us to stretch for the purposes of stress reduction and optimal performance.

Manager's Guide to Effective Coaching by Marshall J. Cook and Laura Poole (McGraw-Hill, 2011). This book explains how to apply sound coaching methods in the workplace, encouraging top performance by working with employees, instead of over them. Cook shows readers how to understand the characteristics of an effective coach and apply them in the workplace.

One Page Talent Management: Eliminating Complexity, Adding Value by Marc Effron and Miriam Ort (Harvard Business School Publishers, 2010). In this revolutionary book, Effron and Ort introduce One Page Talent Management (OPTM): a powerfully simple approach that significantly accelerates a company's ability to develop better leaders faster. The authors outline a straightforward, easy-to-use process for designing results-oriented OPTM processes: base every process on proven scientific research; eliminate complexity by including only those components that add real value to the process; and build transparency and accountability into every practice. Based on extensive research and the authors' hands-on corporate and consulting experience with companies including Avon Products, Bank of America, and Philips, One Page Talent Management shows a radical new approach to growing talent.

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Perfect Phrases for Performance Reviews: Hundreds of Ready-to-Use Phrases That Describe Your Employees' Performance by Douglas Max and Robert Bacal (McGraw-Hill, 2010). This book simplifies the job of writing performance evaluations, providing a comprehensive collection of phrases that managers can use to describe employee performance, provide directions for improvement, and more. With the wide-ranging assortment of descriptions available in this book, managers will be able to find the perfect terms to help them analyze and understand the work performance of each person they work with.
Perfect Phrases for Setting Performance Goals: Hundreds of Ready-to-Use Goals for Any Performance Plan or Review by Douglas Max and Robert Bacal (McGraw-Hill, 2010). This book provides managers with phrases and goals that describe expected future performance from their direct reports. Featuring hundreds of ready-to-use performance goals, this practical job aid makes it simple for managers to set the bar for outstanding future results.
The Carrot Principle: How the Best Managers Use Recognition to Engage Their People, Retain Talent, and Accelerate Performance by Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group, 2009). Got carrotphobia? The Carrot Principle reveals the groundbreaking results of one of the most in-depth management studies ever undertaken, showing definitively that the central characteristic of the most successful managers is that they provide their employees with frequent and effective recognition. The Carrot Principle illustrates that the relationship between recognition and improved business results is highly predictable-it's proven to work. Recognition done right, recognition combined with four other core traits of effective leadership.
The Leadership Pipeline by Ram Charan, Stephen Drotter, and James Noel (Jossey-Bass, 2011). This book shows organizations how to undo the knots and clogs in their in-house "leadership pipeline" so they can constantly groom the best people at every level to move up to the next rung of leadership. The authors identify the six transition phases, or "turns," of the pipeline from selfmanager (individual worker), first-line manager, and managers' manager to function manager, business manager, group manager and enterprise manager. With each, they take care to point out both the new skills and values one must acquire before making a turn, as well as how to measure whether someone has them before moving them along. They also show how to determine whether candidates are embodying those skills and values once they've made the transition and how to groom them for the next level right from day one.
The Talent Masters: Why Smart Leaders Put People Before Numbers by Bill Conaty and Ram Charan (Crown Publishing Group, 2010).Talent is the leading indicator of whether a business is up or down, a success or a failure...The Talent Masters discuss the specifics on how companies regarded as world-class--GE, P&G, Hindustan Unilever (and others)--base their stellar performance decade after decade on their systems for finding and nurturing leadership talent.

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Transformers of Government
Definition: Develops innovative approaches to address problems and drive continuous improvement in State programs and processes; drives effective and smooth change initiatives across the State by communicating, confirming understanding, and actively working with stakeholders to overcome resistance

Suggested Activities for Development

Adapt what's already there. You don't have to innovate from scratch. Some of the most successful ideas build on other concepts.
Attend seminars and lectures outside of the organization. Participate in external forums that discuss current government issues and future trends. Think about how this information impacts your work.
Be able to summarize the short and long-term consequences of failing to implement a new initiative.
Be alert for when you hold on to a solution or procedure because "that's the way it's always been done," instead of considering other alternatives.
Benchmark similar agencies in other states for ideas to improve the efficiency or the quality of work/service provided by the State.
Build in the expectation of continuous improvement. Ask employees about improvements they have identified. Set the clear expectation that spotting opportunities is part of their job.
Celebrate and communicate successes even small ones!
Challenge your employees to find ways of improving business and work processes. Use various forums (staff meetings, private conversations, performance plans) to stimulate and reinforce the need to make continuous improvements.
Clearly set improvement expectations for your employees. Focus on improvements in terms of cost and efficiency, but also innovation.
Conduct a strategic planning meeting within your area. Communicate the overall vision of the work unit with team members. Engage team members in an environmental scanning exercise to identify both internal and external factors impacting the department. Discuss the impact of the factors on the department and establish a plan of action to address any issues.
Constantly expose yourself to new ideas and trends. Build your intellectual curiosity by developing your knowledge of the world around you. Get into the habit of reading newspapers and periodicals for current events, technical journals for new developments in your field, and books for ideas relating to your work and personal life.
Create a formal communication plan to accompany phases and stages of change.
Demonstrate your own enthusiasm and commitment to a change. When your commitment is obvious to your employees, their motivation and involvement in the success of the change effort are likely to increase.
Encourage innovation by creating a climate in which individuals feel free to present their ideas without fear of criticism. When presented with a new idea, ask people to first identify and discuss what they like, rather than what they dislike, about an idea.
Identify the strategic direction of the department. Develop a plan to reorganize the department in a manner that will effectively meet the organization's long-term goals. Seek out suggestions and

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recommendations from people within the organization about your ideas for reorganizing the work unit.
If you have trouble seeing the value of another person's viewpoint, mentally reverse sides to see if you can come up with ideas that support that person's position.
Listen to other people's opinions and suggestions. First identify all the positive aspects of their viewpoint before taking a more critical approach.
Model strategic change leadership. On each project have at least one employee whose job is to watch you and document the team's process and learning. Watching you will help educate this person about how to lead change; it will also help you learn what you do. The documentation of the team's process will help the team learn, which will result in increased competency among your teams in leading change.
On an annual basis, identify out-dated assumptions, changes in the external environment (competitors, market, economy), and opportunities for change.
Once you have defined a problem and generated solutions, challenge yourself to think how you would defend the problem from the opposite point of view.
Publicize stories of successful change.
Read documents and publications and listen to television programs (e.g., Georgia Lawmakers, The Georgia Gang) to learn more about the structure and politics of state government. Consider how the information you learned impacts the organization.
Recognize that how and when changes are implemented are often as important as what is implemented. Solicit local involvement in the process of change even when the decision to change is not a shared one.
Regularly conduct an environmental scan to identify internal and external issues impacting the agency. Lead a discussion group with peers about how these factors impact the organization.
Regularly read information on other agencies' websites.
Remove policy barriers whenever possible. People are often encouraged to analyze their suggestions in terms of existing procedures and policies; thus, they may be discouraged from proposing solutions contrary to current guidelines.
Research ways to effectively apply existing practices or processes to new work situations that result in higher quality work products or enhanced efficiency.
Review the agency's strategic, information technology, and workforce plan.
Reward flexibility. "The way things have always been done" is often a refuge for the inflexible.
Spend some time gathering information about the services provided by each state agency. Identify relationships between the services offered by your agency and other agencies within state government.
Talk to others in different parts of the organization, colleagues outside the organization and friends to see how they have addressed similar situations or problems.
Talk to others outside of the organization about their perceptions of the agency. Take the information into consideration when making decisions. Also, share this information with others in the organization.
Talk to someone in another agency about some of the challenges they are facing. Find out what they are doing. Consider the implications for the agency.
Try to build on other people's opinions by adopting a "yes and..." instead of a "yes, but..." attitude.
Volunteer to serve on a statewide committee and/or participate in a statewide initiative.
Volunteer to serve on your agency's strategic planning committee.
Watch for snap reactions. Rather than assuming that the first alternative that enters your mind is the best solution, write it down and then consider other opinions.

