Minutes of the Board of Trustees

Vol. IV of Minutes of the Trustees of the University of Georgia
(November 6, 1858 August 1, 1877)
PART I: COVERING YEARS 1858 1871
pages 1-364 of the original holograph volume or pages 1-277 of the typed transcribed source
put into electronic form by Susan Curtis starting: May 28th, 2010 finished: June 9, 2010
personal notes:
1. Beginning on page 294 whoever was typing the manuscript began using m.s. for misspelled words instead of sic. The problem is sometimes the word was corrected and
sometimes not. I retained the (m.s.) designation when the typist corrected the spelling and substituted sic when the text is still misspelled.
2. Beginning on page 294 the typist switched to double spacing the text. I retained the spacing which had been used previously.
3.The words conferred, referred and authorize often were spelled as confered, refered, and authorise respectfully and were left as they appeared (not highlighted).
page numbers in this version refer to the page number found in the original holograph minutes (not those of the typed transcription) and are indicated as: (pge 1)
Penciled in remarks from the source text are preserved in this edition in parentheses. This may be confused with text which appears to have been entered in parenthesis in the original document. Any changes made by the current transcripting party are in brackets.
As with previous volumes begun on Sept. 27th 2006, indentations have been standardized.
(i.e. in the typed source text new paragraphs are sometimes indented, sometimes not, and dates are sometimes on the right side of the page, sometimes in the center for the purposes of this version they have, unless they are otherwise deemed unique, been aligned as per their first instance in the current volume).

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Milledgeville Nov 6th 1858 At a stated meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, the following members were present. Messrs. Billups, Brown, Dougherty, Harris, Hill, Hull, Jackson Lewis, J.H. Lumpkin, Mitchell, Reese.
The meeting was opened with prayer by President Church.
The Presidents Report was submitted, which is as follows.
Gentlemen of the Trust.
Nothing important has occurred in connection with the college since your last meeting. The exercises of the institution have been conducted with much quiet and good order, and the students have generally made commendable progress in their studies. The number in attendance upon the duties of the late term, as was expected, was not large. I think it probable it will be larger the ensuing term, though I do not apprehend that there will be a very large increase.
If the college be conducted with prudence there will doubtless, even with the present endowment and means of instruction be a gradual increase of students. But with the powerful efforts to secure numbers for the other colleges, it is not probable that the state institution can have a very large attendance for some time. Its object therefore should be to send good scholars, rather than attempt to secure crowded halls.

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Parents and Guardians will be more influenced by higher advantages than by large catalogues.
If the college can clearly prove by its graduates that it affords superior advantages to its students, it will ultimately receive an honorable and liberal patronage. I consider it important to the reputation of the college that neat and convenient lecture rooms be provided for its officers. The impression made upon parents and visitors who call upon some of your officers at their rooms is anything but favorable. I confess that I have often been mortified, when gentlemen have called upon me at my room, to discover as I thought an emotion of surprise on their entering. I can not speak with more freedom than perhaps would have been deemed respectful heretofore. Much often depens [sic] upon first impressions and I know that parents and students on first entering the college have had very unfavorable impressions upon their minds respecting the character of the institution. But these rooms are not simply without even simple neatness in their construction, they are exceedingly inconvenient with respect to warming and ventilating and lighting, but also as to seating the students, and enabling the teacher to give his instructions with ease to himself and profit to his pupils. A building for a Library is as I have repeatedly stated, much needed.
The Library is a very choice and valuable collection of books, and, if placed in a suitable building would give every visitant a favorable impression with respect to this means of importing

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and acquiring knowledge at your college.
I should suppose, if a proper representation of this subject were made to the Legislature it would give the trustees the funds for erecting a suitable building for the library, and for converting the old buildings into a number of neat and convenient lecture rooms, and a small laboratory for the Professor of Agriculture.
I think it important that the Professorship of Natural Sciences be filled at once, if it can be, by securing the services of a suitable officer.
It is always injurious to have an office vacant in the board of instructors. And in connection with this subject I would remark, that I think each officer should be expected to discharge all the duties of his own chair, unless those duties should at any time be more arduous than those other officers, when he might according to your laws, be released by some of his colleagues. There is one other subject which I think of some importance in the instruction of the college. There is evidently a tendency in our country and perhaps in our age, to change in some good degree the mode of instruction, by attempting to communicate all or almost all by means of lectures instead of text books. Whatever may be the advantages or disadvantages of either mode of instruction, so far as men of mature minds are concerned, I am fully persuaded that with students of the age of those who are usually found in our colleges, the instruction by lectures principally, is greatly inferior to that by text books and regular recitations from them.

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The subject has been to a small extent, discussed in our faculty, and then is some difference of opinion on the subject. I think it worthy the notice of the Board on the present or some future occasion.
I now inform the Board, as I shall tomorrow the Senatus Academicus that I shall retire from my connection with the college at the end of the ensuing year.
A. Church.
The above communication having been read was, on motion, referred to a committee consisting of Messrs, Lumpkin, Hill & Brown.
The Treasurer read an abstract of the finances of the college showing a balance of $708.41.
Apologies for absence from the last meeting were made by Messrs Johnson and Mannerlyn and from the present meeting by Messrs H. Cobb, Cooper, Mercer, Moon &
W. Lumpkin, which were read & sustained.
Letters were read from Messrs Hillyer, Lamar & McDonald, resigning their seats, which resignations were accepted.
The Board adjourned till 8 O.C. P.M.

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Nov 6th, 8 O.C, P.M.
The Board met pursuant to adjournment.
On motion of Dr. Reese,
Resolved. That Messrs Lewis Dougherty and Mitchell be appointed a committee to prepare a Bill to be presented to the Legislature through the Senatus Academicus on the basis of the recommendations contained in the message of Gov. Brown on the subject of University, college, and common school education.
On motion of Judge Lumpkin,
Resolved. That the Senatus Academicus be requested to recommend the appointment of a board of visitors, to attend the annual examination of the graduating class of Franklin college, to consist of five persons (to be compensated for their services) instead of the board of visitors as at present established which has proved a failure.
The Board adjourned till Thursday morning 10 O C
Thursday Nov. 7th 1858
The Board met pursuant to adjournment.
The President being absent, Col Jackson the senior Trustee was called to the Chair.
On motion of Mr. Hill Resolved. That the seats of Hon.

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James M. Wayne, and P.M. Nightengale as members of this Board are vacant by virtue of the act of the Legislature, approved Dec. 17, 1823. They having failed to attend at two successive stated meetings of the Board, and no excuse for such absence, by either, having been rendered.
The Board proceeded to the election of three Trustees to fill vacancies, when on counting the ballots it appeared that Thomas R.R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Thomas
W. Thomas were duly elected.
The resolution offered by Mr. Reese on yesterday and adopted, in relation to the preparation of a Bill was on motion reconsidered.
The Board adjourned till Friday morning at 10 OC.
Friday Nov, 8 1858 The Board met pursuant to adjournment. Messrs Cobb and Thomas, elected on yesterday, took their seats.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell Resolved. That Henry Hull Jr. and Thos. Cobb be added to the Prudential committee.
A letter was read from Mr. Jenkins, resigning his seat in the Board. Whereupon the Board on motion, via voce unanimously reelected Mr.

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Jenkins and Judge McDonald to fill their own vacancies. Hon. Arthur E. Cochran was, by ballot elected a Trustee, and took his seat in the Board.
The Board proceeded to the election of a Professor of Natural Sciences and Teacher of the French language. On counting the ballots it appeared that Dr. Harry Hammond was duly elected.
Mr. Hull gave notice of intention to move a change in the mode of payment of the officers of instruction, making their salaries dependent in part on the number of studentsto be moved at the next stated meeting of the Board.
On motion of Judge Lumpkin it was
Resolved unanimously, as follows:
President Church whose long and faithful services entitle him to the lasting gratitude of the state having given notice of his intention ot resign at the end of the ensuing year.
Resolved. That a successor be selected by the Board, at its next annual meeting in August to be nominated to the Senatus Academicus for its ratification at its meeting in November following.
The Board adjourned, to meet at Milledgeville on the 26th Inst.
Wm. H. Jackson Senior Trustee presiding.
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The Board met pursuant to adjournment.
Present Messrs, Barnard, Brown, T.R.R. Cobb, Cochran, Dougherty, Harris, Hull, Lewis, Moore, Mitchell.
Mr. Bartow took his seat as a Trustee.
Excuse was received from Mr. Law.
A committee of the Senate invited the Board to meet the Senate.
The Board adjourned till tomorrow at 10 OC,
Nov. 27, 1858 The Board met pursuant to adjournment, and on motion, proceeded to the Senate Chamber. Having return to their own chamber on motion of Mr. Cobb it was
Resolved, That the consent of this Board be given to any of the Professors to deliver lectures at the Lucy Cobb Institute at such times as will not interfere with regular duties.
The Board adjourned sine die.

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Athens August 1, 1859
At a stated meeting of the Board of Trustees begun this day, the following members attended to wit Messrs Burnard, Bartow, Billups, Brown, H. Cobb, T.R.R. Cobb, Cochran, Dougherty, Harris, Hill, Hull, Jackson, Jenkins, Johnson, Lewis, J.H. Lumpkin, W. Lumpkin, McDonald, Mitchell, Moore, Reese, Thomas.
Gov. Joseph E. brown exofficer presiding, called the Board to order.
The meeting was opened with prayer by Prest Church.
The standing committees were appointed as follows.
On Laws and Discipline, Messrs J.H. Lumpkin, Thomas, Johnson, & Jenkins.
On Finance, Messrs Mitchell, Harris, Billups, and Lewis.
On Apparatus Messrs, Jenkins, Reese, Dougherty, Barnard, & Hill.
On Library Messrs, W. Lumpkin, Hill, Hull, Jackson, & Billups.
On Buildings Messrs, Moore, T.R.R. Cobb, McDonald, Jackson & W. Lumpkin.
A communication from Prest. Church, & Reports by the Treasurer, and several Professors were presented and appropriately referred.
On motion of Mr. Jackson, Resolved that the Degree A.B. be conferred on the graduating class, and the Degree A.M. on such graduates of this college applying, as may be entitled thereto.
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The death of Ex-Gov. William Schley having been announced, Messrs Reese, Jenkins & Johnson were appointed a committee to report action suitable to the occasion.
A letter from L.B. Mercer was read tendering his resignation as a member of this Board, which was accepted. The Board adjourned until Tuesday Morning.
Tuesday August 2, 1859 The Board met pursuant to adjournment.
On motion an election was had to fill the vacancies in the Board occasioned by the death of Gov. Schley and the resignation of Dr. Mercer; whereupon it appeared that Hon. Robt. Toombs and Hon. A.H. Stephens were elected, who being informed thereof appeared and took their seats.
On motion of Mr. Dougherty a committee was appointed consisting of Messrs Dougherty T.R.R. Cobb, Mitchell, Toombs, & Reese, to consider and report upon the plan of reorganization for this Institution as suggested by the Prudential committee.
Adjourned till Wednesday.
Wednesday Aug. 3, 1859
Dr. Reese from a committee on Monday appointed made the following Report.
The committee appointed to bring in a minute commemoration of the death and virtues of our lamented and distinguished

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colleague Ex-Gov. Schley, ask leave to report the following resolutions.
Resolved That in the death of Gov. Schley the University of Georgia has lost a friend who for more than twenty years labored to promote its best intereststhe State a fearless and faithful servant who discharged his official duties regardless of consequences to himself--the Profession to which he belonged a sound and able advocate and judge and society a just and honest man.
Resolved That a perpetual testimony of our appreciation of the worth of the deceased, these resolutions be placed on our records, and a copy be sent to the family.
Which resolutions were unanimously adopted.
On motion Resolved, That the Degree of Doctor of Divinity be publicly conferred on the Rev. Eustace W. Speer now of this place and the Degree A.M. on Rev. John B. McGehee.
Mr. Dougherty from the select committee on reorganization made a report, adopting the Programme of the Prudential Committee with modifications, and additional resolutions; which was discussed and laid over for consideration.
The Board then proceeded to the college chapel to attend the exercises of the commencement which took place in public as usual.
At the close of the Degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred on the following members of the Senior class.

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The Degree of Master of Arts was conferred on the following Alumni.
William M. Chase J.B.S. Davis
Frank M. Green James M. Hull
John T. Hunt James W. Moore
E.D.Newton R.M.P. Whitehead Joseph H. Wilkins Alex S. Atkinson Wm. S. Norman James H. Phinizy
R.O. Reynolds George W. Philpot John R. Respass John B. McGehee Lucian S. Wilkin. R.Q. Mallard
The Degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on Rev. Eustace W. Speer.
Wednesday afternoon Aug 3 The Board met and resumed the consideration of the programme of reorganization and after some discussion, adjourned until Thursday morning.

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Thursday August 4th 1859
The Board met pursuant to adjournment.
On motion Mr. M.A. Cooper was excused for nonattendance at this session on good cause shown.
The Report of the committee on Apparatus was made by Mr. Jenkins and adopted as follows.
The committee on Apparatus to whom were referred the reports of Profs. Easter and Rutherford, submit the following report.
While we feel the importance of supplying the defects in the apparatus brought to the consideration of the Board by those gentlemen, and would always encourage the members of the Faculty in making known such wants; in the circumstances now surrounding the Board we recommend that no appropriation be made for those objects at this time.
On motion a committee consisting of Messrs Mitchell, T.R.R. Cobb, & Lewis was appointed to codify the Laws now in force in relation to the college.
Mr. W. Lumpkin presented the following report which was adopted.
The committee on the Library to whom was referred the report of the Librarian submit the following report.
The facts stated in the Report of the Librarian appear to be fully sustained by the vouchers and papers submitted to your committee, and the books and other appurtenances which

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compose the Library appear to be properly arranged and as well taken care of as the limited space in our building will admit of.
Your committee, after examining the periodicals now taken for college uses are not prepared to recommend an increase of expenditure for part newspapers as recommended by the Librarian.
Prof. Lee recommends the expenditure of One Hundred dollars for books on Agriculture, but unless your committee be furnished with a catalogue of the books desired by the Professor, they are not prepared to decide on the propriety of their purchase.
The Board then took up the Report of the committee on reorganization and adopted it, with modifications and additions making it read as follows.
In view of the resignation of Dr. Church which goes into effect on the first day of next January, and the necessity of presenting the University to the people of the State in a manner and with an organization calculated to command the confidence of the Public; and in order that the Trustees of the college may have time for reflection upon a subject of vast practical importance and of suggesting amendments thereto; the following programme of a new and enlarged organization, within the means at present

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at command of the Board, is respectfully submitted.
I. To establish an Institute, combining all the instruction given in a well regulated village academy, and in the Freshman and Sophomore classes in college, and having sufficient capacity to board all its pupils from a distance, and observing such constant watchfulness as to secure and protect the morals of its pupils, and advance their education as rapidly and as certainly as their natural endowments and previous training will admit; in a word so to organize this fundamental feature of the whole programme, that the citizen bringing his son or ward here to be trained, will feel that he is as safe, or safer than at home, and that his mind will certainly be educated.
This is the right of the citizen, and therefore the duty of the Trustees to secure it if practicable; No plan has been suggested that promises so well. To advance the age of admission into the Freshman class is deemed impracticable in the present state of college education in the United States. It seems to be conceded, that boys at the tender age of fourteen or fifteen are unfair to be left to themselves, as they are, in a great measure, under the present college regiment in the United States; and that the foundation of failure, if not of ruin, is laid in the Freshman and Sophomore years of collegea result that might [not?] be anticipated if we had no experience

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on the subject. And hence the scheme submitted contemplates the abolishing of the Freshman and Sophomore classes, and having them instructed in the Institute herein contemplated, and there to remain and to be watched over night and day till fully prepared for the Junior class; which each pupil of the Institute should be allowed to enter without examination by the college Faculty, upon the certificate of the Faculty of the Institute.
A suitable location within the corporate limits of Athens, and yet sufficiently isolated can be procured. It has been suggested that the Institute might be properly ranked as a Gymnasium.
II. To establish a college proper, with only Junior and Senior classes, each of one years duration as at present, with the same curriculum as now prescribed, except that these classes might be relieved of a few studies that more properly belong to the University schools hereafter to be mentioned; and that more time might be given thus to the seven liberal arts and sciences which are regarded as the true training studies for the youthful mind; as, for example, the Law School; the Professorship of Agriculture taken out of the college proper, and made to constitute one of the University schools. Thus the students of the college proper would be advanced

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in age and education so far as to realise [sic] the responsibilities of their position, and be very suitable subject for that species of Government existing in the colleges of the United States, and have their characters sufficiently formed to insure well grounded hopes of their success in study, and the maintenance of good morals. For efficient instruction in the college proper there will be needed the President of the University and four Professors. The President however should not be confined to the business of instruction. As the head of the Board of Trustees, his energies should be given to the general advancement of all the departments of the Institution, to intercourse with the public, to the entertainment of visiters [sic] in a word to all the external relations of the Institution, keeping it before the public, and promoting its interests by all the means naturally suggested to one who undertakes the office as a labor of love, and none other is fit for the post so high, so honorable and so useful. To sustain the college proper there must be an income sufficient to pay the President and four Professors; But more of this hereafter.
III. To establish University schools, each independent of the other and of the college proper, so far as such schools can be made self sustaining and under this division of the Programme may be suggested, 1st, A.

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Law School with three Professors having terms of at least eight months in each year, in which facilities for the best legal education would be afforded. Gentlemen highly competent and well known to the Public an ready to undertake this department, looking only to the fees for remuneration. 2nd . An Agricultural School, the foundation for which has been laid by the donation of the late Dr. Terrell; for which, so far as the lectures upon Agriculture are concerned will be free to the public; which we propose to combine a school for the application of chemistry to the Industrial Arts; thus furnishing full employment to that Professor, with adequate compensation for increased labors. 3rd. A School of Civil Engineering and applied mathematics; The Professor to be paid in part from the treasury of the University until, as we may hope from the practical nature of this department, and its great value to a state so rapidly developing its physical capacities, it shall become self sustaining.
For the establishment of all these highly important and useful departments of an university, we have abundant means with our present income. If as we believe, the system should prove efficient in its workings, and an increasing patronage, State appropriations, or individual liberality shall

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enable us to do so, we can enlarge its usefulness, by the addition of a commercial School for the instruction of our young men in the great principles and history of trade, the channels of foreign commerce, the duties of merchants; and finally any other schools for instruction in any branch of useful knowledge that will sustain themselves.
IV. Another feature contemplated in the scheme, is the establishment of Scholarships, by persons making their last Wills and Testaments in terms of the Act of the Legislature entitled An Act to encourage persons making a will to provide a permanent fund for the collegiate preparation and education of endigent boys and young men, Assented to December 22, 1857 and to be found in the pamphlet of that year pp. 11-12.
It will be observed, upon examining this Act that the testator or donor can fix the collegiate or educational advowson at pleasure, so that the state holding the fund and paying the interest semi-annually, her bond for the principal may be held by the Trustees of the University, and the interest applied to the education of such indigent boy or young men as may be presented for its benefit by the son or daughter of the testator or donor, and so the advowson pass from father to son by will, and thus liberal education be secured to the indigent descendent

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of decayed families, and the cause of sound learning be promoted. A proper sum for establishment of such a scholarship would be five thousand dollars. And another feature, kindred to the above is the establishment of fellowships by persons of wealththe Fellows to be elected by the different colleges of the state, in whom the right of presentation may be vested by the founder, and be taken from its graduating class by the college enjoying such right.
These Fellows will attend such of the University schools as they may desire, and enjoy such advantages for the promotion of learning and knowledge as they may find established here. And here they may fully prepare themselves to discharge the duties of Professors in colleges. It would require all of ten thousand dollars to found a Fellowship.
This feature would form a link between us and all other colleges. And lastly, in this feature it is believed that the Trustees and the friends of the Institution by such influences as they may enjoy can from time to time induce persons of great wealth, to endow Professorships in the college proper or schools in the University, and appropriate a part of their riches to advance a high state of civilization in our state in all practicable ways.
V. The Honors to be established for the foregoing enlargement of our Institution may be designated as follows.

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1st
. A certificate of the successful prosecution of all the studies in the Institute, signed by the Faculty, to enable the holder to enter into the Junior class of the college proper without examination. 2nd . A diploma of Bachelor of Arts to each student who passes successfully through the college proper; signed by the Faculty.
3rd
. The Degree of Master of Arts to all graduates of this or any other college, being of three years standing and good moral character, and to such graduates as have passed one year in the University Schools and maintained good morals.
4th
. The Degree of Bachelor of Law, to all Law Students who have attended the lectures of the Professors and secured their approbation.
It is contemplated to ask the Legislature to pass a law, authorising and requiring the clerk of any Superior Court, or of the Supreme Court, to issue a license to plead and practice law, as now done upon examination, by the presentation of the Diploma without examination, upon the payment of the usual fees.
5th
. The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy to such students in the University Schools as
shall spend two years therein and become proficient in at least three of the Schools. 6th
. The Degree of Doctor of Divinity is to be conferred solely upon eminent Divines. 7th
. The Degree of Doctor of Laws is to be conferred on men of eminence, and as the highest literary honor in our power to bestow.

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The Law School will probably be furnished with Judge Lumpkins and Mr.
T.R.R. Cobbs valuable libraries; and this part of the University will be self sustaining. The Agricultural School is already partially endowed and with that endowment, by Dr. Terrell, can maintain itself.
Now the Institute with its three Professors, the college proper with the President of the whole and its four professors; the Law School with its three professors, and the Agricultural school with its one professor, will present an array of twelve professors, and exhibit the University before the public in an attitude altogether desirable. So far every thing is clear. But to have the Institute, and these University Schools we must have buildings and other property, and the question arises where is the money to come from to do this?
We reply, we have in bonds and notes about, $33,600 And we can save from income this year, say 3,000 Making the sum of 36,600 which we propose to apply to the enaction of fire proof building with three stories; one story of which is to be appropriated to Libraries, one story to the museum, and one story to lecture rooms for the Law School, Agricultural School and other University Schools mentioned above as the same may come into existence from time to time, together with such extra lectures by Professors Extraordinary, as we may be able to secure, and we know we can secure a Professor Extraordinary on Natural Theology,

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for the lecture tickets, and, most probably others on the same terms upon Physiology, comparative Anatomy and Zoology, and other branches of Natural Science. The four college Professors in the college proper might be employed also in the University Schools and especially at the beginning.
To the fitting up of the old library building for recitation rooms and other college purposes, and to the founding the Institute above contemplated.
The building, fire proof, for library purposes &c. will cost not exceeding $15,000 and we ask your consent to make a contract at once for such a building, for the reason that the brick must be made and the walls put up and covered before winter or we lose a year, and this is a building highly desirable even if we make no change in our organization.
The proper grounds and buildings for the Institute will cost not exceeding the sum of $20,000, so that it will be seen that with the means now at command, we can put in operation independent of state aid, a scheme far beyond anything yet attempted at the South, a scheme which promises to elevate the Professions of Law and Medicine, to enlarge the boundaries of Knowledge among our people, to develope the vast physical resources of our state, and above all, to protect that most critical period of a boys life, lying between his fourteenth and eighteenth years. No attempt has been made to present the arguments

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in favor of this Programme, or to answer objections, the object being clearly to present the scheme for your unbiased judgment
On motion to postpone the consideration of the subject till the meeting in November next the yeas and nays were required to be recorded and are as follows. Yeas Messrs Bartow, Billups, Harris, Jenkins, & Lewis. 5 Nays Messrs Barnard, H. Cobb, T.R.R. Cobb, Cochran, Dougherty, Hill, Hull, Jackson,
J.H. Lumpkin, W. Lumpkin, Mitchell, Moore, Reese, & Toombs. 14
A motion was made to strike out so much of the Programme as relates to the preparatory Institute or Gymnasium; on which motion the yeas and nays were required to be recorded and are as follows. Yeas, Messrs Barnard, Billups, Bartow, Harris, Jenkins, Lewis, & Moore. 7 Nays, Messrs H. Cobb, T.R.R. Cobb, Cochran, Dougherty, Hill, Hull, Jackson, J.H. Lumpkin, W. Lumpkin, Mitchell, Reese & Toombs. 12
Judge Lumpkin then offered the following resolutions which were adopted.
Resolved That the first section of the programme for reorganization be adopted and referred to the Prudential Committee

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for all necessary details, and that the same shall not go into effect till after the meeting of the Board in November next.
Resolved that the subject of a connection with the Medical college of Georgia or any other Medical college in the State, be referred in like manner, to ascertain upon what terms a connection can be formed with any of them, and report upon the subject at the meeting in November.
On motion of Mr. Toombs it was them, Resolved
That the rest of the report of the special committee of five be adopted, and the details carried out and reported upon at the next meeting in November at Milledgeville.
Resolved That the Prudential Committee be instructed to proceed with the erection of the fire proof three story building at a cost not to exceed fifteen thousand dollars.
Resolved That it is expedient to establish a bording house in connection with the University, where such students as desire it may be boarded at the lowest rate practicable.
On motion it was resolved that Messrs Mitchell, T.R.R. Cobb, & Lewis, be appointed a committee to memorialise the Ligislature to pass an act to render null and void all contracts of minors.
Dr. Moore from the committee on college buildings made the following report.
The committee to whom was referred the

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subject of the college buildings have had the same under consideration and find the same in a fair state of preservation.
On motion of Gov. Johnson it was, Resolved
That the Law School established by the Programme for enlarging the University just adopted by under three Professorships, and that the Hon. Joseph Henry Lumpkin, Thos. R.R. Cobb, & Wm. H. Hull, Esq. be invited to fill them upon the terms indicated in said programme, and that suitable rooms be appropriated in the new building to be erected, for the use of said school.
On motion of Mr. Bartow Resolved
That the appointment of the Junior orators for the commencement exercises be restored to the two Literary Societies as it existed prior to 1836.
Mr. Mitchell from the committee on Finance made the following report.
The Finance Committee find that the Treasurer has charged himself with the various items of income, including the cash balance on hand at his last annual statment, making and aggregate of $22,199.32 And expenditures of the same year supported by proper vouchers 19,185.40 Leaving cash Balance now on hand $ 3,013.92
The income for the ensuing year may be estimated as follows.

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Dividends on Bank Stock $10,000
Interest on $30,000 Bonds (7) 2,100
on 4,250 Notes `297.50
House Rent 833
Tuition 4,500
Terrell Endowment $20,000 (6) 1,200 Estimated income $ 18,930.50
The ordinary expenditure may be estimated as follows. Presidents Salary $ 2,500 Salaries five Professors 2,000 10,000
Two Tutors 1,000 2,000 Secretary & Treasurer 500 Repairs 500 Library & Periodicals 250 Printing Postage &c. 200 Refunded Tuition 50 Negro hire 240 Gold Medals & Music 125 Fire wood 75 Incidental & Miscellaneous 100 Int of Terrell Endowment 1,200
Estimated Expenditure $17,740
To estimated Income $18,830.50 Add balance now on hand 3,013.92 Amount $21,944.42 Deduct estimated expenditure 17,740 Estimated balance August 1860 $ 4,204.42

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It will be seen that the Board have
in bonds $30,000 And in ---------------------Notes 4,250 Which with balance estimated above 38,204.42 Will furnish the sum of $38,454.42
to meet the expenditures contemplated by the programme for reorganization and the accompanying resolution, and the committee recommend the foregoing as an appropriation Bill for the ensuing year.
The report was adopted. On motion it was then Resolved, That the Prudential committee be instructed to revise the amount of rents not paid
on the Professors houses, and make them as nearly equitable as practicable according to the present value of property.
On motion of Gov. Johnson it was Resolved That henceforth the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees shall be held on Friday before commencement day.
On motion of Mr. Dougherty it was Resolved,
That the election of a President of the University be postponed until the meeting in Milledgeville.
The Board adjourned to meet in Milledgeville at the stated day 1st Wednesday in November.
Asbury Hull Secretary

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Milledgeville Nov. 2, 1859 At a stated meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, the following members were present to wit. Messrs Barnard, Bartow, Billups, Brown, Cochran, T.R.R.Cobb, Dougherty, Harris, Hill, Hull, Johnson, Lewis, Mitchell, Moore, Reese, Thomas, Toombs. His Excellency Governor Joseph E. Brown, took the chair, and the meeting was opened with prayer. Excuses were presented and received for the absence of Messrs McDonald, Jackson, Law, J.H. Lumpkin, & W. Lumpkin.
A communication from Prof. Easter was read resigning his chair in the University, and on motion it was Resolved That Prof. Easter be permitted, at his own request, to discontinue his connection with the University at the end of the current year.
The Prudential Committee through their chairman submitted the following rates of rent for the Professors Houses, which were adopted. For Prof. Johnsons House
$300.00
Mills 300.00
Rutherfords 225.00
Hammonds 175

The same committee laid on the table their report on the details of the Programme for

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an enlarged organization of the University which was read and the Board adjourned till 9OC A.M. tomorrow.
Nov. 3, 1859. 9 O!C. .A.M. The Board met according to adjournment. The report of Pres Church was read and ordered to be submitted to the Senatus
Academicus.
The committee appointed at the meeting in August last to memorialise the Legislature on the subject of the contracts of minors, were discharged from that duty, it being stated that the law desired by the Board had been enacted at the last session of the Legislature.
The Report of the Prudential Committee on details of organization was called up & Dr. Moore offered a substitute threrfor providing for the retention of the four college classes as now constituted, and for the organization of University Schools as contemplated in said programme.
Dr. Moore moved that the Report and substitute be laid on the table for the present, which motion was lost.
The question was then put upon the adoption of the substitute and the yeas and nays were required and were as follows.

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Yeas Messrs, Barnard and Moore, 2 Nays Messrs T.R.R. Cobb, Cochran, Dougherty, Harris, Johnson, Mitchell, Reese, Thomas & Toombs. 9
The Report of the Prudential was then read amended and adopted and is as follows.
The University of Georgia shall consist of a collegiate Institute, a college proper, and University Schools of Science & Philosophy.
The Institute shall be located at some convenient distance from Athens, entirely separated from the college grounds, yet under the supervision of the President and Trustees and near enough for the pupils to attend church.
The buildings shall have sufficient capacity to board its pupils from a distance, with the families of the Faculty.
For admission, a boy must be 13 years old, and well prepared in the elementary branches of an English education, and Latin grammar.
The course of study shall embrace Geography, Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Latin lessons, Ceasar, Cicero, Virgil, Sallust, Horace, Greek Grammer and Reader, Xenophon, Homer, with written exercises in both Latin & Greek during the entire course. French during the entire course with Composition Elocution and exercise in English readings.
Examinations shall be both oral and written at the end of each term and an

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exhibition in declamation at commencement.
The discipline of the Institute shall be parental in its character with no written code of laws.
Expenses in this department including board, lodging tuition, fuel, washing, & lights, shall be $250.00 per annum for boarders, and for day-pupils $50.00 for tuition and $10.00 for incidentals.
A certificate of proficiency shall entitle students to admission into college without other examination.
A student shall not be admitted into the college proper under 17 years (Seventeen) of age.
Preparation shall embrace a correct knowledge of the studies prescribed for the Institute or its equivalent.
The course of study in the Junior class shall be in Tacitus, Juvenal, Cicero De Orator, Homer, Sophocles, Demosthenes, Analytical Trigonometry, Logarithms, Surveying and Navigation, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, History, Rhetoric, Logic, Botany, Moral Philosophy, Evidences of Christianity, Elocution & Composition.
For the Senior class the course shall be,

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Terence, Plautus, Plato, Euripides, Calculus, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, History of English Literature, Mental Philosophy, Political Economy, Elocution and Composition, with written exercises in both classes in Latin & Greek, and written examinations at the end of each term.
The Discipline shall be the present code.
The Expenses shall be for Tuition $50.00, Room Rent $15.00, Servant hire $10.00.
The University Department, shall consist of a Law, School with such courses of study, length of terms, fees &c, as have been submitted by the Professors.
The Medical School, wherever situated, shall provide for summer courses in Athens if practicable.
Post-Graduate instruction shall be provided by lectures and study on Agriculture & Agricultural Chemistry, Ancient Literature & Languages, Mechanical Philosophy, Civil Engineering Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, English Literature Moral Philosophy & History of Religion.
Special Students may secure practical instruction in and Science by contract with the Professor.
The Degrees conferred shall be as adopted by the Board heretofore, except that of
A.M. shall
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not be conferred upon Graduates of three years in course.
For instruction in these departments there will be:
A President. A Principal and Associate Teachers in the Institute as patronage may demand. Professors of
1st
. Ancient Languages 2nd
. History Rhetoric, Belles Lettres, with care of the Composition &
Elocution. 3rd
. Moral & Mental Philosophy, Logic &c. 4th
. Chemistry united with Agriculture 5th
. Mathematics, Astronomy & 6th. Natural Philosophy.
If the President takes one of these chairs the number will be reduced to five Professors, and if an arrangement can be made to have Chemistry attached to the Terrell Professorship, with increase of Compensation to the Professor, a large reduction can be made in the Salary account.
This arrangement will give only one recitation per day to each instructor in the college proper, allowing ample time for study, & the preparation and delivery of Lectures to such Students as may desire a course of instruction to suit their own peculiar wants. The funds will be sufficient to pay a fair salary for the labor in the close curriculum and leave every professor to enlarge his

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income by the sale of tickets.
On motion of Judge Thomas it was Resolved
That all action looking to a connection by this Board with any Medical College, be indifinitely postponed.
Communications were read from Hon. A.H. Stephens declining the appointment of Trustee, and from Col. Billups resigning his seat in the Board.
The resignation of Col. Billups was laid on the table, and the Board proceeded to elect a Trustee in place of Mr. Stephens and Mr. Benjamin F. Ward was unanimously elected, & took his seat in the Board.
On motion of Mr. Toombs the Board proceeded to nominate a person to be President of the University, and upon counting the votes it appeared that Mr. Henry Hull Jr. was duly nominated whereupon Messrs Toombs & Reese were appointed a committee to notify Mr. Hull and ascertain whether he would accept.
On motion it was Resolved
That the division of studies in the college among the different officers be referred to the Prudential committee with power to regulate the same.
The Terrell Professorship of Agriculture having been united with the Professorship of Chemistry,
Resolved that the Professor be placed on the same footing with the others as to duties and salary.

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Milledgeville, Nov. 3rd. P.M.
The Board according to adjournment and repaired to the Senate Chamber to form the Senatus Academicus, after which the Board having reassembled the committee appointed to see Mr. Hull reported that he declined the nomination for President,
And the Board adjourned till tomorrow at 10 OC A.M.
Milledgeville Nov. 4, 10 OC. AM
The Board met according to adjournment.
A letter was read from Mr. Mitchells as ex. of the late Gen. Robt. Taylor of Athens, stating that Gen. Taylor by his will had appropriated Five Thousand dollars to found a scholarship in the University. A copy of said will was submitted.
On motion of Mr. T.R.R. Cobb Resolved
That this Board hereby consent to the terms of Gen. Talors bequest so far as any action on their part is necessary.
On motion of Mr. Dougherty Resolved
That the Prudential Committee be instructed and empowered to carry out all the details necessary to put the new organization in operation, to purchase the lands, erect the buildings for the collegiare Institute and buy or build a boarding-house for the college proper.

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Judge Thomas moved that the Hon. Henry R. Jackson be unanimously nominated to the Senatus Academicus for President of the University.
Mr. Marnard moved that the Hon. Joseph H. Lumpkin also be nominated.
The Board took a recess to attend the Inauguration of the Governor elect, and, having reassembled Mr. Barnard withdrew his notion and the motion of Judge Thomas was Unanimously adopted.
On motion of Judge Thomas it was Resolved
That the Salary of the President of the University be increased to $3000.00
The Board adjourned till 2 OC P.M.
Nov. 4th 2 OC. P.M.
The Board met according to adjournment, and repaired to the Senate Chamber for the purpose of uniting with the Senate to form the Senatus Academicus, to which body were to be submitted, President Churchs Report with the accompanying documents, The minutes of the Board at its stated meeting in August last in relation to the reorganization of the University and the finances and the report of the Prudential committee on details and other ordinances of the Board, for the confirmation

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of the Senatus Academicus.
After the meeting of the Senatus Academicus the Board reassembled in the executive Chamber their place of meeting.
On motion it was Resolved
That the Prudential committee be instructed to select a chairman for the college Faculty, in the event the President elect fails to accept, or in the event he cannot enter upon his duties at the commencement of the ensuing term.
Also Resolved. That the Prudential committee be instructed to communicate personally, by a sub-committee with the Hon. Henry H. Jackson, on his acceptance of the appointment which has this day been unanimously confirmed by the Senatus Academicus.
The following resolution was unanimously adopted.
Resolved, That Col. John Billups be requested to withdraw his resignation.
The Board adjourned sine die.

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University of Georgia Athens July 27th 1860
At a states meeting of the Board of Trustees began this day, the following members attended to wit. Messrs Barnard Messrs Hull Billups Jackson
H. Cobb Jenkins
T.R.R. Cobb Lewis Cochran W. Lumpkin Dougherty Mitchell Harris Moore Hill Reese
Toomb.
Col William H. Jackson the Senior Trustee took the Chair and opened the meeting with prayer.
The following standing committees were appointed. 1st
. Laws & Discipline, Mitchell, Jenkins, & Dougherty.
2nd
. Finance. Cobb, Hull, & Lewis. 3rd. Library & Apparatus, Reese, Hill Barnard & Moore. 4th. Buildings, Harris, Moore, & Hill.
Mr. Mitchell presented the following communication on the condition & wants of the college referred to the com. On Laws & Discipline.

