"Hegira" by Georgia Douglas Johnson

Collection:
New Georgia Encyclopedia
Title:
"Hegira" by Georgia Douglas Johnson
Creator:
Johnson, Georgia Douglas Camp, 1886-1966
Contributor to Resource:
Whitsett, Zenzi
Subject:
African American women poets--Georgia
African American poets--Georgia
Women--Georgia
African American women--Georgia
Poetry
African Americans--Social conditions
African Americans--Education--Southern States
Harlem Renaissance
Literature
Poets, American--Georgia
Johnson, Georgia Douglas Camp, 1886-1966
Location:
United States, Georgia, 32.165622, -82.900075
Medium:
Sound recordings
Type:
Sound
Format:
image/jpeg
Description:
Audio recording of Georgia Douglas Johnson's poem Hegira, read by Zenzi Whitsett. A photograph of the author accompanies the recording. She is shown in profile wearing an off-the-shoulder dress.
The word hegira is from the Arabic hijrah and refers to flight from danger. The subject of Johnson's 1917 poem is African Americans' migration from the South. The first stanza is an inquiry to African Americans, asking them why they choose to leave a land in which they live in warm houses, have schools for their children, and are seemingly prosperous. The rest of the poem is answers the question and lists reasons why the north is a more favorable environment in which to live.
Metadata URL:
http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Multimedia.jsp?id=m-10025
Rights Holder:
Courtesy of Georgia Public Broadcasting
Additional Rights Information:
Please contact holding institution for information regarding use and copyright status.
Holding Institution:
New Georgia Encyclopedia (Project)

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