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When generating ideas, broadly scan the alternatives, challenging yourself to view the problem from at least three different perspectives. By spending more time defining the problem in a multitude of ways, you will be able to generate a broader range of possible solutions.
When you first encounter shifting priorities and change, don't react. Gain more information before you express your reaction. Internalizing the change may make it easier for you to accept it.
Books
Managing Change and Transition by Richard Luecke (Harvard Business School Press, 2003). Managing through change and crisis is difficult in any business environment, let alone one as turbulent as managers face today. This timely guide offers authoritative advice on how to recognize the need for organizational change, communicate the vision, prepare for structural change such as mergers and acquisitions, and address emotional responses to downsizing. With tools for managing stress levels and advice on gathering and sharing information during transition, this book is an indispensable guide for managers at any level of the organization.
Managing Creativity and Innovation, Harvard Business School Essentials (Harvard Business School Press, 2003). Innovation is an undisputed catalyst for company growth, yet many managers across industries fail to create a climate that encourages and rewards innovation. This book explores the manager's role in sparking organizational creativity and offers insight into what managers and leaders must do to increase successful innovation.
Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change by William Bridges and Susan Bridges (Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2009). This book provides a clear understanding of what change does to employees and what employees in transition can do to an organization. Directed at managers and employees in today's corporations, Bridges shows how to minimize the distress and disruptions caused by change. The book addresses the fact that it is people who have to carry out the change. When the book was originally published a decade ago, Bridges was the first to provide any real sense of the emotional impact of change and what can be done to keep it from disrupting the entire organization. With new information and commentary on layoffs, corporate suspicion, and the increasing tumult in the business world, Managing Transitions remains the definitive guide to dealing with change.
Our Iceberg is Melting: Changing and Succeeding Under Any Conditions by John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber (St. Martin's Press, 2009). This fable of penguins facing a threat of survival mirrors a business organization facing similar danger. The story is complete with characters such as NoNo and the Professor, whose equivalents might be found in any business. The authors define the penguins' eight steps to making a successful organizational change.
Ping: A Frog in Search of a New Pond by Stuart Avery Gold (Newmarket Press, 2007). This simple, inspirational tale follows the journey of Ping, a frog in search of a new pond, preferably one good for long-distance jumping. Along the way he meets Owl, an insightful teacher who shares his wisdom, encouraging Ping to take an inner journey before pursuing his goal. Not everything goes as planned, but Ping learns how to "go with the flow, because the flow knows where to go." Ping represents everybody who has encountered a setback, needs to take a risk, or is struggling with the challenges of change that is to say, he is all of us. Owl is the mentor who helps him find meaning and leap to new heights. The adventure they embark on together is both engaging and revealing.
The Creativity Book: A Year's Worth of Inspiration and Guidance by Eric Maisel (Tarcher, 2000). This book is by America's leading expert on the psychological side of creativity. In this book Maisel presents a complete one-year plan for unleashing your creativity. It includes two discussions/exercises per week and culminates in a guided project of your choice from working on your current novel to planning a new home business.

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The Heart of Change: Real-Life Stories of How People Change Their Organizations by John Kotter and Dan Cohen (Harvard Business School Press, 2002).The book outlines a framework for implementing change that sidesteps many of the pitfalls common to organizations looking to turn themselves around. The essence of the authors' message is this: the reason so many change initiatives fail is that they rely too much on "data gathering, analysis, report writing, and presentations" instead of a more creative approach aimed at grabbing the "feelings that motivate useful action." This book shows how an eight-step approach has worked at over 100 organizations. In just about every case, change happened because the players were led to "see" and "feel" the change.
The Reinventor's Fieldbook: Tools for Transforming Your Government by David Osborne and Peter Plastrick (Jossey-Bass, 2000). Presenting more than 70 tools, The Reinventor's Fieldbook includes hundreds of practical "lessons learned," "do's and don'ts," "steps to take," and "pitfalls to avoid" in public management and governance. Based on dozens of case studies from five countries, it covers the waterfront of high-performance public organizations, including: customer choice and customer service standards, performance measurement, and performance budgeting; employee empowerment and labor-management partnerships; managed competition and asset privatization; partnerships with communities; culture change strategies; and administrative system reform.
When Sparks Fly: Igniting Creativity in Groups by Dorothy Leonard-Barton and Walter C. Swap (Harvard Business School Press, 2005). Group creativity is the key to success in many organizations. The authors provide a comprehensive look at developing creativity in a group setting, including their five-step process. The book includes examples of corporate innovation and psychology-based look at human creativity.

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COMMUNICATION
Definition: Respectfully listens to others to gain a full understanding of issues; comprehends written material; presents information in a clear and concise manner orally and in writing to ensure others understand his/her ideas; appropriately adapts his/her message, style, and tone to accommodate a variety of audiences

Suggested Activities for Development
Allow important e-mails and other written communication to sit before sending them out. Draft the communication, then come back several hours later and review it again. You will be better able to "see" your message and any errors more clearly. As you read, look up words in the dictionary that are unfamiliar to you and use them regularly.
Ask a colleague or manager to observe and critique your listening skills when you interact with others. Work on problem areas.
Ask your employees what information they would like to receive regularly from you, and then tell them what you'd like to hear from them.
Before making a formal presentation, practice in front of peers. Solicit feedback and incorporate into the presentation.
Carefully watch recognized speakers on television, radio, etc. Incorporate a few of those skills into your presentations.
Create and deliver a visual presentation that communicates the vision for the team, division, or agency.
Critique speakers, team leaders, and managers to better understand the criteria for effective communication.
Each time you have a conversation with someone, log the number of times you stopped yourself from interrupting others to let them complete their thoughts.
Facilitate a focus group session.
Identify situations in which you have the most difficulty being a good listener and devise a strategy to prepare for them in advance.
Identify someone in your agency who is a great presenter or communicator. Ask the person to work with you to develop your communications skills.
Identify someone who is a good listener and observe what she or he does. Seek advice on how to improve your listening skills.
Join your local Toastmasters Chapter. http://www.toastmasters.org/
Keep a log of situations where you made an attempt to listen effectively. List the situation, what you did well and what you need to work on.
Lead a team meeting.
Learn three new vocabulary words a week and use them regularly.
Listen to books on audiotape. Write a summary of the book or discuss the main ideas with others.
Over the next two or three weeks, pay close attention to the non-verbal cues of others when communicating with them. Determine what emotions are being communicated and check your

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assessment with the individual before acting on them. Assess your progress in understanding others.
Play scrabble.
Read articles in professional/technical journals. Summarize the information or write a critique.
Rehearse presentations on video and review before presenting. Make the necessary improvements. Spell out acronyms and abbreviations the first time they're used in any document. This is especially important when communicating with newer employees, customers and vendors.
Take and seek opportunities to speak in front of groups (e.g., business meetings, presentations).
Teach a course at a local college. Train yourself to ask questions instead of making statements. Example: Don't say, "Joan, don't forget that the Miller report is due on Monday morning." Rather say, "How is the Miller report coming along, Joan?" By asking questions, you'll start a dialogue, and you never know what you might learn.
Tutor a student in reading and comprehension.
Use at least two communication vehicles to send important organizational messages.
Volunteer to speak about a work unit or division at new employee orientation.
Volunteer to speak at a local school or to members of a professional and/or community organization about what you do or a topic of interest.
Volunteer to summarize notes from meetings. Distribute the summaries to others and ask for feedback.
Volunteer to write monthly or quarterly reports for your work unit. When talking with others, don't blurt out questions as soon as they finish speaking. It looks as if you were formulating your reply rather than listening. Before you ask a question, paraphrase the other person's words. This cuts down on miscommunication.
Write a speech or draft an e-mail for someone in a higher leadership role in the agency. Write an article for your agency's newsletter, website, or intranet.
Write an article or technical report in your field and submit it for publication.
Write down an outline of significant communications before writing or speaking.

Books

Active Listening by Michael H. Hoppe (Center for Creative Leadership, 2006). Listening well is an essential component of good leadership. You can become a more effective listener and leader by learning the skills of active listening. Working relationships become more solid, based on trust, respect, and honesty. Active listening is not an optional component of leadership; it is not a nicety to be used to make others feel good. It is a critical component of the tasks facing today's leaders.

Are You Really Listening?: Keys to Successful Communication by Paul J. Donoghue, Mary E. Siegel, Joan Lunden (Avenue Records, 2005). Listening is an essential skill worth every effort to learn and to master. Listening takes us out of our tendency toward self absorption and self protection. It opens us to the world around us and to the persons who matter most to us. When we listen, we learn, we grow, and we are nourished. Why do we often feel cut off when speaking to the people closest to us? What is it that keeps so many of us from really listening? Practicing psychotherapists, Donoghue and Siegel answer these questions and more in this thoughtful, witty, and helpful look at the reasons why people don't listen. Filled with vivid examples that clearly demonstrate easy to learn listening techniques, Are You Really Listening? Is a guide to the secrets and joys of listening and being listened to.