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To the Honorable the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
The undersigned has the honor to present the annual communication in relation to the affairs of the college to make such suggestions for the consideration of the Board as his temporary connection with the faculty of Instruction as the chairman thereof enables him to do.
He presents the annual catalogue containing the name of each student and the studies of each class, which have been attended to, substantially in the order, in which they are therein presented, and also including the students of the Lumpkin Law School.
The Treasurers Report will exhibit the receipts and expenditures of the amount of tuition money, and from these documents and the report of the Prudential committee the Board will be enabled to prepare and make the annual report of their actings, and doings to the Governor of the State as required by the act of the last General Assembly entitled An act to abolish the Senatus Academicus, to give its powers to the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, and to vest the Government of said University in said Board of Trustees assented to Dec. 14th 1859.
It will be seen by reference to said catalogue that the whole number of students

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in attendance for the college years now about to end yas been one hundred & twenty five, with a present attendance of Ninety nine in the college & forty eight in the Law School.
The general behavior & attention to study have been commendable, It is a matter of regret however to state, from a sense of duty that the effect of the restoration of the Junior Orators to the two Literary Societies, has been very pernicious, that a system of treating, to procure votes, & influence was begun with vigor & persecuted with disaster, and produced the necessity, on the part of the Faculty of cutting off several promising lads. Its repeal is recommended. The Board will notice that the number of students at the opening of the college in January last, was larger than it has been for a number of years.
The want of an efficient head devoted exclusively to the interests of the University, has been a source of constant anxiety to the Faculty & one of the first and most important duties of the Board at the present sessions will be to supply that want.
It is proper to state in this connection that Hon. Henry R. Jackson of Savannah, after due consideration, declined accepting the Presidency so unanimously tendered him by the Board at their November meeting in Milledgeville, & his letter is on file with the Secretary.
I herewith present the report of Dr. Daniel Lee, Terrell Professor of Agriculture,
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& invite attention to his suggestions.
Col Richard M. Johnston, our Professor of Belles Lettres, Evidences of Christianity & History, has tendered his resignation to take effect at the end of the Year 1860.
I present the letter of Mr. Richard D.B. Taylor stating that he has selected Henry
L. Winfrey for the Taylor Scholarship who is ready to enter the School of Mr. Scudder with your approbation.
The Senior class enjoyed the lectures and instructions of Hon. Joseph H. Lumpkin on the constitution of the United States; Of Dr. Richard D. Moore on Anatomy, the Circulation of the blood & nervous system; and of Thos. R.R. Cobb Esq. on Slavery. These were all gratuitous services and highly appreciated by the class.
Instruction in Natural Philosophy has been imparted to the Junior Class since January br Prof. Rutherford & Mr. William D. Wash, Mathematical Tutor. It is essential to successful college education that this important part of the curriculum be placed in the hands of one Professor, changed with the responsibility of keeping it as high as it has generally been in the college.
The Juniors have yet to study Optics, but have already anticipated Chemistry, so that the Fall term can be devoted

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to that branch of Philosophy.
The duties of the Faculty have been laborious and several of the members have been really over burdened.
The services of Mr. Wash to the Junior class in Natural Philosophy should be noticed by the Board by a vote of additional compensation. They were rendered cheerfully and successfully & under very trying circumstances.
By the act of the last Legislature already referred to for another purpose the Board of Trustees have power to elect its own officers such as President Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, or such only of there as it may require, and any & all others which it may deem necessary for the organization of its own body. The duty of organization is thus devolved upon the Board during its present Sessions.
There are several persons who have paid in full the purchase money for the lots sold them, & others will do so during the year and as there was no President, it was thought safest to postpone the execution of deeds to them till the Board could act in relation to the matter.
Having thus presented the leading facts of the year for the information of the Board; the following scheme of organization for the University is with great diffidence submitted, as likely to meet the demands of the Public & present, the

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Institution properly to the people of the state.
As the first & most important feature in an Institution of the kind committee not to the exclusive control & management of the Board, is a suitable head, & as the institution is gradually expanding into a University proper, a simple college President seems no longer the proper Head for the enlarged plans now in progress, and a more appropriate title for the head of the University is that of Chancellor; therefore it is recommended to establish the office of Chancellor of the University with a Salary of Three thousand dollars & prescribe as his programme of duty the following.
To teach, in the college Proper, Moral Philosophy, the Constitution of the United States, & the Law of Nations, Political Economy or such other branches of the curriculum as he might preferor leave him without any charge of this Int at his discretion; To preside over all meetings of the Faculty when present & upon all public occasions;
To visit from time to time all parts of the state, & address the people upon University education, Professional education, college education, & Promary & elemental education, & rouse them to the importance of the same;

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To visit the Legislature annually and converse freely with the members upon the best means of advancing the educational interests of the state and making the appropriations judicious & efficient;
To correspond with citizens of libiality & wealth, with a view, to induce the establishment of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, &c. ; And to keep there & all other interests of the University before the Public through the periodical Press.
In the college proper, one of the Professors best suited for the office should be elected, vice-Chancellor, and receive as additional compensation his house-rent free---so as to make the Faculty of the college a perfect organism under all circumstances.
In the collegiate Institute, there should be elected a President with power to select & dismiss his own assistant Professors, as this department is to be self-sustaining requiring him however to have a corp of Professors sufficient to carry on the prescribed studies with success.
In the Agricultural Department the Terrell Professor should be allowed to associate with himself such assistants as a paying class will authorize, taking care to have a free course of lectures upon which the Senior class & citizens generally might attend. That Professor with the fine lecture room soon to be ready. in the

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Library building, & the income of $1200 from the Terrell endowment would be self-sustaining, like the Law School, and like it, should be independent and a perfect organism of it self.
Then steps should be taken to found a medical Department and thus complete our University system of college & professional education, and present a picture of which every Georgian might be proud.
Wm. L. Mitchell Athens July 27 1860. Chairman of the
Faculty.
A Report on FinanceReports of the Library and Professorship of Mathematics, also a communication from Prof. Lee, were made and appropriately referred. Also a memorial from students asking an extension of summer vacationand a petition from the Freshman Class, asking to be excused from Saturday morning recitation were presented & referred to Comt. On Laws & Discipline.
Letters from Hon. Wm. Law & C.J. Munnerlyn & Chas. J. McDonald resigning their seats as Trustees were received and read which resignations the Board accepted. And to fill their vacancies the following Gentlemen were elected Trustees, Marcellus Douglas of Cuthbert, H.V.M. Miller of Rome, &

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Benjamin C. Yancey of Atlanta.
Mr. Yancey subsequently appeared and took his seat as a member.
On motion of Mr. T.R.R. CobbResolved, That the committee on Laws & Discipline be required to invite a conference with the Faculty with a view to equalizing the branches of Science & knowledge, taught by the several Professors-& that they report upon that subject to this Board. And that the 5th section of the Rules on Organization of the Faculty be also submitted to the same committee for amendment if necessary.
On motion of Mr. Hill it was Resolved, That the Terrell Professorship be referred to a committee, consisting of Messrs Jenkins, Cobb, & Mitchell, to report thereon.
The Board then adjourned until
Saturday Morning July 28th / 60. Mr. Toombs and Judge Cochrane appeared and took their seats. Mr. T.R.R. Cobb from the committee on finance made the following report,
which was laid upon the table, but subsequently taken up and adopted.
The Committee on Finance having examined carefully the report of the Tresur of the University find it correct and supported by the proper vouchers showing a balance on hand of $9,285.
The present means of the Institution are as follows. viz.

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State Bank Stock $100.000
Terrell fund Bonds 20,000
Bonds & Notes 32,000
Cash on Hand 9,285

Of the above items the first two are permanent endowments and will remain as such. The last two items make the sum of $41,285 available to meet the liabilities incurred by the Board, which are.
By contract with Mr. Hughes for the building of the Institute $23,000 With Mr. Crane for Library Hall 11,600 With do. On Bourding House. 4,000 Making total to be paid in the year 38,600 Which sum deducted from the available assets leaves $2,685. Of this amt. some part will be necessary to fit up the new Library for the arrangements of the Books, and perhaps for other contingent expenses not forseen yet, unavoidable, in getting our improvements ready for use. Thus it is evident that our means will be reduced to our permanent endowments-and our income to its annual dividends, with the rents of our Houses and tuition receipts, which may be estimated as follows.
Annual dividend on Stock $ 9,000 Rent of Professors Houses 1,000 Tuition Receipts 5,000 Making total income 15,000

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Under the present organization the annual expenses may be stated as for
Salary of President $ 3,000
Salaries of 4 Professors 8,000
Addition to income of Terrell fund 800
Two Tutors 2,000
Secty & Treasurer 500
Annual repairs 375
Salary of Librarian 100
Servants hire 250
Printing postage Music &c. 450
Making total of $15,475
Thus it appears that our annual expenses exceed the probable income by $475. But for the ensuing year, this deficiency will be more than supplied by the interests for fractional parts of the year on sums to be paid on our contracts as the work progresses and which till due may remain at interest in our Treasurers hands.
Any changes in the organization by creating new Professorships or otherwise increasing the annual expenses of the Institution will be incurring liabilities without means to discharge them.
The Bank Stock may yield $10,000 but recent heavy losses render it improper to rely upon it. We have estimated the tuition at $5,000 which is more than we have received for some years past, but it is bassed [sic] on the assumption that we get a suitable President to enter fully on the duties of the pastand if fail to accomplish that

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result we will pay no salary and thus the expenses be reduced as much probably as the falling off in tuition.
The condition of the Institution should suggest caution in all action which may for the ensuing year increase expenses.
The committee recommend the following appropriations viz.,
Chancellors Salary $ 3,000
4 Professors do $2,000 8,000
1 Adjunct do 1,300
Sec. & Treasurer do 500
Librarian 100
Repairs of buildings 375
Servants hire 250
Miscellaneous 700
An additional Tutor 800
$15,025

Leaving the Terrell Prof. of Agriculture on its original foundation, supported by the Terrell fund, and that the sum $4,000 made in buying & selling the land for the collegiate Institute is appropriated to that building & improvements.
Mr. Reese from the Library committee made the following report, which was concurred in,
The committee to whom the Librarians report was refered report; They have inspected generally the library & find the books and their care and arrangements creditable to

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the Librarian. There has been for the three past years no appropriation made for increase of books. The donations from individuals mainly of a documentary character from Messrs Tombs & Jackson is hereby acknowledged & the donors hereby tendered our thanks. For the building of several hundred phamplets & periodicals deemed worth preserving we recommend the appropriation of $150 the selection left to the librarian & also the further sum of 125 dollars for the purchase of works connected with the progressive sciences as the European publications on Astronomy, Geology &c. deemed indispensable & they recommend the various periodicals of less value be discontinued as a matter of economy.
The report of the Prof. of Mathematics has also been refered [sic] to your committee they have after confering with the Prof & inspecting the apparatus find many instruments worn & imperfect yet sufficient for instruction in the department of the Prof. of Mathematics. Your committee have considered the suggestions of the Prof. regarding expenditures & from the transition condition of our Institution and the demand for very strict economy they would recommend no appropriation respectfully submitted.
On motion of Mr. MitchellResolved that the 25 members of the Senior class be admitted to the Degree A.B.

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On motion Messrs Toombs & Harris were appointed a committee to consider and report on vacations, time of commencement.
On motion the following testimonial was ordered to be entered on the minutes.
Dr. Church whose long and faithful service entitle him to the lasting gratitude of the State, having resigned the Presidency of the University of Georgia and this being its first meeting since his connexion [sic] with the college has ceased, the Board of Trustees take great pleasure in testifying to his fidelity & zeal in behalf of the cause of learning, and in further testimony of their appreciation of his Character do respectfully invite him to take a seat on the stage in the college chapel during the public exercise of this and each ensuing commencement during his life.
Mr. Mitchell from the committee on the Laws & Discipline reported in part which was consided [sic] and ordered to be laid on the table for the present.
The Board adjourned until
Monday July 30th, 1860
The Board met pursuant to adjournment and resumed the consideration of the report of the comt on the Laws & Discipline of the college, which after amendment was agreed to as follows:

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The committee on Laws & Discipline beg leave to report,
That they have had under consideration the various matters committed to them and now submit to the Board by way of report the following propositions & resolutions viz.
That it be made the duty of the Prudential committee to make the annual report of the actings and doings of the Board to the Governor [sic] of the State in terms of the act of the last General Assembly as soon after the annual commencement of each year as practicable and authenticated by the Signature of the President of the Board.
The beneficiary of the Taylor Scholarship, Henry L. Wenfrey, selected & presented by Mr. Richard D.B. Taylor, is hereby approved and confirmed by the Board and his preparation for college in the School of Mr. A.M. Scudder is here-by ratified.
Resolved that, the thanks of the Board are due and are hereby tendered to Hon. Joseph H. Lumpkin, for his Lectures & Instructions on the Constitution of the United States; to Dr. Richard D. Moore for his lectures on Anatomy, the circulation of the blood & nervous system & to Thos. R.R. Cobb for his lectures on Slavery, gratuitously rendered to the Senior class & so highly appreciated by them.
Resolved that the Secretary by instructed to furnish each said gentlemen with a copy

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of the foregoing resolution.
Resolved, that Mr. William D. Wash the Mathematical Tutor is entitled to the expression of the Board appreciation of his valuable services in instructing the Junior class in Natural Philosophy and as a testimony of this appreciation the treasurer be instructed to pay him the extra sum of three hundred dollars & that the Secretary furnish Mr. Wash with a copy of this resolution and that he be made adjunct Prof. of Math. & Nat. Phil with a salary of $1300 per annum.
Resolved, That the law giving the election of Junior Orators to the literary Societies be repealed & that the selection be left in the hands of the college faculty.
The Committee report that the conference with the faculty was very free & full & that there is no such inequality among the Professors requiring the interposition of the Board and that the only contest among them is which shall have the most to do & advance his department. The 5th section required no change.
Upon the subject of organizations the comt offers the following Resolutions.
That the office of Chancellor & vice Chancellor be and the same are hereby established.

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That the salary of the Chancellor be $3000 per annum & house rent free, & that he preside over all meetings of the Faculty when present & upon all public occasions.
That he teach in the college proper Belles Lettres & English Literature and exercise all the power heretofore exercised by the President not incompatible with the new organization.
That he exercise visitorial power over the collegiate Institute and Agricultural Department; and embrace in his annual communication to this Board any suggestions as to their future management which he may deem expedient.
And that without making it imperative upon the Chancellor to do so as a field of usefulness he might from time to time visit all parts of the State & address the people upon Elemental, academic, College, University & Professional education & rouse them to the importance of the same,
That he might keep these & all other interests of the University and of education before the Public through the Periodical Press.
Resolved that in the collegiate Institute there shall be a President with power to select & dismiss his own assistant Professor, provided he at all times keep a sufficient corps of able assistants to carry on the studies Prescribed for said Institute and that the Prudential committee have power to make the

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necessary contract with the President & to elect him in the absence of the Board & to fill his vacancy. The collegiate Institute is to be self-sustaining.
The Board then proceeded to elect by ballot a Chancellor of the University when on counting the ballots it appeared that the Hon. Joseph H. Lumpkin was unanimously elected. Whereupon Henry Hull Jr. & Thos. R.R. Cobb were appointed a committee to communicate with Judge Lumpkin and ascertain if he accepts.
The Board then proceeded to a choice of vice-Chancellor, when it appeared that Prof. P.H. Mell was duly elected. The Board adjourned until
Tuesday July 31st, 1860
The Board met pursuant to adjournment.
On motion of Mr. Harris the recess of college immediately after commencement was extended one week.
Mr. Toombs from the special comt offered the following which was adopted.
Resolved That the commencement of the University of Georgia be changed from the 1st Wednesday in August to the 2nd Wednesday in July & that the Summer vacation extend from commencement to the 1st day of September & the winter vacation from the 1st day of December to the 5th day of January--after the present year.

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Governor Johnson & Brown, were for valid reasons excused from attendance on this meeting.
On motion the degree of Bachelor of Law was ordered to be confered [sic] upon the Senior class of the Lumpkin Law School under recommendations of the Professor thereof.
The Board then proceeded to the college chapel to witness the confering of the degrees L.L.B. on the following young gentlemen of the Law School, viz.
A.O. Bacon LaGrange W.P. Johnson Jefferson, co
Pope Barrow Oglethorpe Co. Reswell King Savannah
P.H. Brown Griffin L.H. Lane Monticello
R.A. Chambers Columbus S.C. Mitchell Griffin
J.M. Cleveland Washington L.O. Niles Griffin
Lamar Cobb Athens Geo L. PeaveyZebulon
V.C. Cook Rome A.C. Perry Chattooga Co.
Jas. Gardner Talbotton H.I. Randal Atlanta
Jas. S. George Decatur J.H. Reece Rome
W. Robt. Gignilliat McIntosh Co. Jas. M. Reid Sparta
Geo. G. Grattan Lexington Jno. A. Stephens
Crawfordville
A.A. Franklin Hill Athens L.I. Winn Decatur
W.C. Howards, Oglethorpe

The Board adjourned until
Wednesday Aug 1st. 1860
The Board met pursuant to adjournment.
On motion Judge Harris the Degree of Doctor of Law was ordered to be conferred on the Rev. Joseph C. Stiles. D.D.

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On motion of Mr. Jenkins,
Resolved that the new programme shall go into operation and the Chancellor & vice-Chancellor elect shall enter upon their offices on the first day of the next term and that in the meantime Wm. L. Mitchell Esq. be appointed president protem, with full power as President to sign diplomas, and conduct the public exercises of the college.
The Board proceeded to the college chapel to attend upon the public exercises of commencement day. When after orations be the graduating class the degree A.B. was publicly conferred on
W.D. Anderson W.D. Mitchell
R.B. Baxter T.A. Murray
A.M. Brown, Jr. C.J. Reese
T.J. Burns J.C. Rutherford
J.H. Cline Wm. A. Tenille
W.F. Crane E.J. Thomas
J.E. Harper J.H. Thomas Hugh Harris R.J. Thomas
J.J. Head John Weatherly
N.C. Kinbal A.G. Whitehead
W.H. Lee Thomas Wray Frank Lumpkin S.S. Tumlin Robt. C. Lumpkin Also the degree A.M. on Thos. A. Merret, G.W. Philpot, R.W. Hogan, Jas. R. Tolbert, J.H. Dunn, Wm. H.
Simms, John B. McGehee, J.P.C. Whitehead, R.M. Heard, John McMillian, T.W. Harris.

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The honorary degree of A.M. was conferred on Thos. Bacon. And the degree L.L.D. on Rev . Dr. Joseph C. Stiles.
Wednesday afternoon Aug 1st, /60 The resignations of Prof Johnston & Hammond were communicated to the Board and refered to the comt on Laws & Discipline, which comt. reported,
That the Board feel unwilling to part with Prof. Johnston & Hammond without expressing the high appreciation of their abilities, zeal & success in the important chairs occupied by them in this University, and in their retirement to other fields of labor & usefulness they carry with them the kindest regard of this Board. Resolved that the secretary furnish copies of the above resolution to Prof. Johnston & Hammond. Board agreed to.
Thursday August 2nd 1860 Mr. Cobb reported that Judge Lumpkin declined to accept the Chancellorship of the University.
The Board then proceeded to the election of Chancellor, when it appeared that the Rev. Andrew A. Lipscomb, D.D. of Alabama was unanimously elected chancellor. Whereupon the Hon. Mr. Toombs, William Dougherty, & Benj. C. Yancy Esq. were appointed a committee to wait on Dr. Lipscomb in person and secure his acceptance.

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Mr. Mitchell from the Comt on Laws and Discipline recommended the following
programme of the curriculum which was adopted. 1st
. To the Chancellor be assigned Belles Lettres & English Literature.
2nd, To the vice-Chancellor, the Professorship of Moral & Mental Philosophy, Moral Science, Metaphysics, Logic, Political Economy & Evidences of Christianity.
3rd
. That History, Constitution of the United States & Laws of Nations be left for arrangement between the Chancellor & Vice-Chancellor.
4th
. A Professor of Ancient Languages.
5th. A Professor of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry & Natural Sciences.
6th
. A Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.
7th.
The Agricultural Professorship with free Lectures.
That in the absence of the Chancellor the vice-Chancellor shall preside over the meetings of the Faculty and administer the Discipline & Laws of the college.

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Mr. Jenkins from the committee appointed made the following report;
The committee to whom the report of the Terrell Professor of Agriculture was referred, have considered the same and submit the following resolutions.
Resolved, That the students of college should be required to attend a course of lectures to be delivered by that Professor as heretofore required, and that he is expected to exert over them the same authority, and enforce the same discipline in his lecture room as are exerted and enforced by professors in the college proper.
And further that he report to the Faculty the author of any disorder that may occur in his lecture room & that he attend all meetings of the Faculty, called to consider such reports, furnish evidence of such disorders, and vote in such cases as other members of the Faculty.
Resolved-That so much of the Professors report as relates to furnishing a room, for an agricultural museum & to the professors contemplated visit to foreign agricultural colleges, be referred to the Prudential Comt. with power to act, provided that the Treasury of the University be in no event charged with the expense of such visit and that any information acquired be reported & any documents procured be furnished to this Board for the use of the University and Resolved that the teaching of Chemistry be disconnected with

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this professorship & the appropriation of eight hundred dollars be withdrawn.
The Board then proceeded to arrange & fill the Professorships as follows.
Prof. Mell having resigned the Professorship of Languages was elected to the Prof. of Moral & Mental Philosophy.
Prof. Rutherford continued Prof. of Math.
Wm. Henry Waddell elected Professor of Languages.
James Woodrow elected Professor of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry & Nat. Sciences.
Wm. D. Wash Adjunct Professor of Natural Philosophy & Mathematics and the Prudential comt authorized to employ an additional Tutor when necessary.
Mr. Hill from the committee on buildings submitted the following report, The committee on Buildings beg leave to submit the following report,
The buildings for the college Institute are in fair progress and the location is beautiful, commanding and retired. We think the Prudential committee deserve the thanks of the Board for their faithful attention to this subject and we recommend that their proceedings

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be ratified and approved.
The foundations of the new boarding house have been laid and will be doubtless completed at an early day. The buildings for the Library, Lecture rooms &c. has progressed to the third story and the arrangement we think admirably adapted to the purposes contemplated.
The other buildinds are in the usual state of care and preservation.
We think the college chapel entirely too small for the use and purposes of the Universityand the accommodation of the people on public occasions. We can but express the hope that the State of Georgis, with an ample and even redundant Treasury, will at once remedy this want of her general people and enable the Board to erect a chapel suited to the growing importance of the University, and the power and dignity of the State.
Your committee further report that the use of the old church on the college campus as a colored church, ought not longer to be allowed. According to our information the Board is under no obligation to continue such privileges and we think them incompatible with the best interests of the University. We recommend and request the Prudential committee to have this old church removed.
Resolved That the action of the Prudential committee in relation to the various buildings

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ordered by the Board in connection with the University, and the collegiate Institute as reported to this Board be ratified and approved.
Resolved, That the Prudential committee be instructed to discontinue the use of the old Baptist Church for the purposes of the worship of the colored People and that the same be removed.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
B.H. Hull
Chairman. The above report was unanimously agreed to.
Mr. Jenkins offered the following which was adopted.
Resolved That the thanks of this Board be tendered to Mr. William L. Mitchell for his services as Chairman of the Faculty during the closing collegiate year and as President protem during the commencement exercises. The discharge of these duties has but brought out more promenintly the fidelity, ability and untiring devotion to this University of which we have long been witnesses.
Mr. Cochrane offered the following paper which was agreed to,
Whereas by the recent reorganization of the University, the perfection of the system will require several other additional professorships to be endorsed to make the

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University what its founders contemplated, and a large surplus revenue being annually flowing into the State Treasury from the nett [sic] earnings of the State road.
It is therefore resolved that the Trustees in their report to the executive under the late law of the State be requested to bring this subject to his notice and through him to make application to the Legislature for the appropriation of one hundred thousand dollad per annum, for five years, for the permanent endowment of the University--The Board adjourned until
Friday August 3 1860
The Prudential committee were authorized and instructed to arrange for the division of studies among the college officers
the Chancellors & newly elected Professors be at their posts.
Col. Wm. H. Jackson the sevior Trustee was on motion appointed permanent President of the Board of Trustees.
Resolved That there be one annual stated meeting of the Board of Trustees and that meeting be on the Friday before the commencement.
Wm. H. Jackson President Asbury Hull Secretary.
(pge 66)

(pge 67)
Athens, Friday July 5th 1861
At a stated meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, began this day, the following members attended, viz.
Messrs Billups Mess. Jackson
Howell Cobb Wilson Lumpkin
T.R,R, Cobb Mitchell
Dougherty Moore
Harris and
Hull Yaney.
The meeting was opened with prayer by Chancellor Lipscomb who presented in person and read the following communication.
University of Georgia
July 4th 1861
Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees;
After a preparatory visit to the University, last August, I made my arrangements to enter on the duties of my office in the month of September. My introduction to the position of Chancellor which I had the honor of accepting from your hands, was so grateful to my feelings so well calculated to relieve a comparative stranger of all embarrassment and to inspire a spirit of earnest exertion on behalf of the University, that you must permit me to express my sincere appreciation of the courtesy and kindness of the Prudential committee, the Faculty and the Students of the University. I remained here until the close of the fall term, engaging in

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such duties or general superintendence, teaching and lecturing as were practicable. Called by my business affairs to Alabama during the vacation, I was temporarily absent from Georgia, but meanwhile I visited the Legislature, and otherwise attended to such interests of the University as needed official service.
Considering the exited state of the country our opening in January 1861, promising well. Everything indicated a satisfactory degree of prosperity until the intense agitation of the public mind in April, when it became evident that we should suffer a serious interruption in our work. Many of our students were withdrawn, others retired of their own accord, but despite unfavorable circumstances, we continued the regular operations of the college.
One hundred and twenty three students have been matriculated during the present year but, owing chiefly to the cause just named, about seventy five of this number failed to go through with the annual course of study. Several members of the Senior class having been connected with military companies, retired from college in good standing, and entered the service of the country. As their college course was so near ended they are recommended for graduation.
Making due allowance for the disturbed state of the time, the general order, sobriety, many deportment and studious [?] of the members of the college has been good. The discipline exercise by the Faculty has been judicious and efficient, and our constant

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aim has been to maintain the tone of morality and scholarship as high as seemed to be practicable. I take great pleasure in assuring the Board of the cordial sympathy existing between the professors, of their hearty unanimity of purpose and feeling, and of their earnest devotion to the duties of their respective departments. Nor can I omit to express my gratification at the constancy and faithfulness with which they have cooperated with me in all measures to advance the prosperity of the University.
Owing to the resignation of Professor Woodrow, elected by the Board at its session, August 1860, the Professorship of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, and Geology was left vacant. The interests of the University made it necessary that this chair should be promptly supplied, and accordingly your committee appointed Dr. W.L. Jones to discharge its duties for the remaining portion of the session. I have had various opportunities of observing the intelligence, skill and zeal of Professor Jones in this branch of the University and I can commend his unusual merits in Scholarship and his sympathy with the objects of liberal culture to your appreciation.
Professor R.M. Johnston resigned the Professorship of Belles Lettres &c. at your last session but was subsequently induced to remain in connection with the University. His services this year have been exceedingly valuable. I greatly regret to inform the Board that he has given me notice of his intention

(pge 70)
to retire from the University at the close of the present year.
The condition of the country will embarrass our operations for the ensuing year, I am unable to form any opinion as to the number of students likely to be in attendance but I am satisfied that our wisest course will be to continue the exercises without any interruption. It if should be necessary to accomotate the working of the University to the exigencies of the day, the Faculty will cheerfully co-operate with you in any measures, that you may think prudent. There are some evidences of a growing interest in behalf of the University, which taken in connection with the fact that so many of our Southern youth have been permanently withdrawn from Northern Institutions, lead me to hope that we shall be able to struggle through the difficulties impending--A new Era must soon begin in the history of Southern education, and I therefore think that we should keep the University progressing, so as to avail ourselves promptly of any advantages that may offer. Apart from this, a system of education that involves uniform and regular progress as the condition of success, cannot be disturbed without most serious injury. I trust Gentlemen, that you will deem it advisable not to suffer the operations of the University to be discontinued.
Reviving the history of the year now closing, -the continuance of our work under circumstances tending to distract attention

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and relax effort, -the good health and obedient spirit of the students, the harmony and activity of the Faculty, -I feel well assured that it becomes us to acknowledge the kindness of Gods Providence over the interests of this University and to rely on his guidance and help for the future.
I remain, Gentlemen,
Your obdt. Servant,
Andw A. Lipscomb.
On motion, the following Standing committees were appointed viz,
Laws and Discipline of the College,
Dougherty, Billups and Lumpkin.
On Finance,
T.R.R. Cob, Hull and Harris.
Buildings, Library and Apparatus,
Moore, Howell Cobb and Yaney.
A report on the condition of the Finances and reports from several Professors were read and appropriately referred.
Adjunct Professor Wash sent in a letter, resigning his seat at the expiration of the present year, which resignation was accepted.
On motion of Gov. Cobb, Resolved, That it is inexpedient to close the University, and that

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to be referred to the committee of Laws and Discipline to inquire and report the most practicable mode of continuing the operations of the University upon a basis suited to the existing state of things.
On motion of Judge Harris, the papers of this and other placed were requested to publish the Chancellors communication made to the Board.
Excuses for absence from the present meeting were made and sustained from the following members, -viz. Mess Bartow, Jenkins, Johnson, Miller, Toombs, and Ward.
The Degree of A.B. was conferred upon the members of the Senior class, as follows,
J.M. Britain, J.H.McWhorter,
E.A. Carter Benjamin Mell
E.Y. Clarke, B.R. Mosely
R.A. Clayton, C.E. Ridley
J.H. Foster, J.J Robinson,
G.C. Gardner, G.W. Rush
J.J.F. Gore, J.N. Theats,
W.A. Hemphill F.M. Stovall,
T.J. Hester, J.M. Ware,
E.T. Langford, G.C. Walker,
T.N. McMullen, Harrison Wells. Also the degree of A.M. was conferred upon William H. Prichett of Cass County. Rev.
C.M. Cooper, of Athens.

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On motion of Dr. Moore
Resolved, That the subject of converting the Preparatory School, attached to this University into a Military Academy, be referred to the committee on Laws and Discipline.
The Board then adjourned until
Saturday Morning July 6th, 1861
A letter was read from Dr. Lee proposing to remit half of his salary for the coming year, and was appropriately referred.
Mr. Mitchell offered the following preamble and Resolution which was adopted, viz.
It was announced that Vice-Chancellor Dr. Mell had consented to go into the Military service of the Confederate Government as captain of a volunteer Company, which has been offered him and which meets our approbation and having made application to be relieved from the rule requiring six months notice of intention to resign, and the Board being desirous of retaining him in connection with the University.
It was resolved, -That instead of a resignation, Dr. Mell have leave of absence from his duties during his connection with the Army, and that his family remain in the house now occupied by him, free of rent, his salary as vice-Chancellor to be suspended during his absence.

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The Board then proceeded to the election of a Professor of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, and Geology, when it was ascertained that Dr. W.L. Jones was duly elected.
Mr. Hull from the committee on Finance made a report which was laid upon the table but was subsequently taken up and adopted as follows,
The committee on the Finances of the University for greater simiplicity, beg leave to state first the existing liabilities on contracts, as follows,Balance unpaid on C. Hughes contract, $11,636 R. Cranes (Liby) 5,300 (Boarding H. 1,260 Making a total of $19,196
To meet these extraordinary expenses we have Bonds to the amount of $11,000 Notes of Individuals to amt of $10,750 Making, besides Interest due, $21,750 Showing a surplus, if all of our means were convertible into case, of $ 2,554 and as our investments bear interest, we may safely estimate that we can discharge existing debts with our present means at any probable depreciation in their market value. Of Annual; income we shall have, Dividend on Bank Stock, $8,000 House Rent, ---------------------------------700 and Tuition estimated at, ____________ $3,000 The Interest on the Terrell Endowment and Taylor Scholarship, as hitherto appropriated entering into our estimates of income

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because the whole Interest goes to specific objects.
It will be seen at a glance that this estimated income, added to the cash now on hand, making a total of --$12,325, will fall far short of our annual expenditure, heretofore, amounting to, say $15,000, making a reduction of at least Twenty per cent necessary in all expenditures for the year, but it is quite likely to fall short rather, in the next six months, and we respectfully recommend a reduction of all salaries for the ensuing year of Twenty per cent.
We have examined the accounts of the Treasurer and find them correct, and proper vouchers are filed away for all reported items of expenditure during the past year. The committee cannot submit any detailed estimate of appropriations for the ensuing year, until the Board shall have acted on the report of the committee on Laws and Discipline, who were charged with the duty of proposing the necessary changes in the mode of continuing the operations of the University on a basis suited to the existing state of things.
The committee recommend that the income of the Institution be appropriated to pay the Salaries as agreed upon by the adoption of the Report of the committee on L. &
D. & other necessary expenses for the ensuing year.
T.R.R.
Cobb

H.
Hull Com

J.L. Harris

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Mr. Dougherty from the committee on Laws and Discipline made a report, which was discussed and recommitted to the same committee with instructions.
Mr. T.R.R. Cobb presented the following Resolution,
Resolved, That the Terrell Professorship as at present organized shall be discontinued after the present term, and that the fund be allowed to accumulate, during the present troubles of the country,
Which elicited much discussion, when a motion was made to lay the Resolution on the Table, -on which motion the yeas and nays were required to be recorded, and are as follows. Those who voted in the negative are,-Mess. Howell Cobb, T.R.R. Cobb, Hull and Wilson Limpkin, so the Resolution was laid upon the table for the remainder of the session.
Mr. Dougherty renewed the Report on Laws and Discipline, which was adopted and is as follows.
The committee on Laws and Discipline have had under consideration the several subjects referred to it; and beg leave to make the following report.
The Board having unanimously concurred with the Chancellor as to the propriety of continuing the exercises of the University and that being the only question presented by the communication requiring its [sic] action,-the

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committee have deemed it unnecessary to consider it farther than to express its satisfaction at the able and efficient manner in which the affairs of the University have been conducted, the fidelity and harmony with which the duties of the several officers have been discharged and the assurances given by the Chancellor of their willingness to co-operat with this Board in accommodating the operations of the University to the exigencies of the times. With their co-operation your committee believe (notwithstanding the difficulties that seemed at first to attend it) they have been able to suggest a plan whereby the exercise of the University may be continued and the instruction, necessary for those who may patronize it, afforded without transcending its certain and available means. The difficulty seems to be a want of patronage owing, doubtless, to the present state of the country, and this, of itself, would seem to suggest, as an appropriate remedy, a reduction of the officers. Professors Johnston and Wash have tendered their resignations, your committee recommend that they be accepted, and that their chairs remain vacant for the present, and that the Chancellor and remaining Professors be requested to discharge as far as practicable, by such a distribution among them, as they may agree on, these officers, excepting, however, from this arrangement, the Terrell Professorship. Inasmuch as that officer discharges no police duties and could not conveniently discharge

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any portion of the duties of the two vacant Professorships, the committee recommend the reduction of the salary of that officer to the sum of Six Hundred dollars.
It will be seen by reference to the Report of the committee on Finances that our means will be ample to meet the current expenses of the year, without relying to any extent upon an uncertain and fluctuating patronage, and in all probability this state of things will continue as long as the exigencies requiring its adoption shall exist.
They, therefore, recommend that the salaries of the Chancellor and of the Professors of the University, wit the exception of the Terrell Professorship, be reduced Twenty PerCent, and that a committee be appointed to confer with the aforesaid officers on the subject of such reduction.
The Secretary and Treasurer having generously offered to serve the Board in the capacity in which he had heretofore acted for the next collegiate year, without a salary, your committee recommend the acceptance of the liberal proposition of that officer and the saving thereby of the amount of his salary to the University.
The committee have also considered the propriety of introducing into the collegiate Institute, as a study, Military Tacitts (Tactics), under the Superintendence of a competent Instructor. The Resolution referring this matter to the committee, by its terms seems to contemplate a change of that institution into a Military

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Academy, -but from the remarks of the mover at the time of its introduction it is understood that the object of his proposition was, to add that study to the others necessary to admission into the higher classes, and in this light it had been considered by the committee.
Whilst they are fully sensible of the value of Military Schools and the many advantages that might be derived from Military instruction in our Preparatory school, yet, in view of the fact that this Institution had not yet been organized, and probably will not be within the next year, your committee deem it advisable and so recommend the Board, to defer further consideration of the subject for the present. All of which is respectfully submitted.
The following Resolution was offered by Judge Harris and adopted;
Resolved, -That the Prudential Committee be fully authorised to provide until the next meeting of the board, the necessary officers of instruction for the University and to provide for any contingency that may arise in that department, within the means in hand.
Mr. Mitchell offered the following Report which was accepted.
The committee of one to confer with the Chancellor and members of the faculty in relation to the reduction of salaries, begs leave to report that he had seen the Chancellor and several of the Professors, who assure him that the Faculty have had the same

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subject under their consideration and are willing to make any sacrifices demanded by the extraordinary state of the country. Indeed the committee feels constrained to express his high gratification at the devotion manifested by these valuable gentlemen to the interests of the Institution and to the cause of education. All of which is respectfully submitted.
Wm. L. Mitchell-
The Board then adjourned, Sine die. Wm. H. Jackson President.

