Body talk: African rhythmic language through body percussion, 2020

Collection:
Atlanta University and Clark Atlanta University Theses and Dissertations
Title:
Body talk: African rhythmic language through body percussion, 2020
Creator:
Stewart, Joseph
Contributor to Resource:
Black, Daniel
Date of Original:
2020-05
Subject:
Degrees, Academic
Dissertations, Academic
Location:
United States, Georgia, Fulton County, Atlanta, 33.749, -84.38798
Medium:
theses
dissertations
Type:
Text
Format:
application/pdf
Description:
This study examines the transmutation of rhythmic language spoken first through African drum, and later on through African bodies practicing body percussion. The use of African drums became illegal on plantations because of its communicative power during slave revolts. Africans circumvented the oppressive slave laws, by using their bodies as drums in art forms such as hambone, tap dance, church hand clapping, and foot stomping. These rhythmic language techniques have altered into scatting and beat boxing, highlighting the ingenuity of the African spirit. In any case, the aim of this thesis is to identify the parallels between the talking drum and the human body, and to recognize the ingenuity of African rhythmic language.
Date of award: 2020-05
Degree type: thesis
Degree name: Master of Arts (MA)
Granting institution: Clark Atlanta University
Department: Department of African American Studies, Africana Women’s Studies, and History
Advisor: Black, Daniel
Metadata URL:
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12322/cau.td:2020_stewart_joseph
Language:
eng
Holding Institution:
Clark Atlanta University
Rights:
Rights Statement information

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