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Business Communication, Harvard Business Essentials (Harvard Business School Press, 2003). Effective communication is a vital skill for everyone in business today. Great communicators have a distinct advantage in building influence and jumpstarting their careers. This practical guide offers readers a clear and comprehensive overview on how to communicate effectively for every business situation, from sensitive feedback to employees to persuasive communications for customers. It offers advice for improving writing skills, oral presentations, and one-on-one dealings with others.
Can-Do Writing: The Proven Ten-step System for Fast and Effective Business Writing by Daniel Graham, Graham, Judith Graham (Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated, 2009). A simple, ten-step system for mastering the art of effective, persuasive business or technical writing. This book assists the readers with writing business plans, scientific papers, press releases, and more.
Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen, Roger Fisher. (Penguin Group USA Incorporated, 2010). Asking for a raise. Ending a relationship. Saying "no" to your boss or spouse. Confronting disrespectful behavior. Apologizing. Conversations we dread, and often handle clumsily as a result, are part of all our lives: in boardrooms and family rooms, across the negotiation table and the dinner table. Now, Difficult Conversations teaches us how to handle these dialogues with more success and less anxiety.
Effective Business Writing by Patrick Forsyth. (Kogan Page, Ltd., 2009). This book helps readers formulate a systematic approach to writing that makes it easier and quicker to get the right words down, avoiding the dangers of bland and formulaic approaches.
Get to the Point! Painless Advice for Writing Memos, Letters and Emails Your Colleagues and Clients Will Understand, Second Edition by Elizabeth Danziger (Mesa Publishing Company, 2010). This book carries readers through the entire writing process letters, memos, and emails.
Getting Your Point Across by P. Khan-Panni (Parkwest Publications, Inc., 2007). Getting your point across quickly and effectively is a skill that will get you noticed and give you the competitive edge in business. It will make you more interesting, give you the high ground in group discussions, gain you the respect and even the admiration of your peers. Forget "the gift of the gab". Learn how to transform yourself into a compelling speaker. Discover how to put your message across in a way that makes others want to hear it. This book will uncover the secrets of powerful communication.
Just Listen by Mark Goulston (AMACOM, 2009). In Just Listen you'll discover field-tested, powerful techniques for getting people to do what you want them to do. With Just Listen, the power to succeed is yours.
Presentation Skills 201 by William R Steele. (Outskirts Press, Inc, 2009). This book is for presenters who are determined to get even better. It includes valuable, easy-to-implement tips for every facet of the presentation process from planning to delivery. Readers will learn how to increase the impact of their presentations.
Presenting to Win, The Art of Telling Your Story by J. Weissman. (Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2008). Jerry Weissman shows you how to transform your presentations from dry recitals of facts into compelling stories with a laser-sharp focus on what matters most: what's in it for the audience.
Speed Reading For Dummies by Richard Sutz (Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated, 2009). This practical, hands-on guide gives you the techniques you need to increase your reading speed and retention, whether you're reading books, e-mails, magazines, or even technical journals! You'll find reading aids and plenty of exercises to help you read faster and better comprehend the text.
The Elements Of Style by W. Strunk, E. B. White, & R. Angell (Walking Lions Press, 2009). Contains rules of grammar phrased as direct orders and provides the principal requirements of plain English style. Concentrates on fundamentals: The rules of usage and principles of composition most commonly violated.

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The Lost Art of Listening: How Learning to Listen Can Improve Relationship, 2nd Edition by M. Nichols, PhD (The Guilford Press, 2009). One person talks; the other listens. It's so basic that we take it for granted. Unfortunately, most of us think of ourselves as better listeners than we actually are. Why do we so often fail to connect when speaking with family members, romantic partners, colleagues, or friends? How do emotional reactions get in the way of real communication? This thoughtful, witty, and empathic book has already helped over 100,000 readers break through conflicts and transform their personal and professional relationships. Experienced therapist Mike Nichols provides vivid examples, easy-to-learn techniques, and practical exercises for becoming a better listener--and making yourself heard and understood, even in difficult situations.

External Training
Universities Offering Free Writing Courses Online Whether you are currently writing professionally or are looking to break into the field, formal writing courses can help you hone your skills. If you don't have the money or the time for campus-based courses, there are plenty of universities offering free writing courses online.
1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm) MIT offers dozens of free undergraduate and graduate writing courses online through its MIT OpenCourseWare initiative. Course topics include everything from writing fiction, poems and essays to analyzing all forms of literature. Lecture notes, videos, suggested reading lists and more will help you to become the writer you've always wanted to be. No registration is required.
2. Utah State University (http://ocw.usu.edu/) Utah State University's Department of English publishes three free courses devoted to the art of writing through the school's OpenCourseWare program. The courses are extensive and may take up to 16 weeks to complete if you study at the average pace. No registration is required. Courses are similar to the courses that might be found in a professional writing degree program.
3. Open University (http://labspace.open.ac.uk/) The UK's largest academic institution, Open University, offers a number of different writing courses through their OpenLearn website. The free curriculum includes both undergraduate and graduate level writing courses that are available to everyone regardless of country of origin. No registration is required.
4. University of Utah (http://www.hum.utah.edu/english/) The University of Utah's English Department offers free courses to self-learners around the world. Currently, there are only two free writing courses. Both offer strong preparation in their topic and are built for beginners. No registration is required.
4. Western Governors University (http://www.wgu.edu/) Western Governors University has made free course materials available through an open content license. There are several free writing courses courtesy of the university's Liberal Arts Department. All courses are split into convenient self-study modules. No registration is required.
6. Purdue University (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/) Purdue University brought their writing lab to life online in 1994 to offer a writing resource to students no matter where they were located. Online Writing Lab (OWL) materials are now free to everyone

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regardless of location or student status. The OWL site offers writing instruction, grammar and usage information, individualized help from tutors and much more. No registration is required.
7. Steven Barnes' UCLA Writing Course (http://www.lifewrite.com/html/class.htm) Best selling author and screenwriter Steven Barnes offers a free version on his website of the writing class he has been teaching for many years at UCLA. The course offers in-depth instruction on writing, which is why Barnes suggests completing each part of the nine-week course one week at a time. Nevertheless, the course can be downloaded all at once. No registration is required.
8. News University (http://www.newsu.org/) News University has a solid e-learning program designed to provide training to journalists and other professional writers. Most of the courses offered at News U are free, especially those that are selfdirected. Courses cover everything from writing and editing to reporting and ethics. News U also offers a newsletter, a blog and other great resources. Registration is required, but the course is free for everyone.
9. E-Zine University (http://www.ezineuniversity.com/) E-Zine University offers quite a few courses written by Internet publisher Kate Schultz and visiting professors. Although the courses offered at E-Zine University are designed mainly for web writers and E-zine writers, they would be helpful to almost any scribe. Courses are very short and don't take much time to complete. No registration is required.
10. Wikiversity (http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Wikiversity:Main_Page) Wikiversity is an active learning project that encourages people to create and benefit from online courses and tutorials. There are currently several different writing courses that can be found at Wikiversity, many of which focus on technical writing. Although these courses vary in length and content, there's something for everyone. No registration is required.

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CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
Definition: Addresses conflicts by focusing on the issues at hand to develop effective solutions when disputes or disagreements occur; helps others resolve conflicts by providing impartial mediation when needed

Suggested Activities for Development
Co-teach a conflict management class.
Identify recurring conflict situations. Investigate the barriers that prevent agreement to help determine the root cause for disagreement. Discuss your observations with your manager and create a plan to address the issues.
Involve yourself in projects or committees that will require working with challenging persons or colleagues. Keep a journal of difficult situations and how you handle them.
Keep a log of situations that involve conflict and stress. Write down key points and try to identify any common themes.
Participate in role plays where you must deal with a difficult customer, coworker, or employee. Ask for feedback.
Reflect on patterns of conflict that might exist within the entire organization. Formulate a plan to begin to address the workplace issues. This could benefit the organization/agency as a whole
Research past incidents of workplace violence in both private and public sector (newspapers, magazines). Form a group discussion on the initial conflict and how it could have been resolved before violence occurred.
Seek out a manager or co-worker who has effective conflict resolution skills and ask them to coach you or give you feedback.
Subscribe to management newsletters or websites. Conflict management is usually a popular topic. Read the articles and apply what you have learned.
Volunteer to assist in mediating between team members to resolve conflicts.

Books

Anatomy of Peace: Resolving the Heart of Conflict by Arbinger Institute (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2008). "The Anatomy of Peace" shows how to get past preconceived ideas and self-justifying reactions that keep us from seeing the world clearly and dealing with it effectively. Yusuf al-Falah, an Arab, and Avi Rozen, a Jew, each lost his father at the hands of the other's ethnic cousins. As the story unfolds, we discover how they came together, how they help warring parents and children to come together, and how we too can find our way out of the struggles that weigh us down. The choice between peace and war lies within us. As one of the characters says, "A solution to the inner war solves the outer war as well." This book offers more than hope -- it shows how we can prevent the conflicts that cause so much pain in our lives and in the world.