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University of Georgia Athens October 29, 1861
At a called meeting of the Board of Trustees of this Institution the following members attended. William H. Jackson, President Messrs, Billups, Hull, Wilson Lumpkin, J.H. Lumpkin, Mitchell, Moore, Reese, & Ward.
Prayer by Chancellor Lipscomb
Minutes of the last meeting reade [sic]. Excused for absence Harris, Jenkins, Barnarde, Elliott, Cooper, Hill, Dougherty, and those members of the Board in the Service of the Confederacy.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell,
Resolved, That the Collegiate Institute be put in operation by the first of January next or as soon thereafter as Practicable that for this purpose a President of the Institute be now elected upon the basis heretofore adopted, provided that the expenses of board and tuition &c. shall be left to the judgment of the President, and that military training be authorized to be included in the gymnastic exercises contemplated for said Institution at his discretion and that the Prudential committee be authorized to make all necessary contracts with the President and arrange all necessary details, provided that if the President now elected shall fail to accept the Prudential committee shall proceed
(pge 82) to supply his place, if a suitable person can be procured, it being understood that the Institute is to be self-sustaining.
After the adoption of the foregoing, Rev. C.P. Beman was elected President of the collegiate Institute, Whereupon Dr. Reese and Mr. Dougherty were appointed a committee to see Mr. Beman and request his acceptance.
On motion Prof. Mill was placed on the same footing, as to house rent as the other Professors.
On motion the following rates were fixed as to the salaries of the College officers, after the first of January next, Chancellor Lipscomb $2,000.00 Professors each 1,500.00
On motion resolved that the Prudential Committee be authorized to rent the Boarding house on the best terms.

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Athens, Friday, July 4th 1862
At a stated annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, begun this day, the following members attended.-viz,
Mess. Cochran Mess. J.H. Lumpkin
Hill Wilson Lumpkin
Hull Mitchell
Jackson Moore and
Jenkins Yancy

The meeting was opened by Prayer from Rev. Dr. Lipscomb, Chancellor, Col. Jackson, Presiding.
The minutes of the last meeting of the Board and an abstract of the proceedings of the Prudential committee were read.
The following Standing committees were appointed, On Laws and Discipline, Mess. Lumpkin, Jenkins, and Hill. On Finance, Mess. Mitchell, Yancy and Hull. On Buildings, Library, and Apparatus, Mess. Wilson Lumpkin, Moore and Yancy.
Dr. Lipscomb presented in person and read his communication to the Board, which was referred to the committee on Laws and Discipline, and is as follows,-

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University of Georgia,
July 1st. 1862 Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees:
The operation of the University which were resumed on the 1st of last September, have been regularly continued through the college year, I look back to the history of the year now closing, with thankfulness to God, that we have been able, under the circumstances of the times, to sustain the Institution, The wisdom of your policy in determining to carry on the college had been fully vindicated and I feel quite well assured that when you examine the details of the current year, you will see that, while the mere numerical results have fallen much below the standard of usual success, we have accomplished some objects of permanent interest and value. Had the University done nothing more than demonstrate its vitality under the pressure of this adverse period I should have reason to congratulate you on the intelligence and zeal which you have evinced, in upholding your state Institution. But knowing as I do that more than this has been effected, I cannot withhold the expression of my gratification at the course which you were pleased to adopt.
During the past college year, thirty nine (39) students have been matriculated in the University. Of this number, more than one half have gone through the prescribed curriculum. Previously to the Draft of March 4th 1862, we lost several students in anticipation

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of that fact, but our loss would have been greater, had not Governor Brown very wisely released the members of the University in common with other colleges of the State from the provisions of that measure. Others were withdrawn by the Conscript Act of the Confederate Government. Despite of the interruptions we have been able to maintain the classes in their regular organization.
The spirit of the students, their attention to study and obedience to discipline, have been highly gratifying, and while they have shown a disposition to submit to authority and fulfil their obligation, I am happy to state, that they have generally manifested a sympathy with our effort to advance the welfare of the University.
The interest of the Professors in their respective departments has been as constant and earnest as I could desire. Feeling with me that the State of the Country made an unusual degree of watchfulness and exertion necessary on our part to sustain the University, they have spared no pains to infuse life into their work and it affords me great pleasure to say that the results of the year afford ample proof of the success of their toil.
By the action of the Prudential committee, I was allowed Fifteen Hundred (1500) dollars of the Tuition fund to fit up the new Library Building. Finding that the Building was not altogether suited to the end I wished to accomplish, I made some changes, be the consent of the committee, in the arrangements of the rooms, which have greatly promoted the convenience and comfort of

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the University. We now have three large and elegant halls for recitations and lectures. Special reference has been had in these arrangements to the illustrative offices of instruction. The facilities for successful teaching have been increased, while the general order and discipline of the University has been advanced.
Through the kindness of Mrs. Asbury Hull the University has been furnished with a most valuable collection of the best foreign engravings, illustrative of Classical History. Not only as works of art, but as useful auxiliaries to the study of the Classice, this very liberal donation is exceedingly valuable to the Institution.
The Library has been removed to its new Hall, a room sixty feet by fifty, which, by means of alcoves affords ample space for its books. The transfer of the Library to its new accommodations has given us an opportunity to classify its different departments, as well as to arrgment [sic] in other respects, its utility to our students and to general readers.
By reference to the accompanying reports, (marked A & B) from Professor Rutherford and Jones, you will be informed as to the condition of the Apparatus and Museum, The large Hall in the new Library Building is now ready to receive the necessary fixtures for the Museum, and I recommend you to make an appropriation for this purpose, A suitable Lecture Hall for the Chair of Natural History may be fitted up in

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connection with it, the expense of which may be included in the outlay for the Museum.
You will learn from the report presented herewith from B.R. Carroll, Esq. President of the University High School, that this branch of the University is in a most flourishing state. The discipline and instruction which Characterise this school are most admirable. Its success is the fruits of real merit. Satisfied as I am that it meets an urgent want, by combining the advantages of domestic care and watchfulness.
Permit me to urge upon you the adoption of such measures as your means will allow for the enlargement and more effective working of the University. The present period it is true, is one of disturbance and commotion, but education is not an interest that should be suffered to yield to the agitations of the day. On the contrary, every reason exists, why we should put forths unusual efforts to expand and ennoble our work. I believe that this is a most favorable time, for you to adopt those preparatory measures which shall look to widening the basis and increasing the facilities of the University. We are not undergoing a transition from a state of things, that interfered with our legitimate progress, and particularly tended to restrain and thereby impair our intellectual growth. Under our former political relations, none of

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our interests suffered more than those of education. But have entered on an era that will communicate a new and mighty impulse to the mind of our people. It strikes me therefore that muchwill be gained by placing the University, as soon as practicable, in a position to meet approaching circumstances. If this preparation is postponed, we shall not be in a condition to appropriate to ourselves the advantages which will be within easy reach; and I therefore beg to impress upon you how much of vital significance to the future power and dignity of the University is at stake upon the decision, to which you may come, Every available resource should now be employed to perfect the arrangements of the Institution, and put it on vantage ground in view of the new order of things awaiting our independence.
I recommend to your consideration the propriety of establishing at once, a school of Civil Engineering in connection with the University, The Industrial interests of the Confederacy will necessarily stimulate the department of professional life in an unusual degree, and hence, I do not know a better service that you can render the State than be immediately adopting measures for the organization of a school for Engineers.
The following gentlemen have been recommended by the Faculty for graduation, viz.
S.H. Brooks, W.H. Bass. L.H. Hardeman. Alsey Huggins. H.H. Kinnebrew.

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Since your last meeting, it has pleased the Providence of Almighty God to remove from our midst, the Rev. Dr. Church, formerly President of the University. A large part of his life was spent in your Service, and the lofty integrity of that life, its constant earnestness and inflexible devotion , are imperishable portions of the Institution committed to your care.
I beg to remain, Gentlemen, Your obedient Servant; Andrew A. Libscomb.
The Treasurers Report of the Finances was presented and read and referred to the Finance committee.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, a new standing committee, -viz. On the University High School, was appointed, consisting of Mess. Mitchell, Hull, and Jenkins.
5 OClock. P.M.
On motion of Dr. Moore, it was Resolved, That thanks of the Board of Trustees are hereby tendered to Mrs. Asbury Hull for the very valuable engravings, which she has presented to the University of Georgia.
Judge Lumpkin from the committee on Laws and Discipline made the following Report,
The committee to which was referred the Chancellors communication. beg

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leave to report that so much of said communication as refers to the organization of a school of Civil Engineering in connection with the University of Georgia has been under their careful consideration. It is quite clear to the committee that the prospective necessity of education will require some such provision to be made for the Profession of Civil Engineering, and further more that a distinct department for this purpose, furnished with all necessary and desirable means of Instruction, ought to be established. Such a School, while accomplishing its own specific object, will greatly promote the general interests of the University, and largely enhance its utility as a state Institution.
The condition of the country will not permit, at this time, the complete organization of the contemplated School-But your committee have concluded that initial measures, looking to this important enterprise may now be safely taken, and they, therefore recommend that the Prudential committee Be empowered to carry out the suggestions of the Chancellor at such a time and in such form, as may be warranted by the monetary resources of the University.
All of which is Respectfully submitted.
It is ordered that the degree of Bachelor of Arts be conferred upon
William H. Brooke.
William H. Bass.
Tampson H. Hardeman,

(pge 91)
Alsey Huggins, -and
J.H. Kinnebrew. and that Diplomas be sent to each one of them accordingly.
The large hall in the new Building being now ready to receive the necessary fixtures for the Museum, it is recommended to the Prudential committee to apply the necessary funds for this purpose, whenever in their judgment, the finances of the University will ustify it, and in connection therewith, that a suitable lecture Hall be fitted up for the chair of Natural History.
In view of the depressing influence exerted by the existing war upon Institutions of learning and upon all the educational Instrumentalities of the country, and of the unabated zeal and devotion of the Chancellor and Professors of this University in promoting its present usefulness and ultimate success, the committee recommend that adoption of the following resolution.
Resolved, That the thanks of this Board are due and hereby tendered to the Chancellor and Professors of the University for the self-sacrificing, spirit, and the persistent energy they have displayed in preserving the organization and advancing the usefulness of the Institution amid the unparalleled discouragements.

(pge 92)
In view of the recent dispensation of Providence Resolved, That we sympathize with the people of our state and Especially with his bereaved family in the demise of Dr. Alonzo Church, late President of the University and faithfully devoted during many years to its Prosperity and usefulness.
Resolved further, that the best portrait that can be obtained of Dr. Church be procured be the Prudential committee and suspended in the Library Room.
All of which was agreed to.
Mr. Jenkins offered the following resolution which was agreed to,
Resolved, That the Chancellor be requested to memorialize the President of the confederate States, to permit conscripts of the State under the age of 21 years, who may desire to pursue a course of collegiate education in the University of Georgia, to remain in this Institution until in the opinion of the President, their services are required in the field, it being understood that whilst here, they will be carefully drilled as if in a camp of Instruction, by a competent officer and further that the Chancellor place his memorial in the hands of the Hon. B.H. Hill who is requested to forward it to the President and give it such aid as may consist with his sense of propriety.
Mr. Mitchell offered a resolution with regard to the Terrell Professorship of Agriculture, -for which the following substitute was proposed

(pge 93)
by Mr. Jenkins and was agreed viz.
Resolved, That on and after the 1st day of January next, the chair of the Terrell Professorship of Agriculture be vacated, until it shall be the pleasure of the Board to fill it, and that, in the meantime, the interest of the Terrell Fund be kept separate, to be added to the principal.
Mr. Wilson Lumpkin, from the committee on the Library, Apparatus &c. made the following Report, which was agreed to.
The committee to whom was referred the Reports of the Librarian, the Professor of Natural Philosophy and the Professor of Mathematics have been much gratified in witnessing the greatly improved appearance of the Library as now exhibited in its transfer to the new Building erected for that and other purposes. The committee admire the good taste and perfect order, with which everything has been arranged under the Superintendence and vigilance of Chancellor Lipscomb.
Mr. Mitchell, from the committee on Finance, made the following report,--
The committee, to which was referred the annual report of the Treasurer, and the general subject of the finances and appropriation for the next collegiate year, beg leave to submit the following report.
The Report of the Treasurer has been carefully examined as to Receipts and expenditures, and approved by your committee on Finance,

(pge 94)
showing a cash balance of -----$2,344.25 The committee have estimated the receipts of the next collegiate year, as follows.
From Bank Stock Tuition House Rent $1,500 $10,500 $ 8,000 $ 1,00
And the expenses as follows

Salaries of Chancellor and Professors$ 8,000
Treasurer 400
Repairs 300
Negro Hire 200
Printing, Postage &c 100
Incidentals 150
$9,150
The contract for the new Library
Building amounts to $14,600
On which, has been paid 11,800
Leaving a balance of $ 2,800
The contract for the collegiate
High School Building amounts to $24,000
On which has been paid 22,448.41
leaving a balance of $ 1,551.59
Besides these liabilities, there
Are also claims be the Contractors

of the High School Building, as extra, about *800 and also unsettled bills made by the Chancellor, for fitting up the Lecture rooms, about $ 830 Making in the whole about $5,981.59
Neither of the buildings, however, have ever been fully received and the above items are subject to settlement and final adjustment.

(pge 95)
There are, in the hands of the Treasurer, to meet these liabilities, the following
assets, heretofore appropriated, -viz. Lewis J. Lumpkin, note $ 4,030.00 Thos. R.R. Cobb 140
Lucy Cobb Institute 800
Jos T. Lumpkin 1,470
Mary Mathews 500
University High School Note. 600
7,540.00 To which add cash balance 2,344.25 $9,844.25 This estimate does not embrace the interest due on said notes, nor the rent for the Boarding house.
The committee submit the following resolutions:
Resolved, That the estimate for the expenses of the next collegiate year, be passed as an appropriation bill for the same period;
Resolved that any funds in the Treasury, not otherwise appropriated, are hereby put at the disposal of the Prudential committee to meet the various objects contemplated by the action of the Board at this meeting in relation to the School of Civil Engineering, the cabinet of minerals, the museum, the Potrait of Rev. Alonzo Church, D.C., to be procured and suspended in the Library &c, &c, &c.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Wm. L. Mitchell
Benj. C. Yancey
A. Hull, Jr. Com on Finance.

(pge 96)
Mr. Carrolls Report was referred to the standing committee on the University High School, and consisting of Mess. Mitchell, Hull and Jenkins to report at the next meeting of the Board.
The Board then adjourned Sine Die. Attest Asbury Hull Edw. H. Jackson Secretary President.

(pge 97)
Athens Friday July 3rd 1863 At a stated meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia begun this day, the following members attended, viz.
Mess. Billups Mitchell
Harris Moore
Hull Reese
Jenkins Toombs
Lewis and
J.H. Lumpkin ey Yancy
Mr. Jackson, President of the Board being absent, Dr. Reese, the oldest Trustee present, was called to the chair.
The meeting was opened with prayer from Rev. Dr. Lipscomb, Chancellor.
The minutes of the last meeting of the Board of Trustees were read.
The following Standing Committees were appointed, -On Laws and Discipline, Mess. Lumpkin, Jenkins and Toombs. On Finance. Messrs. Mitchell, Lewis, Yancey, and Hull. On Library, Apparatus and Buildings Mess. Moore, Harris, and Bullups. On University High School Mess Jenkins, Mitchell, Hull and Toombs.
Dr. Lipscomb presented and read his annual communication which follows,-

(pge 98)
University of Geo.
July 1st, 1863
To the Board of Trustees, Gentlemen,
After the adjournment of your last meeting, I addressed a communication, through Senator Hill, to President Davis, setting forth your views with reference to the operation of the Law upon our students, In reply, I was informed by the Secretary of War that the Executive Department of the Confederate Government had no control over the matter, At this point the correspondence ended.
The difficulty of retaining our students when they approach the age of eighteen years continues to embarrass the university. Such are the wants of the Government for effective men in the service of the Army that I see no way by which this obstacle to our success in the University can be directly obviated. But I think it will be desirable for you to suspend the Law, which requires a candidate for admission into the University, to be fourteen years of age, and thereby allow us to receive applicants, irrespective of age, if they are found on examination, to be prepared for collegiate instruction.
Another cause, which diminished the number of Students in the college, was the removal of the Freshman Class to the University High School. This proved

(pge 99)
a loss to the college, without any gain to the numerical strength of the High School. The applications for admission into the School have been much more numerous than its capacity for accommodation would permit it to accept. I therefore recommend that you restore the Freshman class to the college, limiting the action for the present, to the continuation of the war.
In conformity with your resolution at the last Session of the Board, establishing prospectively, a school for Civil and Military Engineers in connection with the University course of Education, I commenced a correspondence with different parties, to ascertain if a suitable person could be secured for this Professorship. The correspondence was successful in bringing to my knowledge, a gentlemen admirably qualified by education and experience for this important position. But in consequence, of the embarrassments of the times, I deemed it advisable to postpone the commencement of the School. Under present circumstances, the enterprise would not be self-supporting, had you the means to expend in behalf of this object, I should earnestly recommend its immediate inauguration, for I am fully satisfied that the results of such a measure would largely enhance the usefulness of the University. In some form or other, Engineering is destined to be the basis of a great part of our future industry, and hence, such a department, without interfering with the intellectual aim of the University, would have a vital practical

(pge 100)
bearing on the materiel [sic] and social civilization of the state.
During the past year, Twenty students have been enrolled in the University against Forty in attendance, 1861-61. The decrease is owing to causes already stated. Should the Freshman class be restored to the college, I should judge from the applications for admission already made, that the attendance next year, will be considerably greater than during the past session.
In accordance with the action of the Faculty, I recommend for graduation Mr. Thomas W. Grimes of Columbus, Geo.
Our Professors have continued diligent, faithful and earnest in the duties of their respective departments. For the last few weeks, Professor Mell, D.D. Colonel of the Troops raised for Home Defence in this section of the state has been actively engaged in perfecting the Military organization entrusted to his care. Feeling that this was a movement which you would heartily sanction, and believing that Dr. Mell was singularly qualified for its direction, I had no hesitation in advising him to accept the position tendered him. To liberate his time for this office, the duties of his Professorship were assumed by the Faculty during his temporary absence.
In behalf of the Professor of Mathematics of Natural Philosophy, I report the instruments in each department in good order.

(pge 101)
No expenditures have been incurred in connection with the Library, except by the purchase of Bentons abridgement. The new Natural History Hall has progressed as far as our Materials allowed. I have not been able to arrange the Museums because of the impossible of getting fixtures for their accommodation.
The accompanying Report from the Senior Professor of the High School, Mr. Charbonnier (in the absence of the President, Mr. Carrol, ) presents a most encouraging statement of the affairs of this branch of the University. I have frequently visited the Institution, hearing its classes recite and witnessing its Examinations; and I take great pleasure in expressing my deep sense of the skill, energy and devotion, which President Carrol and his assistants have evinced in the discharge of their duties. The peculiar circumstances under which the High School went into operation, the scarcity of provisions, the difficulty of furnishing an establishment unexpectedly large, and the embarrassment attending the securing of suitable teachers to carry out so extensive and complicated a plan as that on which the school is founded, Have greatly enhanced the labors of the president and his Professors. But, as already intimated, they have been earnest in their work, exhibiting a resolute zeal in fulfilling the purposes of the Board of Trustees, worthy of the highest appreciation.

(pge 102)
During the past year, there have been in the high School, one hundred and three Pupils. Nor has its patronage been confined to our own State. Of the number entered, twenty three (23) were from South Carolina; Four (4) from Alabama; Three (3) from Florida; Three (3) from Louisiana; Two (2) from Tennessee; one (1) from Mississippi; while the remainder sixty-seven (67) were from Georgia.
The larger part of the former pupils it is expected, will return to the High School next Session, which will open July 13th. Applications for next admissions amounting to between thirty and Forty have already been made for the ensuing year. Of last years pupils it is probable that between ten and fifteen will be prepared to enter the University on the opening of the Fall Term in September.
The practical working of the High School promises to realize the expectations of your Board in its organization. Apart from its attention to accurate and thorough preparatory scholarship, I beg to express my warm commendation of the interest in cultivating among its pupils, those qualities of character, which are inseparably connected with elevation of spirit and manliness of bearing. Strict watchfulness over their morals has been exercised. They are distributed according to their wishes, in the Sunday Schools of the

(pge 103)
city, and the Boarders in the Institution have been regularly in the habit of attending the Sabbath afternoon Lecture of the University. All which is respectfully submitted. Andw A. Lipscomb, Chancellor. The Report of the High School was read and referred.
The Treasurers Report was read and referred to the committee on Finance.
Mr. Jenkins made a Report on the High School under an appointment of last Session, which is as follows,-
The Committee appointed at last session of the Board, to visit the collegiate Institute, attached as a Preparatory school to the University, performed that during the Month of November last, and submit the following report. The location, eminently salubrious; sufficiently removed from the ceaseless movement and bustle of Town life, to secure freedom from temptation and privacy endispensable to success in the education of boys yet near enough to secure the daily fostering care of the University, through its Chancellor and resident Trustees, of itself insites patronage. The building is large and judiciously planned; furnishing apartments for teachers, Recitations Rooms, commons and Dormitories,-all well ventilated
(pge 104)
and comfortable at all seasons. The number of pupils in the Institute in now , but many applications for admission have necessarily been postponed, for lack o accommodations, and in this, the Board may find gratifying evidence, that the enterprise meets the approval of our fellow citizens. Should the anticipated success attend our new University programme, of which the Institute is a very important part, it will doubtless become necessary to enlarge the structure, and increase the facilities for instruction. Nevertheless, we think, in these respects, all that a wise use of existing means and prudent forecast would justify has been done and well done. The grounds appear to be ample for horticultural purposes and for athletic exercise; and when their projected improvement shall have been accomplished, there will be space enough for the sportive energies of boyhood, and beauty and taste enough to excite and fix local attachment. This contemplated improvement embraces the entire physical man. The Institute is yet in its infancy and there has scarce been time to inaugurate its system of moral, intellectual and physical training, much less to mature its first fruits. Your committee, however, were impressed by

(pge 105)
their visit with the belief that it gives promise of great usefulness. They witnessed the exercises of different classes, conducted, as they were informed in the usual course, and had the satisfaction of observing that they were adapted to test severely the fidelity and success of each pupil in mastering the lesson of the hour. This is certainly a great desideratum. The ordinary routine of School Exercises affords to the laggard but too many facilities to drag through term after term by hanging upon the skirts of a class, studying and learning just enough to cover from the view of a carless instructor, idleness and ignorance. It is a cardinal point in every school system to forestall this very common boyish duplicity, involving fraud and inevitable disappointment of the just expectations of parents and guardians. More than this, its successful practice at school, prepares the boy to cheat the public when he shall have put on the man. and it may safely be assumed that the teacher who tolerates it is himself, in his own vocation an example of this pernicious training.
The dwelling together and constant association of Preceptors and pupils, if the former be wise enough to avoid, on the one hand undignified familiarity, and on the other excessive government, too severely repressing natural hilarity and making their presence hateful,-must have a happy effect in cherishing virtue and suppressing vice.

(pg 106)
With the necessity of observing this medium course, in order to incorporate as far as may be possible, daily government with scholastic education, we are satified [sic] the Principal and his assistants seem fully impressed.
We think it may be said of the Institute that its beginning is auspicious, that it merits and will receive public patronage and that it will prove a valuable appendage of the University.
Excuses for absence were made and sustained for Mess Brown, Cochran, Cooper, Dougherty, Jackson and Johnson.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, the Degree of A.M. was conferred upon Mr. W.N. White, a graduate of Hamilton college, N.Y.
The degree of A.B. was conferred upon Thomas W. Grimes, the only member of the Senior class.
Mess. Hull, Jenkins and Toombs were appointed a committee to bring in a minute in regard to deceased members.
Mr. Mitchell offered the following resolution in regard to Professors volunteering, which was agreed to.
Resolved,-That in view of the calls made upon the people to military organization under the Acts of Congress of August, 1861 and September, 1862,-the one providing

(pge 107)
for local State defense, and other for local neighbourhood defense, -the members of our Faculty, if disposed to join any of them, should join those only, formed under the latter act.
Saturday, July 4th. The Board met, and, in the absence of Dr. Reese, Judge Jenkins was called to preside.
Judge Lumpkin from the committee on Laws and discipline, made the following report which was adopted,-
The committee to which was referred the annual report of the Chancellor, beg leave to submit, That, upon an examination of the document, they find nothing demanding the action of the Board, except the minimum age required by candidates for admission into the University, and the removal of the Freshman class from the College. Satisfied that, from the circumstances of the country, the law in relation to both of these subjects ought to be suspended, as least for the present, we recommend the adoption of the following resolution,
Resolved,-That the law requiring of applicants to be Fourteen years old for admission into the University be suspended during the war, and that the Freshman class be restored for the same periods.
Mr. Mitchell from the committee on the University High School made the following Report, which was agreed to.

(pge 108)
The committee on the High School to whom the Report of the First Assistant has been referred, congratulate the Board upon the flourishing state of that Institution. That it is destined to promote the cause of education in our State, and prove an important auiliary to the University, does not admit of doubt. The system of instruction designed to be followed there is just in the process of developement [sic] and your committee think it would be prejudicial to the enterprise to indulge at this time in Minute criticism upon it.
With the acknowledged ability of the President and the supervision of the Chancellor and the Prudential committee, we may hopefully anticipate good results. Your committee, however, making due allowance for the disturbing causes springing out of the State of the country think it wise, as a general rule that none under the age of thirteen should be admitted as pupils. It is designed to be a High School, but in the absence of any limit as to age, it will become a Primary School. Should the Board, by the adoption of this report, signify their concurrence with the committee in this view, we doubt not it will be respected.
Mr. Lewis offered a resolution, requesting the President of the High School to explain fully, the modes of teaching &c. therein pursued, which was agreed to, and is as follows,

(pge 109)
Resolved, that the President of the High School be requested in his next Report to this Board to give fully his modes of instruction, rules of government, the time devoted to study and recitations, and the time devoted to amusements and their kind, with full explanations of the reasons for said modes and rules. That said report be made and handed to the Chancellor, and through him submitted to the Board, with his comments.
Mr. Mitchell from the committee on Finance made the following Report, which was agreed to,
The committee to which was referred the annual Report of the Treasurer and the general subject of the Finances and appropriations for the next college year beg leave to submit the following Report.
The Treasurers Report has been examined, audited, and approved by your committee on finance, showing a cash balance of, -$5,187.27. The committee have estimated the receipts, of the next collegiate year as follows,
From Bank Stock, $ 8,000
Tuition 2,000
House Rent 1,000
$11,000
And the expenses, as follows,Salaries of Chancellor and Professors, $ 8,000
Treasurer, Repairs Negro Hire Printing and Postage 400 350 250 100
(pge 110) Brought over Incidentals 9,100 200
$9,300

The committee find that the balances due a year ago for the new Library building and the High School have been paid off and discharged, and there are notes on interest, the principal of which is about, $5,000, at present, at the rate of
$240
The committee submit the following resolution.
Resolved, that the estimate for the expenses of the next collegiate year be passed as an appropriation Bill for the same period.
Resolved, That in view of the high price of living and the very low figure at which the Salaries of the Chancellor and Professors were placed a year ago, and the fact that the Bank has made a dividend of 12,000 $, there be paid to the Chancellor, the sum of $500 and to each of the Professors $300 for the past year.
Resolved, That should the Boarding House not be needed for the college, the Prudential committee be authorized to rent the same at a proper rent.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
W.S. Mitchell Chairman.
The following gentlemen were elected Trustees to fill vacancies,
H.R. Jackson of Savannah, Saml Barnet of Washington, R.M. Johnston of Hancock, and David A. Vason of Albany.

(pge 111)
Mr. Mitchell offered the following resolution looking to the enlargement of the college chapel.
Resolved, That the Chancellor be requested to submit to the board at its next annual meeting, his view with a plan for the enlargement and emprovement of the college chapel.
The Chairman was requested to give expression of the feeling of the Board occasioned by the absence of Governor Lumpkin, and to communicate to him their high appreciation for his character and services.
Dr. Moore, from the committee on Library, Buildings and apparatus made the following Report, which was agreed to,
The committee on the college Buildings, Library and Apparatus beg leave to report that they have examined the same and find the college Buildings in a fair State of preservation, and the Chancellors and Professors Houses and premises well cared for. They find the Philosophical and chemical apparatus in their usual condition, many parts in good and perfect order, but report some utterly useless, and must, at some future day, be repaired or replaced by new. The Library in its present position, and arrangement, is in perfect condition. The museum, the room for its reception not being completed, is mostly in disorder. Your committee beg leave to notice a little more in detail
(pge 112)
the new building in which we are now assembled. In the interior arrangement we think that it is almost perfect. The large and pleasant room, in which we are now assembled needs no description, as each one sees for himself its beauties and adaptation to its purposes. In the West and on the same floor is the Mathematical Room, 30 x 50 feet. Black Boards worked in the wall reach across two ends and one side. This decided improvement enables the Professor to put up at the same time a number of students, thus placing in the range of possibility for him to call upon a class of fifty or sixty to recite within one hour. In the center of the ceiling and reaching across the entire room is a large Diagram of the Solar System, showing the apparent size of the sun as seen from each Planet and the comparative magnitude of each, the manner of a comet entering the system, and the number of Satellites attending each primary. On the right is a very fine diagram illustrating the phases of the moon as seen both from the sun and earth. On the left are two diagrams, one illustrating the change of seasons and the other the equation of time. On the walls above the blackboards are diagrams illustrating almost all the principles of this department of education, -viz. on the left is found the famous Pythagorean proposition, or what is more generally remembered as

(pge 113)
the Forty-seventh of Euclid. Then follows the different graduants of the circle, with the various functions of the arcs. The Parabola and ellipse illustrating the principles of Conic Sections and Analytical Geometry. Next a figure illustrating the Ecliptic limit, a diagram illustration the effect of refraction upon the appearace [sic] of a heavenly body; another representing the eclipses of the sun and moon, then follows a figure illustrating twilight, next two figures showing the great circles of the heavens and earth, -illustrating clearly and beautifully the difference between right ascension and declination and latitude of a heavenly body. Then follows Newtons demonstration of Keplers first Law; next Geometrical figures one of which illustrates the differential of the functions of the arc, teaching in a clear manner some of the abstruse principles of the Calculus; next a Hemisphere of the Earths surface, illustrating the principles of Navigation; next and last, on the right, is a figure illustrating the leading principles of surveying; the whole making twenty one elaborately drawn figures executed with consummate skill, aiding the Professor in imparting and the student in receiving instruction in the leading principles of the Mathematical department. In the second story, we enter the splendid and elegantly furnished Library Room, in which during the past year, the improved

(pge 114)
arrangements have (as your committee have been informed by the Chancellor) proved successful in advancing the taste for reading among the students, and, as a reading room, it has been in constant use, and numbers of persons, refugees from their homes, as well as our own citizens have availed themselves of its attractions. On the same floor, the classical Hall has been very tastefully and beautifully fitted up in fresco maps, with such engravings and paintings as verify ancient edifices, costumes and events. Added to this, it is proposed to form a classical museum, which will serve still further to reproduce antiquity for the student and enhance his interest in this branch of education. In the third Story is the Hall of Natural History, filled with most beautiful and appropriate diagrams, the central one intended to exhibit a section of the earth, with its nucleus, and crust, the thickness of the latter being much exaggerated. The subdivision of the nucleus. The radiating light-colored space refer to the animal remains found in these strata, the end of the space next [to] the nucleus indicating the point at which the animals embraced in that space were created; the other extremity, the point at which they disappeared from the earth, and the varying width of the spaces, indicating the varying abundance or

(pge 115)
scarcity of the animals in the successive strata through which they extend. The four grand divisions of the animal kingdom are pointed out by dividing the circle into quadrants and placing the animals of each type by themselves in each quadrant. The four triangular spaces around the central figure contain each a single animal as a representative of the four divisions. The long quadrangular spaces on each side are intended [sic] to bring into view still more clearly the succession of animals through geological epochs being there presented. The plan of illustration thus presented on the frescoed ceiling will be farther elaborated on the side walls, so as to give the students a miniature library of the connection subsisting between Geology and Natural History.
The large room in the West end of the same story, intended as a general Lecture Room, is unfinished and it is contemplated to finish it in a style corresponding to the rest of the building. Your committee recommend no appropriation for the present year.
R.D. Moore.
Mr. Hull from the special committee upon deceased members, made the following Report.
The committee to whom was referred the duty of preparing, proper minutes of the

(pge 116)
decease of those members of the Board, whose places are vacant by death, beg leave to submit the following Report.
It has pleased Divine Providence to take from among us four of our late associates. We have lost by death, Gen. Thos. R.R. Cobb, Gen. Francis Barton [Bartow], Mr. John B. Barnard, and Col. Marcellus Douglass.
Three of these gentlemen gave their lives for their country on the battlefield and that country mourns with us their sad yet glorious fate.
Gen. Cobb fell in the first battle of Fredericksburg, gallantly leading his brigade, which distinguished itself in that splendid victory. His exalted character, his intellectual power, his manly and Christian virtues are known and valued in the State and confederacy. His preeminent usefulness in this Board claims a special tribute to his memory. An ardent friend of education, he entered with all his great abilities upon his duties as a Trustee, and labored as few men can labor for the promotion of the interests of the university. He was our most active, energetic and valuable associate, never once absent from his place, and his loss will be long felt by this Institution, as by every other interest, which had the benefit of his multiplied efforts for every good work.
Gen. Francis L. Bartow fell, one of the earliest Martyrs to Southern independence, at the first battle of Manassas.

(pge 117)
His death was like his life, lofty and chivalric, a thorough gentleman, scholar and patriot. He loved this college, as his Alma Mater, and was her devoted and consistent friend, on all occasions, defending her interests and laboring in her service with marked ability, whether as a legislator or as a Trustee.
Col. Douglass was among the patriotic dead of the battle of Sharpsburg. A young man and a lately chosen Trustee, his accomplishments and abilities, combined with his high character, private and professional, gave promise of eminent usefulness both to his state and to her University.
Mr. Barnard had been for several years one of the Board, and frequently present at our meetings. His uniform courtesy and amiability had endeared him to his associates, while his excellent abilities and sincere attachment to the interests of the University made him a valued member of this Board. All these gentlemen were graduates of this college, and she will ever cherish their memories and point to them with ptide as among her children.
We therefore, recommend the adoption of the following resolutions,
Resolved, That we deeply lament the loss of Gen. Thos. R.R. Cobb, Gen. Bartow, Col. Douglass and Mr. Barnard, and shall long remember their devotion to the cause of education, their uniform courtesy, and accociates and their value, as members of this Board.
Resolved, That we unite with the whole people of the

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state in the grief occasioned by their death, and join them in giving all honor to their memories and all sympathy to the bereaved families who especially feel their loss.
Resolved, That a copy of this Report and of these Resolutions be transmitted by the Secretary to the families of the deceased.
The Board then adjourned, Sine die. Wm. H. Jackson President. Asbury Hull Secy,

(pge 119)
Athens, Friday, July 1st, 1864
At a stated annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, begun this day, the following members were present, viz. Mess Billups Mess. W. Lumpkin Cobb J.H. Lumpkin
Barnett Mitchell Cooper Moore Dougherty and Hull Yancey.
Mr. Jackson, President of the Board being absent, Gov. Lumpkin was called to the Chair.
The meeting was opened with prayer from Rev. Dr. Lipscomb, Chancellor.
A letter was read from Mr. Jackson resigning his seat in the Board of Trustees. Gov. Lumpkin was unanimously elected President of the Board in his stead.
Excuses for absence were made and sustained for Mess. Jackson, Miller, Harris, Jenkins, Hill and Lewis.
Dr. Lipscomb presented and read his annual Report, which is as follows,.

(pge 120?)
University of Geo. June 30th, 1864
To the Board of Trustees
University of Georgia:
Gentlemen,
At the regular time, the exercises of the University were resumed for the Fall Session. We opened with nearly forty students, the increased number having been due to the High School. Three classes, Freshman, Sophomore and Junior comprised the Matriculated. During the second week of the session, the Proclamation of Gov. Brown calling upon the State Guard to enter upon active service, was received, and as the Faculty and a part of the Students were connected with that portion of the Guard required for duty, I deemed it proper that we should respond promptly to the Governors order. I therefore had a meeting of the Prudential committee, and obtained its consent to the suspension of our exercises for such length of time as we should be held to field-service. On the expiration of our term of service (Feby 4, 1864) it was found impracticable to reopen the University and, hence, we have remained until the present date in suspension. On the passage of the law of Congress requiring the enrollment of youths between seventeen and eighteen years of age, I applied to the Secy of War to

(pge 121)
exempt such pupils of the University High School as came under the provisions of this Law, except for local defence, and the request was granted.
You will find from the accompanying report of the President of the High School that its affairs have been prosperous during the past year. Seventy pupils were in attendance the last Term. Since the latter part of February, Prof. Wadell has discharged the duties of classical Professor in the school.
On application from the authorities of the Confederate Government, the use of most of the University Buildings has been granted for an Opthalmic Hospital, reserving under our control the Library Edifice and the new College.
The Museum has been carefully transferred to the commodious Hall in the Library Building and, as far as practicable suitable arrangements have been made for its accommodation.
I have found it impossible to secure proper architectural drawings for the reconstruction of the Chapel, and I have therefore to request that longer time be granted me to effect this object.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Andw A. Lipscomb.
Chancellor.
Pres. Carrolls Report on the High School was read and appropriately referred.