Don't Sweat the Small Stuff at Work: Simple Ways to Minimize Stress and Conflict While Bringing Out the Best in Yourself and Others by Richard Carlson (MJF Books, 2010). Richard Carlson shows readers how to interact more peaceably and joyfully with colleagues, clients, and bosses and reveals tips to minimize stress and bring out the best in themselves and others. Spending forty

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hours or more a week in an office, along with rush deadlines, heavy workloads, and daily dilemmas, can make working a very stressful experience. Richard Carlson reveals tips that will transform your outlook at the office, easing stress there and also leading to a happier life at home.
How to Reduce Workplace Conflict and Stress: How Leaders and Their Employees Can Protect Their Sanity and Productivity from Tension and Turf Wars by Anna Maravelas (August 2005). An alarming 88% of Americans cite hostility, desk-rage, and workplace incivility as top concerns. How to Reduce Workplace Conflict and Stress will help executives, supervisors, and managers-and the people that work for them-protect pride, profit, and productivity from these disabling emotions and behaviors.
Perfect Phrases for Dealing with Difficult People: Hundreds of Ready-to-Use Phrases for Handling Conflict, Confrontations, and Challenging Personalities by Susan F. Benjamin (The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2007). No matter where you work or what you do, you're bound to run into "colorful characters" who can make your job challenging. No question-learning to deal with them will prove critical to your success in the workplace. That's why you need this all-purpose reference of readyto-use phrases to help you handle all kinds of people at all job levels. Whether you work for the proverbial "bad boss" manage an office packed with "personalities," or juggle a three-ring circus of cranky clients, crazy customers, and annoying associates, you'll find just the right words for every situation.

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CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION
Definition: Applies creative problem-solving skills to his/her work to develop solutions to problems; recognizes and demonstrates the value in taking "smart" risks and learning from mistakes; develops multiple alternatives and understands the feasibility of each; effectively shares and implements his/her ideas

Suggested Activities for Development

Adapt what's already there. You don't have to innovate from scratch. Some of the most successful ideas build on other concepts.
Commit to identifying two or more solutions when solving a problem. Weigh the costs and benefits associated with each solution and determine a course of action.
Constantly expose yourself to new ideas and trends. Build your intellectual curiosity by developing your knowledge of the world around you. Get into the habit of reading newspapers and periodicals for current events, technical journals for new developments in your field, and books for ideas relating to your work and personal life.
Continually scan the media for interesting or unusual trends (e.g., technology). Identify one or two trends that could enhance or potentially threaten services that are currently being provided. Present findings and recommendations to your manager.
Encourage innovation by creating a climate in which individuals feel free to present their ideas without fear of criticism. When presented with a new idea, ask people to first identify and discuss what they like, rather than what they dislike, about an idea.
Identify a recurring problem in the work unit. Generate a set of solutions to address the problem. Devise an implementation plan for the chosen solution.
If you run out of ideas, take a break. Later redefine the problem and look at it from a different perspective.
Interview customers to determine how they view the organization or department. Based on this information evaluate current processes, people, and technology. Share any recommendations with the manager and devise a plan of action.
Listen to other people's opinions and suggestions. First identify all the positive aspects of their viewpoint before taking a more critical approach.
Once a week, engage in an activity that is not familiar.
Once you have defined a problem and generated solutions, challenge yourself to think how you would defend the problem from the opposite point of view.
Play games that stimulate creative thinking (e.g., Charades or Pictionary).
Recognize and reward employees who come up with innovative ideas.
Research how new technologies are being used and applied in different industries or organizations. Determine how the basic concepts could be applied in the organization. Formally present ideas and an implementation strategy to senior management.
Seek out creative thinkers and talk with them to generate new ideas that can be applied in the work unit.
Subscribe to magazines or attend conferences and workshops that present innovative concepts and ideas in the field.

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Talk to others in different parts of the organization, colleagues outside the organization and friends to see how they have addressed similar situations or problems. Try to build on other people's opinions by adopting a "yes and..." instead of a "yes, but..." attitude. Use the "W" questions (why, where, what, who, when, and how) more in approaching situations. They'll increase your understanding of the challenge and its relation to other issues. These links can lead you to greater enthusiasm and satisfaction. Volunteer to work on cross-functional teams or with people who are known to think outside of the box. Incorporate any new ideas and concepts gained from the experience in the work unit. Watch for snap reactions. Rather than assuming that the first alternative that enters your mind is the best solution, write it down and then consider other opinions. When generating ideas, broadly scan the alternatives, challenging yourself to view the problem from at least three different perspectives. By spending more time defining the problem in a multitude of ways, you will be able to generate a broader range of possible solutions.
Books
How To Get Ideas, 2nd Edition by Jack Foster (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2007). Written by Jack Foster, a creative director for various advertising agencies with more than 40 years experience, How to Get Ideas (over 90,000 copies sold and translated into 15 languages) is a fun, accessible, and practical guide that takes the mystery and confusion out of developing new ideas.
The Creativity Book: A Year's Worth of Inspiration and Guidance by Eric Maisel (Tarcher, 2000). This book is by America's leading expert on the psychological side of creativity. In this book Maisel presents a complete one-year plan for unleashing your creativity. It includes two discussions/exercises per week and culminates in a guided project of your choice from working on your current novel to planning a new home business.
When Sparks Fly: Igniting Creativity in Groups by Dorothy Leonard-Barton and Walter C. Swap (Harvard Business School Press, 2005). Group creativity is the key to success in many organizations. The authors provide a comprehensive look at developing creativity in a group setting, including their five-step process. The book includes examples of corporate innovation and psychology-based look at human creativity.

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CULTURAL AWARENESS
Definition: Demonstrates an open-minded approach to understanding people regardless of their gender, age, race, national origin, religion, ethnicity, disability status, or other characteristics; treats all people fairly and consistently; effectively works with people from diverse backgrounds by treating them with dignity and respect

Suggested Activities for Development
Actively solicit input from a wide variety of people and functions. Circulate newsletters and articles talking about diversity in the workplace. Create a diversity newsletter for your organization. Involve others to help it expand. Create learning opportunities about diverse cultures during team meetings (e.g., have a `diversity' potluck for lunch or play a diversity trivia game). Create or volunteer to participate on a panel that reviews organizational policies and practices for inclusiveness. Create or volunteer to serve on a diversity council. Educate yourself about your own cultural values, assumptions, and background. Make a point of drawing together diverse groups when discussing issues, solving problems and developing opportunities. Research diversity topics (e.g. TV specials, articles, blogs, theater). Engage colleagues in discussions about diversity. Seek to have a mentor/mentee from a different background. Speak out when others are not valued or their ideas or views are not taken into account. Spend time (e.g., lunch, breaks) with people who are from a different background. Suggest diversity issues and topics for the agenda at regular management or work team meetings. Survey or conduct a focus group to gain insight regarding ways to make the work environment more inclusive. Use personality tools like the DiSC Profile to learn ways of understanding individual differences among people. Volunteer to do an internal diversity analysis of your workplace. Share your findings with others.

Books

Bridging Differences: Effective Intergroup Communication by William B. Gudykunst (Sage Publications, Inc., 2003). One of the biggest challenges in today's organizations, in which most managers work with people from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds, is communication. Stereotypes impact how messages are received and interpreted. The author discusses how individuals can improve their intergroup communication.

Generations, Inc.: From Boomers to Linksters - Managing the Friction Between Generations at Work by Meagan Johnson and Larry Johnson (AMACOM, 2010). Because each generation looks at business from its own unique perspective, they won't always see eye to eye. Professionals of different ages have different definitions of concepts like success, work ethic, priorities, and a job

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well done. Generations, Inc. makes it easy for any manager, supervisor, or team leader to: Talk openly about conflict Create cross-generational alliances Reconcile disparate values and idiosyncratic working styles Run meetings and direct teams with equal (and equally valued) input from members of all generations.
None of Us Is As Good As All of Us: How McDonald's Prospers by Embracing Inclusion and Diversity by Patricia Sowell Harris (Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated, 2009). Everyone knows McDonald's, one of the most recognizable brand names in the world. But few know the extent to which McDonald's continued and ongoing success is due to the company's internal philosophy of inclusion and diversity. One of the biggest employers in the world, McDonald's staff is one of the world's most racially, culturally, and religiously diverse. This book offers the first inside look at the company's philosophy of inclusion and diversity through interviews with more than 60 key employees and leaders.
Salsa, Soul, and Spirit: Leadership for a Multicultural Age by Juana Borda (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., 2007). This book shows how incorporating Latino, African American, and American Indian approaches to leadership into the mainstream has the potential to strengthen leadership practices and inspire today's ethnically rich workforce. The book identifies eight core leadership principles common to all three cultures, principles deeply rooted in each culture's values and developed under the most trying conditions. Using a lively blend of personal reflections, interviews, and historical background, it shows how these principles developed and illustrates the creative ways they've been put into practice in these communities (and some forward-looking companies).
The Loudest Duck: Moving Beyond Diversity while Embracing Differences to Achieve Success at Work by Laura A. Liswood (Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated, 2009). The Loudest Duck is a business guide that explores workplace diversity and presents new ideas for getting the most business and organizational benefit from it. In the Chinese children's parable, the loudest duck is the one that gets shot. In America, we like to say that the squeaky wheel gets the grease. Comparing the two, it's easy to see that our different cultures teach us different sets of values, and those values often translate into different ways of doing business that may subtly advantage one culture at work and disadvantage another. The Loudest Duck offers a way to move beyond traditional diversity efforts that ignore our differences and toward modern diversity practices that embrace those differences--and profit from them.
What If?: Short Stories to Spark Diversity Dialogue by Steve L. Robbins (Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc., 2008). Losers in the war for talent: hiring and retaining the best and the brightest are what market leadership is all about. What If? delivers a highly creative and innovative new way to explore the issues that dominate today's multicultural, multiethnic workplace. To the 25 witty yet inspiring stories in this collection, Robbins has added tips and suggestions for putting these key learnings into action, and questions and an exercise at the end of each chapter to help readers further explore each topic. Combined, What If? offers a powerful lens into the human experience.

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FLEXIBILITY
Definition: Adapts to change and different ways of doing things quickly and positively; does not shy away from addressing setbacks or ambiguity; deals effectively with a variety of people and situations; appropriately adapts one's thinking or approach as the situation changes

Suggested Activities for Development
Ask your manager and/or colleagues about how you can improve your performance on the job. Modify your work behaviors as appropriate. Be alert for when you hold on to a solution or procedure because "that's the way it's always been done," instead of considering other alternatives. Develop a business case that supports a significant change in the way your work unit or department does business. Present the costs/benefits associated with the change. Each week commit to doing something different (e.g., spend time with someone from a different background, listen to different music, take a different route home). Explore different management styles and techniques for different employees. If you have trouble seeing the value of another person's viewpoint, mentally reverse sides to see if you can come up with ideas that support that person's position. Make a list of routine processes in your work unit. Devise a plan to implement new technology and/or techniques to make them more efficient. Reward flexibility. "The way things have always been done" is often a refuge for the inflexible. Take a personality inventory (e.g., Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or DiSC Profile) to learn more about your personality. Tell your peers you are trying to improve your flexibility and ask them to give you feedback when you are or are not being flexible. Keep a log of the situation and determine ways in which you could be more flexible in the future.
Volunteer to work on an innovative project or a project that is different from your normal work. Volunteer to work with someone whose viewpoint is different from yours. When you first encounter shifting priorities and change, don't react. Gain more information before you express your reaction. Internalizing the change may make it easier for you to accept it.

Books

How Successful People Think: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life by J. C. Maxwell (Center Street, 2009). Gather successful people from all walks of life-what would they have in common? The way they think! Now you can think as they do and revolutionize your work and life! A Wall Street Journal bestseller, How Successful People Think is the perfect, compact read for today's fast-paced world. America's leadership expert John C. Maxwell will teach you how to be more creative and when to question popular thinking. You'll learn how to capture the big picture while focusing your thinking. You'll find out how to tap into your creative potential, develop shared ideas, and derive lessons from the past to better understand the future. With these eleven keys to more effective thinking, you'll clearly see the path to personal success.

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AdaptAbility: How to Survive Change You Didn't Ask For by M.J. Ryan (Crown Archetype, 2009). This book does a great job of outlining how to survive change - expected or unexpected. In a hurry? Reading the table of contents alone will give you more than enough to get started. In itself, it's a step-by-step guide to surviving unexpected change. At 219 pages, this book manages to be both a quick and easy read and everything you need to know to become adept at staying afloat in permanent white water. The book is crisp, clear, and full of useful advice.

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INITIATIVE
Definition: Proactively identifies ways to contribute to the State's goals and missions; achieves results without needing reminders from others; identifies and takes action to address problems and opportunities

Suggested Activities for Development
Discuss your schedule with colleagues who are engaged in similar work activities to determine if they are having similar difficulties in completing tasks. Brainstorm with colleagues about ways to overcome the difficulties. Determine which factors you have control over and which ones you do not. Get input from colleagues to develop an action plan to overcome difficulties.
Express an interest in taking on a broader range of job responsibilities. Determine the type of skills you would like to learn. Identify the actions you will need to take to learn these skills. Create an action plan with your manager, which includes the establishment of timelines. Monitor your progress toward completing your goals.
Identify a process in your workgroup that could be more efficient. Develop a plan to make the process more effective. Implement your plan. Solicit feedback from team members about the effectiveness of the new process.
Identify a project that you are currently involved in. Identify all of the tasks involved in completing the project and the challenges associated with each task. Determine if the challenges are high or low risk. Prepare alternatives and discuss the risk associated with each alternative with your manager.
Identify an initiative that was not successful. Determine what happened and establish a plan to ensure that the initiative is a success. Evaluate the effectiveness of your plan. Modify the plan as appropriate.
Identify someone who is successful at prioritizing and managing multiple tasks. Observe them for several hours and model how she or he prioritizes and manages multiple tasks.
If you are a manager, make a list of all of the tasks that must be completed. Determine which tasks can be delegated and delegate as appropriate.
Next time an assignment is received, evaluate the goal of the assignment. Devise a plan to exceed the goal above and beyond what is expected. Implement your plan.
Over the course of a week or a month, keep a log of all of the tasks that must be completed. Ask someone who is successful at prioritizing and managing multiple projects to review your log and provide suggestions and recommendations.
Over the course of a week, create a log of activities that you expect to complete and the length of time you expect to spend on each task. Keep another log of the activities you engage in and the amount of time you spend on each task. Compare the two logs. Determine if you are underestimating the time it takes to complete various tasks or if there are any obstacles that are keeping you from completing your tasks. Identify what you can do differently to accomplish your goals.
Review current processes for quality, effectiveness, and efficiency. Establish a taskforce to improve productivity and quality. Encourage the team to establish alternatives for improving processes of strategic importance.

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Review your weekly schedule with your manager to ensure that you both have an understanding of both your medium and long-term priorities. Discuss those factors that you have no control over that are taking up your time. Share your ideas to address these factors with your manager.
Take some time out each Friday to prioritize your tasks for the upcoming week. Group tasks into one of three categories: Critical, Important, and Nice to Do. Determine the consequences or benefits involved if each task is completed or not.
Use a project management tool (e.g., Microsoft Project) to manage future projects.
Volunteer to serve on a task force engaged in solving an organizational problem.
Whenever you have downtime, review your performance goals to identify something else you can do to go "above and beyond."
Books
Get Out of Your Own Way at Work and Help Others Do the Same: Conquer Self-Defeating Behavior on the Job by Mark Goulston (Penguin Group (USA), 2006). Whether it's a simple breach of etiquette or fear of learning new things, expecting too much from employees or failure to delegate, self-defeating behavior is the most common reason people put their jobs and reputations in jeopardy. Covering 40 of the most common self-defeating behaviors, this new book shows how to change behaviors-from self-defeating to career-enhancing.
Goal Setting: How to Create an Action Plan and Achieve Your Goals by Michael S. Dobson (AMACOM, 2008). In today's hectic work environment, the chances are that you have way too much to do and too little time to get it done. No matter how accomplished and capable you are, achieving your goals can seem almost insurmountable. Why is it that some people consistently seem to get more done than others? The answer is that they know how to set specific, achievable goals for themselves . . . and then follow through on them.
StrengthsFinder 2.0 by Tom Rath ( Gallup Press, 2007). Do you do what you do best every day? Chances are, you don't. From the cradle to the cubicle, we devote more time to fixing our shortcomings than to developing our strengths. To help people uncover their talents, Gallup introduced StrengthsFinder in the 2001 management book Now, Discover Your Strengths. The book ignited a global conversation, while StrengthsFinder helped millions discover their top five talents. In StrengthsFinder 2.0, Gallup unveils the new and improved version of its popular online assessment. With hundreds of strategies for applying your strengths, StrengthsFinder 2.0 will change the way you look at yourself -- and the world -- forever.An updated version of the StrengthsFinder program developed by Gallup experts to help readers discover their distinct talents and strengths and how they can be translated into personal and career successes.
The Procrastinator's Guide to Getting Things Done by Monica Ramirez Basco (Guilford Publications, Incorporated, 2009). Expressly designed for people who want to make changes but would be easily daunted by an elaborate self-help program, this concise, motivating guide is packed with highly practical tips and suggestions to help get things done in a timely manner. For therapy clients and others whose procrastination is causing problems at work, in school, or in relationships, this concise, motivating guide is packed with highly practical tips and suggestions. The book is expressly designed for people who want to make changes but would be easily daunted by an elaborate self-help program. Engaging quizzes and exercises help readers determine what type of procrastinator they are, outsmart their own delaying tactics, and build crucial skills for getting things done today. Cognitive-behavioral therapy expert Monica Ramirez Basco peppers the book with easy-to-relate-to examples from "recovering procrastinators" - including herself.