(pge 122)
The following standing committees were appointed, -viz. On Laws and Discipline, Mess. Lumpkin, Cooper, and Barnet. On Finance, Mess. Mitchell, Dougherty and Hull. On University High School Mess. Cobb, Cooper, and Mitchell On Library, Apparatus & Buildings. Mess. Moore, Billups and Yancey.
The Treasurers Report was then read and appropriately referred.
Having finished his report, Mr. Hull tendered his resignation in the following terms, viz.
And now, with this Report having served in this capacity for something over 45 years, I beg leave to resign the office of Secretary and Treasurer of the University of Georgia, -with sincere good will for the prosperity and usefulness of the Institution and for each of you personally.
Very Respectfully,
Asbury Hull
Saturday Morning July 2nd .
Judge Lumpkin from the committee on Laws and Discipline made Report,involving a resolution to allow the Professors salary of $750

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during the suspension of the Institution.
On motion to strike out 750$, the yeas and nays were required to be recorded. and are as follows,
Yeas. Mess Billups, Cooper, Dougherty, Hull, W. Lumpkin, Moore and Yancey. ( 7)
Nays. Mess. Barnet, Cobb, J.H. Lumpkin & Mitchell (4)
The Report as thus amended, was adopted and is as follows,
The committee on Laws and Discipline to which was referred the annual Report of the Chancellor of the University beg leave to state to the Board, that, after a careful perusal of said document, they find nothing in it, demanding the action of the Trustees.
But other subjects of grave consideration have been submitted by Resolution to our consideration,-to wit, -first, shall the exercises of the University be resumed during the existing war? and Secondly, if not, What disposition shall be made of the college Faculty?
We deem it useless to discuss the first question, believing it to be utterly impracticable, if desirable, to carry on the Institution, flagrante bello. Upon the second question there is more embarrassment. Knowing the officers as we do,-approved as they are by their past services, and appreciating the difficulty of supplying their places,

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we can not, for a moment, get our consent to disband the Faculty and dissever totally our connection with the gentlemen who compose it. What, then, is best for them and for us under the circumstances?
We remark that it is indispensably necessary that some one should be entrusted with the protection, preservation and control of the College Buildings and property belonging to the State. Who so fit as our Chancellor to be invested with this trust? We recommend, therefore, that he be retained at his present Salary, and charged with the performance of this duty as well as with the completion of other plans, connected with the Institution and which have heretofore received the sanction of the Board.
As it respects the Vice Chancellor and Professors, we further recommend that they be permitted to retain the tenements allotted to them, respectively----free of rent.
In conclusion, we would submit this resolution.
Resolved. That whenever it shall be announced that the exercises of the University are to be resumed, it is expected by the Board that every member of the Faculty will report for duty without other and farther notice, the Status and pay of said officers to be the same as before the war.

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Mr. Cobb, from the committee on University High School made the following Report. which was adopted.
The committee to which was referred the report of B.B. Carroll, Esq. President of the University High School, and the accompanying documents, beg leave to submit the following report.
The University High School being committed to the exclusive control of its President, in the employment of Assistant Professors, only required this Board to see that is kept and managed in a way to become a feeder to the college and to answer the general purposes of its establishment. This is seems to be doing from the facts stated in the documents accompanying the Report. The range of studies, including oratory, reading and composition seems to be ample, yet the committee learn that sufficient attention is not given to composition. This the committee deem a matter of vital importance. The testimony in regard to the oratorical exhibitions of the cadets is highly creditable to them and to their President, but in relation to composition nothing is known, excepting that is seems to be, in some degree, neglected.
The committee find nothing in the Presidents Report requiring the action of this Board.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Howell Cobb. Chairman.

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Dr. Moore from the committee on Library Apparatus and Buildings, made the following report, which was adopted.
The committee to whom the college Buildings, Apparatus, Museum and Library were referred, beg leave to report that they find no material change in any part of the college Buildings. The apparatus not having been used is carefully put into one room of the Building, which is locked securely.
The Library is in a perfect state of preservation, no mildew on the boods, or insects in them, -the result of perfect ventilation.
Since the last years Report, the room in the West End, Third Story, has been completed in part, and the Museum, previously huddled together in the old building, has been removed to it, and tastefully and appropriately arranged,-presenting an imposing view,-but still very meager in many things, which ought to belong to the University of Georgia.
Your committee recommend no appropriation.
R.D. Moore, Chairman.
An election was held to fill vacancies in the Board, occasioned by the resignation of Col Jackson and by the death of Judge Thomas, Judge James Jackson and Hon. E.A. Nisbit were found to be duly elected.

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Mr. Mitchell, from the committee on Finance, made the following report.
The committee on Finance beg leave to submit the following report:
The Treasurers report has been examined audited and approved by your committee Showing a cash balance of $301.45 and that there has been invested in Confederate Bonds $6,400,00 bearing 8 percent Interest, in the purchase of $6,000 in the same. The committee estimate the income
for the ensuing year, as follows Dividend in Bank Stock, no declared, $7,000.00
to be declared $8,000.00 Interest on Bonds, 480.00
And the expenses as follows: Salary of the Chancellor $2,000.00
Treasurer 400.00 Repairs 350.00 Negro Hire 300.00 Printing and Postage 100.00 Incidentals 200.00
There will be rent coming from the Government for the use of the college Buildings as an Eye Infirmary, and from the Boarding House, -which can not now be correctly estimated and these buildings are left in the hands of the Prudential to make the proper arrangements as to the rental.

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The committee submit the following Resolution, Resolved, That the estimates for the expenses of the next collegiate year be passed as an appropriation bill for the same period. The foregoing estimates and expenses of the college will not be resumed before September, 1865. Resolved, that any surplus in the Treasury from time to time be invested as part of the permanent funds. All of which is submitted. Wm. L. Mitchell Chrmn. By the unanimous request of the Board, Mr. Hull withdrew his resignation of the position of Secretary and Treasurer.
Mr. Barnett, from the committee appointed to prepare a minute in relation too the death of the Hon. Thos. W. Thomas, late a member of this Board, reported as follows.
The committee recognize in the death of Judge Thomas the extinction of one of the most brilliant and powerful intellects of the State, -ardently devoted to the interests of the Country and to the cause of education. In the midst of numerous losses and calamities, this is sufficiently prominent to call forth general

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attention and regret. Although no so immediately and obviously connected with the great struggle as those who lost their lives upon the battle field his name is to be added to the long list of victims of the war,-the most numerous and precious sacrifices ever offered on the alter of any nations liberties. The disease of which he died was induced by exposure for which he was physically unfit, and yet which he incurred voluntarily, and protracted beyond his powers of indurance.
In the prime of life and usefulness, filling public positions of great importance with ability and fidelity, he was stricken by disease, and his valuable life lost to the country and to his family. In the discharge of his judicial duties, he was singularly able and impartial, and was a terror to evil doers, especially to the perpetrators of low and base offenses. As a member of this Board, he was zealous in deliberation and action, and his strong good sense rendered him a valuable auxiliary.
The committee recommend that this brief and imperfect tribute of regard be entered upon the minutes of the Board and that a copy of it be communicated to the family of Judge Thomas.
Which was adopted.

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On motion of Mr. Hull, it was Resolved.
That the Prudential committee be authorised to appropriate and expand, through the Chancellor, such sums in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, as may seem to be proper during the ensuing year.
The Board then adjourned Sine die. Asbury Hull
Secy Wilson Lumpkin.

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University of Georgia. Athens, June 30th 1865.
At a regular annual meeting of the Trustees of the University of Georgia, begun this day in Library Hall, the following members of the Board were present, viz. Ex-Govern. Lumpkin, President Messrs, Lumpkin
Mitchell Moore Yancey Hull Billups Dougherty Cooper Barnett
Jenkins and Cobb.

Prayer by the Chancellor, Rev. Dr. Lipscomb.
The annual Report was then presented by the Chancellor and read. University of Ga. June 28th, 1865
To the Board of Trustees, Gentlemen,
The act of your last session, by which the exercises of Franklin college were suspended made it my duty to take charge of the Library and the property of the Institution, as well as to give my attention to all the interest confided

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to your care. Agreeably to this action of your Board, I have devoted the year to the management of the Library for the public good; to the protection of the building and so far as practicable, their profitable use; to such oversight of the High School as seemed desirable; and to other incidental services as our peculiar condition suggested.
Amid the ravages of the times, we have sustained new material losses in the property upon the campus. The different buildings are in as good a state of preservation as could be expected; the two dormitories have been and still are advantageously rented, while the Apparatus, Museum and Twin of the Halls, are in no degree damaged, so far as these are concerned, the working functions of the University can be resumed at short notice.
You can readily imagine the anxiety, which this responsibility has imposed upon me during the year, and I should feel, that I had ill discharged the trust, which your high confidence committed to my hands, if I failed to express in your presence, my grateful acknowledgements to Providence for the favor, which, He has been pleased in this respect to vouchsafe to the University.

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The books of the Library have been used by a large number of readers. No losses worth mentioning have occurred. I have generally spent six or eight hours, each day in the service of the Library, giving such assistance to readers and students as I deemed in accordance with the duties you had assigned me. As you allowed me the liberty of appropriating the incidental revenues of the University, from the rent of the rooms I purchased some months since for the Library, the portraits of Genl Hardee and Hood for seven hundred (700) dolls. Owing to the danger that threatened us, I had them removed to a place of safety in which, they still remain.
I made arrangements during the year to have our valuable collection of Birds fitted up as a partial Museum in Natural History. Suitable persons, under the superintendence of Dr. Wilson, who had paid much attention to Ornithology, were employed for this purpose. But, in the processes of cleansing and stuffing most of the specimens were bound to be greatly injured, so that the project had to be abandoned.
The war having ended, I am extremely anxious in common with yourselves to see the University, in all its departments re-opened as soon as practicable. So far as I can learn, our people were never so anxious on the subject of education, and never so poorly prepared to bear its expenses. If we could command our former sources

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of revenue, one of the main difficulties in supporting the Institution would be obviated. But, there is apparently no hope for the parent in this direction. If the regular State Government should be re-established at any near date, I doubt the policy of urging the State Legislature to re-instate immediately that portion of the endowment Fund. Which was deposited in the State Bank. Time should be allowed for the public mind to recover its former modes of thinking and acting, as well as for the capital and industry of the state to rally from its recent shock, before measures are adopted to secure the payment of this part of our endowment.
Nor do I think, that under existing circumstances, it will be prudent for you to obligate the University for the support of the Faculty by ordering it & exercises to reopen independence upon the tuitional fund. Such a reliance in favorable times, is always uncertain; and as an expedient in the present aspect of affairs, I could not commend it to your consideration. Impoverished as is our country, we cannot depend upon tuitional receipts to defray the most moderate schedule of expenses that would be incurred in resuming our exercises.
I recommend, therefore that this question be left with the

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Prudential committee and the Faculty. If circumstances should indicate that the Institution can be advantageously re-opened, the proper steps can be taken to accomplish it, subject to the condition, that the risk of compensation rest upon the Professors.
I submit herewith the Report of the U.H.School. Despite of the great embarrassments, to which, this Institution has been subjected, I bear a most cheerful testimony to the intelligence, skill, and fidelity, which have characterized the administration of its affairs. The present arrangements of the school are to continue, by agreement between the Professors and myself, until November earning, in view of which, it will be necessary for you to take action as to its future management. As to the plan and details of this management I do not deem it advisable to enlarge in this communication, but express my suggestions for an interview with you.
If, gentlemen of the Board, your meetings of late years have sadly reminded you of the frail tenure, by which the gifts of intellect and the still higher graces of character are held in earthly companionship and communion, the present occasion repeats the same mournful lesson with the same impressive emphasis, Death has removed from our midst, Mr. B.R. Carroll, late president of the U.H.School. A teacher by the instincts of his heart, he found it

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pure and inspiring where one less moved to generous aims might have found the tasks and toils of drudgery. His clear, keen and vivid insights into character; his calm and persistent earnestness; his varied culture; his thirst to communicate whatever charmed him in the wisdom of books or in the observation of men; his impassionate fervor in acting upon the youthful mind; his truthfulness of intellect no less than of feeling; his depth of senseability; and above all, because uniting and consecrating all, the reverence for God and love for Christ, in which he daily grew; these were the qualities which won for him our admiration and regard, while at the same time they constituted his qualifications for the responsible service, to which you had called him.
Such men are always rare; day by day, they become rarer with us whose misfortunes as they have crushed humbler interests, have attained the climax of calamity in the death of pure and noble companions; and day by day, the broad and luminous spaces which they once filled are made broader and blanker in the gloom that had befallen our fortune and our hopes; but let us calmly accept the Infinite Will that thus condescends to blend our welfare

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with its own glory, and thereby gives us the firmest assurance, that our experience however painful, is a cherished portion of its own blessedness, and the fairest foundation for our participatancy in its own immortal beatitudes.
I have the honor, Gentlemen, to remain, Your Obedt. Servant. Andrw. A. Lipscomb. Chancellor.
The annual Report of the U.H.School from the Senior Professor, Capt. Charbonnier, was then presented and read. According to the Report, the sixth session of the school opened July 13, 1864; number of students being, Boarders 33, Day Scholars, 18; Aggregate 51, The fall term began Nove. 10th; number of studentsBoarders 26, Day scholars 27, aggregate 53.
The Report was appropriately referred.
The Treasurers Report was then read and referred.
Standing committees were appointed as follows, viz, On Laws and Discipline, Messrs Lumpkin, Jenkins, & Cobb. On University High School, Messrs, Mitchell, Jenkins, Cobb, Lumpkin & Barnett.

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On Finance, Messrs, Mitchell, Hull, & Cooper. On Buildings & Apparatus. Messrs. Moore Yancey & Billups On Library Messrs, Barnett, Cooper, Moore.
The meeting then adjourned.
Saturday, July 1, 1865 The Board met this morning at the usual hour and proceeded to business. From the committee on laws and discipline, judge Jenkins made the following
report mez.
The committee on Laws discipline, to whom was referred the annual Report of chancellor Lipscomb, beg leave to submit the following report.
Notwithstanding the war has ended and sensible as we are of the anxious desire felt by our people to educate their children, still we deem it enexpedient if not empracticable to re-open the university at present. What delay must intervene fist, we cannot conjecture with any degree of certainty. Perhaps not less than six months; it may be double that time. It depends upon causes over, which, we have no control.
All we can

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say on this subject is, that as a Board charged with a great educational trust, we stand pledged to the public to watch diligently the signs of the times, and avail ourselves of the earliest possible opportunity to cause the exercises of the University to be resumed in all its departments, that it may impart to the youth of the country all the benefits, of which, they were so suddenly deprived by the rude shock of war; and then we hope our good chancellor will realize the desire of his big soul and be satisfied.
In the meantime, your committee would recommend, that private schools in the University and its vicinity, by member of the Faculty and be encouraged under the approval of the Chancellor; and that access to the Library, Apparatus, and other appendages of the University be allowed under suitable regulations to be prescribed by the chancellor; and that Professors be allowed the use of the houses they have occupied, rent free, as heretofore, during the war.
You shall thus be subsowing the cause of education and promoting directly the interests of the University. It being understood, however, that the members of the Faculty are held liable and bound to report for duty, in their several departments, whenever reasonably notified to do so.
Your committee would recommend, that the salary of the Chancellor, whose, management under

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trying and ? circumstances we cordially approve, be continued to be paid our of any funds that come into the Treasury, not otherwise appropriated, or in such other way as the Board may direct.
The above Report was adopted. But thereafter on motion to reconsider and strike out so much as allow the use of Library & apparatus to schools.
The yeas and nays were ordered to be recorded.
Yeas; Messrs Cooper & Dougherty
Nays; Messrs, Billups, Cobb, Hull, Jenkins, W. Lumpkin, Mitchell, Moore, Barnett, & Yancey.
Whereby the Report wad affirmed.
The Report of the committee on the University High School was then presented through its chairman, W.L. Mitchell Esq.
Report.
The committee on the U.H.School, to which, was referred so much of the chancellors report as relates to that school, together with the accompanying documents on the same subject, beg leave to submit the following report,
It appears from the statement of Capt. Charbonnier, Prof. of Math, and French, and Senior Professor in the Institution, that the

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school, notwithstanding the calamitous year, through which, it has just passed has enjoyed a marked degree of prosperity and public confidence, numbering sixty-seven pupils, forty boarders (40) and twenty-seven oppidans (27), and that the usual studies have been attended by the classes, with an improvement in composition, to which special attention was called a year ago. The committee is impressed with the importance of bringing this school into the closest possible union with the college, that the instruction given there may have direct reference to preparation for classes in college, and would urge upon the chancellor to keep this important matter steadily in view, and upon the prudential committee to give him any aid he may need at any time during the recess of the Board.
The only other subject that calls for the attention of the Board is the announcement of the decease of President B.R. Carroll, who departed this life on the tenth ultimo in his fifty-fourth year. The devotion of Mr. Carroll to the noble profession of teaching was most admirable, with him to teach was an enjoyment; and his influence upon the boys under his control was elevating. He died the death of the righteous and his last end was peace.
The committee submit the following resolutions, viz.
Resolved, That as soon as the present engagements of the U.H.School are fulfilled, which will be on the 1st day of Nov. next, the Board will proceed to elect a

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President to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Mr. Carroll upon the same terms as he was elected in 1862, provided suitable person can be procured; and in the interim that the Chancellor, aided by the Prudential committee, take all necessary pains to be prepared to nominate to the Board a proper man for the responsible Post.
2ne Resolved, that the Board deeply sympathize with the widow and family of the late President B.R. Carroll in their great bereavement, whose death was a loss to this University and to the people of Georgia and the neighboring States.
3rd
. Resolved, That the secretary transmit to the Family of Mr. Carroll, so much of this Report and of these resolutions as apply to him. All of which is respectfully submitted. Mr. S. Mitchell Chairman. The above report was adopted. But a motion to reconsider having been made, the yeas and nays on said motion were ordered, and resulted as follows. Yeas; Messrs, Barnett and Yancey.
Nays, Messrs Billups, Cobb, Cooper, Dougherty, Hull, Jenkins, W. Lumpkin, Mitchell, Moore
So the motion to reconsider was lost.

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The report of the committee on Finance was presented and adopted.
Report.
The committee on Finance submit that the report of the Treasurer has been examined; and the vouchers for expenditures and balance on hand in confed. Fed. Notes found correct.
In the past years $9000 of confederate Bonds were purchased and added to our investments.
The means of the University now consist in the 1000 shares of State Bank Stock; $20,000 of old Bonds of the State of Georgia bearing 6 per cent int. constituting the Terrell endowment; $2,100 of individual notes made prior to the war and considered good; and $16,000 of Confederates Bonds. How soon, and to what extent, these sources of income may be available, it is impossible to say. At present we can have no income from our investments. There will be small sums for rent coming in from time to time, which matters are in the hands of the Chancellor, who has submitted to the committee his report of receipts and expenditures, showing a balance in his favor of $101.59, to meet which and other contingent expenses of the college for the next twelve months, there will be coming into the Chancellors hands from said rents, a sufficient sum of money.
The only appropriation needed now to be made by the Board, except leaving

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in the hands of the Chancellor as heretofore, the receipts from rents and the expenditure as described for the protection of the interest of the University, is the Chancellors salary of $2,000, which is hereby recommended.
The committee cannot close this report without expressing to the Secy. & Treas. Hon Asbury Hull, the appreciation of his conduct in relinquishing his salary for the past year and in waiving any claim to salary for the coming year.
All which is respectfully submitted.
Wm. S. Mitchell.
Chairman.
The committee on Buildings, made a report, which was adopted.
Report.
The committee, to whom, was referred the college Buildings beg leave to report, that they have had the same under observation and report, that the larger part of the buildings are so occupied that they could not make a minute inspection but from outward observation, they observe considerable damage in the breaking of the glass of the windows, the removing of locks and other fastenings from the doors, and the pretty general destruction of the fencing around the campus.
R.D. Moore, Chr.
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The committee on the Library reported as follows; Report
It requires but a glance at the Library to be satisfied not only of the care and diligence but of the fine taste and skillful management displayed in its keeping. The Library room is a delightful one; the arrangement of the books admirable; and their state of preservation, perfect. The arrangement of light, air, and temperature, is all that could be desired. it is the pleasant duty of your committee simply to commend the fine order of the Library, its delightful provisions for comfort and the satisfaction of taste.
Saml. Barnett, Chr.
The above report was adopted.
Announcement of the commencement sermon by the Chancellor on Sunday morning at 10 Oclock in the Pres. Church, having been made, the Board on motion, adjourned to meet Wednesday Nov. 1, 1865.
Wilson Lumpkin
Secretary President.
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(pge 147) University of Georgia,
Athens, June 29, 1866

The stated meeting of the Board appointed for this day was attended by
Messrs Billups Hull Moore & Mitchell
There being no quorum present, the Board adjourned to 9 OClock to-morrow morning.
Saturday June 30, 1866 The following additional members attended, to wit Messrs Barnett,
R.M. Johnston. & Yancey There being still on quorum present, the meeting was adjourned to Monday next at 8 A.M. Monday Morning July 2, 1866 The Board met this morning according to adjournment, present, W. Lumpkin
Messrs Barnett Jenkins Billups Lewis Brown Mitchell Hull Moore &
H.R. Jackson Yancey
R.M. Johnston
In the absence of the President of the Board Ex-Governor Lumpkin, who subsequently attended, His Excellency Charles J. Jenkins, the Senior Trustee present, took the chair according the requisitions of the charter and prayer was made by Chancellor Lipscomb, who proceeded thereafter to read his

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annual Report, which is as follows:
University of Georgia
June 28th, 1866
To the Board of Trustees,
University of Georgia,
Gentlemen,
I have awaited your present session with more than usual solicitude. The circumstances under which you assemble, can not fail, while reminding you of the eventful past, to suggest that more critical future, on which, as a State and People, we have been ordained to enter. Education in common with other interest, feels the revolution through which, we have passed and like other institutions of society, must be adjusted to the new order of things, in which we find ourselves placed. To meet these contingencies is the important task of your present session, and in this respect, I am quite confident that you will fully realize the responsibilities of your position.
You will remember that at your meeting July, 1865, you took action to the effect, that private schools, in the University and its vicinity by members of the Faculty and others, should be encouraged, and you instructed me to furnish all the educational facilities of the University, to promote this end. Unable to open the University, it was hoped that this plan would gather together a number of young men who might subsequently prove a nucleus for the re-organization

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of the University. The plan succeeded, so much so, that we determined in November to resume the operations of the University in January 1866.
Measures were immediately taken to get control of our College Buildings. Under the instructions of the Prudential committee, I went to Augusta, and applied to Genl. Steedman and King for the removal of the U.S. Garrison from the campus. The application was earnestly recorded by His Excellency Chas. J. Jenkins. The effort was successful, but not until I had yielded the University High School for the occupancy of the Federal Soldiers.
I obtained possession of our buildings early in December and proceeded to put them in order for college uses. Our means were very limited and extensive repairs were necessary. But by confining myself to such an out-lay as was merely requisite to meet the more urgent necessities of the University, I was able at moderate cost to fit the property for domestic and teaching purposes.
The four classes of the University were organized Jany 5th. Seventy eight students have been matriculated and taken as a body of young men, whether reference be had to character or intellect, I could hardly express myself too strongly in their praise. The most of them are much more manly in their sympathies and aspirations; much more obedient as to the real spirit of submission to discipline and consequently much more thoughtful and prudent as to matters of personal control; much more under influence and requiring

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less of stern authority for their government than we ordinarily find in this class of persons. I can not convey to the Board of Trustees my appreciation of the real nobleness of these young men; nor should I be so emphatic in commending this fact to your official consideration, were if not, that a new era, -one of higher moral intellect no less than of broader and juster insights into the real import of education,-has been evolved from circumstances which would certainly be much more painful but for this and similar mitigations of their harsher evils.
The educational results of the past 14 months, I am warranted in saying, are of an unusually interesting and gratifying nature. There results differ in kind as well as in degree from the ordinary effects of college instruction. I do not propose in this communication to go into details. I simply make such general statements as will serve to guide your deliberations. They are their own justification; they are their own enforcement; and if they should quicken and direct that serve of responsibility which you gave so constantly and so honorably shown in your management of the University, I shall be more confirmed in my impression that these facts must be thoroughly seen and felt before you can adopt such measures as the University demands. Pardon me for yielding to the impulses of my heart when I beg to assure you, that the trust now devolving upon your intelligence and

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skill involves interests of vast moment. I cannot think or feel otherwise. I dare not think or feel otherwise as it respects you, or my colleague, or myself. The position which we occupy, is one of real significance. Almost every thing is favorable to the complete success of the University. Judging from the number of letters which I have received, I am led to conclude that the Teachers of the State are taking a deep interest in the properity of the University, and I can not doubt that if this interest is actively maintained on our part, we shall have a full and steady supply of students. The field of education is open widely before you, the sympathies of the people and of the press are growing closer and stronger in your behalf, a large and more influential patronage can be commanded, if we will command it, nor can I imagine any reason why the University should not at once commence that exalted career which you so profoundly desire to witness.
I cannot omit to notice at this point, the untiring energy which my colleagues have evinced in sustaining the interests of the University. Such constancy of earnest effort, such cheerfulness in sacrifice, such entire devotion to their duties-a devotion worthy of the name of consecration,-I have never known. Their time, patience, and endurance have been severely taxed; their work has been labor and often, their labor has beel toil; but they have fully maintained their respective departments, and furthermore, they have imparted an impulse to the students which can be plainly seen, if not accurately measured and which you will
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agree in estimating as the most valuable results of professional influence.
Among the changes introduced into the University, it is proper for me to call your attention to the fact, that I have deemed it very advisable to try a different plan for the domestication of the students. Instead of the old Dormitory system, which I consider the most unmitigated evil connected with the college-life, I have undertaken to provide a home for our young men which would secure them an amount of physical comfort as well as social and moral advantages not possible under the former arrangement. So far as this plan had indicated decisive results, it has grown upon my confidence and while I cannot affirm that a sufficient trial has been had to determine its merits, I can assure the Board that it has contributed most palpably to the order, refinement, and propriety of the University.
The New college, which W. Moore and family occupy, was not so much impaired and injured as most of the other buildings. It yet needs an expenditure of one hundred, or one hundred & fifty dollars to refit it for complete occupancy. Old college which should be repaired immediately to meet the wants of the ensuing session will require a large outlay it in an habitable condition. The estimated expense of putting it in order, exclusive of white-washing, plastering, painting, and repairs of floors, is $851.20. The whole cost of restoring it, will not fall under $1400. Your attention is especially called to the building. We can not accommodate the

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students expected to matriculate next September, unless immediate measures are adopted to give us the use of this building.
Another appropriation of money will be necessary to restore the fences around the campus. The lots of the Professors Houses are badly protected and hence, if it be practicable, I should be pleased for you to order their repairs. It will also require about $250 to put the University High School building in a good state of repair.
I beg to call the attention of the Board to the fact, that it will be advantageous to the interests of the University to unite the two terms of the college year in one so as to have a single and continuous session. The present arrangement is exceptional as respects the usage of most Institutions and is prejudicial to the propriety of the University. It involves a large additional expense on the part of students and it largely diminishes the revenue of the University. Numbers are kept away from the Fall Term and especially students at a distance from Athens, because of the present division of scholastic periods. Looking at this subject in the single light of gain to the University and of desirableness on the part of our patrons, I should warmly recommend this change, but I am not sure that you can disembarrass it of the difficulties connected with the time of holding commencement, and of the annual sessions of your Board.
You will recollect that three years since, you adopted measures looking to the establishment of a school of Civil Engineers. The view which I

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then urged upon the Board, are stronger than ever in my own mind. If I could have commanded the means, I should have initiated this movement, last January. No branch of education is rising so rapidly into prominence in this country and none is more worthy of your fostering hand. Satisfied as I am that this entrprize is of the first importance to the State, that it will command itself to a time & right-minded popular interest; that it will meet our want and augment in patronage; that it will give the education of the University such a practical direction as the times demand while it need to interfere with a close curriculum, I feel no hesitancy whatever in pressing it upon your attention as a department of special education, for which, you should provide as promptly and liberally as your means will permit.
We shall need an addition to our Faculty, as the duties of instruction next year, can not be otherwise discharged. At the September Term we expect a large increase of students and it is necessary to provide for them. If these who have signified their intention to apply for matriculation do not disappoint us, it is quite likely that we shall think it important to have, at least, two Adjunct Professors.
Accompanying this, you have a report of the various donations recently made to the Library & Museum. The bequest of the late Ex-Governor George R. Gilmer, comprising his Library, Cabinet of minerals, and canorites came into my hands a few months since, and have been placed in the New Library Building.

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I have appropriated one of the rooms in this building to the Library & cabinet, hoping that as soon as your means allowed, you would permit me to make such provision for this valuable donation as would express your [ ] of the late Ex-Gov. Gilmers attachment to the University and his profound interest in the cause of education.
I beg to present to the University, a few specimens of the work of the Art class which was established last Summer as a private enterprize in connection with the University. Owing to unavoidable circumstances, this class was suspended when the University was re-opened in January, but sufficient was accomplished to demonstrate a great utility of this department of instruction. The specemens do much credit to the students and to the Professor, W.C.F. Weignandt.
The portrait Gallery, belonging to the University, has not, since your last session been much enlarged. But I am gratified to announce the presentation to the Gallery of an admirable portrait of Ex-Gov. Lumpkin.
I present herewith the Report of Capt. Charbonnier, Senior Professor of the U.H.School. Although the school has been small, I have great pleasure in bearing testimony to the remarkable skill and fidelity with which, Capt. C. has conducted its affairs, and in assuring the Board that he has shown himself worthy of our highest appreciation.
I am instructed by the Faculty to present you the names of the following candidates for graduation, viz.

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Charllin Hillyer, Saml Lumpkin, R.B. Gunby, A.L. Hull, James McCluskey, and F.A. Lipscomb.
W.V. Smith who has pursued the irregular course is entitled to a certificate of scholarship in the departments, with which he has been connected.
Since you last assembled, it has pleased almighty God to remove from our midst your Secretary & Treasurer, the Hon. Asbury Hull. His valuable services to the University which were continued with unabated interest through so many years, terminated only with life. Rarely has it happened that such virtues as adorned his character have been so long preserved in active devotion to the welfare of an institution of Learning, nor is it often our privilege, amid the[ ] of death to recall the memory of one so worth of our most truthful and tender regard.
I have the honor, Gentlemen of the Board to remain your Obt. Srt. Andr. A. Lipscomb. Chancellor.
On motion of W. Yancey, the Board then took a recess to attend the Sophomore Prize Declamation in the college Chapel, after which the Board returned to the Library Room and resumed their business, Hon. Wilson Lumpkin, President in the chair, when the Reports of the Treasurer Pro tempore Prof. Wm. Henry Waddell and of Wm. H. Hull Esq, Executor of Hon. Asbury Hull late Treasurer were read and ordered to be referred to the Standing committees as follows.

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On Laws & Discipline Messrs Jenkins, H.R. Jackson, & R.M. Johnston. On University High School, Messrs Barnett, Lewis, Billups, & Yancey. On Finance,
Messrs Billups, Brown, & Lewis On Buildings & Apparatus Messrs Moore, Hull, & Lewis, On Library
Messrs Johnston, Barnett, & Yancey.
Excuses were made & sustained for Messrs Elliott, Cobb, James Jackson, Hill,
H.V. Johnson, Harris, Vason, & Nisbit. The report of the Senior Professor of the University High School, Capt. Charbonnier was read and appropriately referred. The Chancellors Report was referred to the committee on Laws & Discipline and the documents accompanying it to the proper committees.
The Board then adjourned to 6 Oclock this afternoon when it again assembled and proceeded to business, where on motion of W. Mitchell the following resolution was adopted, to wit.
Resolved, That the Chancellor be instructed to procure the medals due T.A. Barrow and J.M. Smith, the successful Sophomore Prize Declaimers of 1860 & deliver the same to them respectively as First & Second prizes.

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Dr. Moore, Chairman made the Report on buildings & Apparatus, which was received and laid on the table for the present.
A vacancy in the Board having been made by the death of Judge Cochran, the Board proceeded to fill the vacancy, when it appeared, that Hon. James L. Seaward was duly elected.
On motion of W. Mitchell, It was Resolved, That the committee on Laws & Discipline be instructed to consider the Propriety of establishing a Professorship of Natural Philosophy & Astronomy, and of the two Adjunct Professorships of Mathematics and the Ancient Languages, and also of the School of Civil Engineering as a University School, and of re-opening the Terrell Professorship of Agriculture.
On motion of W. Lewis, it was Resolved, That the same committee enquire into the propriety of addressing the youth of Georgia upon the importance of getting their education here.
The subject of furnishing the members of the Board with printed statements and tables of the condition of the University a month in advance of the annual meeting, was also referred to the same committee, which was likewise instructed to consider the importance of its meeting in advance of the Board.
The Board then adjourned to meet to-morrow morning at 10:00 Oclock.

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Tuesday Morning 10:00 Oclock
July 3, 1866
The Board met according to adjournment. Hon. Joseph Henry Lumpkin, Chief Justice, having returned, last night, from the Supreme Court, at Milledgeville, appeared, this morning and took his seat.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, it was Resolved, that the degree of Bachelor of Arts be conferred by the Chancellor in behalf of the Board upon the 14 regular members of the graduating class, and the proper certificate of scholarship upon the irregular member of that class.
On motion of Mr. Hull, it was Resolved, That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon Jabez L.M. Curry.
The committee on the University High School made their report, which was received and laid on the table for the present.
The committee on the Library reported, and the Report agreed to and is as follows:
The committee on the Library report, That they have found it to be in admirable order, both as to the taste with which its parts have been arranged and the care with which they have been preserved.
The committee were highly gratified by the notice of several valuable gratuitous contributions of Books, Paintings and various curiosities a list of which is appended to this report.
As the trustees have

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been informed by the Chancellor, that the Library & Museum, bequeathed by the late Ex-Gov. G.R. Gilmer, have been received and deposited, in the University, your committee recommend that in appreciation of the generous interest evinced by Ex. Gov Gilmer in the University, a member suitably prepared for the accommodation of said Library & Museumas soon as the funds of the University will justify said expenditure, We recommend that an appropriation be made for purchasing additions to the Library. Respectfully submitted.
R.M. Johnston Chairman-
Resolved, That the degree of Master of Arts be conferred on Wm. H. Lee, Frank Lumpkin, Robert C. Lumpkin, John C. Rutherford, and Wm. G. Hill, alumni of this Institution, and the honorary degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon Genl. Wm. M. Broune.
The Board then adjourned to 9 Oclock tomorrow morning
Wednesday morning 9A.M.
July 4th, 1866
The Board met according to adjournment, present as yesterday.
Mr. Johnston submitted the following resolution, That the Salary of the Secretary
& Treasurer be fixed at five hundred dollars. Mr. Billups suggested that in the present uncertain state of public affairs it was highly desirable to have these duties performed

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gratuitously and appealed to Mr. Mitchell who was acting as Secretary pro tempore to undertake this service for the Board, to which Mr. Mitchell agreed if the Board so desired, whereupon W.H.R. Jackson submitted the following resolution, which was agreed to.
Resolved, That the Board accept the services of W. Mitchell as Secretary & Treasurer without compensation.
On motion of W. Yancey, it was Resolved, by the Boards of Trustees that the parents of scholars in the University of Georgia be requested to refuse to pay accounts contracted without their sanction.
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Board make publication of the above resolution so as to give notice to merchants who may be inclined to extend credit to minors.
W. Lewis submitted the following resolution which after lying on the table was taken up and agreed to, viz.
Resolved, That every fourth annual meeting from this date, this Board will vote by ballot and without discussion upon the question of each member of the Faculty continuing to occupy his chair, and upon any member failing to receive a majority of votes, his chair shall be considered vacant.
The committee on Laws & Discipline made their report, which was received and laid on the table for the present in order that the Board might attend

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the annual commencement in the college chapel when after the delivery of orations by the
graduating class the degree of A.B. was publicly conferred upon.
Carllin Hillyer,
Saml Lumpkin,
R.B. Gunby
A.L. Hull James McCluskey, &
F.A. Lipscomb. Also the degree of A.M. was publicly conferred on Jabez L.M. Curry
Wm. H. Lee
Frank Lumpkin
Robert C. Lumpkin
John C. Rutherford &
Wm. G. Hill The honorary degree of A.M. was conferred on Genl. Wm. M. Broune.
The Board then returned to the Library room & resumed their business.
On motion, the Report of the committee on Laws & Discipline was taken up, discussed, amended, and agreed to and is as follows:
The committee on Laws and Discipline, to whom were referred the various subjects embraced in the report of the Chancellor and in Sundry resolutions of the Board having given to them all, such consideration as the engagements of the occasion permit, respectfully report, that after so long a suspension of the exercises of collegiate Institutions of the South, and

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whilst so many of them still remain closed, it is especially incumbent upon this Board, to enlarge to the full extent of the means at their command, the proportions of the University,-to extend its usefulness, -and to meet just public expectations.
Believing that the Report of the Committee on Finance will be found to justify the increased expenditure consequent upon the changes they propose they submit, without further comment the following resolutions.
Resolved 1st, That there be established, to be put in operation as soon as suitable imcumbent can be found a Professorship of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy.
2ndly That there be established adjunct Professorships of Mathematics, and of Ancient Languages & Literature, to either of which the Chancellor may attach the duties of Librarian.
3rdly, That there be established as a Professional department of the University, as school of Civil Engineering.
4thly, That the Professorship now known as that of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, and Geology, be hence forth denominated, The Professorship of Chemistry, Geology and Agriculture, and that it be charged with the instruction contemplated in the Terrell endowment.
5thly, That the Salary of the Chancellor be two thousand five hundred dollars, that of each Professor two thousand dollars, and that of each adjunct Professor one thousand dollars, per annum.

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6thly, That the terms of tuition in the School of Civil Engineering be one hundred dollars per annum, but the Professor of Civil Engineering be guaranteed [sic] the sum of two thousand dollars as his annual salary, and that any excess of tuition above the last named sum, in that School be paid into the Treasury of the University.
7thly, that the sum of fifteen hundred dollars be appropriated for the purpose of repairing and fitting up appropriately for the uses of the School of Civil Engineering, the
abandoned Library building, for the purchase of necessary instruments and models, and for carrying into full effect the 6th resolution.
8thly, That the annual commencement shall hereafter be on the first Wednesday in August, and that there shall be two Terms, the first commencing on the 15th day of August and ending on the 15th day of December, and the second commencing on the 15th day of February and ending with the commencement exercises.
The annual meeting of the Board of Trustees shall be on the Friday before Commencement.
9thly, That a special committee of five be appointed, whose duty is shall be to prepare & publish an address to the people of Georgia, setting forth the educational advantages now offered to the public by this University and inviting their patronage of their own foster-child.

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10thly, That it is deemed advisable, that there shall hereafter be prepared and transmitted to the Trustees severally, with the annual catalogue, a condensed printed statement, of any material changes that may be proposed in the Chancellors annual report, and of the Treasurers report.
11thly, That this Board cannot with hold the expression of their great gratification in view of the present condition of the University, & they tender their thanks to the Chancellor, and Faculty for the zeal and energy which have produced this result.
On motion the committee to prepare and publish an address was increased to seven and consists of Messrs Jenkins, Brown, H.R. Jackson, R.M. Johnston, Mitchell, Lewis, and Barnett.
On motion of Mr. Yancey, it was, Resolved, That the Faculty of the University of Georgia be authorized to receive beneficiaries of this State, for the purpose of being educated, beyond the number heretofore authorized to be received.
The Board then proceeded to ballot for the several new Professors when it appeared that
N. Leroy Brown was elected Professor of Natural Philosophy & Astronomy.
J. Pembroke Jones was elected Adjunct Professor of Mathematics.
L.H. Charbonnier was elected Adjunct Professor of Ancient Languages & Literature.

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M.L. Smith was elected Professor of Civil Engineering in the Professional School of Civil Engineering.
The report of the committee on Buildings and Apparatus was then taken up & agreed to, and is as follows:
The committee to whom was referred the college Buildings & Apparatus, beg leave to report, that they have had the same under consideration; they report that the entire wooden fence around the campus is destroyed and that the old college is in such a dilapidated condition that renders it wholly unfit for habitation.
We therefore recommend that this Building be immediately repaired, and also that the fence around the campus be included in the repairs.
We recommend further, that all instruments belonging either to the Chemical or Philosophical Apparatus absolutely necessary for instruction be repaired, and where repairs are impracticable, new ones be purchased out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated.
R.D. Moore Chairman,
The committee on the University High School made the following report, which was adopted. The committee on the University High School respectfully report,
1. That the Building and out-buildings should be promptly, put in a state of substantial repair.

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2, In consideration of the circumstances of the University and the country, your committee are of opinion that it is the interest of the University to dispose of the High School property. This opinion is not founded upon any dissatisfaction with the accomplished scholar under whose superintendence it now is, but upon considerations connected with the general condition of the University. The conduct of this Institution by Capt. Charbonnier has met with the high appreciation of the Board and the community.
The committee recommend that the Prudential committee be authorized to sell the property, if practicable to do so, on terms satisfactory to them, but not less than $20,000
3. That during the effort to sell the property, the school be continued as at present, and upon the failure of a reasonable probability of effecting a sale in the opinion of the Prudential committee, that the action proposed by this Board at its last meeting be carried into effect---or the building rented, if practicable, at the discretion of that committee.
Saml Barnett
D.A.Lewis John Billups
B.C. Yancey Committee.
Mr. Barnet submitted the following preamble and resolution which were adopted.
Whereas the attendance of the Board of trustees at the annual meetings is important to the interests of the University,

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in many respects, not only in discharge of their regular duties, and in the exercise of their descretion in the action of the Board, in the information the Trustees can furnish from different parts of the State, and the fresh energies they bring with them, but also in the spirit infused into the institution, the encouragement afforded to the Faculty and students by their appreciation, and their own increased interest and zeal arising from actual contact with the exercise of the commencement.
And whereas there had been great irregularity in attendance, and the law intended to ensure attendance is all sufficient and full, but not practically enforced, and no sufficient provision made for bringing it before the Board, be it
Resolved, 1st, That the excuses of members may be made at any time by letter to the Secretary, or otherwise prior to the next regular meeting after the failure to attend. 2nd, That it shall be the duty of the Secretary at each meeting of the Board to
report the names of all members whose seats shall be regarded as ipro facto vacated. 3rd, That it shall be the duty of the Board promptly to fill such vacancies. The Finance committee made their report, which was adopted and is as follows:

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The Finance Committee beg leave to report that the following are the incomes which may be relied upon with reasonable certainty for the ensuing year together with the estimated expenditures.
Balance in the Treasury $ 3,691.12 Due from the State during the year 8,000.00 Tuition of 100 students at $75 each 7,500.00 Interest on Terrell endowment 1,200.00 House rent 1,300.00
$21,691.12
Estimated Expenditures Chancellors Salary 2,500.00 Four Professors 2000 each 8,000.00 Professor Natural Philosophy & Astronomy
10 months 1,666.66 Two Adjunct Professors 10 months each 833.33 1,666.66 Professor of Civil Engineering & to purchase
models &c. 1,500.00 To pay balance now due Chancellor 1,057.12 Servant hire 300.00 Printing & postage 200.00 Incidentals 300.00 Medals 100.00 Music 100.00 Library 100.00 To repair apparatus 50.00 Repair on College buildings & fences 1,700.00
High School 250.00
$19,490.44
Estimated Balance 2,200.68
$21,691.12

The committee respectfully recommend the appropriation, by the Board of the several amounts of expenditure above mentioned for the objects herein specified.

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The above report does not include the cupons now due on the State Bonds which constitute the Terrell endowment.
The committee have examined the report of Prof. Waddell Treasurer protem. Which embraces the items reported by the late Hon. Asbury Hull Treasurer, and find it correct.
John Billups
Chairman.
The following resolution was agreed to,
Resolved, that the Treasurer be directed to surrender to the Representative of the late Genl. T.R.R. Cobb his note given as a consideration for the ground on which the Lucy Cobb Institute has been built upon the assumption of the debt by the Trustees of the Institute, and that the Prudential committee be authorized to extend a liberal credit, whenever the trustees of the Institute shall place the debt upon a sure footing, and that in no event shall the debt be enforced against the estate of Genl. Cobb, and that such entry be written across the face of said note.
The following resolutions were adopted,
Resolved, That in the death of the Hon. Asbury Hull The University has lost a faithful and skillful officer, whose services embrace a period of nearly half a century, a steadfast friend, and a constant patron; that his high Character as a citizen, & as a Christian man, render his death a public calamity.

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Resolved, that this Board tender to his family their heartfelt sympathy, and that the Secretary transmit to them a copy of these resolutions.
On motion of Mr. Yancey it was Resolved, by the Boa rd of trustees that in view of the valuable services of Chancellor Lipscomb, and his precarious state of health, he be requested, in addition to the usual vacations in each year, to absent himself from his professional dutieswhenever he deems it advisable, divided as he may wish.
The Board then adjourned Sine die Wilson Lumpkin Wm. S. Mitchell President Secretary

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University of Georgia Athens, August 2nd, 1867
The stated meeting of the Board of Trustees appointed for this day was attended by Messrs Billups, Cobb, Harris, Hill, James Jackson, Mitchell, & Moore.
There being no quorum present, the meeting was adjourned till tomorrow morning 9 OClock.
August 3rd, 1867. The Board met according to adjournment when there was a quorum present. At this and subsequent meetings the following members were in attendance, to wit,
Messrs Barnett Mitchell
Billups Moore
Cobb Yancey
Harris Brown
Hill Lewis
James Jackson Vason
Wilson Lumpkin
Ex-Gov. Lumpkin, President of the Board of Trustees, took the chair, & the meeting was organized.
Prayer was made by Chancellor Lipscomb, and the minutes of the last stated meetings were read by the Secretary.
Excuses were made & sustained for the non-attendance of Messrs Dougherty, Hews, R. Jackson, Jenkins, Nisbit, Toombs

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Johnson and Cooper. The question as to the effect of removal from the State upon the right of a member to his seat in this Board was then submitted by Mr. Barnett and the following resolution adopted.
Resolved, That the removal of a member of the Board from the State, ipso facto vacates his seat.
It appearing that that there are seven vacancies in the Board, two by death, chief Justice Joseph Henry Lumpkin, Rt. Reverend Bishop Stephen Elliott; Three by removal from the State, D. David A. Reese, and Henry Hull jr. Esquire, & Col. Richard M. Johnston; and two by operation of the Statue, for non-attendance for two or more stated meetings, Messrs Miller & Ward; on motion of Mr. Cobb, The Board proceeded to fill these vacancies, when it appeared, that the following gentlemen were unanimously elected, to wit. Hon. Martin J. Crawford of Columbus, Samuel Hall esq. of Oglethorpe City, Bishop George F. Pierce of Sparta, Joel A. Billups esq. of Madison, Genl. James W. Armstrong of Cartersville, Stevens Thomas Esq, of Athens, David C. Barrow Esq. of Athens.
Mr. Cobb was appointed to wait upon Messrs J.A. Billups, Thomas & Barrow and write them to take their seats in the Board.

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The Board having been invited to dine at the University High School with the Students of that Institution known as the Indigent maimed Soldiers, requested Mr. Cobb to make a short address at the dinner table on behalf of the Trustees, and Prof. Waddell on behalf of the Faculty, who were also invited guests.
Messrs, Barrow & J.A. Billups appeared and took their seats.
The chancellor then read his annual communication, which is as follows.
University of Georgia Aug. 1st. 1867 To the Board of Trustees, University of Georgia Mr. President & Gentlemen,
On the adjournment of your last session, immediate steps were taken to execute your instructions as to enlarging the domestic and other accommodations of the Institution. Old College was put in a complete state of repair the basement excavated and fitted for family uses, and by the opening of the Fall Term Aug. 15, was ready for occupancy; The former Library Building was re-arranged for teaching purposes and appropriated to the Engineers School; to the Adjunct Mathematical Chair, and to the Department of Natural Philosophy. Later in the Session

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the upper story of the Chemical Laboratory was converted into a large and convenient Hall for the Terrell Professorship. These have proved valuable additions to the working machinery of the University and as the outlay was made as judiciously as circumstances allowed, I trust, that the improvements will commend themselves to your approval.
The new session, (sixty sixth year) opened most favorably. The first term fully met our expectations, while the second Term has been yet more prosperous. Franklin College has matriculated with the nine (9) students in the Engineering school, 172 students which with 93 pupils in the High School gives the total number of 265 in the University during the session. This is numerically a greater result than we anticipated; and taken in connextion (connection) [sic] with the disturbed state of the country, affords a most gratifying proof of the interest of the state in education.
The capacity of our people to give their sons the advantages of a Liberal education and those social encouragements that stimulate to sacrifices in its behalf, are certainly at the present time much below the ordinary mark. But nevertheless our citizens are exerting themselves as never before to afford their sons the best opportunities of college training.
One of the most marked features in our young men is that they very generally

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bring from home a sentiment on the subject of education, a conception of its value and an eager interest in its attainment which have never been previously witnessed on so broad a scale. Although many of these men are defectively prepared for admission into college, yet, in this respect they are better trained than any as a class, I have ever known. They come to us for the most part ready in heart for instant sympathy with their work. I consider this a great gain. It relieves us in no small degree from our hardest task, that of forming a reliable taste for study, and moreover gives us that assurance of cooperative sympathy at home which, as a moral auxiliary in an extended course of education can hardly be over-estimated.
I cannot speak too highly of these young men. Taken as a body, they belong to a new race of students, the most hopeful product of these troublous times. The past session has subjected them to the necessity of an unusal [sic] degree of exertion both as it respects constancy and intensity of effort. This has been owing somewhat to their scholastic deficiencies and likewise to the enlarged methods of instruction and examinations which have been introduced into the University course. A students amount of labor is now from one fourth to one third greater than formerly; in some departments it is doubled; while the kind of application required for success is much more taxative to mind and body.

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This severe test during the recent session has very effectually tried the stamina of our young men; nor do I advance beyond the limits of simple justice when I say, that they have shown a capacity for work & an enthusiasm in its performance that I have never seen surpassed; What is even more gratifying, the power of self-government is increasing among them, so much so, that the discipline of the University is approximating to that higher moral spirit which avails itself of the sensibilities of the students to maintain propriety of Conduct.
Without expanding on this point, I merely remark, that the instances needing positive discipline are more & more exceptions. This state of things is largely due to the moral influence of my colleagues over the students. I mean much more than official commendation, when I speak of these men as inspiring the students with a sense of manliness, of genuine and trustworthy honor, and of earnest devotion to duty because of its self-rewarding joys, that I regard as the most striking results of the past years work. Teaching is inspiration or it is dead routine. At last, the power of the Professor to reproduce himself in his pupil, to see his own tastes & aims & aspirations renewing their vitality in the minds committed to the ministry of his genius; -is the real measure of his worth. Aside from this I am quite sure that no University can grow, unless its Faculty sets an example of steady and constant growth & unless

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they themselves exert an increasing influence over the students by those various modes of contract which are so essential to their personal & professional culture.
I cannot doubt that this important end is being attained more & more fully in the operations of the University. Professors & students are brought into closer relations. The effect of the Lecture system which we are developing as rapidly as circumstances justify, is in this respect a signal accession to the power of the Professors. Mutual enthusiasm on the part of Professors & students in behalf of common objects of thought and by virtue of reciprocal participancy in the same pursuits is unquestionably the main element of educative force. As this end is more directly & effectively reached by means of the Lecture-system than through any other instrumentality. I feel constrained to say that the fresh and vigorous impulse which my colleagues have communicated to the educational methods of the University is mainly due to their energy in this direction. How far this impulse shall extend, is dependent upon the facilities which your means will allow you to furnish the various departments of the University. The want of recent works of science; of new and improved instruments in the Mathematical Philosophical & Chemical departments of the Institution, and of other appliances for illustrative teaching is now seriously felt; and I therefore beg your attention to the fact that an appropriation is very greatly needed to aid the Professors in their work.
Looking at the history of the University during the past year, your own minds will

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readily suggest the wisest course for your present legislation to take. The particular direction in which the Institution is advancing is easily seen. Where its openings lie can hardly be mistaken. Public sentiment is concentratine [sic] with more unanimity on the paramount importance of the State University, To foster this sentiment; to respond to its advances in every legitimate way; to recognize the specialties of that public sentiment so as to adjust your measures to the reasonable demands of the enlightened thought of the day will be your first solicitude. Education is always a new question. Its problems must be solved by each generation for itself. If education is a science, it is a science only in scientific hands that understand how to adapt its fundamental principles both to circumstantial & paramount ends. I think it therefore essential to the continued success of the University that you make immediate provision for a more general course of education than has hitherto existed. Such a course should be so arranged as to offer all the advantages of elaborate instruction and honorable graduation [sic] to that class of students known as irregular. That this class of students will increase cannot be doubted; but under our present system, it is extremely difficult if not altogether impracticable to give them such a thorough and complete training as the reputation of the university and a high grade of scholarship demand at our

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hands. If you could command the necessary means, it would be your wisest plan to organize at once a distance & independent Institution that should afford the requisite facilities for the educational course contemplated in this arrangement. Such an organization separated from Franklin College would present itself in a definite form to the public eye; while its different curriculum and discipline would give it an individuality of character that would contribute to its success. Aside from this, the more you divide and distribute the power of the University, locating each interest to itself, specializing each interest, according to its intrinsic merit and substituting for the sense of general responsibility, always more or less vague and indefinite, the failing of specific responsibility, the more fully this plan of organization is carried out, the more confidently you may rely on the steady growth of the various departments included in our scheme of education. If however, you cannot establish, under present circumstances a new organization that can give such an extended education in Mathematical Science, & Belles Lettres as the times demand then, the next best course, is to expand Franklin College, so that it may cover ground as far as practicable. This arrangement could only exist as provisional & hence should be so incidentally united with Franklin college as to be easily detached.
I would suggest then, the following organization.
1st
. The present Four Years course in Franklin College to remain unchanged.
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2nd
. Establish an Elementary scientific Course, embracing the elements of Mathematics, English, French, or German, said course to continue two years and to be binding upon all students under seventeen years of age who are not prepared for the higher grades of instruction.
3rd
. Institute an Elective Course, for such students as are competent by age and acquirement to select their own studies, and give certificates or diplomas to these students on the basis of proficiency without regard to length of time devoted to any given pursuit. If this Elective Course with its specific advantages for advanced students, be combined with the Prescribed Course for younger pupils, so as to constitute a complete schedule of studies suited to each stage of advancement, and if, then we bring the principle of class-graduation to bear upon the curriculum of each year so that every student who complies with the fixed requisitions of such departments, shall receive an annual testimonial in public form of his proficiency it would certainly tend to bring the work of the University under closer inspection, to render its results more palpable, while at the same time, it would multiply our checks upon defective scholarships and augment the force of intellectual & moral discipline. A great point will be gained when the entire influence of the University is felt by each class in each stage of its advancement. A still greater point will be

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gained when every student is brought under the concentrated power of the University during every portion of his educational course. Though I cannot flatter myself that this is fully attainable, yet I cannot doubt that the plan suggested would strengthen our hold upon the students, while it would unquestionably mitigate some of the evils, under which University schemes of education have hitherto labored.
To carry out this plan we shall need two additional professors, one of these should be connected with the Mathematical Department; the other with Belles Lettres, and it would be advisable to select a man for the Belles Lettres Chair who could give instruction in the Modern Languages. This increased expense will be probably met in whole or in part by the increased receipts, and as it is quite likely that you will find it expedient to raise the annual tuition to $100.00 I see no ground to fear any embarrassment to the finances from the outlay required.
Early in the present term, Capt. Pembroke Jones resigned the adjunct Math. Prof. during his connection with the Institution, I found him a most worthy and efficient officer. The duties of Prof Rutherford having been much increased by the retirement of Capt. Jones, the new Mathematical Professor might be appointed as Adjunct to Prof. Rutherford, and at the same time, have sufficient leisure to fulfill his part of the new schedule in the Scientific course.
Agreeably to your plan, the

(pge 182)
Terrell Professorship has been organized and put into successful operation. The opening course of lectures which D. Jones delivered, was well attended, the lectures themselves evinced great research and were adopted to the wants of the times; while as supplimentary to the chemistry course of the college, the methods employed were precisely such as advanced students need for their higher culture. What seemed to me the prominent feature in these lectures was the clear and tangible conception of what such courses of instruction should be and how it should answer its object as a constituent part of University education.
If your judgment approve the measure, I should be glad to see this Department expanded and an agricultural museum established.
Your attention is called to a Report submitted herewith from Prof. Rutherford with regard to Mathematical Instruments. you will see from this statement, that his Department needs certain instruments. For the want of these Instruments, the practical operation of his Department are frequently embarrassed and therefore urge the importance of an appropriation to meet its necessities.
Daniel Pratt Esq. of Alabama, has signified his desire to present to the University of Georgia two large paintings if the University will guarantee their proper accommodation. The size of these

(pge 183)
Paintingsone of them being 17x23, will make it necessary if they are accepted, that a gallery or a Hall be constructed for them. I recommend that the College Chapel be so enlarged and refitted at to answer the two-fold purpose of a commencement Hall and an Art Building. This is much the most economical plan which you can adopt, and as the thorough repair of the chapel is exceedingly desirable in view of the necessities of the University, I suggest that this provision be made for the acceptance of this munificent donation.
The death of Genl. M.L. Smith, Professor elect, of the School of Civil Engineers, occurred soon after your adjournment. I had hoped to have the aid of his large experience and distinguished abilities in the organization of this school but in this was disappointed. Measures were immediately adopted to fill the Professorship but they failed.
I availed myself without delay of the services of Prof. Rutherford and Capt. Charbonnier, to where skill and energy, the organization of the school is due. For some months past Capt. Charbonnier has had entire charge of the enterprize, Prof. Rutherford having been engrossed with the duties of his own chair. As the young men who entered this school were not prepared for a course of Engineering, they were taken through the introductory studies. Geometry, Trigonometry, Surveying,

(pge 184)
with drawing have been very thoroughly as well as admirably taught both by means of Text Books and Lectures, the latter methods having been employed with great advantage to the students in Geometric, Topological, and architectural Drawing. Instruction in French has been added. The results of the years course in the school have been very gratifying not only as to the acquisitions made by the students and the marked facilities they have shown in using those acquisitions in such original forms as their age and experience permitted, but even more in that spirit of sympathy with art as to its substantial utility and elegant accomplishments which Capt. Charbonnier has awakened in these students.
The re-organization of the High School was effected on the opening of the present University Term by the Prudential Committee in the presence of difficulties peculiarly embarrassing and which seemed at times to be insurmountable. Under the circumstances that surround the incipiency of this organization the means put in operation, to achieve results which at every step, were complicated with most perplexing contingencies, reflect the higher credit on the sagacity and enterprize of these gentlemen. As an interest of the University, its present condition and growing prospects can not fail to enlist your attention and sympathies. A full report from the President, W.B.T. Hunter is herewith submitted. Ninety three pupils

(pge 185)
representing thirty seven counties of the State have been enrolled in this School. There disabled soldier have entered generally with a most earnest purpose into the spirit of the Institution and have shown a most praiseworthy disposition to reciprocate the solicitude of the State, in behalf of their education. The labors of Mr. Hunter and his associates, growing out of the peculiar constitution of the School, have necessarily been very arduous but they have been sustained by a patient endurance as well as directed by an executive wisdom that merit the warmest commendation.
Among the objects claiming your consideration, I wish specially to suggest the importance of re-opening a Law School in connection with the University. The success which has recently attended this class of Professional schools in other States and the facts passing under my own observation, have led me to think such a school, located in our midst and associated directly with the University, would be productive of great benefit not merely in its own sphere but as an auxiliary to the general objects of the University. So far as I can learn this school might go at once into successful operation. I have had repeated applications for instruction in such a school, and I have no doubt, it would soon prove self-sustaining.
I informed you in the abstract of my Report, that a circular on the subject of military education, had been received

(pge 186)
by the University. It is signed by Major J.H. Whittlesey, W.S.A. who under order of the Secretary of war invites official action on the plan presented in said circular.
It is proposed by Act of Congress, to authorize the President of the U.S. to detail two competent officers of the Army as Professors and Assistant Professor in any University or College numbering 150 students that shall establish a course of Instruction in Military studies and in Military Exercises. Said University or college shall allow for Military studies, one hour a day for four or five days of the week during the Senior year, but attendance upon this course will be optional with students, and furthermore, the course of Military exercises; (as distinct from Military Studies) shall occupy one hour a day during the week-days of the entire collegiate terms. While the President of the United States, may prescribe the course of military studies and exercises, the rights of self-government of said colleges, are not to be infringed. And, moreover said Universities or colleges complying wit these conditions, shall be authorized and empowered to recommend to the President a list of five graduates, one of each five to be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the army of the United States, or if no vacancies exist, to be attached to the army as a Brevet Second Lieutenant. To carry this arrangement into effect, the sum of $2,000 to be appropriated for text books, models, &c. and the sum of $10,000 to erect a suitable building for an

(pge 187)
armory, &c. said appropriations to be made by the Secretary of war. The purposes proposed to be accomplished are: First, to furnish a body of well instructed officers for a permanent Military Establishment, and secondly, To diffuse throughout the educated classes of the country a knowledge of military Science.
I do not think it advisable in my present report to discuss the various bearings of this plan. If a military education as a part of college training be assumed as either necessary or desirable, the plan in question seems adapted to accomplish the object, while its popular features would certainly serve to enhance its attractions. It will doubtless meet with extensive favor on the part of many of the Institutions of the country. But I have never thought that the two systems of education should be profitably blended, nor do I see how the plan proposed could be engrafted upon our University course without essentially modifying its spirit and ends. Apart from these objections it is open to doubt whether the University of a State should enter into this sort of co-partnership with the Federal government in the work of education.
Reviewing the history of the University for the past year, I find much to encourage the hope that its future progress will be such as to reward the exertions which you have recently made to enlarge and perfect its usefulness. The sentiment of the state has responded to your efforts and you have a widening patronage that cordially

(pge 188)
appreciates the measures you have inaugurated for the advancement of learning. Providence has been pleased to bless the University in its religious interests as well as in its intellectual aims; to make us glad according to the day wherein he has afflicted us and The years wherein we have seen evil; so that his mercy permits us to hope that his Beauty is resting upon us and the work of our hands in being established in the sure ordinations of His Almighty strength.
While your grateful recollections recall these divine evidences of prospering favor, you will not been mindful of those chastenings which have befallen your body in the death of your former associates, Bishop Elliott and Chief Justice Lumpkin. Over them and their work, death hath no power, for their name liveth ever more. Admired for their genius and revered for their virtues they are still dearer to our personal affections by reason of those companionships which here and elsewhere, we enjoyed with them under the inspiration of common tastes and in the genial pursuits of common aims.
I have the honor to remain
Gentlemen, your Obt. Svt.
Andw A. Lipscomb.
Chancellor
(pge 189)
The Treasurers Report was then read, as well as the Reports of Prof. Rutherford & Prest Hunter.
The president of the Board then appointed the standing committees.
1.
On Laws and Discipline Messrs, Hill, Harris, & James Jackson.

2.
On Finance. Messrs, Jno. Billups, Cobb, & Thomas.

3.
On buildings & Apparatus Messrs Moore, Barrow, & Yancey.

4.
On Library Messrs, Barnett, Joel A. Billups, & Yancey.

5.
On University High School Messrs Cobb, Moore, Joel A. Billups, James Jackson, & Brown.

The following Resolution was adopted
Resolved, That there be a summer vacation from the first Wednesday in August to the First Wednesday in September, of each year, and a Winter vacation from the fifteenth day of December to the Fifteenth day of January of each year, and that this arrangement take effect from commencement day of this year.
Messrs, Cobb, & Mitchell were on motion appointed a committee of invitation to invite to seats on the stage such persons of eminence, including former Trustees & Professors, as are entitled to such a courtesy.

(pge 190)
The Board then adjourned to 5 Oclock this after-noon, and proceeded to the University High School, where they were handsomely entertained in connection with the college Faculty by the President & his maimed pupils, and where addresses were listened to with interest from Prof. Waddell and Hon Howell Cobb.
August 3rd. 1867. 5 Oclock P.M.
The Board met at this hour in the Library when Ex-Gov. Brown appeared and took his seat, and was added to the Committee on the University High School, Col. Jno. Billups, Senior Trustee present in the chair, in the Presidents absence.
Mr. Cobb submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved, That a committee of five be annually appointed by the Board to represent the interests of the University of Georgia before the Ligislature, before all constitutional conventions that may at any time, be held, and before the Military authorities of the General Government controlling the State, for the purpose of protecting and promoting its interests.
The Board then adjourned to Monday Morning next at 9 Oclock.
August 5, 1867 The Board met according to adjournment when Messrs Lewis & Vason appeared and took their seats.

(pge 191)
The committee on Laws & Discipline reported on the re-organization of the Law School, & their Report was taken up and adopted, and is as follows;
The committee on Laws & Discipline, to whom was referred so much of the report of the Chancellor as recommends the reopening of the Law School in connection with the University having had the same under consideration beg leave to submit the following report;
The committee concur in the recommendation made by the Chancellor. A Law School in connection therewith, is in accordance with the enlarged plan and purposes of the University; and provision for its establishment becomes one of the duties of this Board. Besides, it is wise and appropriate that the young men, especially of Georgia, should find the facilities in this State, for requiring a proper instruction in this learned and important profession of the Law.
When the late war commenced, this School was in most successful operation under Professor Chief Justice Lumpkin, T.R.R. Cobb, and Wm. H. Hull. By the decease of the two first names, two vacancies exist, and your committee recommend that the Board, at the present session, fill these vacancies and direct that the Law School be at once organized, and go into operation with the beginning of the ensuing session of the University.
The committee deem it very important that a proper Law Library should be provided as early as practicable, and they recommend

(pge 192)
that the Board authorize the Professors in the Law School to make suitable arrangements for procuring such a Library. They also recommend that the Professors and students in the Law School have the use of and access to the University Library.
In view of the present financial condition the committee cannot recommend any salary for the Professors in the Law School other than prerequisites thereof. They recommend sixty dollars per session as the tuition in the Law School payable in advance, and that the same be paid to the Professors in such proportions as they shall agree among themselves.
When the present new Library Building was erected, a lecture room was specifically provided for the use of the Law School, and the committee recommend that this room be again appropriated to that use.
By the committee
B.H.Hill Chairman. The same committee on Laws & Discipline made the following report on Military education which was adopted & is as follows;
The committee on Laws & Discipline to whom was referred a circular to the colleges of the United States on the subject of Military education, have had the circular under consideration and submit thereon the following report;
That in view of the present condition of the country, no action should be

(pge 193)
taken by this Board on the subject brought to their attention in said circular. And which is respectfully submitted.
B.H.Hill
Chairman.
The same committee also submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, the tuition fees in this Institution be one hundred dollars per annum, payable $40, the first session and $60.00 the second session, always in advance.
The Board then took recess to attend the prize Declamation of the Sophomores; after which the Board returned to the Library room when Judge Harris introduced the following resolution, which was adopted;
Resolved, That the Secretary be requested to express to Maj. Trowbridge, the commandant of this post, their gratification at his readiness cheerfully to aid in keeping good order during commencement week.
The Board then proceeded to ballot for the two Law Professors, when it appeared that Hon. Benjamin H. Hill and Wm. L. Mitchell Esq. were duly elected.
Mr. Barnett was added to the committee on Finance.
Mr. Lewis was added to the committee on Laws and Discipline; ;and Mr. Vason
was added to the committee on Buildings and Apparatus. The board then adjourned to meet

(pge 194)
this after-noon immediately after the close of Rev. D. Branteleys oration on the life and character of Chief Justice Lumpkin, delivered at the request of the Phi Kappa Society, of which Society the Chief Justice was the founder.
The Board met according to adjournment, when Bishop Pierce appeared and took his seat, and was added to the committee on Laws & Discipline; after which the Board adjourned to 9 OClock to-morrow morning.
August 6, 1867
The Board met according to adjournment. On motion of Wm. L. Mitchell,
Resolved, That the degree of A.B. be conferred upon the five members of the Graduating class, and the degree of A.M. upon all graduates of proper standing who apply for the same; to wit
E.Y. Clarke, Esq.
D.C.B. Ridley, Rev. Jabez Brittain,
W.H. Bass, Esq. & John D. Pope Esq. & G.A. Nunnally. That the Honary Degree of A.m. be conferred upon Prof. L.H. Charbonnier, and
the Degree of D.D. upon Rt. Rev. Bishop, John W. Beckwith, & Rev. Joseph S. Key.

(pge 195)
The committee on the Library reported, and their report was adopted and is as follows; The committee on the Library respectfully report, that the condition of the Library as regards the order, arrangement & preservation of the books is admirable.
While your committee would gladly see large annual additions to the Library, they can not, in the present state of the Finances of the University, recommend any large appropriation. They would suggest the usual appropriation for periodicals, and the sum of $100 for the purchase of such books as the Chancellor may deem most valuable.
Saml Barnett
Chairman.
The Board then took recess to attend the Junior Exhibition; after which the Board returned and resumed business. On motion of Mr. Mitchell,
Messrs. Hill, Barrow, & Thomas were added to the Prudential committee.
The annual committee of five to watch over the interests of the University were announced by the chair just before the Board took recess, and are:
Ex-Governor Joseph E. Brown, Chairman,
His Honor, Iverson L. Harris,
Genl. James W. Armstrong
Col. Benj. C. Yancey.

(pge 196)
The committee on Laws & Discipline reported further and their report was adopted and is as follows:
The committee on Laws & Discipline, to whom was referred the report of Capt. Charbonnier adjunct Professor Ancient Languages, and to whom has been assigned the management of the School of Civil Engineering during the last scholastic year, report, That Prof. Charbonnier, form the examination the committee have given the subject and information derived from eminent persons qualified to judge, has instructed his pupils in a manner highly satisfactory to the Chancellor of the University and the pupils themselves and to your committee. They therefore recommend that he be raised to the chair of Professor of Civil Engineering and be clothed with full power to administer the affairs of that school, with the request that he still assist the Professor of Ancient language in that chair in Franklin College, and that his salary be raised to that of a full Professor, $2,000.
Submitted by W. James Jackson on behalf of the committee.

(pge 197)
The committee on Laws and Discipline further reported, and their report was adopted and is as follows:
The committee on Laws & Discipline further report, That Wm. L. Mitchell Esq. had, during the last year and since the decease of the late Secretary and Treasurer, most ably discharged the duties of that office without compensation; That in addition to those duties, his services have been energetically and almost unremittingly devoted to the interest of the University; especially had he labored effectively for the University High School, and they consider his services indispensible to the furtherance of its interests and the general prosperity of the University.
They feel that it is wrongunjust to Mr. Mitchellto require these services from him without compensation; They, therefore, recommend his permanent appointment to the office of Secretary and Treasurer, and that in connection therewith he be requested to advise and consult with the Chancellor touching the general interests of the entire University, to assist in the administration of its laws and discipline, and continue to give his energy and talents to its advancement.
In consideration of which services they recommend that he be paid the annual salary of one thousand dollars.
In consideration of his past services, since the death of Mr. Asbury Hull, they further recommend that he be authorized to retain out of the funds in his hands, or which may come

(pge 198)
into his hands the sum of five hundred dollars.
Submitted by Mr. James Jackson in behalf of the committee.
The Board adjourned to 8 OClock on to-morrow morning.
August 7, 1867, Wednesday.
The Board met according to adjournment.
The committee on the University High School submitted their report, which was adopted and is as follows:
The committee on the University High School, to whom was referred the report of President Hunter as well as the reports of the Chancellor and the Prudential committee on that Institution, report:
As the Board is aware, the entire character of this School had undergone a change, in the effort made to erect as a main instrumentality of our University in carrying into effect the munificent provision of our State for the education of our maimed and indigent soldiers, The arrangements made by the Prudential committee in this regard, are commended to our cordial approval by the eminent success which has attended the effort. Nearly one hundred of this worthy and deserving class of our fellow-citizens have been the recipients of the States bounty during the past session of the School, and it is not too much to say in their behalf that their conduct and improvement, during this period, have shewn them truly worthy of the interest taken by the State in their

(pge 199)
education and advancement. It would be an interesting duty to go more into detail on this subject, but time and the occasion forbid. When we remember the number of students, ninety three, who have received instruction at this school during the first session, and the extraordinary progress, under the circumstances, made by them, and that all this work had been accomplished by President Hunter with the aid of his single assistant Mr. Peyton C. Moore, we can not award to this accomplished Teacher, and his worthy assistant, too much praise. In this connection, it is but an act of simple justice to Mr. Moore to say that the compensation of forty dollars per month paid to him is wholly inadequate to his worth and services.
The committee have endeavored to inform themselves of the mode and manner of the expenditure of the three hundred dollars allowed by the State for each of these Students, with a view to a modification of the present arrangement, if it could properly be done, but their limited time and opportunities would not admit of such examination as would justify positive action upon it, but authorized them to submit some suggestions on the subject. The present arrangement gives to President Hunter the entire trust, finding his compensation in the amount he may save after meeting all required expenditures. The committee think, that if it could be done it would

(pge 200)
be better to pay President Hunter and his assistant, a fixed salary, and that by a proper and judicious expenditure of the balance of the fund, there might be saved a sufficient amount to meet other expenditures necessary for the successful operations of the School. So impressed are they with this fact, that they recommend that the whole subject be referred to the Prudential committee with full power and authority to them to act in the premises, and to make such arrangements for the future operations of the School during the next session & following year as in their judgement will be best for the school and the University.
Upon one point, there should be, however, a clear and distinct understanding, that the University incurs no pecuniary liability except as is involved in the administration of the fund furnished by the State for this special purpose. If from any cause, that fails, we are unable to make it good. Of this we entertain no serious apprehension at present. The number of applicants is equal to the capacity of the school, as we are informed by Mr. Hunter, the number is daily increasing.
There is required for necessary repairs, which ought to be made at the earliest moment, the sum of three hundred dollars at leastindeed five hundred dollars could be well invested in needed repairs. The committee indulge

(pge 201)
the hope, that the Prudential committee will be enabled to provide for these repairs under the new arrangement without taxing the limited funds of the University. To prepare however, for any contingency that may arise, the committee recommend an appropriation of three hundred dollars for these repairs to be called for only in the event, that it should become absolutely necessary to do so.
In conclusion, the Committee would have the Board manifest, by their action, to the State and all the friends of education their appreciation of the high trust committed to them, in the proper management of this sacred fund, and that nothing will be omitted on their part to do with it, all that can be done in the education and advancement of these favored sons of the State.
Submitted by Mr. Cobb, Chairman of the Committee.
The committee on Laws & Discipline made a report which was adopted and is as follows:
The committee on Laws and Discipline have had under consideration the recommendations of the Chancellor in his annual report, touching on irregular course of instruction, and embracing an Elementary Scientific Course, and an Elective course, and beg leave to report.
The committee concur in the views so

(pge 202)
well expressed by the Chancellor, and deem the practical establishment of the organization suggested, wise, proper, and in strict accordance with the condition and demands of the times, and the true objects and purposes of the University.
The committee, are of the opinion, however that the usual time allotted for the sittings of this Board, in its annual meeting, is not sufficient, to justify the full Board in an attempt to organize and perfect the curriculum & course suggested and recommended.
They, therefore, recommend, that the Report of the Chancellor on the subjects named, be referred to the Prudential committee with the following powers and instructions:
1.
That said Prudential committee may carry out the plans and recommendations of the Chancellor in whole or in part, and with modifications varying, enlarging, or curtailing the same as the funds of the University, the demands of the patronage, and the suggestions of wisdom may authorize and dictate.