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NEGOTIATION AND INFLUENCE
Definition: Effectively represents his/her position on issues to gain support and buy-in from others; generates multiple alternatives to a problem to meet the needs of other stakeholders; works to achieve win-win outcomes that others can accept; appropriately utilizes settlement strategies, such as compromise
Suggested Activities for Development
Ask for feedback from people who did not support an idea or proposal you developed. Find out what you could have done to persuade them. Attend an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) workshop. Before presenting a new idea or action plan, list the people whose support is needed. Attempt to discover where each person stands in relation to your proposal pro, con, or neutral and formulate a plan to handle each. Do some brainstorming and list a number of ways that you could act to influence a situation, then consider which are most likely to be effective. Invite your manager to observe you in a meeting where you will be negotiating or influencing a group. Ask for feedback. Make a presentation to senior management about providing an innovative product or service to customers. Meet with someone whose negotiating skills you would classify as win/win. Find out what she or he does and apply what you learn to similar situations. Negotiate a contract with a customer. Observe people in your organization who are highly influential and try out techniques they use that best fit with your own style. Practice active listening, restate and recap others' perspectives back to them, so they will know you have understood the essence of their position. Seek assignments for yourself that require you to lead without formal authority. Seek these assignments for your team members as well. Think about your audience's needs, concerns, and perspectives. Consider how people are likely to react to your message, and whenever possible, position your message in a way that appeals to them and avoids negative reaction. Videotape yourself participating in a role-play where you are persuading someone to take action. Review it and give yourself feedback on your approach. Volunteer to negotiate a problem with a customer. Volunteer to serve as a mediator. Volunteer to work on a cross-functional team. When preparing for a negotiation, practice in front of your manager, colleagues, or family members.

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Books
Creative Negotiating: Proven Techniques for Getting What You Want from Any Negotiation by Stephen Kozicki (Adams Media Corp, 1998). Creative Negotiating gives you the negotiating techniques you need for every situation you'll face-from the simplest to the most difficult. Author Stephen Kozicki breaks the negotiating process into four easy-to-follow steps investigation, presentation, bargaining, and agreement and shows you how to negotiate your way successfully through all four stages. With dozens of real-world examples, illustrations, and diagrams, Creative Negotiating shows that you don't have to be manipulative or play tough to be a master negotiator.
Essentials of Negotiation/Edition 5 by Roy J. Lewicki, David M. Saunders, Bruce Barry (The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2010). Essentials of Negotiation, 5e is a condensed version of the main text, Negotiation, Sixth Edition. It explores the major concepts and theories of the psychology of bargaining and negotiation, and the dynamics of interpersonal and inter-group conflict and its resolution. Twelve of the 20 chapters from the main text have been included in this edition, several chapters having been condensed for this volume. Those condensed chapters have shifted from a more research-oriented focus to a more fundamental focus on issues such as critical negotiation subprocesses, multiparty negotiations, and the influence of international and cross-cultural differences on the negotiation process.
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie (Simon & Schuster, 2009). Carnegie's belief is that success is 15 percent knowledge and 85 percent in one's ability to express ideas, to assume leadership, and to arouse enthusiasm among people. He teaches these skills through underlying principles of dealing with people to encourage them to feel important and appreciated. He also emphasizes fundamental techniques for handling people without making them feel manipulated.
Influence without Authority by David L. Bradford and Allen R. Cohen (Wiley, 2005). The authors discuss how people without official authority can command the resources, information, and support needed to get work done. They stress thinking of the interests of coworkers in order to gain collaboration, assignment to challenging tasks, and opportunities for responsibility from above, laterally, and below.
Influence: Science and Practice by Robert B. Cialdini (Prentice Hall, 2008). Influence: Science and Practice is an examination of the psychology of compliance (i.e. uncovering which factors cause a person to say "yes" to another's request). Written in a narrative style combined with scholarly research, Cialdini combines evidence from experimental work with the techniques and strategies he gathered while working as a salesperson, fundraiser, advertiser, and in other positions inside organizations that commonly use compliance tactics to get us to say "yes." Cialdini organizes compliance techniques into six categories based on psychological principles that direct human behavior: reciprocation, consistency, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity.
Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B. Cialdini (HarperCollins Publishers, 2007). Influence, the classic book on persuasion, explains the psychology of why people say "yes"--and how to apply these understandings. Dr. Robert Cialdini is the seminal expert in the rapidly expanding field of influence and persuasion. His thirty-five years of rigorous, evidence-based research along with a three-year program of study on what moves people to change behavior has resulted in this highly acclaimed book. You'll learn the six universal principles, how to use them to become a skilled persuader--and how to defend yourself against them. Perfect for people in all walks of life, the principles of Influence will move you toward profound personal change and act as a driving force for your success.

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Definition: Demonstrates a commitment to professional development by proactively seeking opportunities to develop new capabilities, skills, and knowledge; acquires the skills needed to continually enhance his/her contribution to the State and to his/her respective profession

Suggested Activities for Development

Ask for feedback when working on projects and keep a journal of the feedback that you receive. Identify trends that reveal areas for improvement and devise a learning strategy to develop your skills in these areas.

Ask your manager and/or colleagues to point out sources of information that will help you to increase your knowledge in a particular area. Review the information and share what you have learned with others.

Ask your manager to increase the scope of your decision-making authority. This will enable you to learn more about other areas of the business.

Attend meetings in other work units or departments to learn more about what they are working on.

Become active in a volunteer agency.

Become an active member in a professional or community organization.

Commit to reading professional journals, books, and articles that will expand your knowledge in a particular area.

Develop a new concept that would impact your industry and develop a plan to support its implementation.

Establish a mentoring relationship with an internal or external expert in an area you would like to develop.

Establish three professional goals and develop a personal learning agenda, which includes specific steps needed to accomplish your goals.

Implement a Lunch and Learn program where your colleagues can share information about what they have learned in their field every month.

Join an industry or community board.

Join an online discussion group or participate in roundtable discussions on a topic in your field.

Keep abreast of new legislation. Share with others how it impacts your work unit or department.

Keep track of lessons learned. Refer to them periodically to reinforce what you learned.

Learn a new language.

Learn to look at negative feedback and criticism as potentially useful information that you need to understand more fully.

Limit your focus. Genuine progress on a couple of important goals is more meaningful than negligible progress on many less-important goals.

Make a list of areas you would like to know more about. Identify specific steps you will take to enhance your knowledge in these areas (e.g., reading books, attending classes, talking to experts).

Put your action steps for your development goals on your daily "to do" list and make sure they are considered high priority.

Regularly view your organization's website and/or intranet.

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Research a new trend or technique. Summarize what you learned and present it at one of your manager's staff meetings. Research an interesting topic in your field. Write an article about it and submit it for publication.
Teach yourself how to use software programs that will help you on the job. Use a multi-rater or 360-degree feedback instrument to obtain comprehensive feedback on yourself from others. Volunteer to accompany and/or stand in for your manager at meetings.
Volunteer to work on a project outside of your work unit or department. Work with your manager to identify a temporary role/assignment that you can fill to broaden your skill set and learn more about the business.

Books

Getting Ahead: Three Steps to Take Your Career to the Next Level by Joel A. Garfinkle (Wiley, 2011). In Getting Ahead, Joel Garfinkle reveals his signature model for mastering three skills to take your career to the next level: Perception, Visibility, and Influence. The PVI-model of professional advancement will teach you to: (1) Actively promote yourself as an asset and valuable person inside the organization, (2) Increase your visibility to gain others' recognition and appreciation for your efforts and (3) Become a person of influence who makes key decisions inside the organization.
Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton (Free Press, 2001). The premise of this new management study is that the most effective method for motivating people is to build on their strengths rather than correcting their weaknesses. The authors, researchers at the Gallup Organization, have analyzed results of interviews conducted by Gallup of over 1.7 million employees from 101 companies and representing 63 countries. When asked, only 20 percent of these employees stated that they were using their strengths everyday. So that they can take a test revealing their strengths, readers are given access to the StrengthsFinder web site and a special ID number; once they learn their profile, they can read the analysis in the book. A description of each type is included, together with case studies, and managers are shown how to handle various types. This book offers a unique perspective on successful management strategy and developing employees' strengths.
Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey (Free Press, 2004). In this book, the author relates how true success encompasses a balance of personal and professional effectiveness. It is a manual for performing better in both arenas. Covey takes you through the necessary changes to adopt the seven habits, which encompasses such things as productivity, time management, attitude, and becoming proactive.
Successful Manager's Handbook: Development Suggestions for Today's Managers by Sue Gebelein (Personnel Decisions International, 2000). This book offers development advice and resources for leadership competencies. The book breaks the critical areas of business into four basic areas: Thought Leadership, Results Leadership, People Leadership, and Self Leadership. In addition, it breaks down those four areas into nine core factors that determine business success. These core factors include Strategy, Judgment, Business Knowledge, Planning and Execution, Motivation and Courage, Leadership, Interpersonal, Communication, and Self-Management.
Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else by G. Colvin (Portfolio Trade, 2010). Asked to explain why a few people truly excel, most of us offer one of two answers. The first is hard work. Yet we all know plenty of hard workers who have been doing the same job for years or decades without becoming great. The other possibility is that the elite possess an innate talent for excelling in their field. We assume that Mozart was born with an