2.
That they elect the Professors and assistant or adjunct Professors which may be needed to carry out the plans, and fix their salaries until the next meeting of this Board.

3.
That the Prudential committee may also include in their arrangements in the Elementary, Elective, or Regular course, a chair of Modern Languages including Spanish, German, and French.

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4. That for the purposes therein contemplated, the said Prudential committee shall have all the powers of an executive Board necessary to accomplish the ends proposed and that they report their actings and doings in the premises to this Board at its next meeting for ratification.
By the Committee
B.H.Hill
Chairman.
Mr. Cobb submitted the following resolution:
Resolved, That the committee appointed as an organ of communication between this body and the Civil and Military authorities of the State be instructed to take in special charge the financial interest of the University as involved in the Constitutional provision for the support of the University as well as any other appropriations by the state that it may deem advisable to apply for.
Resolved, That the committee be instructed to make an earnest appeal to Genl. Pope for the removal of the Military Head Quarters of this sub-division from the town of Athens for reasons and considerations growing out of the location of the University at this place, and to represent to Genl. Pope that nothing has occurred on the part of the military at this place to call for complaint or censure, on the contrary, that the conduct of the officers in command, has commanded our respect and obligation.

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The Board before acting on the foregoing resolutions took recess in the chapel upon the commencement exercises, during which the Degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred publicly by the Chancellor upon the following graduating members of the Senior class, viz,
G. Legare Comer, Eufaula, Ala.
W. Allen Fort, Americus, Ga. Malcolm Johnston, Milledgeville, Ga. Samuel Spencer, Columbus, Ga. Tarpley H. Ward, Greensboro, Ga.
And also upon W. Barderville after examination in the Senior studies, and the Honorary degrees & the Degree of A.M. were announced by the Chancellor as the same had been conferred by the Board; after which they returned to the Library room and adopted the resolutions submitted by Mr. Cobb.
The Board then took recess to 6 P.M. when they reassembled & proceeded to business.
Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution, which was referred to the chancellor to report upon at the next annual meeting;
Resolved, That the Chancellor be authorized, if he deem it expedient, to offer suitable premiums to the speakers of the Junior and Senior Exhibitions.The Premiums to be of two distinct features; 1st-& 2nd premiums for the best style.
1st
. & 2nd Premiums for the best declamation

(pge 205)
1st & 2nd Premiums for specimens of poetry or Rhyme, the same to exceed seven lines. 1st & 2nd premiums for the best specimen of a Biographical Sketch of any deceased member or graduate of the college; Member of the Faculty, of the Board of Trustees.
Mr. Hill submitted the following resolution, which was agreed to, to wit.
Resolved, That this Board will at the proper time entertain a proposition for the establishment of a Medical School in this University.
The Report of the Committee on Buildings & Apparatus was called, for amended, and adopted, and is as follows;
The Committee to whom was referred the college Buildings & apparatus beg leave to report, that they have examined the buildings and find that the Professors Houses so far as external appearances indicate are all in good order. The old College has been under the supervision of the Chancellor well and thoroughly repaired, and is now in a better habitable condition than it has been for the last twenty years. The new college is also in a new good condition. These buildings will need very little repairs for the coming year. The old apparatus room has been altered so as to make a most complete and comfortable lecture room for the use of the Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. The room on the first floor of the same
(pge 206)
building fitted up originally for the chair of chemistry is entirely unfit for the purposes intended and should be at the earliest possible moment re-modeled. The building formerly containing the Library has been made into two lecture rooms, the upper one for the use of the Professor of Civil Engineering, the lower to the Professor of Natural Philosophy & Astronomy, to which the entire apparatus belonging to this chair has been removed. The fence around the campus destroyed as reported last year is still in the same condition. Upon a minute examination of all the apparatus belonging to the Mathematical chair, your committee find that the most important instruments are so entirely worthless that it was a matter of wonder that the Professor could use them at all. We therefore earnestly recommend, in order that the worthy Professor may do justice to himself and the young men of the University, the immediate purchase of the following instruments, viz. A 1 level $100 Models in solid Geometry 20 Civil Engineering 40 Necessary repairs to other Instruments 30 Col. Tilleys improved Instrument for Surveying & calculating areas $150 Amounting in all for this Department $340
To the Professor of Natural Philosophy ad Astronomy the University is greatly indebted for the skill displayed and amount of labor bestowed in bringing

(pge 207)
into perfect working order the almost useless apparatus belonging to his Department. In order to perfect the machinery of this Department, we recommend as absolutely necessary the immediate purchase of an induction coil, which with the appliances will cost about six hundred dollars, ($600)
In the Chemical department, almost every thing necessary for proper teaching of this Science is wanting, we therefore for the ensuing year, recommend the purchasing of the following articles, viz,
of Chemicals $50. worth
Flasks 15 We also recommend the purchasing of Dr. Hares Self-adjusting Hydrogen generator 5 Daniels Constant Acting Battery & Electrotyping apparatus 25 & Groves Battery 20 Amounting to $150
4. The Induction Coil recommended for the Philosophical Department can be used in this also, and is very greatly needed.
Your committee would earnestly recommend the immediate purchase of all the above named Instruments, believing that no out-lay of money could be more useful, both to the Professors in imparting and the students in receiving knowledge.
R.D. Moore Chairman.

(pge 208)
Bishop Pierce was appointed to prepare a minute in relation to the death of Bishop Elliott and Chief Justice Lumpkin.
Mr. Cobb submitted the following resolutions:
Resolved, That this Board of Trustees here by affirm its conviction of the importance of that law of the University by which, party political subjects are excluded from the speeches of students at commencement.
Resolved, That the Chancellor and Faculty be requested to exercise under present circumstances more than usual vigilance lest this rule be violated.
Resolved, That we express our sincere regret that anything should have occurred during the literary exercises of the commencement to suggest the idea of even an unintentional departure from the established usage of the University.
To which Gov. Brown proposed the following resolution as an amendment;
Resolved, That the Chancellor be requested to see that no speech delivered by any student at this or at any future commencement be published in the news-papers without his consent, & any student violating this rule shall be dismissed from the privileges of the University.
Which amendment was agreed to, and the Resolutions and amendment

(pge 209)
were then adopted as a whole.
The Finance committee made their Report, which was adopted and is as follows:
The Finance committee report, respectfully, That the estimated income of the college consists of the following items.
Income Balance in Treasury $ 411.79 Due from the State 8,000.00 Tuition estimated on 140 students (e) 100 14,000.00
Interest on Terrell funds 1,270.00
Rent 1,300.00
Aggregate 25,081.79

They recommend the following expenditure considered as certain.
Expenses Certain Chancellors Salary $2,500.00 6 Professors 12,000.00 Secretary & +Treasurer 1,000.00
Do for 1866-67 500.00 $16,000.00
Expenses Contingent Hire 300-Printing & postage 200 500.00 Medals 100 Music 100 200.00 Incidentals-Painting Chapel included 400.00 Library & Periodicals 200-U.H. School
Repairs 300 500.00 Apparatus 1,200.00 Fencing (undressed & Whitewashed) 350.00
$3,150.00 To balance 5,931.79 they propose to dispose of as follows:
They recommend that the Prudential committee be authorized

(pge 210)
to draw therefrom the needful salary for each of the new Professors recommend in the Chancellors Report, viz A Professor of Belles Lettres capable to teach the Modern Languages $2,000.00 A Mathematical Professor 2,000.00
They would confer authority upon the same committee to expend unappropriated funds not to exceed $3,000 for the purpose of enlarging the Chapel, putting it into perfect order, restoring the seats, & fitting it to receive the largest & valuable pictures, the munificent donations of Mr. Daniel Pratt.
The report of the Treasurer has been found correct, & a small decrepency of ten dollars explained and allowed.
Your committee recommend that, hereafter the Prudential committee appoint an auditing committee in advance of the meeting of the Trustees, who shall report on the correctness of the Treasurers Report, and submit to the Board the best estimate they can make of the prospective income & expenses of the University for the year then ensuing.
Estimated Income $25,081.79
Estimated expenses Salaries 20,000.00
Contingent Expenses 3,150.00
Unappropriated 1,931.79
$25,081.79 Submitted by Mr. Burnett in behalf of the committee.

(pge 211)
Mr. Barnett submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, That , hereafter, the assembling of the students for prayers on Saturday and Sunday mornings be discontinued.
Bishop Pierce offered the following paper in relation to the death of Messrs Elliott & Lumpkin.
The Trustees of the University of Georgia having been bereaved since their last annual meeting by the death of J.H. Lumpkin, Chief Justice of Georgia, and of Rt. Rev. Bishop Stephen Elliott of the Episcopal church it is due alike to the virtues of the departed and to our convictions of loss, that we adopt the following resolutions;
Resolved That while we sorrow most of all that we shall see the faces of our honored colleagues no more, nevertheless we submit in cheerful hope to these dispensations of Providence assured that the deceased rest from their labor and that their works to follow them.
Resolved, That the distinguished dead, (each in his sphere) were beautiful examples of intelligence, patriotism, and piety, unselfishly consecrated to the service of their generation by the will of God.
Resolved, That we will tenderly cherish their memory, as we assure the families of each, of our sympathy and condolence, and that the Secretary be directed to furnish them with a copy of these resolutions.
And the same was agreed to in silence.

(pge 212)
The Board then adjourned sine die. Wm. L Mitchell Wilson Lumpkin
Secretary President

(pge 213)
Macon Ga. November 13, 1867.
The Board of Trustees met this day at 10 Oclock A.M. in this city in the Session Room of the Presbyterian Church, having been called together by their President, Hon. Wilson Lumpkin, under a resolution of the Prudential committee.
The following members were in attendance, to wit., Messrs
Armstrong Hill
Barrow James Jackson
Joel A. Billups Jenkins
Crawford Mitchell &
Cobb Moore
In the absence of the President, His Excellency Charles J. Jenkins, the Senior Trustee present, took the chair, and the meeting opened with prayer according to the usual rule.
Excuses were made for the absence of Messrs. John Billups, Barnett, Dougherty, Harris, Henry R. Jackson, Lewis, Lumpkin, Cooper, Thomas, & Yancey.
The following communication from the Chancellor was then read and laid on the table and then ordered to be placed on the minutes:
University of Georgia
November 11th, 1867
To the Board of Trustees Of the University of Ga. Gentlemen, My duties this week in the University will not allow me to attend your session in Macon.

(pge 214)
So far as the number of students in the University is concerned, the Institution continues to prosper. It is evern more prosperous than it was during the last term. We have one hundred and ninety two matriculates in Franklin College and in the Engineer School; and nearly three hundred in all the Departments of the University. Owing to the difficulties in which we became involved, we were unable to organize the New College in a distinct form, We have incorporated, however the schedule of study into Franklin College, and, in this way are provisionally executing the scheme, which you established at the last session of your Board. The success of these new measures is quite as great as circumstances permit, and I feel assured that if we could have carried out the plan contemplated, fully, its success would have justified the expectations which you formed of its vast advantages.
Of the present number of matriculates in Franklin college and Engineer School, Sixty four are new Students. This is an unusually large increase for the Fall Term. Of those in attendance at the close of the last session, we lost twelve students in addition to the Senior class. Some of these are only absent temporarily on account of ill health.
The conduct of the students and their general attention to study are worthy of special mention. So far indeed as the internal life of the University is concerned, we have much to encourage our exertions. My colleagues are

(pge 215)
working with great earnestness and untiring assiduity to improve the methods and expand the scope of teaching, and their success has been most gratifying.
If we can command the means, I feel perfectly satisfied that we can rapidly expand the University. These means are particularly needed to adapt the Institution to the wants of the times. You can rely upon a large and growing partronage, if you can make provisions to give the kind of education which the circumstances of the country now demand.
The Law School has been organized. The facts connected with its operations and the general details of the High School and of the other University interests, will be fully communicated by Col. Mitchell.
I beg to remain.
Gentlemen,
Your Obt. Servant,
Andw Lipscomb
Chancellor.
Mr. Joel A. Billups submitted a resolution, which was considered and adopted. This was done after the reading of the minutes of the Prudential committee since commencement, the reading of a letter from the President of the U.S. to Mr. Hill enclosing the copy of a letter from Genl. Pope to Genl. Grant and an account by Mr. Hill of his interview with the President & Genl. Grant in relation to Genl. Popes order to the State treasurer to make no more payments to the University and also Gov. Jenkins statement of his conversations during his recent visit to Washington from which it appeared that the President &

(pge 216)
Genl. Grant both disapproved Genl. Popes order that Genl. Grant had requested its revocation by Genl. Pope and Genl. Pope had promised to do so if Genl. Grant should still insist upon it. The resolution is as follows, to wit:
A copy of the letter of Genl. Pope of the 22nd of October last to Genl. Grant having been placed before the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia,
Resolved,
That the Chairman of this Board be requested & directed, to communicate to other proper authorities at Washington, the views of the Board, upon the questions discussed in said letter touching the interest of the University.
Dr. Moore submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the Indigent maimed Soldiers, members of the college, be charged only half tuition fees, while students, two fifth payable for the first session, & three fifths for the second session of each college year.
In view of the great age and infirmity of the President of this Board, Hon. Wilson Lumpkin, it was deemed expedient to carry into effect so much of the act of the Legislature assented to Dec. 14, 1859 as empowers the Board to elect a vice-president.

(pge 217)
Whereupon his Excellency Charles J. Jenkins was unanimously elected vice-resident of the Board to perform the duties of President upon the death or inability of the President.
The Board then adjourned.
Wm. L. Mitchell Wilson Lumpkin
Secretary Pres.
_____________________

(pge 218) (pge 219)
University of Georgia, July 31, 1868
The stated meeting of the Trustees of the University of Georgia was begun this day in the Library and at this and subsequent meetings the following members attended, to wit.
Messrs. Barnett Nisbit
Joal A. Billups, Thomas
Barrow Yancey
Cobb Hall
Hill Dougherty
James Jackson Lewis
Mitchell Miller
Moore Tombs
John Billups Seward, &
Vason
Col. John Billups, the Senior Trustee present, in the absence of the President and vice-President, according to the provisions of the Charter, took the chair and called the Board to order, a quorum being present for the transaction of business, when the meeting was organized, & prayer was made by Chancellor Lipscomb.
The minutes of the last annual meeting and of the special meeting at Macon in November last, were read and the proceedings of the Board at Macon ratified and confirmed.
On motion of Mr. Cobb, An additional standing committee on the Law Department was ordered to be added to the Standing Committees.

(pge 220)
Excuses were made & sustained at this and subsequent session of the Board for the absence of Messrs. Henry R. Jackson, Crawford, Harris, Armstrong, Lumpkin, and Cooper and Jenkins.
The Reports of the Treasurer were submitted by him and the abstract read, said reports having been previously audited and approved by the auditing committee according to the instructions of the Board last year with an estimate of receipts & expenditures for the next college year.
The report of the Prudential committee was read.
The Board then adjourned till to-morrow morning 10 Oclock.
August 1, 1868. Board met, when Messrs Barrow, Barnett, & Hall appeared and took their seats. The Standing committees were announced and are as follows; to wit.
1.
Committee on Laws and Discipline. Messrs. Hill, Jas. Jackson, Tombs, & Hall.

2.
Committee on Finance. Messrs Barnett, Thomas, & Nisbit.

3.
Committee on Buildings & Apparatus. Messrs Moore, Yancey, Barrow & Miller.

4.
Committee on Library. Messrs Yancey, Jas. Jackson, & J.A. Billups

5.
Committee on University High School Messrs Cobb, Moore, Hill, & Lewis.

6.
Committee on Law Department Messrs Nisbet, Cobb, Toombs, & Dougherty.

(pge 221)
The resignation of Hon. Hershel V. Johnson was received, and on motion the Board proceed to fill the vacancy, and upon counting out the votes it appeared that
D.H.V.M. Miller was duly elected. The Chancellor D. Lipscomb then read his annual communication, which was as follows; University of Georgia July 30th, 1868. To the Board of Trustees, Gentlemen,
The year now closing has been one of unusual prosperity to the University. We have had Three hundred and fifty three (353) students in attendance. Of these matriculates, there have been in
Franklin college & Elective course 200 Engineer School 7
Law 14 High School 132
Of the two hundred students in Franklin College, twenty seven have been beneficiaries, exclusive of Fourteen disabled soldiers, who have been, in part, Beneficiaries.
There have been a gain of a fraction less than forty eight per cent on the previous year, an increase that under circumstances much more propitious, would be considered remarkable. A gratifying fact in connection with this prosperity ir, that the most of these students are from Georgia. The University of Virginia the past year, had 475 students, 40 percent being from that state; Washington college

(pge 222)
had 410, 31 7/10 being from Virginia; while our University had 93 percent of its students from our own State. This indicates not only the ability of our citizens to educate their sons, but a disposition to encourage their State Institution. I give importance to this fact because I think that the most desirable kind of prosperity is that which a State University enjoys from the patronage of its own people. And from this, the direct usefulness of a State-University as such is largely determined by the proportion of students from its own families. While, then we have reason to congratulate ourselves on the kindness of Providence to the University, we may give his congratulation a deeper emphasis from the consideration, that the citizens of Georgia have yielded us their sympathy & support under circumstances that give the sanctity of sentiment no less than the virtue of principle to their conduct.
Owing to causes, I need not mention we have not been able to carry out all the measures which you so wisely devised at your last session for the expansion of the University. If those measures could have been promptly executed, we should have been strengthened in our position before the public and likewise increased the internal efficiency of the Institution. Rather than incur risks we were ill-prepared to bear we deemed it best, to adhere in the main to the former plans, shaping the organization and curriculum so far as practicable,

(pge 223)
to meet the intelligent demands of the times. In the Elective course, we have had Thirty students; and although we have not secured that completeness to this Department which we deem desirable, yet we have made sufficient progress to demonstrate the great utility of the plan. If your means will allow you to furnish us two adjunct Professors, we can accomplish still further the objects contemplated in the action of the last session of your Board. The scope of education in the South will every year become broader, tastes will multiply, and what is stronger than taste, necessities will multiply and demand larger and more numerous means of instruction and culture. This is occurring every where. There is not a system of education in the world that is not yielding in its oldest and most organic features to the imperative pressure of a public opinion which the men educated under these systems have themselves formed; and hence as the time must come when men will be educated for every thing instead of for a few things as hitherto, I deem it of the utmost moment that we afford the University all requisite aids to enlarge in the direction of popular wants.
During the past year, I have been gratified to observe a higher tone in the scholarship of our students and a commendable desire on their part to meet the additional requirements of the University. The average grade of scholarship has advanced; the intellectual discipline has not only become

(pge 224)
more rigid but embraces a wider compass; and especially the education of our students by means of the few has very decidedly increased. The order and behavior of the students have generally been creditable, nor has there been a single instance of such conduct as made severe discipline necessary. I give this testimony with a glad and thankful heart, and the more so, as the credit is due to the Faculty and Students. Ill health has very greatly interfered [sic] with my personal duties, and for five months, by the kindness of the Prudential committee, I was absent from the State, but during this time, a period in some respects of peculiar trial, the interests of the University were most vigilantly watched, while its prosperity was not only maintained, but augmented. For this and the general success of the year you are indebted to the Vice-Chancellor, Rev. D. Mell, to my other colleagues, and to the confidence and reciprocal good feeling existing between them and the student.
The same causes which prevented an enlarged organization of the University, have also compelled us to defer certain improvements in the chapel and other buildings that are regarded as very desirable. So far, however, as our means permitted, we have put the chapel in much better order, fitted up a museum, fenced in a portion of the campus, and made some other changes that we thought calculated to enhance the value of the property. As we shall probably have means sufficient, I would

(pge 225)
urgently recommend to your attention, the erection of a new Philosophical Hall for the use of Prof. Brown and the refitting of the old chemical Laboratory for Dr. Jones. Just now, these are much needed, and if the University [is] to grow, these Departments will require special aid to prepare them for successful service. With these improvements we shall also need some new Apparatus for these two departments and for the Mathematical and Engineering Professorships. The Reports from these Departments herewith submitted, will furnish the details necessary for your action, and I therefore merely add, that if the elective course be fully organized, it will require such appropriations to be made as will enable these Departments to furnish the means for a complete, practical education.
From the report of President Hunter, you will learn the flourishing condition of the University High School. The testimony given in former communications to the Board as to the wisdom and energy of the Principal and the fidelity of his assistants has been confirmed by the management of the present year. The special reports of the Engineer School and the Law School will give you gratifying intelligence as to the operations of these Departments, and as far as I can judge, these schools will attract public attention as soon as their merits become known. I am more than ever satisfied that each of these schools, while accomplishing its own special ends, is a valuable auxiliary to the university in respect to interests out side of

(pge 226)
its immediate sphere. If you should be able to give the classical Department an Adjunct Professor, it will be advisable for Prof. Charbonnier to assist Prof. Rutherford, whose duties are too onerous for one Professor.
I recommend you to authorize the Faculty to establish a course of study for such as wish to extend their education beyond the present curriculum, said course to be entitled the Maters Course and to be followed on its satisfactory completion be the Degree of Master of Arts. The effect of this will be, to encourage graduates with the Degree of A.B. to prosecute their studies under a formal University system. Such a curriculum for might be arranged as would probably put the Masters Degree within the reach of earnest Students, one year after graduation with the Bachelors Degree, but it would be wise to have no specific limit as to time, the sole condition of said Degree being the acquirements secured. If, apart from the Masters Degree, and additional thereto, certain awards and rewards could be granted to distinguished proficients in this course, I should expect, the results however limited by the number of students, to prove beneficial to the University is that which proceeds from the most careful and considerate forethought as to the direction which education is likely to take among us in the future. So far as I can see, this forethought demands two things; first, that the plan of the University embrace as many Departments as we can properly establish,

(pge 227)
and Secondly, that the facilities for the higher modes of Instruction and culture be as extended as possible. The new feature suggested involves, on your part, no increased out-lay; the present system will not be disturbed by its introduction; while the only change required will be the abolishment of the Degree of Master of Arts for graduates of thee years standing. You might provide that the Degree of A.M. could be conferred as an Honorary Degree upon such of your graduates as by merit and success, were entitled to the distinction.
You are aware, that 30,000 acres of land for each Representative in Congress, have been appropriated by the Federal Government to each State, for certain specific objects in conexion [sic] with education. Should this land come into the possession of the State of Georgia it might be expedient for you to have a committee to represent, in this matter, the interests of the University. If the fund accruing from the sale of this land, could be secured to the University in such a way as not to embarrass its present mode of organization or interfere with its present mode of operations, it could be employed under your direction with equal advantage to the University and to the State.
The large paintings, given to the University, by Daniel Pratt Esq. of Alabama, are now in our possession. If we enlarge the chapel as contemplated, a suitable arrangement can be made for their accommodation without incurring any additional expenses. This munificent gift by Mr. Pratt in memory

(pge 228)
[of] his early manhood in Georgia and his regard for the State, will greatly add to the attractions of the University, and I am sure is warmly appreciated by every member of the Board.
It would give me great pleasure if you would increase the salaries of my colleagues. These salaries, in view of the circumstances of the day and the large amount of additional work which is now devolved upon the Professors, are not adequately remunerative. I have no doubt that the future income of the University will fully warrant this increased expenditure; and I am very sure that the services of these valuable men who are exerting themselves much above the measure of ordinary fidelity to advance the welfare of the University, will lend weight to the suggestion which I make.
For the Degree of A.B. the following Seniors, Franklin College are recommended.
viz.
H.D. Benne; J.L. Brown; W.A. Carlton;
E.B. Connell; A.H. Coz; W.L. Dennis;
J.E. Donalson; Charly DuBose; G.T. Goetchins;
C.M. Goodman; W.S. Gordon; H.W. Grady
R.B. Hodgson; B.R. Holtes D. Jackson
L.E. LeConte; M.V. McKibben P.W. Melchim
W.R. Mims; H.P. Myers; W.F. Parks;
F.B. Phinizy; J.W. Rhodes; J.H. Rucker;
R.A. Pussell; W.B. Thomas; W.W. Thomas;
Robert Toombs; H.A. Whitman; S.F. Wilson;
Hamilton Yancey;.

For the Degree of Civil Engineer, the following, viz.
F.H. Harris; G.D. Harris;

(pge 229)
J.F. Kollock, W.W. Kollock; J.J. Nevitt;
For the Degree of Bachelor of Law, the following, viz. John Billups, A.L. Dent; T.W. Dodd; M.C. Fulton; T.F. Green; C. Jones; A.L. Mitchell; .M.W. Riden; J.E. Scofield, E. Thompson.
I have the honor to remain
Gentlemen,
Yr. Obt. Servt.
Andw A. Lipscomb,
Chancellor. The Chancellor then read Reports from Prof. Brown, Jones, Rutherfors, Waddell, & Charbonnier.
Messrs. Moore & Cobb were appointed a committee to represent the Board in inviting persons of eminence to seats on the platform, to which committee any member fo the Board is to be at liberty to suggest proper persons for this courtesy.
Mr. Cobb submitted the following Resolution, which was referred to the committee on Laws & Discipline.
Resolved,
That the committee on Laws & Discipline be instructed to enquire & report upon the propriety and mode of giving to the two Literary Societies of the University, Demosthenian & Phi-Kappa, a representation in the exercises of the commencement week, by the restoration to them of the right to elect Junior Orators, or otherwise.
The annual communication of the Chancellor was referred to the Standing committee on Laws & Discipline.

(pge 230)
The Treasurers Reports and abstract together with the auditing committees estimates for the ensuing collegiate year were referred to the Finance committee. The Report of the Professor of the Law Department which had previously presented & read was in like manner referred to the committee on the Law Department, and so all the other Reports were referred to their appropriate standing committees.
On motion of Mr. Cobb. The chairman was authorized to add members of the Board to the different Standing committees at discretion as they may hereafter arrive.
The Board then adjourned to Monday morning 9 Oclock, A.M.
Monday August 3rd. 1868. The Board met according to adjournment, when Mr. Dougherty appeared & took his seat, & was added to the committee on the Law Department.
Messrs. Lewis & Miller also appeared & took their sets; and Mr. Lewis was added to the committee on the University High School, and Dr. Miller to the committee on Building and Apparatus.
The committee on Laws and Discipline reported in part and the same was debated laid on the table, subsequently taken up and further discussed, amended, and finally adopted as follows;
The committee on Laws & Discipline

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to which was referred the communication of the Chancellor, submit the following report on so much thereof as relates to the subject of additional Professorships and adjunct Professors;
After giving the subject full consideration the committee are of opinion that this Board should now establish a Professorship of Modern Languages including German, French, and Spanish with a salary of $2,000; also a Professorship of Rhetoric & Oratory with a like salary of $2,000 and an assistant Professorship of the Ancient Languages with a salary of $1,500.
By the committee
Benj. H. Hill
Chairman.
The same committee further reported in part on the subject of restoring to the two Literary Societies a representation in the exercises of commencement week, and the report was by consent laid on the table, and subsequently taken up, amended, & adopted and is as follows:
The committee on Laws & Discipline to which was referred a resolution instructing the committee to inquire and report upon the propriety and mode of giving to the Literary Societies of the University, a representation in the exercises of commencement have had the same under consideration and beg leave to submit the following report.
The committee are will convinced of the propriety of granting, or rather of restoring, to the Literary Societies, the right of representation as suggested by the resolution. The committee

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recommend that the Board adopt the following rules as methods of securing to the Societies this representation in the exercises of commencement hereafter.
1.
In the election of Junior Orators, the Faculty shall determine the number to be chosen as heretofore. Of this number, at least two, and not exceeding three, (the number to be determined by the Faculty) shall be chosen by each of the Societies, Demosthenian and Phi-Kappa, the remaining orators shall be selected by the Faculty, and in making this selection, it is recommended that the Faculty shall be governed in the selection of a portion of the number by proficiency in composition.

2.
The number of those who shall participate in the Senior exercises shall also be fixed by the Faculty, and the Honors shall be conferred by the Faculty as heretofore. Of those remaining as Speakers, after the Honors have been conferred, at least two and not exceeding three (the number to be determined by the Faculty) shall be chosen by each of the said Literary Societies.

3.
It shall be the duty of the Chancellor to make known to each Society, the number of Junior and Senior Orators to be chosen by the Society, at the proper time preceeding each commencement.

4.
The programme of exercises shall designate the Speakers chosen by the respective Societies, the Speakers chosen for scholarship, and the speakers chosen for composition; and the Faculty shall have power to adopt all other rules necessary to carry these

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recommendations into effect. By the committee
Benj. H. Hill Chairman. The committees on Buildings & Apparatus, & on the Library reported and their reports were laid on the table for the present. The Board then took a recess to attend the Sophomore prize Declamation in the college chapel, after which they returned to the Library and resumed business.
The chairman of the Board announced, that Mr. Barnett, chairman of the Finance committee had been providentially called home by the sudden illness of his wife, and that he had appointed Mr. Cobb on that committee in Mr. Barnetts place.
Mr. Mitchell introduced the following Resolutions which were unanimously adopted;
Resolved,
That the two magnificent paintings The Interior of St. Peters Church at Rome, by George Cook; and The Last Supper, by Leonardo Da Vinci, an original copy by Creighoff, an Italian Artest; presented by Mr. Daniel Pratt of Alabama, selected from his own gallery at Prattville, are accepted by the Trustees of the University of Georgia with peculiar feelings of gratification; and the thanks of the Board are hereby most cordially expressed to him as a Patron of Art, and especially, as the Patron of that distinguished Southern Artist, Mr. George Cook, whose name in conexion [sic] with his Patrons shall be ever cherished by the University of Georgia.

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Resolved,
That this expression of our appreciation be engrossed upon parchment signed by the Chancellor, authenticated by the seal of the coporation, and transmitted to Mr. Pratt, Properly encased.
The Board then adjourned to meet in this room tomorrow morning at 9 OClock.
August 4, 1868. The Board met according to adjournment, when Messrs. Toombs, Seward, & Vason appeared and took their seats.
The Board was engaged in the discussion of additional professorships, when the hour arrived to repair to the chapel to attend the Junior exhibition, and for that purpose took a recess; after which the Board returned, and the committee of Finance reported and the Report laid on the table for the present.
On motion of Mr. Toombs, the following Resolution was adopted.
Resolved, that it is inexpedient to put up any additional buildings.
The committee on the University High School reported and the report was adopted and is as follows;
The committee on the University High School, to which was referred the communication of its President, Benj. T. Hunter esq. respectfully report;
This Institution has been conducted
(pge 235) during the past year with very great success, particularly so, in view of the embarrassments, to which it has been subjected from causes not likely again to occur, and therefore unnecessary to discuss. The number of students during the past year was one hundred and thirty two. The number in attendance since the 1st of January last, was one hundred, of which number eighty one were disabled soldiers.
It is due to President Hunter and his assistants to say that the committee has received gratifying evidence of their faithful and energetic discharge of duty.
The finances of the Institution have been so managed as to carry out in the fullest manner the object of the appropriation in the education of our disabled soldiers, and at the same time to make all required repairs and still leave an unexpended balance of $2,885.37.
The committee recommends that an expenditure of $150 for a Teachers Library, and the sum of $500, for a Library for the use of students be authorized from this balance; under the direction of the Chancellor and Prudential committee.
The committee notice with great pleasure the introduction of a printing press into the University High School and the part it is made to perform in the business of education and especially in facilitating written examinations, and duly appreciate the enterprise of President Hunter in this respect.
By the committee, H. Cobb, chairman.

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The board adjourned till to-morrow 9 Oclock.
August 5, 1868,
Board met according to adjournment.
The following resolution was adopted.
Resolved, that the degree of A.B. be conferred upon the thirty three members of the Senior class; the Degree of Civil Engineer upon five members of the Engineer School; and the Degree of Bachelor of Law upon the ten Law students, as recommended by the Chancellor in his annual communication.
The Degree of A.B. was also conferred upon Howell Cobb Jr. and Thomas A. Barrow, who had been interrupted by the War in the last year of their college course, and who by their course since the war had entitled themselves to the same.
The Degree of A.M. in course, was conferred upon Pope Barrow Esq. Col. Samuel Hall, Rev. D.B. Hamilton, W.C.C. Kennebrew.
The Honorary Degree of A.M. was conferred upon William B. Johnson Esq. of Mechlenburg county, Virginia.
The Degree of D.D. was conferred upon Rev. John Fulton, of Columbus, Georgia.
The Degree of LL.D. was conferred upon Hon. Eugenius A. Nisbet, of Macon, Georgia.
The Board took a recess to attend the commencement exercises in the college chapel where the usual exercises were performed, the Degrees conferred publicly by the Chancellor upon those present, and announced as to those absent in the order named above.

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The following is the order of exercises; Commencement Day, Aug. 5, 1868 Prayer
W.W. Thomas, P.K.S. (3rd Honor) Latin Salutatory.
R.A. Russell, D.S. Art and Science.
H.A. Whitman P.K.S. Danger of being feared. Charles DuBose P.K.S. Brutus at Phillipi. Julius L. Brown What shall he do with it?
A.H. Alfriend Freedom; Obedience its puniary Law.
P.W. Meldrim Union of thought & Action. Davenport Jackson P.K.S. Security is mortals chiefest enemy.
W.F. Parks The Emerald Isles of Life. Herbert P. Meyers, D.S. Measure of Mans True Greatness. John E. Donalson P.K.S. Moral of Prussian Policy.
L.E. LeConte D.S. The mind is its own place, and in itself, can a Heaven of Hell a Hell of Heaven.
W.L. Dennis, P.K.S. Search for truth. Georgia Bancroft D.S. (1st Honor) Valedictorly [sic] to Trustiest Faculty.
B.PHollis D.S. (1st Honor) Valedictory to Audience and Class. Speakers Excused
S.F. Wilson (2nd Honor D.S. Hamilton Yancey P.K.S.
A.H. Cox D.S.
W.B. Thomas
The Board returned to the Library at the Conclusion of a brilliant commencement, and it being past three OClock in the afternoon, and the members from a distance expressing a willingness to spend another day here, the Board adjourned to 9 OClock tomorrow.

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August 6th, 1868
The Board met according to adjournment.
The Report of the committee on Laws & Discipline in relation to a post-graduate course was adopted and is as follows;
The committee on Laws & Discipline, to which was referred the report of the Chancellor, beg leave to submit the following report thereon.
The committee recommend that the Faculty be authorized to establish a course of study for such as wish to extend their education beyond the present curriculum, said course to be entitled the Masters Course, and to be followed on satisfactory completion by the Degree of Master of Arts; and that the Faculty be also authorized to provide appropriate Honors and rewards for distinguished proficients in this course.
The committee also recommend that the present rule of conferring the Degree of Master of Arts in Graduates of Three Years standing, as a matter of course, be abolished, and that this degree shall hereafter be conferred as an Honorary Degree upon such graduates as by merit, and success, shew themselves entitled to the distinction.
By the committee Benj. H. Hill Chairman.