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astounding gift for music, and Warren Buffett carries a gene for brilliant investing. The trouble is, scientific evidence doesn't support the notion that specific natural talents make great performers. According to distinguished journalist Geoff Colvin, both the hard work and natural talent camps are wrong. What really makes all the difference is a highly specific kind of effort-"deliberate practice"that few of us pursue when we're practicing golf or piano or stockpicking. Based on a wide array of scientific research, Talent Is Overrated shares the secrets of extraordinary performance and shows how to apply these principles. It features the stories of extraordinary people who never stopped challenging themselves and who achieved world- class greatness through deliberate practiceincluding Benjamin Franklin, comedian Chris Rock, football star Jerry Rice, and top CEOs Jeffrey Immelt and Steven Ballmer.
The Brand You 50 : Or : Fifty Ways to Transform Yourself from an 'Employee' into a Brand That Shouts Distinction, Commitment, and Passion! by Tom Peters (Knopf, 1999). In The Brand You5 0, Peters sees a new kind of corporate citizen who believes that surviving means not blending in but standing out. He believes that "90+ percent of White Collar Jobs will be totally reinvented/reconceived in the next decade" and that job security means developing marketable skills, making yourself distinct and memorable, and developing your network ability. His list-filled prescriptions cover everything; for example, "You are Your Rolodex I: BRAND YOU IS A TEAM" (no. 22), "Consider your 'product line'" (no. 25), "Work on your Optimism" (no. 35), "Sell. SELL. SELL!!!" (no. 47).
The Power of Feedback: 35 Principles for Turning Feedback from Others into Personal and Professional Change by Joseph R. Folkman (Wiley, 2006). For business leaders and their organizations, as well as professionals in any industry, listening to and acting on feedback is the best and most effective way to become more competent, capable, and effective. In The Power of Feedback, the author presents thirty-five principles that help people and organizations turn feedback into real, effective, and long-term change. He shows you how to determine which feedback instruments will work for you and how to make the best use of their results.
The Talent Code: Greatness Isn't Born. It's Grown. Here's How. By D. Coyle (Bantam, 2009). Journalist Coyle travels the world to discover the truth about talent in this fascinating account that studies how individuals can unlock their full potential and bring their talents to light. The discoveries put forth by Coyle come down to three main elements: coaching, motivation and practice. While these hardly seem like breakthroughs, Coyle's discovery process proves fascinating. Providing detailed examples from a variety of different sources, Coyle's work becomes as motivational as the stories he presents.

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PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Definition: Effectively manages project(s) by appropriately focusing attention on the critical few priorities; effectively creates and executes against project timelines based on priorities, resource availability, and other project requirements (i.e., budget); effectively evaluates planned approaches, determines feasibility, and makes adjustments when needed
Suggested Activities for Development
Develop a forecasting model or use forecasting software to determine staffing, technology, and/or budget needs. Develop a formal implementation plan for a new product or service. Present ideas to senior management. Devise a tracking process for monitoring progress and/or the progress of others against deadlines and standards that have been established. Prepare interim progress reports and schedule regular update meetings to provide feedback regarding progress against deadlines. For upcoming projects, identify the tasks involved and the type and amount of resources needed to complete each task. Devise a plan to acquire the necessary resources. Identify one or two people within the organization who have excellent project management skills. Work to improve relationships with them. Discuss how they have handled various work situations. Apply what is learned to similar situations. Identify people who are successful at making optimum use of their resources (e.g., people, financial, and technology). Find out what they do. Meet with the manager to discuss the budget and ways to control costs in the work unit. Identify the resource(s) that consume most of the work unit's budget. Periodically, ask employees if they have the necessary resources to perform their job. Review procedures for acquiring resources. Make sure the approval process is understood for obtaining various resources. Review your weekly schedule with your manager to ensure that you both have an understanding of both your medium and long-term priorities. Discuss those factors that you have no control over that are taking up your time. Share your ideas to address these factors with your manager. Seek feedback from a manager and/or colleagues regarding planning skills on a current project. Work to strengthen skills in problem areas. Take some time out each Friday to prioritize tasks for the upcoming week. Group task into one of three categories: Critical, Important, and Nice to Do. Determine the consequences involve if the task is not complete and the benefits if the tasks are completed. Volunteer to manage the budget tracking process for the work unit. When working on a project, develop or use a project management tool to help track resources. When working on a project, make a list and prioritize the resources needed according to their level of importance within the department. Determine the cost (including opportunity costs) involved in using these resources.

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Books
Absolute Beginner's Guide to Project Management (2nd Edition) by Greg Horine (Que, 2009). This book will walk you step by step through an entire project. Expert project manager Gregory Horine shows you exactly what works and what doesn't, drawing on the field's proven best practices. Understand your role as a project manager...gain the skills and discover the personal qualities of great project managers...learn how to organize, estimate, and schedule projects effectively...manage deliverables, issues, changes, risks, quality, vendors, communications, and expectations...make the most of technology...manage virtual teams...avoid the problems that trip up new project managers! This new edition jumpstarts your project management expertise even faster, with all-new insights on Microsoft Project, challenging project situations and intriguing project management topics of the day.
Mastering Project Management: Applying Advanced Concepts of System Thinking, Control and Evaluation and Resource Allocation by J. P. Lewis (McGraw-Hill Companies, 2007). For nearly a decade, Mastering Project Management, has been the field's gold standard reference. Now, James Lewis has updated his classic guide, offering both practical, real-world guidance and a focus on higher-level tools and applications that you won't find anywhere else. This fully revised second edition shows project managers and team leaders from all industries how to ramp up and fine-tune managing skills and bring all projects to a successful completion. Carefully avoiding any overlap from his other popular project management titles, Lewis clearly defines your role as a project manager and outlines the steps to mastering project management.
Project Management For Dummies by Stanley E. Portny (Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated, 2010). The tools you need for successful project management. In today's time-crunched, cost-conscious global business environment, tight project deadlines and stringent expectations are the norm. So what does it take to succeed? This hands-on guide introduces you to the principles of project management and shows you how to put them to use so you can successfully manage a project from start to finish. And if you're studying for the Project Management Institute's Project Management Professional certification exam, you can rest easy knowing that this book is aligned with the guide that's the basis for the exam.
The 25 Best Time Management Tools & Techniques: How to Get More Done Without Driving Yourself Crazy by D. Sundheim (Peak Performance Press, Inc., 2005) A no-fluff, easy-to-read compilation of the best advice from the top 20 time management books. Recommendations cover five areas: Focus, Plan, Organize, Take Action, and Learn. Short chapters cover the A to Z of time management from finding out the value of time to prioritizing, overcoming procrastination, and managing stress and well being.
The Project Management Tool Kit: 100 Tips and Techniques for Getting the Job Done Right, 2nd Edition (Amacom, 2010) Today's projects are more complex and challenging than ever, and project managers need all the help they can get to succeed amid shifting priorities, interruptions, inadequate funding, expectations of multiple stakeholders, and other obstacles. A practical on-thejob resource for project managers in any industry, this fully revised and updated edition of "The Project Management Tool Kit" is packed with results oriented, practical tips. Complete with checklists, examples, and clear graphics, "The Project Management Tool Kit" offers 100 practical, use-them-now strategies for mastering any project challenge.

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TEACHING OTHERS
Definition: Enhances the capabilities of the organization by openly and effectively sharing his/her subject matter expertise with others; supports a continuous learning environment by preserving and compiling intellectual capital which can be used by others within his/her work group, department and State entities, as appropriate
Suggested Activities for Development
Arrange to meet and work with people who are good at coaching and teaching others. Incorporate their methods in your own teaching style. Ask an employee to attend a meeting in your place, ask him/her to take notes. Schedule time afterwards to review the details of the meeting. Become a mentor. Coach someone on how to do something with which he/she has little familiarity. Connect people with role models and mentors who possess the skills they are trying to develop. Develop a presentation that informs customers of your agency's products and services. Identify job assignments that will increase team members' or employees' exposure to different divisions and management experience. Identify initiatives in other areas that may provide development opportunities for others. Let employees take turns running staff meetings. This does three things: It shows that you respect and trust their abilities, it builds their confidence and leadership skills, and it gives you a chance to see how someone handles a group. Partner with your direct reports to create development plans and encourage them to do the same for their staffs. Personalize your approach. You may be coaching many employees and be tempted to adopt the same style with each. Instead, get to know them as individuals so you can tailor your coaching efforts appropriately. One employee may need reassurance, while another may respond to being challenged. Learn how to reach each one. Provide and participate in mock feedback sessions. Regularly share resources or information that you have researched or learned about for the benefit of individual agencies and the government as a whole. Schedule individual one-on-one time with subordinates/supervisor for the sole purpose of development. Focus on coaching and development--what is accomplished well and what could be done differently to be more effective. Volunteer to talk to students about what you do at your local high school, college, church or civic organization. When you attend a conference, bring it back with you. Whenever you attend an industry conference, take detailed notes and turn them into a presentation for your direct reports. Bring them up-to-speed on hot topics, what they should read up on, and so on.