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The Report of the committee on the Law Department was taken up and adopted, and is as follows;
The committee on the Law Department of the University beg leave to submit the following;
They have had before them the report of W.L. Mitchell Esq. giving details relative to the condition and wants of that Department & are gratified to learn that it is in successful operation. The students of the Law receive for one year the daily instructions of Mr. Mitchell, with lectures upon the Constitution of the United States by the Honorable B.H. Hill, on Medical Jurisprudence by Dr. R.D. Moore, and a course of lectures on Metaphysical Philosophy as applied to practical thought & illustrative of the mental processes of the Lawyer, by Dr. Lipscomb, the Chancellor of the University
The Department has the use, but not the ownership of a small, well-selected Library embracing standard Elementary Books & Reports, With the very able Instructors engaged in this Department, and with access by the Students, to the University Library, committee are satisfied, that it affords advantages no where else to be had in the State. The course of Instruction embraces a thorough knowledge of the elements of the Science of the Law, and of the practical forms & Philosophy of Pleadings, of Constitutional Law, of Medical Jurisprudence & of Logical Processes & Mental Discipline. Most cordially, therefore, do the committee commend this Department to the patronage of the country. It is scarcely possible to overestimate its importance. No class of the people exert a more decided influence upon all the interests of Society than the members of the Legal Profession. The discussions of the Court Room instruct the People, and give tone & direction to popular

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sentiment. Connected ,as Legal Science is, with Constitutional Law, the practical working of Government, and the Administration of Justice, the advocate, the forensic orator, & the Judge, must, each and all, necessarily exert vast influence, and especially, in free government, either for good or evil. This influence depends greatly upon the learning & virtue of the profession; & there, in their turn, depend greatly upon the dignity & elevation of the Profession; and these again must depend in no small degree upon the facilities and thoroughness of preparation for admission to the Bar. These things being conceded, it is obviously desirable to raise this Department of the University to the highest practicable grade.
The regular course of study divided into two terms of 4 months each causes one half of the Law Classes to terminate their course in the middle of the collegiate year, and it is suggested, that the Degree of Bachelor of Law be conferred upon such at that period in like manner as upon those whose year ends at commencement, in order, that they may be admitted to the Bar, without delay, if they so desire. This seems to the committee, obviously proper.
It is further suggested, that an additional Degree, to be known as Doctor of Jurisprudence be now created by the Board of Trustees, and conferred upon students, who have been successful in the practice, for the term of seven years, and have maintained good moral characters; and

(pge 241)
also upon other members of the Georgia Bar, whose eminence and character may entitle them to the Honor. The committee, without giving reasons approve the foregoing suggestion taken from the report and recommend its adoption by the Board.
Whilst as before stated the Library is equal to the necessary wants of the Department, yet its enlargement is desirable. The Library of the late distinguished Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Joseph Henry Lumpkin, consisting of twelve (1200) hundred volumns is offered to the Department at the price of two dollars a volume. It is well selected & cheap & the committee recommend its purchase, whenever the University is in funds, and when sufficient means upon any plan, can be raised for that purpose.
The valuable services of Dr. Moore are bestowed gratuitously, and he is entitled to the thanks and grateful commendation of the Board of Trustees.
The committee beg leave to present the following Resolutions.
Resolved, That the Degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence be, and is hereby added to the Degrees of the University of Georgia, and that it be conferred by the Board of Trustees upon all the graduates of the Law Department of the University, who have successfully practised [sic] the Law for the term of Seven Years and maintained an honorable and virtuous character; and upon such other members of the Profession, as in the judgment of the Board, may be considered, on account of character & position worthy of the honor.
Resolved, That the Chancellor of the

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University, with the approval of the Prudential committee, be and is hereby authorized to confer the Degree of Bachelor of Law, upon those Law students whose course may terminate in the middle of the collegiate year, at the period aforesaid, as fully and in all respects, as if the same were conferred at commencement.
Resolved, That the thanks of the Board are hereby tendered to Dr. R.D. Moore, for his most valuable and gratuitous lectures to the students of the Law Department, upon Medical Jurisprudence.
E.A.
Nisbet

H.
Cobb

R.
Toombs

Wm Dougherty Committee.
The Report of the Finance committee was next taken up and adopted, and is as follows;
The committee on Finance submit the following report, viz.
Estimated Income for the next year.
From State Tr. Tuition Rent Terrell EndowmentCash Balance on hand $ 4,000.00 15,000.00 1,300.00 1,370.00 9,048.09 $30,718.09
(pge 243)

Estimated Expenditures for same period.
Salaries $15,500
Advertising & Printing 600
Stationary 100
Insurance 360
Music 100
Medals 50
Servants 250
Post Office 60
Periodicals & Library 200
Chemicals 150
Apparatus already ordered 600

Fencing to do 7 improvements now going on 800 Repairs 500 $19,270 Leaving estimated balance of 11,448.09 $30,718.09
The Finance committee submit for the information of the Board the following estimate of annual income, which may be relied upon for years to come; From the State 8,000
Tuition 15,000 Rent 1,300 Terrell Endowment 1,370.00
$25,670 And as the Institution is now constituted, it will require an annual expenditure as
follows:
(pge 244)
For salaries $15,500
Advertising & Printing 600
Stationary 100
Insurance 500
Music 100
Medals 50
Servants 250
Post Office 60
Periodicals & Library 200
Chemicals 50
Repairs 500
Incidentals 100

$18,010
Leaving an annual estimated balance of 7,660 $25,670 In the event that the salary of the Chancellor is increased $300-and each of the Professors $200-it would require an additional sum of $1,500to be added to the above
expenditure and reduce the extimated balance at the end of each collegiate year to the sum of $5,160.
There estimates, it will be perceived, do not include the salaries of additional Professors, if such should be created, but the same can readily [be] included in the estimates when they are created
The foregoing estimate of $5,160 Is the amount upon which the Board can rely for the enlargement of the Faculty & other necessary annual expenses.
Looking to permanent improvements now demanded by the necessities of the Institution, the committee report that the cash balance of $9,048.09

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is subject to a deduction of $4,000 Which has been paid by the state in advance for the last six months of the year 1868, which leaves the sum of $5,0489.09 as the reliable cash balance, subject to expenses already
incurred of about $1,500.00 And which will leave an estimated balance of 3,548.09 to be applied to permanent improvements & apparatus. This balance of $3,548.09 may be increased by such portion of the above sum of 5,160.00 as may not be appropriated to other objects of the University.
The permanent improvements which have been recommended together with the apparatus needed may be estimated as follows; though the committee have not been furnished with detailed statements.
For enlargement of the Chapel & provision for a Philosophical Hall under it $5,000 For apparatus & other things in the three Departments of Nat. Phil, Math, & Chem 2,155 Making an aggregate for these objects of $7,155 all which is respectfully submitted by the committee
H. Cobb Chairman.
The Report of the committee on the Library was next taken up, and adopted, and is as follows;
The committee on the Library report it in its usual admirable condition. In the present financial condition of the University, it is not deemed advisable to recommend any additions thereto. But they feel impressed with the importance of providing Departmental

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books, necessary to successful teaching. Hence it is respectfully recommended that the sums of books, maps, or illustrative prints, or models for the Civil Engineering Department; Sixty dollars for books in the Classical Department; one hundred fifty dollars for books in the Department of Natural Philosophy & Astronomy, one hundred dollars for books for chemical Department; Thirty dollars for books for Mathematical Department; thirty dollars for Geological & Chemical Journals; Thirty five dollars for Journals of common interest & advantage to both Departments of Natural Philosophy & Chemistry; and fifteen dollars for the four English Reviews and Blackboards Magazine. These sums to be expended under the direction of the respective Professors of said Departments. A part of the sum thus recommended was appropriated at our last annual meeting, but not expended for want of money in the Treasury.
Your committee think that a Librarian should be appointed as a Salary not exceeding five hundred dollars, whenever our finances will justify the expenditure-and that this Librarian be also charged with the general superintendence of the Buildings and grounds. To this end, the time of election of such Librarian, & the person to be selected should be referred to the Prudential committee.
Respectfully submitted on behalf of the committee.
Benj. C. Yancey
Chairman.

(pge 247)
The Report of the committee on Buildings and Apparatus was taken up and adopted, and is as follows;
The committee on Buildings and apparatus beg leave to report, that they have examined the buildings belonging to the University. The Professors Houses and all buildings attached thereto seem to be in a fair state of preservation and will require but little to keep them so during the coming year. The college buildings are both in perfect order furnishing comfortable and neat homes for the students. All other buildings are well cared for, the chapel has been in every part repaired and looks better than even when new, the old and uncomfortable benches have been replaced by neat and comfortable chairs. The lecture rooms in this building where we are assembled are almost perfect, but not enough for rooms for the Law Department, one, in which the Library now being collected can be placed.
Your committee think that a few alterations involving no great cost, will supply this want. The room fitted up for the Professors of Natural Philosophy & Astronomy has proven to be too small for the class and for the apparatus. The old Philosophical Hall as before reported has the room in the upper story handsomely fitted up for the lectures and experiments of the Professors of Agricultural Chemistry. The room on the first floor which was originally intended for the chemical Department is utterly unfit and consequently useless. Your committee having come to this

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conclusion earnestly recommend that this room be immediately fitted up after the most approved plan for the reception of the apparatus and facilities for successful experiment.
This Board, if not now satisfied, will be before they adjourn, that the chapel must be enlarged, and in doing this, it has been suggested, that, with very little additional cost, a large and altogether suitable room can be made for the reception of Philosophical & Astronomical apparatus and a most perfect lecture room for the Professors, with capacity sufficient to accommodate any class which we may have.
The fencing around the campus is complete as far as was thought necessary by the Prudential committee and gives to the whole a look of finish and neatness never before noticed.
One other subject in connexion [sic] with these wants your committee deem of grave importance and that is the supply of water sufficient for the use of the Professors & students. For many years and at considerable cost, we made efforts to sink wells, but signally failed, we also entered into negotiations to bore for water, but found this too costly; the only feasible plan that now presents itself to your committee and one that can not involve any great amount of outlay is to dig cisterns which can be filled in the winter and with proper management, pure & healthy water may be furnished the whole summer.

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By reference to the report last year you will find that an appropriation was made for various pieces of apparatus thereon named for the use of the Professors of Mathematics & Civil Engineering amounting to $240. There Instruments were not purchased for want of funds, but will now be ordered, in addition to these, your committee recommend the following; A Theodolite, at a cost of $260-A Quadrant $75amounting in all for this Department to ($565) five hundred and sixty five dollars.
For the Department of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, last year, the sum of $600 was appropriated, this we recommend for repairs of valuable but now useless insturments, and the purchase of new ones for the illustration of Acoustics, electricity, Hydrostatics, and Heat, the sum of $500making the amount for this Department $1,100.
In the Chemical Department the fires and great want is the room above alluded to, and your committee recommend that appropriation of $500 which is deemed sufficient to accomplish this greatly desired object. The amount appropriated last year $115. We recommend again, and add thereto the sum of $400 for the purchase of some new apparatus and necessary Chemicals to be used in the teaching of the next class, making for this Department the sum of $1,015.
Your committee do not think it necessary to enter into an argument to convince this enlightened Board that all of the Above appropriations asked for, are reasonable and very necessary for the proper teaching of the young men presenting themselves to this University.
By the committee.
R.D. Moore Chairman.

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Mr. Nisbit presented the following Resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, That the Prudential committee publish from time to time in the gazettes of the State, but without cost such parts of the Report and proceedings of the Board as they may deem calculated to advance the interests of the University and enlighten the public mind as to the advantages of education enjoyed here.
On motion the increase of salaries was post poned indefinitely.
On motion of Mr. Cobb, the following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That when this Board adjourned it will adjourn to meet in the city of Macon on Wednesday after the first Monday in December next, to elect the Two Professors, one of Modern Languages and the other of Rhetoric & Oratory together with an assistant Professor of Ancient Languages.
Mr. Hill introduced the following resolution, which was adipted:
Resolved, That a special standing committee of thee be appointed by the president of the Board, the committee to consist of one from the Faculty, one from the resident Trustees and one from the non-resident members of the Board, to whom shall be referred all applications for Honorary Degrees for examination, and report to each annual meeting of the Board.
The committee are: Rev. Andw Lipscomb, Chancellor-Hon. Benj. H. Hill, of Athens. Hon. Howell Cobb, of Macon.

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Mr. Hill submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, That the Faculty be authorized and instructed to make such arrangements for the administration of the discipline of the University as will relieve the Chancellor as far as possible from all detail duties in that respect.
Mr. Dougherty submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, That Messrs Toombs, Mitchell and Lewis be a committee to adjust a plan to cheapen education in this Institution, and present the same to the meeting of the Board at Macon in December next.
The Board then adjourned to meet in the city of Macon on Wednesday after the first Monday in December next at 10:00 Oclock in the fore-noon of that day at such place in said city as the President Trustees of Macon may provide.
Wm. Mitchell Wilson Lumpkin
Secy.
President.
________________________
(pge 252) Macon, December 8th, 1868

The Board of Trustees met according to adjournment. There were in attendance,
Col. John Billups, the oldest Trustee present in the chair, and Messrs Barrow
Joel A. Billups, Lewis
Barnett, Mitchell
Hall Moore
Harris Nisbet
Hill Toombs Jas. Jackson, Yancey.
The meeting was opened with prayer by Judge Nisbet.
The following communication from the Chancellor, Rev. Andrew A. Lipscomb,
D.D. Was read: University of Georgia. Dec. 7th 1868 To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, Gentlemen,
The Number of students matriculated in the different departments of the University during the Fall Term of the present session, is two hundred & eighty. Of these there have been in Franklin College, in Elecitve course, in Law School, and in Engineer School 166 And in the University High School 114
Total 280 The exercises of the University have gone on with order and regularity. The usual curriculum of study has been carried out,

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and the students have generally given close and earnest attention to their prescribed duties. The intellectual and moral tone of the University is good, the conduct of the student has been exemplary, and at no time, since my connection with the University have I been more gratified with the current results of our operations.
The funds, which you appropriated at your last session for the purchase of Books and Instruments, and for repairs, have been partly expended, and the University has been improved in its working facilities by these additions to its Library and Apparatus.
The organization of the High School is now complete. Its schedule of studies and the provisions for teaching, are fully adopted to preparatory training for the University, and under the judicious management of President Hunter, I feel assured that it will become a very important auxiliary to the success of our general scheme of education.
I send herewith the applications and testimonials that have come into my hands from the candidates for the Professorships which you are about to fill, and I will only add, that the Faculty of Franklin College will proceed at once to arrange the new schedule of study to suit the enlarged operations of the University. You may therefore expect that so far as we can possibly effect this object, in the midst of the annual session,

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we shall have the University by the opening of the ensuing term, Jany. 15, 1859, in the position contemplated by the enlargement of its Faculty of instruction.
Since the last meeting of the Board of Trustees, one of your number, Genl. Howell Cobb has departed this life. I cannot add to your appreciation of his character and worth by the expression of my admiration of his talents and usefulness; nor could I intensify your sense of the loss which the University and the State have sustained in the death of so disinterested a citizen and so noble a man. But you will permit me to mingle my profound regret with yours, that he should have followed so soon in the footsteps of those who have gone from our midst, and that the void which their removal created, should have been so suddenly and so painfully widened.
I have the honor, Gentlemen. To remain, Your obedient Servant Andrew A. Lipscomb
Chanc.
On motion of Mr. Barnett, the following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, that a Professorship of History and Political Science be now established, and a Professor elected at once to fill the same with a salary of two thousand dollars.
The Board then proceeded to balot for a Professor of History & Political Science,

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and upon counting out the votes, it appeared, that Hon. Alexander H. Stephens was unanimously elected. In making this election it was stated to the Board that Mr. Stephens could not in all probability commence his duties prior to the next commencement of the College, still the Board requests that he enter upon the duties of this important chair at as early a day as may be practicable for him to do so.
Judge Nisbit presented a memorial from the Physicians of Macon looking to the establishment of a Medical Department located in the city of Macon, which memorial was referred to a committee consisting of Messrs, Nisbet, Moore, & Barnett, to report to the next annual meeting of the Board.
The testimonials of candidates for the Professorship of Belles Lettres & oratory were then read and the balot cast, when it appeared that Maj. Charles Morris was duly elected.
The Board met according to adjournment, when the testimonials of candidates for the chair of Modern Languages were read and the balot cast, and it appeared that Mr.
M.J. Smeade was duly elected. On motion of Wm. L. Mitchell, the election of Assistant Professor of Ancient
Languages was post-poned to the annual meeting of the Board. Genl. Toombs moved that a committee of three appointed

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to prepare a memorial of Genl. Howell Cobb, and report the same to the Board at its next commencement; which being agreed to, the chair appoonted Messrs. Toombs, Nisbet, and Hill that committee.
Mr. Mason M. Davis presented for the cabinet of the University an African Relic found on the Ship Wanderer, and Messrs Nisbit & Jackson were appointed a committee to express the thanks of the Board to Mr. Davis.
Mr. Toombs, chairman of the committee on cheap living at the University made a verbal report to the effect that, while it is very desirable to cheapen the expenses of education in relation to board, and that this can be done in Athens by such students as will agree to club together, or otherwise put up with plain fare at an expense of $10 to $15 per month, yet the Board have no desire to control the style of living which may be demanded for others by their parents. The whole subject was in his motion referred to the Prudential committee.
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Mr. Yancey moved to fill the Vacancy of Trustee occasioned by the death of Mr. Cobb, which motion was postponed to the annual meeting.
Mr. Barnett submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted;
Whereas it is necessary to arrange for the expansion of the University long contemplated and now realized by the election of several new Professors, and to adjust the order of exercises and duties of the Professors to some extent, Resolved
That a committee of three be appointed to report to the Board at its meeting in August next, on the proper methods of placing the Institution on a strict University footing based on the independence of the general Departments, or otherwise, as they may deem advisable.
Resolved, That in the meanwhile, the Chancellor be empowered to make any such adjustments and changes as may be necessary and desirable. The chair appointed Messrs Barnett, Mitchell, & Yancey the committee contemplated in the foregoing resolution. The Board then adjourned sine die Wilson Lumpkin Wm. L Mitchell Secy. President.

(pge 258) (pge 259)
University of Georgia July 30 1869 At a stated meeting of the Board of trustees was this day begun in the college Library and at this and subsequent meetings, the following members attended, to wit.
Messrs. Barrow
John Billups, Miller Yancey
Joel A. Billups Mitchell Cobb.
Crawford Moore
Harris Nisbet
Hill Thomas
Jas. Jackson Toombs
Lewis Hall
Beckwith and Vason

Col John Billups, Senior Trustee, called the Board to order in terms of the charter, a quorum being in attendance, and the meeting was opened with prayer by the Chancellor, Rev. Andw. A. Lipscomb, D.D.
The roll was called, the minutes of the annual meeting at Athens and of the adjourned meeting in Macon were read.
The Chancellor then read his annual communication, which is as follows:
University of Georgia.
July 28, 1869 To the Board of Trustees,
Gentlemen: The catalogue of the 67 annual session

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(1867-68), presented a matriculation of Three Hundred and Forty seven students. The present year the matriculates number Three Hundred and Forty Four, showing that the numerical strength of the University has but slightly varied during the last two sessions.
I am happy to say that the general order and discipline of the Institution have maintained their elevated tone. The manly character of our young men; the cordial harmony between them and the Faculty; the mutuality of spirit and effort in fulfilling the purposes of educational life; and that wise sensitiveness to the dignity of the University which allies its moral and intellectual welfare with individual honor and virtue, have not declined, but in some respects have increased.
Our present mode of government aims to form in the students habits of self control by means of self-respect to remove all possible occasions of conflicting feelings between the Professors and themselves; to confine, their relations as far as practicable to the general intercourse of teacher and pupil; and above all to develop the sentiment that they are parties pledged by their position to one common interest and bound by

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right instructs to be co-workers for the same ends. So far as I can see this sentiment of earnest co-operation is fast becoming an organic principle of the University. If it continue to grow, some of the more serious difficulties in the way of expanding the functions of the University will cease to exist.
The theory of University-life is founded on the opinion that students are competent in ordinary matters of conduct to take care of themselves.
Supposably they have reached an age when their intellects and sensibilities are sufficiently matured to give them the capacity of self-direction, and hence to set aside the necessity for minute supervision on the part of the University officers.
On no other theory can a University be sustained. Watchfulness, constant and unvaried watchfulness, it must exercise over the moral spirit of its members, removing or abating with its utmost energy all the tributary circumstances of temptation, and evincing both a kind and resolute guardianship over the habits of daily life. Beyond this, it should not seek to go in systematic discipline.
Its real power lies in its influence rather than in its authority. Its best results are attained more indirectly

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than directly; and hence under such an administrative economy, the better qualities of Professors and students are cultivated. All my experience here has satisfied me that the only true scheme of government for a University, is the one which avoids needless interference with the student, which aims to form his character more by calling out his good qualities than by antagonizing the bad; and builds up its strength by, intellectual and moral considerations, instead of those selfish inducements that pertain to government as such, and which in University-Life, most generally operate to enhance the very evils they are intended to check.
On this subject the exactions of public opinion have been unjust and unreasonable. A standard of judgment proper to an Academy or a mere college has been rigorously applied to officers of a University; while the young men who have been treated as mere boys have practically adopted the estimate set upon them and their virtues. But I am happy to observe in this respect a growing change in the public mind.
Salutary as this change is in its action on students, its effect in elevating University-Teaching to the

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dignity of a Profession is yet more apparent.
You have a basis now laid for the expansion of the University.
Whatever power you possess in your Faculty can be economized in its proper work and not frittered away in tasks as irrelevant as they are revolting. A thorough fraternity of intellect exists throughout the Institution; a love of letters, a reciprocal support in all the functional distributions of our work, that cannot be too highly commended. This is the true basis of expansion.
The present year has witnessed a marked advance in the methods of instruction adopted in the University and in the quality of culture attained by the students.
The average grade of scholarship is higher. I can see also a very perceptible improvement in the promptitude and energetic dexterity, which the students show in the uses of their minds and in the application of their knowledge. Much of this has been accomplished by the education of the pen. The greatest, because the surest of instruments to make an accurate and finished thinker no less than a precise and reliable scholar. Without abating the

(pge 264)
tutorial modes of examination and trainingwe have found room to enlarge our system of lectures, particularly in the Junior and Senior years, and after a close scrutiny of the results, I am quite satisfied that the University has gained much both in the general activity of intellect and in the available products of scholarship by the adoption of these methods. Fortunately for the interests of the University, the valuable services of Dr. Smead and Professor Morris were added to those of my former colleagues at a most opportune time; and it affords me very sincere pleasure to inform you that nothing has been wanting on the part of these gentlemen that skill could furnish or enthusiasm supply in aiding me to execute your plans to give the University a high range and a broader compass. I very greatly regret that ill health compelled the Hon. A.H. Stephens to suspend his acceptance of the Professorship of History and Political Science. To which you called him last December.
Nothing could have given us greater strength with the public or been personally and officially more agreeable to myself than the presence in our midst of the mature wisdom and large experience

(pge 265)
of this distinguished statesman, and I cannot but hope that his health will yet allow him to take this position.
Amid these encouragements we are still cramped by old restrictions by traditional usages, by fixed boundaries that once acted as limitary lines but now operate as formidable barriers to an intelligent and healthy progress.
The remnants of the old monastic scheme of education yet exists, a scheme that denies the name of an educated gentleman to one who happens to prefer the Modern Languages or the Physical Sciences to the Ancient Classics, a scheme that sets up an aristocracy of pretensions to culture.
If any system of education could be entitled to this honor of exclusiveness, let the Classics have it in full and undisputed measure.
But it is just because no system can rightfully claim this monopoly of application that a valid and unanswerable objection lies against the overweening self-assertion of its excellence. So far as language is concerned, its disciplinary virtues by means of formulated style, its exactness, its liberal force, its emotional grandeur; so far as expressional energy imparts the vigor of tersness amplitude of compass and richness of

(pge 266)
illustrative imagery or far as wood can assume the stern precision of sculpture or the flowing grace of painting; it were an idle search to look elsewhere than to those models which have stood the sifting tests of twenty centuries of different civilizations and won the admiration as well as the judgment of mind under every aspect of national culture.
Let classical learning have this proud distinction; it is nothing more than its authenticated and confirmed merit. But the universe of thought is surely too large in its scope, too complex in its structure and too multiplied in its variety to permit a diference to one form of education at the expense of all others. The practical effect of the argument in behalf of classical culture, has been to depreciate other modes of education. Scores of young men are led to these studies by the simple fiction of respectability. Like other fashions and their tyrannical prescriptions, the virtue of conformity is the motive that determines the conduct. Aside from this, the natural result of this preponderation in favor of ancient learning is to overcrowd the Professions, and as an inevitable sequence to lower the

(pge 267)
dignity of honest and manly work in other departments of human activity.
I cannot help think, that our Southern Universities have fallen into a most unfortunate error on this subject. The error does not lie in their estimate of classical instruction, but in their neglect to give sufficient degree of prominence to other branches of education. As might have been expected nine tenths of Southern graduates who rise too any distinction, acquire it in the walks of professional life. A defective, onesided civilization is the legitimate offspring of such a system, a drain of all the fountains to feed a few great streams, a parched soil to secure an excess of fertility in certain favored locations. Let any man picture to himself what would be the effect if we had the same amount of skilled talent and effective genius in other pursuits that we can show in the learned professions, and then let him ask for the reason of this mortifying anomaly, and I do not see how he can escape the conclusion, that the tone of opinion in our Universities is largely responsible for this unnatural state of things.

(pge 268?)
You have already made an admirable beginning in this matter. What I now urge is to continue your efforts with renewed zeal in this direction. Whether public opinion promptly sustains you or not, whether you meet with a compensating patronage or not, do your whole duty as guardian of a noble interest, by forming a proper sentiment on the subject of educated mind, and by offering all possible advantages to young men who may wish to enter on any recognized sphere of exertion. This policy is clearly demanded by the course of events in our midst. Such an impulse as is now communicated to the industrial energies of Georgia, ought certainly to be reciprocated by its cultivated mind, and through the organic machinery of the University? Nothing strike a traveler more forcibly that the fact that labor is quite as much a matter of mind as of muscle. Nor can it escape his attention that both classes of society, the intellectual and the mechanical, are greatly helped each in its own vocation by this interaction the one upon the other. A community of labor is essential to the idea of labor as a providential system. Differ it must in its degrees of importance and dignity some being thinkers and others mere artisans, but that oneness which

(pge 269)
marks its spirit and end, and renders it an achieving power for moral and social utility, ought to be regarded as the fundamental condition of its existence. On this account, I urge that you should never be satisfied until you put the University in living connection with the industrial economy of Georgia. I should consider it a memorable era in the annals of our University when her Alumni could be seen in the work-shops, foundries and factories, mines and laboratories of our State. Anything really good will bear this sort of popularization. Neither our Science nor Art will be the worse, but much the better for this widening of its sympathetic range. Best of all we shall be acting after the example of Him who sent his elect messengers to the highways and hedges and compelled the neglected and destitute to come into his temple.
To put the University on the ground contemplated we shall need some further changes. Within the last few months this subject has been thoroughly investigated by the Faculty and you will find them ready to co-operate with you in adapting the Institution to the necessities of the day. A complete University system is not deemed practicable, But we can advantageously modify

(pge 270)
the present arrangements so as to accomplish certain ends which we think highly desirable. At present, I recommend you to authorize such changes as will secure greater prominence to the Modern Languages; reduce the close curriculum of Franklin College to two years (Freshman & Sophomore) allow the elective principle to apply to all students who are qualified by age and attainments to enter the Junior class; permit each Professor to control his own Department and to issue his certificate to each student on the completion of his course of study and lastly, make Graduation dependent not on time, but on the complete mastery of subjects incorporated into the schedule of instruction.
From this statement you perceive that the collegiate idea of discipline and training is retained during the more elementary period of student-life. Subjected to close and immediate supervision in studies prescribed for him, the student is prepared for a position in which the freedom of choice, the indulgence of personal tastes, and the activity of those individual impulses which give a decided bent to talent and genius, and constitute the very nourishment of their vital essence, will demonstrate themselves under a restraint

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proceeding from an educated judgment. The plan therefore presupposes that he has been fitted to exercise his own will by an apprenticeship under an established routine. Viewing this scheme in all its bearings, I can conceive of nothing better suited to our existing stage of culture, since it provides for the contingencies of each course, authoritative in the one and unrestricted in the other. Nor can I doubt but that it will act quite as favorably on the more elementary years of an enforced curriculum as on the higher interests of education.
If, then, you consent to these modifications, I am persuaded that the University will acquire a power of self-development not possible under present circumstances.
You will not consider me, I trust, as departing from the usages of propriety, if I call your attention to the report of the Board of Visitors, addressed to his Excy Gov. Bullock. The thorough investigation which these gentlemen made into the workings of the University; and the intelligent and earnest sympathy which they evinced with the cause of education entitle their views to much more than ordinary consideration. My object in presenting this report to your notice, is to suggest to you the importance of adopting some measures to interest

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the State in those branches of education for which we are unable to make special provision. I am not sure that the plan named, of identifying the local interests of prominent points in the State with the University, is feasible. But the schools themselves either in Athens or elsewhere, under the supervision of the University might be made of immense value to the State.
I ask an appropriation of $250.00 to pay the expenses of Prof. W. Leroy Broun and four members of the Senior class to Abingdon, Va. For purpose of making observations in connexion [sic] with the total eclipse of the sun, Aug. 7th ensuing. Abingdon is one of the most accessible points in the central line of the eclipse and hence will afford to the Professor of Astronomy and his party of assistants, the most desirable position for observing this most interesting phenomenon. So rarely is an opportunity offered to witness this great spectacle of nature that I feel exceedingly desirous for the University to participate in the scientific interest which this eclipse has awakened. Other Institutions are making large outlays of money and resorting to extensive preparation for this purpose; and I should extremely regret a failure on the part of our University at this time when

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many circumstances are conspiring in its favor, to improve so extraordinary an occasion by expressing its sympathy with the cause of science.
I submit herewith the Reports of Prof. Rutherford, Prof. Charbonnier, Prest. Hunter and Major Barnwell.
The facts contained in Prof. Cs report, will commend themselves to your notice as illustrative of the utility of this Department. Although the class has been small, yet the school is admirably managed and is building up a character as well as a reputation of decided merit. If you had the means to expend that would furnish the outfit for its work, it would soon acquire numerical strength, and attract the attention its excellence deserves.
The organization of the U.H. School under the care of Pres. Hunter has attained a most satisfactory degree of completeness and is fully answering the purpose for which it was established.
The loss of the Maimed Soldiers last April, subjected it to a test which it bore without any serious injury, its private patronage being ample to sustain a most creditable corps of Instructors.
My personal knowledge of this school of its disciplinary force, of its energetic life, of its high moral spirit, warrant me in speaking of its worth

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in terms of unqualified praise. It does what it promises to do, and this is testimony sufficient.
Your kindness in giving me the aid of Major Barnwells services in the Library and superintendence of the University Buildings, has proved a most timely help to me, personally as well as to the University. Apart from his fine qualities as an officer, his influence over the young men, the quiet vigilance which they catch from his intercourse I can but reckon among the most beneficial agencies of the Institution.
You will learn from his report on the Library, that it is being gradually enriched as well as enlarged by the addition of books; while you will see from the report on the Buildings and Campus, that they are in better condition than they have been for some years. If it be within the compass of your means, I advise an appropriation for the seating of Prof. Brouns new Lecture-Hall, and also for an additional room or rooms to the building occupied by him and Dr. Jones to be used for the accommodation of apparatus and the preparation of experiments.
The exercises of the Law School have been faithfully continued

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during the present year by W.L. Mitchell Esqr. and Dr. Moore. Three of its students graduated on the close of the Term, last February.
I append a list of the gentlemen recommended by the Faculty for graduation in the several Departments.
For the Degree of A.B.
A.R. Adams R.T. Hull
F.M. Allen S. Jordan
R.T. Barksdale H.H. Linton Saml Barnett T.R. Lyon Benj. Burrow A.T. McIntyre
T.W. Baxter H.G. McIntyre
W.S. Bean OE. Mitchell
W.E. Bird S.S. Murdoch
W.B. Bounell E.M. Murphy
N.J. Bussey I.C. McMichael
H.H. Cabaniss W.H. Parsons
C.A.
Crane I.D. Rambo

C.A.
Collier J.L. Robertson

J.M. Edwards F.I. Spain
G.H.Estes E. Spear
W.M. Finley B.G. Swanson
W.H.
Fish H.B. Van Epps

M.
Guyton J.W. Walters

W.R. Hammond J.T. White
E.S. Harrison J.T. Winibish
B.H.Hill H.W. Woodruff
O.C. Hill A.C. Young
A.C. Howze. For the Degree of Bachelor of Science.
T.W. Young

(pge 276)
For the Degree of Bachelor of Law
P.W. Meldrim For the Degree of Civil Engineer:
W.W. Thomas.
Taking a general survey of the interests of the University one point has given me no small solicitude, viz. the expense of living to the students. You will remember that at your last session you discussed this subject. I have labored during the year to carry out several plans to cheapen the cost of boarding, but I find it difficult to regulate. Though the expense is not higher than in most Universities in other States yet it is higher than in similar Institutions, in our state, which leads to a discrimination against us and often deprives us of students. I shall be happy to confer with the committee, to whom this matter was entrusted and some views may possibly be presented worthy of consideration.
Turning to another topic that has occupied by thoughts I beg to suggest whether some plan cannot be devised to bring the society of the Alumni into closer and more practical connexion [sic] with the affairs of the University. My object at present is simply to call your attention to the fact, that this influence which forms such a vast power in certain

(pge 277)
leading Universities, is dormant among us, and hence, it seems to me, that as you have been so successful in organizing your other agencies of activity, it would be exceedingly wise in you to deliberate on this subject.
Reviewing the past year, I find much to re-assure my confidence in the growth and prosperity of the University. I never had less to awaken my apprehensions and never more to excite my hope and trust. On no occasion have I addressed you when the signs of expanding vigor and widening usefulness for the University have appeared so cheering and so inspiriting.
In conclusion I have a task to perform which is the saddest of my life. I tender you to-day, my resignation of the office of Chancellor of the University to take effect, August, 1870.
This step is not hastily taken, I have given it the thoughtful deliberation of many months and I have reached the conclusion I now announce, against my wishes and my feelings. The state of my health, the condition of my private affairs, the need of rest, require this at my hands.
Believing as I do that the University is entering on a new stage of progress and that its near future is full of quickening inspirations for its intellect and action, I have an equally

(pge 278)
profound conviction that I have not the physical energy, nor am I otherwise in a suitable condition to meet the responsibilities that press on my office. This is the sole ground of my determination.
I am now about to enter on the tenth year of my official relations; and if I am permitted by the grace of Providence to finish these ten years, I shall retire from this great trust, thankful above all things that I have been allowed to serve under your direction the interests of this University.
I have the honor to remain
Gentlemen
Your Obedient Servant
Andw A. Lipscomb
Chancellor
Mr. Harris, at the close of the reading, and the Chancellor having retired, promptly moved the appointment of a committee of conference with the Chancellor to induce him to withdraw his notice of intention to resign at the close of the next collegiate year in August 1870, which motion was agreed to, and Messrs. Harris, Nisbet, & Lewis were appointed that committee.
Dr. Moore also at once submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved, that the Chancellors Salary be made $3,000 per annum.

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And in the same line of policy Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved, That one fourt [sic] of the piece of land lying near the University High School, and bought in part by the Chancellor to protect our interests there, be taken off his hands and paid for our of the balance of funds now in the treasury and a proper deed executed therefore by the Chancellor.
On Motion of Judge Nisbet,
The committee on the Medical Department was continued.
The Board then adjourned to 9 OClock to-morrow morning.
July 31, 1869
The Board met according to adjournment, when Messrs. Vason & Hall appeared and took their seats. The committee to confer with the Chancellor reported that (he) had withdrawn his resignation.
The Standing committees were announced as follows:
1.
Committee on Laws & Discipline; Messrs Hill, Nisbet, & Harris.

2.
Committee on Finance: Messrs Thomas, Barrow, & Crawford.

3.
Committee on Buildings & Apparatus; Messrs. Moore, Yancey, & Crawford.

4.
Committee on Library Messrs. Lewis, Jackson, & Crawford.

5.
Committee on University High School. Messrs. Yancey, Barrow, Harris, & Vason.

6.
Committee on Law Department. Messrs. Jackson, J.A. Billups, Crawford, and Hall.

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The following resolution was adopted.
Resolved,
That the chairman be authorized to add to any of the foregoing committees, any members of the Board who may hereafter arrive.
Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That it be the duty of the Chancellor to furnish his annual communication with the Documents accompanying it, consisting of the Report of the Several Departments, of the University, to be printed and sent to each member of the Board at least two weeks before its annual meeting;, the printing & distribution to be under the direction of the Secretary & Treasurer of the Board.
The applications of Prof. Morris & Broun for payment of salary to be counted from the beginning of the calendar year, & not from the time they entered upon their duties respectively were laid on the table.
On motion of Judge Nisbet.
The Board proceeded to the election of the Adjunct Professor of Ancient Languages when it appeared that Mr. Francis A. Lipscomb was duly elected.
The following resolution was adopted,
Resolved, That in all our processions to the college chapel, the members of the Board fall into ranks of two and take position according to the date of their election.
The Board then adjourned to Monday morning at 9 Oclock, with the understanding

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that in attending the commencement sermon expected from Rev. Jno. N. Waddell D.D. Chancellor of the University of Mississippi, each member will be seated upon the stage.
Monday morning August 2, 1869
The Board met according to adjournment.
The Chair appointed the committee of Invitation to seat distinguished strangers upon the stage, to wit. Messrs. Moore & J.A. Billups.
The following resolution was adopted,
Resolved,
That the Chairman & Secretary of this Board be instructed to make such arrangements with the civil authorities, as in their judgment shall secure the preservation of order in the chapel and on the adjacent grounds on Wednesday next, and that the usual amount from the Treasury is hereby appropriated for the purpose.
On motion of Judge Nisbet, The Board agreed to go into the election of two trustees to fill the vacancies occasioned by the death of Genl. Howell Cobb and Genl. Armstrong.
Upon counting the vote it appeared that Bishop Beckwith & Lamar Cobb Esq. were duly elected.
The Report of the committee on re-organization was read by the chairman, and is as follows.
The committee to which was referred the subject of reporting upon the reorganization of the Departments of study

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in the University, beg leave to submit the following report:
I. The committee recommend that the curriculum of study for the four years embracing Freshmen, Sophomore, Junior and Senior classes remain the same as now prescribed, with class graduation for each year.
II. That there be now established a curriculum of study embracing a period of three years, to be known as Junior, Middlw, & Senior Classes, the studies of which shall correspond in every respect with the studies of the Sophomore, Junior & Senior classes, except that the Modern Languages of Germany, France, and Spain shall be substituted for Latin and Greek; that German and French be taught during the two years allotted to the Junior and Middle classes, and Spanish during the Senior year; as set forth by the Professor of Modern Languages in the paper herewith submitted, marked A.
III. That the preparation and age for admission into the Freshman class remain unchanged, and for an advanced standing, the studies of the class proposed to be entered.[??]
IV.
That the preparation and age for admission to the first class of the three years shall be the same as that prescribed for admission into the Sophomore class, except that Latin and Greek may be omitted.