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Books
A Mentor's Companion by Larry Ambrose (Perrone-Ambrose Assoc, Inc., 1998). A Mentor's Companion is written in a conversational manner. Chapters 2-6 begin with an on-going mentoring scenario that unfolds throughout the chapters. After each scenario, a short chapter follows that delves deeper into the mentoring attributes touched on in the story. Larry Ambrose then shows notepads for the mentor's use and practical checklists that are incredibly helpful for anyone preparing to serve as a mentor. Each chapter's title page also has an insightful quote that sets the mood for the chapter.
Coaching for Performance: Growing Human Potential and Purpose: The Principles and Practice of Coaching and Leadership by John Whitmore (Brealey, Nicholas Publishing Limited, 2009). The bestselling bible of the coaching industry provides an in-depth look into maximizing performance. This revised and expanded fourth edition has four new chapters including a critical examination of the future of coaching and its applications in times of crisis and change.
Developing the Leaders Around You by John C. Maxwell (Thomas Nelson, 2005).The basic premise of this book is that you can multiply the efficiency of your organization by devoting time to developing the potential leaders around you. The book provides guidelines as to how to identify those individuals who have the potential for leadership, and then gives instruction on how to develop them. The guidelines and instruction the author gives can be summarized as follows: choose the individuals who are the most willing to grow and learn new things as your potential leaders, and grow them by investing time in them, empowering them for success by delegating wisely and providing counsel.
Leadership Coaching: Working With Leaders to Develop Elite Performance by Johnathan Passmore (Kogan Page, Limited; 2011). Leadership Coaching" examines the models and techniques used to develop leadership in others through a coaching relationship. Looking at specific models, each contributor reviews the research which supports the model and then explores how the model can be of help in a coaching relationship. The book includes chapters on well-known models such as Porter's Strategy model and Goleman's model of leadership styles.
Manager's Guide to Effective Coaching by Marshall J. Cook and Laura Poole (McGraw-Hill, 2011). This book explains how to apply sound coaching methods in the workplace, encouraging top performance by working with employees, instead of over them. Cook shows readers how to understand the characteristics of an effective coach and apply them in the workplace.
Mentoring 101: What Every Leader Needs to Know by John Maxwell (Thomas Nelson Incorporated, 2008). In a concise, straightforward voice, Maxwell focuses on essential and time-tested qualities necessary for developing mentoring relationships that make a difference in the lives of colleagues and the life of a business.
Quiet Leadership: Six Steps to Transforming Performance at Work by David Rock (Harper-Collins Publishers, 2007). Improving the performance of your employees involves one of the hardest challenges in the known universe: changing the way they think. In constant demand as a coach, speaker, and consultant to companies around the world, David Rock has proven that the secret to leading people (and living and working with them) is found in the space between their ears. "If people are being paid to think," he writes, "isn't it time the business world found out what the thing doing the work, the brain, is all about?" Supported by the latest groundbreaking research, Quiet Leadership provides a brain-based approach that will help busy leaders, executives, and managers improve their own and their colleagues' performance. Rock offers a practical, six-step guide to making permanent workplace performance change by unleashing higher productivity, new levels of morale, and greater job satisfaction.

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TEAM LEADERSHIP
Definition: Effectively manages and guides group efforts; tracks team progress, adequately anticipates roadblocks, and changes course as needed to achieve team goals; provides appropriate feedback concerning group and individual performance, including areas for improvement
Suggested Activities for Development
Arrange to have regular conversations with some mentors that are good leaders. Make a point of discussing specific issues, and model your behavior after the leadership mentors. Ask for regular feedback on your leadership style from colleagues, managers and team members and employees. Delegate as much as possible and make challenging assignments available to everyone. Keep a journal of tasks that were delegated and their outcomes. Provide feedback to team members or employees. Develop a presentation of your vision for your work unit. Create a graphical image that reinforces the key concepts of your vision. Present your vision at a team meeting. Develop and deliver motivational speeches about your team's successes to create positive morale. Identify future trends and events that will impact your work unit. Work with your team to develop strategies to meet future challenges. Monitor the "right" performance measures; Give frequent and candid performance feedback on how employees are doing their jobs. Notice and show appreciation when expected results and behaviors are realized; Retain high performers through recognition of accomplishments and development/career opportunities. Pair new employees with a "buddy" to ease their transition into the organization. A buddy can give them information that's not generally available from traditional orientation programs how to get things done, what to avoid, etc. Provide adequate resources for employees to accomplish their goals up front and upon request of employees; remove barriers as needed to help accomplish team goals. Spend 20 minutes a day "checking in" with four of your employees for five minutes each . . . every single day. No conference rooms or formal agendas just stop by somebody's desk and check in. You can accomplish a lot in those five minutes: sharing information on project updates, burning questions, industry trends, important customer issues, etc.

Books

How the Best Leaders Lead by Brian Tracy. (AMACOM, 2010). Do you have the heart of a leader? You'd better. Because even under normal circumstances, only the most focused, effective, and inspiring leaders have what it takes to motivate their teams to outstanding success--and now, as we navigate the turbulent waters of more challenging times, competition is leaner and more fierce than ever. No matter what your goal, your coming out on top depends not only on knowing how to lead...but on being one of the best at doing it. Packed with proven winning strategies and actions

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you can implement immediately, plus powerful tools, including self-assessments, a strategic planning questionnaire, and other eye-opening exercises, How the Best Leaders Lead reveals a champion's playbook of secrets, tactics, and strategies to make you a successful leader.
Lead with Love: A way to create real success by Ken Blanchard and Colleen Barrett (FT Press, 2010) For decades, Southwest has been the airline industry's shining performer: the company of choice for travelers, employers, and investors alike. Why? Southwest's leaders know how to lead with love. As Southwest's President, Colleen Barrett proved that leading with love is the non-stop route to outstanding business performance. Lead with LUV is an extraordinary, wide-ranging conversation between Barrett and Ken Blanchard, the legendary author of The One Minute Manager. Together, they reveal why leading with love is the most powerful way to lead, how to make it work wherever you are, and how it can help you achieve truly amazing results.
Strengths-Based Leadership by Tom Rath, Barry Conchie (Gallup Press, 2009). Using Gallup's discoveries, authors Tom Rath and Barry Conchie identify three keys to being an effective leader and use firsthand accounts from highly successful leaders -- including the founder of Teach for America and the president of The Ritz-Carlton -- to show how each person's unique talents can drive their success. A new version of Gallup's popular StrengthsFinder assessment helps readers discover their own special gifts, and specific strategies show them how to lead with their top five talents. Loaded with novel research, inspiring stories, and actionable ideas, Strengths-Based Leadership offers a new roadmap for leading people toward a better future.
The Carrot Principle: How the Best Managers Use Recognition to Engage Their People, Retain Talent, and Accelerate Performance by Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group, 2009). Got carrotphobia? The Carrot Principle reveals the groundbreaking results of one of the most in-depth management studies ever undertaken, showing definitively that the central characteristic of the most successful managers is that they provide their employees with frequent and effective recognition. The Carrot Principle illustrates that the relationship between recognition and improved business results is highly predictable-it's proven to work. Recognition done right, recognition combined with four other core traits of effective leadership.
The Mentor Leader: Secrets to Building People and Teams That Win Consistently by Tony Dungy. (Tyndale House Publishers, 2010). "Your only job is to help your players be better." Tony Dungy is sharing his unique leadership philosophy with you. In The Mentor Leader, Tony reveals what propelled him to the top of his profession and shows how you can apply the same approach to virtually any area of your life. In the process, you'll learn the seven keys of mentoring leadership-- and why they're so effective; why mentor leadership brings out the best in people; how a mentor leader recovers from mistakes and handles team discipline; and the secret to getting people to follow you and do their best for you without intimidation tactics.

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Individual Development Plan Worksheet

Name

Title

Date

Development is a partnership between the agency, the employee, and the manager. One of the key steps of development is to establish a development plan. There are three components to consider when creating this plan:
Development in current role Expand skill set and knowledge areas Prepare for future roles
Considering the three components, complete the sections below. After the development plan is completed, meet with your manager to review the plan.
Strengths Strengths can be based on your current job performance or your career aspirations. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
Development Needs Development needs can be based on your current job performance or your career aspirations. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
Development Focus Select two or three areas from the lists above to focus on for the current year. 1. 2. 3.

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Individual Development Plan Worksheet

Employee Development Plan: Identify and list activities that will support the identified focus areas

On-The-Job Learning

Use a wide variety of development approaches Timeframe Completed Self-Directed Learning
(Books, Articles, Job Shadowing, etc.)

Timeframe Completed

Classes / Workshops / Timeframe Completed Professional/Community Timeframe CompletedTimefram

Conferences

Activities

Mentoring

TeimfraemfraemCeomCpolemtepdleted Assessments

Timeframe Completed

Formal Education

Timeframe Completed Other

Timeframe Completed

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Locations