V.
That the classes be graduated in the three years course at the end of each year, in the same manner as is now done in the four years course, and at the end of the

(pge 281b) (282?)
course upon the recommendation of the Faculty, each student found worthy shall receive the Degree of Bachelor of Science and a Diploma for the same in the English Language, in the same manner and upon the same terms as students receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts and a diploma for the same in the Latin Language.
VI. That students of the three years course shall be equally entitled to the honors of the college upon commencement and other public occasions as those of the four years course according to merit to be decided by the Faculty.
VII. That the Faculty shall so arrange the hours of recitations and lectures, that a student of the four years course may have opportunity to study one or more of the Modern Languages as a fourth study; and a student of the three years course also may have opportunity to study Latin and Greek as a fourth study. Provided no student of either course shall be allowed this privilege unless he rank as a proficient in his class graduation, and obtain the consent of the Faculty to undertake the fourth study; and provided farther, that when a student undertakes a fourth study as herein provided it shall be estimated in making up his average and ascertaining his standing in the class, and he shall not be at liberty to abandon such fourth recitation or study till the end of the year and his graduation in that class, and any such abandonment shall be a bar to his class graduation if occurring during the last year of his course.
VIII. That an Elective course be, and the same is hereby established; for admission into which the candidate must be at least seventeen years old and of good moral character, and he may select his three studies from both or either of the aforesaid courses of four and three years, or pursue such other studies as the Faculty may be able to provide and at the close of his connection with the Institution shall be entitled to a certificate setting forth his degree of advancement in learning. All of which is respectfully submitted.
Wm. L. Mitchell
B.C. Yancey, Committee.
A. Junior Class.
French, First Term Ottos Conversational French Grammar. Mad. Cottires Elizabeth begun.
German, First term--Wormans Elementary German Grammar; Ch. Von Schmidts Weihnachtsabend begun.
French, Second Term--Ottos Grammar continued, Elizabeth, Ladreyts Modern French Reader, Paul et Virginie.
German, Second Term--Worman;s Elementary Grammar Continued, reading Weihnachsabend, Andersons Bilderbuch Ahne Bulder.
Middle class French, First term--Ottos Grammar continued, Bolmans French verbs, Reading mad. De Staels Allemagne
(pge 283)
German, First Term--Wormans complete German Grammar, Reading Schiller s Lied wonder Glocke. French, Second Term--Translations into French with Grammar, Reading Moliere, Racine, and Voltaires Plays. German, Second Term--Wormans Grammar combined, r s readings Dee
Jungpan Von Chleans, or Wilhelm Tell by Scheller, and Jphigenia auf Tauris by Goethe.
Senior Class. [Spanish], First Term--Velasquez Spanish Grammar, reading Cubis Spanish Translation, begun. [Spanish], Second term--Velasquez Grammar continued, reading Cubis Sp. Translation, Le Sages Gil Blas.
At the conclusion of reading the report, the same was laid on the table and ordered to be printed for the use of the members. The Board then took a recess to attend the Sophomore Declamation, after which
the Board re-assembled in the Library. The following resolution was adopted, Resolved, That so muc of the Chancellors annual communication as asks on
appropriation of $250.00 for the expenses of Prof. Broun and his four assistants from the Senior class to observe the approaching eclipse of the sun in Tennessee, be adopted, and that said sum be and the same is hereby appropriated for that purpose.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, the Board adopted the following resolution. Resolved that the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, the Degree of Bachelor of Law, and the Degree of Bachelor of Science and

(pge 284)
the degree of Civil Engineer be conferred upon each of the young gentlemen
recommended by the Chancellor in annual Report and whose names are therein recorded. The Degree of Bachelor of Law was conferred by the Chancellor with the approval of the Prudential committee upon Messrs J.E. Doanlson, A.B. J.R. McCluskey,
A.B. and B. Whitfield in the month of February last according to the scheme for the Law Department adopted in 1868.
Judge Nisbet was added to the special standing committee of three to examine and report upon all applications for honorary degrees to each annual meeting of the Board, in place of Genl. Howell Cobb deceased.
The Board then adjourned till after the Speaking this afternoon. Upon reassembling Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution, which was agreed to: Resolved,
That Prof. William Henry Waddell have leave of absence for the ensuing Fall term of the college to visit Europe with a view to the advancement of classical literature.
The Presiding officer then announced the committee to invite distinguished strangers to seats on the stage during commencement week, to wit, Messrs Moore and
J.A. Billups. The following resoltuion was adopted, Resolved,
That the chairman and secretary of this Board be instructed to make such

(pge 285)
arrangements with the Civil authorities, as in their judgment shall seem the most preservative of order in the chappel and on the adjacent grounds on Wednesday next, and that the usual amount form the Treasury is hereby appropriated for that purpose.
The Board then adjourned to nine OClock to-morrow morning.
August 3rd, 1869
The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Lamar Cobb appeared & took his seat. He was added to the committee on the Law Department.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution which was agreed to:
Resolved,
That the action of the Board at its last annual meeting touching the conferring of the Degree of Master of Arts upon graduates of three years standing be so constructed as not to apply to classes graduating prior to this time.
A communication from C.F. McCay was read and referred to the committee on the Library together with important suggestions of Judge Nisbet.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution which was discussed & adopted.
Resolved,
That it be made the duty of the Faculty to change the public prayers and recitations now held before breakfast to such other time in the morning as they

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may deem best, as well with a view to the physical health and comfort of the Professors and Students, as to the effect it may have in enabling students to board in the country at any convenient distance from the college grounds, provided, there shall be three daily recitations for each class.
Messrs. Lewis & Jackson dissented from this resolution, and requested their dissent entered upon the minutes.
The committee on Finance reported, and the report was laid on the table to enable the Board to attend the Junior exhibition, for which purpose the Board took a recess, and after speaking returned to the Library, and took up the said report on Finance which was adopted and is as follows:
The committee on Finance report,
That they have examined the Treasurers account, which under a standing order of the Board had been audited by a committee from the Prudential committee, that they find the same correct and the balance of $5,838.47 in the hands of the Treasurer to be correctly stated.
The committee submit the following estimates of Income and expenditures for the next fiscal year: Income.
From State Treasurer
Tuition
Rent
Terrell Endowment
Cash Balance

(pge 287?)
Expenditures. Advertising & Printing Stationary & Postage Insurance Music & Medals Hire of servants Periodicals & Library Wood & Incidentals Repairs Salaries

leaving a balance of
$ 4,000 13,000 1,276
1,370 6,838.47 $26,483.47
$ 600 160 360
150
200 100 300

1,000 20,375 $23,245 3,238.47
This balance of $3,238.47 is subject to a deduction for expenses already incurred and appropriations already made at this session of the
board of about 1,758.77 which deducted from the above sum of $3,238.47 leaves a balance of 1,469.70 to which should be added for past due cupons in
the hands of the Treasurer not collected and which
therefore do not appear in his reports, 685.00 which added to the above sum of $1,479.70 makes the estimated cash balance at the end of
the next fiscal year $2,164.70 The committee submit for the information of the Board the following estimate of Income.
Estimated Annual Income From the State $ 8,000
Tuition 13,000
Rents 1,300
Terrell Endowment 1,370
$23,670

As the University is now organized, there will be required, an annual

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Expenditure as follows:
For Sundry Items as stated in the estimate of expenditures for the next fiscal year
and which are believed to be indispensible $ 2,870
For Salaries 22,000
$ 24,870
showing a deficit of 1,200

In these estimates of expenditures for the next fiscal year and of annual expenditures, your committee have not included the salary of the Professor of History & Political Science.
Should the Professor elect [to] enter upon the duties of his appointment, the item of salaries would be increased $2,000 thereby reducing the cash balance in the estimates for the next fiscal year to $164.70 and increasing the estimated deficit in the annual income to $3,200 instead of $1,200 as above stated.
The provable deficit can only be met by a considerable increase in the number of students & of income from tuition. Whilst the enlarged organization and usefulness of the University as well as the returning prosperity of the country might justify the assumption that there would be a large increase of income from this source, yet as this is contingent and uncertain, your committee have deemed it prudent in their estimates not to rely upon any increase and in view of this uncertainty & the foregoing estimates, earnestly recommend that no appropriations other than those herein stated and which are believed to be indispensable, be made.

(pge 289)
Respectfully submitted
S. Thomas,
MJ. Crawford, Committee.
Mr. Crawford submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, that a committee of three be appointed of the Resident Board, whose duty it shall be to examine into the Treasurers Report, and ascertain the exact amount of Income and expenditures of the current fiscal year, shewing what deficit, if any, or cash balance may be on hand, together with the extimates for the next ensuing year, and that they do report on the same the first day of each annual meeting.
The committee are
Messrs. Thomas,
Moore, &
Yancey.
Excuses were made for the absence of Messrs, Brown, Barnett, Cooper, & Cougherty
The following resolution was submitted by Mr. Harris and adopted:
Resolved, That the standing committees be appointed a year in advance, the chairman of each of which committees shall be a Trustee resident in Athens, whose duty it shall be to collect all facts germain to the business of his committee and have the same ready in writing on the first day of the annual session.

(pge 290)
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution which was agreed to:
Resolved, That the Chancellor be authorized to confer the Degree of Master of Arts on graduates of this University of three years standing, in course, who may apply for the same.
The Board then took a recess till after the speaking to-night, and then reassembled in the Library and took up the Report on Re-organization, and proceeded to its consideration, but adjourned, before coming to a vote, to nine Oclock to-morrow morning.
August 4, 1869 The Board met according to adjournment, and the Chairman announced the annual standing committees, viz.
1.
On Laws and Discipline, Messrs. Hill, Toombs, Nisbet, Harris, & Pierce.

2.
On Finance, Messrs. Thomas, Grown, Cooper, Miller, & Vason.

3.
On Buildings & Apparatus. Messrs. Moore, H.R. Jackson, Seward, Beckwith, & Jenkins.

4.
On Library. Messrs. Yancey, Barnett, Hall, Crawford, & Lumpkin.

5.
On University High School. Messrs. Barrow, Lewis, Dougherty, Yancey, & Hall.

6.
On the Law Department. Messrs Cobb, Jas. Jackson, J.A. Billups, Toombs and Crawford.

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The committee to recommend proper persons for Honorary Degrees made their report, which was agreed to and is as follows:
The committee on Honorary Degrees beg leave to submit the following report:
Resolved, That the Honorary Degree of Master of Arts be and the same is hereby conferred upon Col. H.D. Capers of Eatonton, Georgia.
That the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Divinity be and the same is hereby conferred upon Rev. S.B. Sutherland of the State of Maryland; and
That the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Law be and the same is hereby conferred upon D. Louis A. Dugas and D. Lewis D. Ford.
B.H.Hill Andw A. Lipscomb.
E.A. Nisbet Committee.
The committee on Building & apparatus made their report which was agreed to & is as follows:
The committee to whom was refered the college buildings and apparatus beg leave to report:
That they have had the same under consideration and that the Inspectors report covers the entire college buildings and we make no additional recommendations.
The apparatus with the new and complete instruments added by your appropriations of the last year is now in perfect working order,

(pge 292)
except the old compass and level attached which should be exchanged for a new one when the funds will authorize it.
For the ensuing year, the compass being the only instrument out of order, your committee deem no appropriation necessary.
R.D. Moore Chairman.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell the Degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon
Jno. T. Glenn of Atlanta, whose college course was cut short by the war, but whose acquirements authorize this college honor.
Bishop Beckwith appeared & took his seat. Mr. Toombs also appeared in his place.
The Board resumed the subject of re-organization as reported by the special committee, before a vote was taken repaired to the chapel to attend the exercises of commencement, during which the Degrees were conferred by the Chancellor as herein before recorded, including as Bachelors of Law the names of the Three graduated by the Prudential committee, viz. J.E. Donalson, J.B. McCluskey, & B. Whitfield, and in addition thereto the Degree of Master of Arts was conferred in course upon the following graduates of the University of three years standing,
Mr. Carlton Hillyer
Samuel Limpkin,
R.B. Gunby,
A.L. Hull
F.A. Lipscomb,
Jas. McClusky,
T.A. Murray.

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At the close of the Commencement exercises, the Board returned to the Library and adjourned to four OClock this after-noon.
August 4, 1869 4 P.M.
The Board met according to adjournment.
The committee on the University High School reported, and their report was agreed to and is as follows:
Honorable Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia:
Your committee to whom was referred the report of the President of the High School are gratified at the eminent success which its able & working Faculty have achieved in the past year.
The recent exhibition attended by most of the committee reflected great credit upon both teachers and pupils.
The system of written examination is practiced [sic] . The printed questions submitted to us indicate thorough examinations. The Board are doubtless aware that these papers are printed on a Press within the school. And to encourage this useful enterprise, as German and French have been introduced among the studies, your Committee would recommend an appropriation of fifty dollars for the purchase of German and Greek type.
The needed repairs to the building have been executed in a neat and substantial manner. The fencing is decapitated, but in view of more important

(pge 294)
demands upon the Treasury at this time no appropriation is suggested.
The Committee commend the zeal, devotion, and ability of President Hunter and Faculty.
B.C. Yancey,
D.C. Barrow,
I.L. Harris,
D.A.Vakn
Committee The Board resumed the consideration of the Report on Re-organization and the debate being closed, on the motion to adopt the Report the vote upon a call of the Ayes & Nays stood 6 Ayes and & Nays, so the motion to adopt the Report was lost.
On motion of Mr. Jas. Jackson, the Chancellors recommendation on reorganization was adopted, leaving the details to be settled by the Faculty. Upon a call of the Yeas & Nays on agreeing to Mr. Jas. Jacksons motion, the vote stood Yeas 8, Nays 7 so, the motion was agreed to.
The Committee on Library submitted their Report which was amended and adopted as amended and is as follows:
The Committee have considered the communication of Prof. F. McCay late of the University proposing to allow this Board to draw on him to the extent of one thousand dollars from time to time for binding of such matter or printed documents illustrating the History of the South in the late struggle with the North as the Board may from time to time acquise [sic.].

(pge 295)
They recommend the adoption of the resolution at the close of this Report thanking Mr. McCay for his liberality.
Resolved, that they convey to Mr. McCay the thanks of the Board for his valuable suggestion and his liberal offer.
The Books in the Library should be arranged by a letter or figure on the shelf on which any book is place, that a visotr could take up a catalogue and readily find any volumn in the Library. No appropriation is asked for it, and it is suggested whether the Librarian can not by a step at a time gradually so perfect the catalogue and the arrangement of the Books.
The Committee to whom was referred the Report of the Librarian, that the sum of one Hundred dollars or so much there of as may be necessary to pay for the annual number of Periodicals to be selected by the Chancellor and Faculty reply.
In the present condition of the Library the Committee do not recommend the purchase of any additional works or volumns except as may be deemed absolutely necessary to the labor of the Faculty, the expenditure to be limited within the amount above specified.
In consideration of donations we recommend the adoption of the following resolution
Resolved, That the thanks of the Board are due Mr. Barney Hill, Rev. D.M.H. Henderson, Col. Wm. LeRoy Brown, & Prof. M.J. Smead; also to the Department of the Interior

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at Washington D.C. & to the Executive Department of the State Government, for valuable contributions of volumns in Literature, Poetry, Science, etc. to this Library.
Resolved, that this resolution be published in the papers of this place and copies furnished to the Donors above named
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, that it be made the duty of the Professor having charge of the Terrell Professorship of Agriculture to give at least one months notice to the Public of the time when he will commence his course of lectures and the length of time to be occupied in the course, and that said course is free to the Public.
On motion of Dr. Mine, the following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That Students in the Law Department be permitted to study the Modern Language and take the Belles Lettres course free of tuition therefore, provided they are graduates of this Institution, or have been two years members of it.
Mr. Toombs in behalf of the Committee appointed at Macon to prepare a memorial of Genl. Howell Cobb and report at this meeting submitted the following report which was agreed to:

(pge 297)
The Committee to which was referred the duty of submitting some appropriate action to this Board concerning the death of Honorable Howell Cobb beg leave to report:
Since our last regular meeting, Death has caused us in common with his family, his friends, Society, and his country, to weep at the tomb of one of our most illustrious (m.s.) fellow citizens, and one of our ablest, most devoted and learnest [sic] co-laborers in the great work of promoting Art, Science, and Education through the instrumentality of the University of Georgia. Howell Cobb, and orator, stateman, patriot, and Christran is no more. His life was devoted to the service of his country, the main tennance of the rights and happiness of his fellow citizens, to the cause of virtue and the pursuit (m.s.) of truth.
His education was begun and finished in the Schools of this University. In the very threshhold at the grammar school and University he exhibited (m.s.) there moral, social, and intellectual characteristics which was much confidence, admiration, and affection, and gave him such premmence [sic] throughout his too brief yet brilliant career.
By his compreheniveness (sic.) of intellect, his accurate and solid pidment [judgment], his kind, generous, and noble heart, his almost miraculous quickness of perception, and his rapid execution, and rapid execution, and native [ ] stamped his as a leader of men. His whole life illustrated and reindicated (m.s.) his title to that distinction. Called by the people at an early age to represent them

(pge 298)
In the House of Representatives of the United States, a place amoung the most distinguished, controlling and trusted of his fellow members, was immediately assigned him without cause or question. The discriminating pidment [judgment} of his associates soon called him to the Chair of the House, where he won new and unsupassed [sic] honor, for his ability and fidelity in the discharge of the duties of the office. He then filled with unexcelled ability and faithfulness the office of Governor of Georgia and was again returned to Congress to win new claims to public gratitude. He was next called to fill one of the highest positions in the Cabinet of Merident [sic.] [President]. Buchanan. Equal to the performance of its high duties, clean in his office. His zeal, fidelity, and capacity placed his name high on the soll [sic] of his most distinguished predicissas [sic].
In the grand effort of the late Confederate States to assert and vindicate them Soverignty and to maintain the rights and liberties of the people he was conspicuous on the side of his country in the council and in the field. As President of the Convention,

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he aided he aided by his great talents and ripe experience to erect a new government, and he buckled in his sword to give permanence and security to the great work, still struggling in the cause of truth and right, still worshipping at the altar of patriotism.
When the fotune of war wrested (m.s.) the sword from his own hand and from the hands of the bave and chivalious [sic] champious [sic] of liberty and blacked the hopes of his country men, he yielded to inevitable fate with a spirit unbroken and a heart undaunted, without a stain in his honor, or a single unworthy concession to the power which over threw the right.
Death found him in the zenith of gloriery career standing at his part, a faithful sentinel (m.s.) ready amid the firey deluge of rage, hate, and curruption [sic] which was over whelming and consuming the best hopes of the liberty in his native land.
This is but a faint outline of the public career of the great man, whose loss we deplore. Amid all of these public cares, we all know his zeal, fidelity, and constancy in the discharge of every duty connected with his office of trustee. Here he was never wearied in well doing.
His private life commends him no loss of our love and affection than his public life to our gratitude and admiration. In all the relations of private life, as son,

(pge 300)
husband, father, relative, friend, citizen his daily walk from youth to the grave was a model of excellence, of affection and fidility, and sheds naught but joy, happiness, and blessing upon family, friends, and society.
Therefore your Committee would reccommend the adoption of the following resolutions.
Resolved, That it is the same [sic] of this Body that in the death of Howell Cobb, the State of Georgia has loss one of [the] most gifted and distinguished of his sons, the University one of its ablest and most useful members.
Resolved, that this Board tenders to the afflected family of our camented associate the expression of their sincere condolence [sic] and sympathy in the great afflection with which it has pleased God to visit them.
Resolved, That it is the desire of this Board as Representatives of the University to obtain permission to inscribe upon the monument to be erected to the memory of Howell Cobb their estimate of his character and virtues and that the proper steps to be taken to secure the permission of his family to carry out this wish.

(pge 300)
Resolved, That these resolutions be spread upon the records of this Board and that a copy of them be communicated by the

(pge 301)
Secretary to the widow of our deceased brother.
R. Tombs Chairman
Judge Nisbet moved that a committee of three be appointed to carry into effect the suggestion of the Report in relation to the inscription of our sentements upon the monument to Mr. Howell Cobb, requesting that he might not be put upon the Committee.
The Chair appointed as the Committee under this last motion, Messrs Mitchell, Toombs, and Harris.
The Board then adjourned sine die.
(m.s.) President Wm. L. Mitchell Secy.
(pge 302) (pge 303)
University of Georgia Library, July 29, 1870
The Board of Trustees met this day and commenced the annual stated meeting; present,
Messer. Barrow Moore
J. Billups Thomas
J.A. Billups Vason
Cobb Yancey
Harris
Mitchell

During the Session the following members appeared, at different days, to act,
Messer. Cooper, Dougherty, Lewis, Hill, Barnett, James Jackson. Col John Billups, the oldest Trustee present was called to the Chair, the roll called, and prayer made by Rev. Andrew A. Lipscomb D.D. Chancellor of the University.
The minutes of the last annual meeting was read, when the Chancellor read his annual communication, which is as follows:
University of Georgia
July 28, 1870 To the Board of Trustees of the University, Gentlemen:
I am happy to report the continued prosperity of the University. The loss of the disabled soldiers as a class, and comparative scarcity of many have operated against us but despite these circumstances, we have had 292 students in attendance.
(pge 304) Last year (1868-69), we had matriculates 344 and the year previous (1867-68) matriculates 347, but if we deduct from these numbers one hundred as disabled soldiers sho from the nature of their relation to the Institution, could only be regarded as transient (m.s.) patronage, we find a gain of about fifty students over the two proceeding sessions (m.s.) Lacking at this fact as indicating the more permanent elements of success, I think that the past year may be safety assumed as a test year of our strength. In this light I am warranted in congratulating you on success, which has attended, during this session, your administration of the affairs of the University.
A minutes examination of the different Departments of the University, confirms this impression. The Law School, the Engineer School, the School of Modern Languages have all advanced upon these former patronage; while the High School, which numbered last year 146 pupils including some 80 disabled Soldiers, has had this year 95 pupils exclusive of these men.
The internal state of the university as to its order, its teaching and study, its methodic discipline, has been encouraging. I do not mean by this, that we have had nothing to disturb the quiet of University life, a [sic] that we have approximated to the excellence which should ever be our aim in such a work as we are doing.
(pge 305)
Such expectations are insational [sic] in any business, and most of all in such a task as rest upon our hands. This, however, I can say, that the present system is acting year by year with increasing power on the student as a student, and by this means, operating more effectively through more study (m.s.) and indirectly on him as a man. So far as our recent scheme of organization has demonstrated any thing, this result is beyond doubt, viz, Students are better as Students, more respectful towards Professors, more manly toward one another, and more inclined to exercise a firm and truthful self-government. Not only has the average attendance on class recitations and lectures been higher the past session than any I have observed, but the average grade of actual scholarship has also been higher. And form other things bearing on the same conclusion, these two facts are sufficient to show the steady and substantial (m.s.) progress which the University is now making.
The devotion of the Professors to their Departments, has been constant and earnest, while their success has been equal to their exertions. Under the existing system, then labor has been much increased. It is greatly above what was formerly required but as to quality and quantity, and so far as I am able to judge, these gentlemen are more valuable than ever to the University. Under your instructions of the last annual session of the Board, we proceeded as far as practicable to re-organize the working schedules of the University and inaugurate (m.s.) such other measures as we deemed advisable in the execution of your plans. Provisions was immediately made for a broader curriculum; for larger freedom of choice in the pursuit of courses of study; and for a fuller blending

(pge 306)
of the various interests of education in unity of receprocal [sic] action. The results more especially in Modern Languages and in the Engineer School have been very favorable. There have been eleven (11) students in the Engineer School, and sixty five (65) in the Modern Languages (French 54 and German 11) besides seventeen (17) in the Law Department, part of the last number having been connected with the Academic Curriculum. As the system is further enlarged and better understood, I feel confident that it will prove a most wise and beneficent adaptation to the State no less than to the University. By combining with it certain features of the Old College System such as enforced attendance on daily recitations and other forms of Students responsibility, the chief dangers of the University scheme of organization have been avoided.
The influence of Professors on Student, the action of Student on student; the common amenability to a loftier ideal standard of cultivated mind, the very marked increase of sympathy between all the Departments; the introduction of a living unity instead of a mechanical union, the removal of many occasions of petty strife and yet more the presence of a generous spirit of thought, that persuade every portion of the University, are vigus [sic] unmistakable that we are moving in the true direction. I am more than ever satisfied, that a scheme of education band in influence rather than in mere authority, is the wiser and the better for young men. It is wiser and better for the present student if he has attained a proper age, and it is wiser and better for the future man; and hence I feel a graving hope that they may be able under the guidance of Providence to eradicate (m.s.) some of these evils
(pge 309)
which have abated the general utility of Education and too often made it a waste of time, money and talent.
Such advantages as these have scarcely been secured in a period so short as four years and in the midst of circumstances not friendly to the pursuit of learning. What has been done by your fore-thought, by your anticipation of the drift of events; and more particularly by your clear comprehension of public taste and public wants. But the present vantage-ground which you occupy is simply incidental to a partial development of a great scheme, and I, therefore, beg you, not to conclude that your work is any thing more than work barely begun. You cannot maintain the University where it now stands. It must advance, or it will inevitably languish.
If this language is more emphatic than I generally use, I trust, you will remember that it is the language of four years observation, experience, and study. Language less earnest, would not harm the confidence I cherish in your so gracious judgment and Christian philanthsophy [sic], nor would it represent the feelings of my own heart, which your kindness has inspired with a profound anxiety to render you the highest possible service. Pardon me then, If I say, that at this juncture in our history you have a task on your hands greater than at any previous period. The present organization of the best American University proceeds upon the principle that special schools constitute the educational power of the age. This remark is much more true of Foreign Universities than of this country but I prefer for obvious reasons to make the argument on the basis of American facts. Every year, education is becoming less general and more specific. So is everything in our civilization. So are industry,

(pge 308)
trade, and commerce; and hence, the main reason for this marked change in education is because the age has forced the change. I find in an examination of several catalogues of leading Institutions, ranging from five hundred to more than one thousand students that their main strength as to numbers and to income so far as income is derived from tuition fees, is due to these special schools that give either a professional or a practical education, and more over I have been struck with the fact that the University of Georgia, on a basis of thee hundred men, is affording a liberal education, known as the Academic course in Arts and Sciences, to as many students as other Universities who have more than double our patronage. To verify the points just made, I remark that the statistics on this subject show in nine colleges of the United States (four of which are Southern) there are 6017 students. Of this number 1968 persue the regular Academic course, being less than one third of the whole. The follwoing Table gives a more delanted view viz: This Table shows that two thirds of Students in these Institutions adopt the scientific and professional courses.
Total No. Of Students Academic Students
1870
Yale College 736 518
Harvard 1107 563
Univ. of Michigan 1112 332
Columbia College N.Y. 776 129
Cornell University 563 Arts & Philosophy 89
Washington College 344 In Greek 114
Richmond College 160 51

1869 Kentucky University 767 Arts 168
University of Virginia 442 Greek 104
6017 1968

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And I remark farther, that in 1840 when the population of the U.S. was 14,582,029 the rates of regular students was 1 to about 1500; in 1860, population 27,000 ration 1 to 2012; in 1869, population of 36,000,000, ratio of 1 to 2546; thus proving that the ratio of Academic students to population has constantly decreased and that of late years the decrease has been most striking. (See Prof. Barnardss Report)
The inference from this state of facts is clear and conclusive. It shows that we have reached the maximum of development in an Academic curriculum. It shows too, that if we increase our numbers and revenue, it must be done by specific education. It shows, further-more that the growth of population enhances the ratio of professional and practical culture. If therefore, this is the line of advance in Modern Society; if growing States are necessitated to progress in this path and in no other, if this kind of education is vindicating its ability not only by a wider scope of activity but by a more remunerative (m.s.) records; if Institutions are most amply sustained that offer the largest diversity in their curriculum; it is obvious that our course of action is unequevecally [sic] indicated.
Intelligent men sometimes argue, that an increase of the population and wealth of Georgia, will necessarily tend to augment in a considerable degree the number of students on the old basis at our University. I cannot accept such as conclusion. I believe, that the tendency will be not to advance much beyond our present status as to matriculates and revenue. If our population were doubled and our wealth trebled, the demand would be proportionally greater for specific education. This demand is rare to come. Year, by year, it will press upon you with an urgency more intense and unyielding. As wealth

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increases, the ways of making money must also increase. New substances must be created, new energies employed, new articles introduced into trade. If no methods of originating capital could be devised, the boundary of production would soon be reached. The same inflexible necessity fastens itself on population. As it progresses, the modes of diversifying and distributing active life, must likewise develope. Because of these laws education will become more and more a fact of daily bread.
If then we would avail ourselves of the immense power that is spring into activity in Georgia, if we would make ready for the imprecidented [sic] growth which I cannot doubt is even now withing immediate reach; I cannot impress on you too strongly the instant importance of concentrating your most thoughtful and energetic efforts on the special school which bear on the practical resources of the State. Among the means at our disposal that may be employed to build up a commanding University, to give it character, to give it revenue, to give it the hearts and the hands of our people, I know of nothing comparable with these Department.
I understand the difficulty in our way. It is simply the want of money. But I think, that the surest way to get money, is to feel deeply and keenly the want of it.
Take, for instance, our Engineer School. It has strong claims on your fostering solicitude. Taking all cirstances [sic] into account, it has had a success as signal as gratifying. Without models, with few appliances, lacking adequate want for its accommodation, it has steadily risen in public favor by its demonstrated usefulness.

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I recommend, therefore, that provision be made for its enlargement; and while I urge on your consideration its specific claim, I beg to be understood as making the argument in behalf of every Department that bears on the practical service of the State.
Permit me at this point to remark, that these Departments of the University which are connected most closely with a liberal and elegant culture and which indicate (m.s.) their utility on the highest growth of taste and scholarship, are worthy to be commended to your warmest approbation. The part year they have made an advance on any excellence I have yet witnessed. Results as positive, as varied, and as high, as have come under my observation, these gentlemen have obtained in the labors of this session. Feeling then that these Departments have already accomplished a great end and are certain to go forward in enlarging and perfecting their spheres of exertion, I have been the more anxious for your attention to be turned to the special schools, in which, success depends so much on the out-fit of the Schools themselves. Here, the outlay of money is a main consideration. The best men have to be furnished with apparatus and fixtures for complete effectiveness. The paramount need of the University is an increase of its working capital. Without it, no further expansion is possible. You had better borrow the money than have the present opportunity to advance the University. Every dollar you expend in the way pointed out, will add much more than its own worth to values already created. The risk is not in this expenditure; the risk is altogether on the side of no expenditure. But I do not apprehend that it is necessary to borrow money for these purposes. We have dormant (m.s.) capital, that may be put to active use. As this matter, however,

(pge 312)
has passed under the review of one of your Committees, I leave it to their better judgment.
I present herewith a plan from the Faculty for a new arrangement of the order of Commencement Exercises. Acting under your instructions relative to the re-organization of the University, the Faculty have felt that there was need for a change in this respect, and the more so, as the system of individual graduation will soon take the place of class graduation. The Faculty have discussed this subject patiently and fully; and I am sure that their suggestions will receive due consideration at your hands.
I submit also the Report of President Hunter of the University High School. Its success continues to be gratifying; and as a proof of this, I need only mention the fact, that 24 pupils will be transferred this Term from this Department to the University classes in higher Departments. I call your attention to Prest. Hunters suggestion as to the boarding of young men; and trust, that the rule alluded to will be changed as it work, badly.
The other annual Report accompany this communication and will give you the requisite into the affairs of the Institution. I am particularly gratified to mention the prosperity of the Law School and to bear witness to the wisdom and fidelity, with which its education is conducted.
You will remember that at your last meeting, you made an appropriation to pay the expense of Prof. Brown, Prof. Charbonnier, and the Honor Men, Class of 1868-69, as an Astronomical party to visit Bristol, Tenn. and make observations on the Suns eclipse. In his official Report, Prof. Brown states, that through the interest manifested in this expedition by the Governor, there was secured for the party free passage from Atlanta to Bistol and return;

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hence appropriation made by the Trustees was more than sufficient to pay all necessary expenses. This act of liberality on your part has been highly appreciated; it was money most judiciously expended and it has had a most favorable effect both on public sentiment and the sentiment of the University.
You are aware that for some months past, a paper entitled the Georgia Collegian has been published by students of the University. It has been so creditably managed and has proved so good an auxiliary to the University, that I should be much pleased to see some aid extended to it by the Trustees. While I should not advise any official connexion [sic] on the part of the University with it, or the assumption of any responsibility, I am quite satisfied that individually we may assist it to the decided advantage of our interest.
I will furnish you in due time with a list of Seniors who are candidates for degrees.
In conclusion, I beg to express the pleasure I have in renewal of personal and official intercourse with you and I utter my very sincere desire that your meeting may be as happy as occasion to you as it is to me. Now [sic] could I feel that I had spoken your hearts or my colleagues and my own, if I failed to embrace this occasion to acknowledge the watchful tenderness of Gods providence during the past year over the University and its welfare.
I have the honor, Gentlemen, to remain,
Your obedient servant
Andrew A. Lipscomb
Chancellor.

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The resident finance committee of three, Mr. Thomas, Chairman, made their report, which is as follows:
The undersigned committee appointed to examine the Treasurers account for the past fiscal year, report,
That they have discharged that duty and find that the receipts were $23,405.00, that the disbursements were $26,680.28 for which proper vouchers were shown, and that the cash balance now in hands of the Treasurer is $3,304.42 being a little over one half the amount of the cash balance in the hands of the Treasurer at the last annual exhibit.
The Committee in the further discharge of the duties of their appointment submit the following estimates of Income & Expenditures for the next fiscal year.
Income
From the State $ 4,000.00
From Tuition 13,000.00
From Rents 1,300.00
From Terrell Endowment 1,370.00
Add cash balance as above 3,304.42
Amount of estimated income $22,994.42
Expenditures
For Annual Catalog 170.00
For Advertizing (m.s.) 120.00
For Stationary & Postage 100.00
For Insurance 230.00
For Music 100.00
For Hire of servants 300.00
For Periodicals 100.00
For Repairs 200.00
For Miscellaneous Incidentals, etc. 350.00
For Salaries $20,800.00
22,470.00
________
Showing a balance of $ 504.42

The Committee submit for the information of the Board the

(pge 315)
following estimates of annual Income & Expenditures:
Estimated Annual Income
From the State $ 8,000.00
From Tuition 13,000.00
From Rents 1,300.00
From Terrell Endowment 1,3700.00
$23,670.00
Estimated Annual Expenditures
For secondary Items as stated in the estimate of expenditures for the next fiscal year and
which are deemed
Indispensible $ 1,6700.00
For Salaries 22,000.00 $23,670.00
From the foregoing estimates it will be seen that the estimate of annual expenditure had been reduced to the amount of the estimated annual income, and largely below the amount expended the past fiscal year this retrenchment in view of the rapid absorption of the handsome surplus in the Treasury, but a few years since, is imperative, if we would save the University from the embarrassment of debt. It should be remarked however in this connexion [sic] that the estimates of receipts from tution are a fraction lower than the amount actually received the past fiscal year, and that the receipts, from this, our principal source of supply, may be temporarily diminished during the present period of transition to the full plan and purposes of the University as well as from other courses which need not be enumerated.
Your Committee therefore earnestly recommend that the estimates for sundry items of miscellaneous and incidental expenditures shall not be exceeded, unless the receipts from tution shall exceed our estimates, in which event we recommend that the Prudential

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Committee be empowered to authorize such additional expenditures as shall be deemed proper.
Respectfully submitted.
S. Thomas (m.s.)
R.D. Moore
Ben. C. Yancey Com.
which Report was received and referred to the Committee on Finance.
The Committee on Buildings & Apparatus, D. Moore, Chairman, made their report, which was discussed, and laid (m.s.) over.
The Committee on the Library, Mr. Yancey, Chairman, made their report, which was adopted, and is as follows:
The Committee in the Library report it in annual good order. The number of bound volumns per catalogue 10,207. In reality there are not so many. Quite a number of volumns have been lost in a course of years. The Committee think it desirable to have a new catalogue made and reported to the Board of Trustees at our next annual meeting.
By statement of Librarian 1418 volumns have been issued to readers during the past official year; number now out for last Term 112 volumns. An unusual interest has been manifested by Students in reading; much of which may be attributed to the courteous manner and sympathetic interest exhibited by the Librarian, Maj. Barnwell, who is ever present to welcome them into the Library Room.
The Librarian says that he has been informed by a gentleman that within a few years he had seen a book belonging to the Library, in a Railroad Car, 200 miles from Athens, and not in the hands of a student; that he is sometimes solicited to lend Books to persons not students or residents or officially connected with the University; male and female.
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If it is the desire of the Board to restrict the circulation of this Library in such manner that the Librarian may better control and recover his issues of books, he would be glad for the Board to adopt some rule, under which he may gracefully decline to lend the Books. There are but few copies of histories, and the demands of the students cannot be met. Some few novels, worn out, considered no loss. From loss, some broken sets of books.
The Committee in view of the Financial condition of the University, think it unwise, however, to recommend any appropriation-save the $100 usually recommended by the Finance Committee for Periodicals.
The Committee recommend the adoption of the following resolutions:
That the Librarian be instructed to furnish to the Board, at the next annual meeting, a revised copy of the Catalogue with annotations showing the Books actually in the Library.
That the Librarian be instructed to allow no Book to be taken from the Room by any person who is not a student, or who is not officially connected with the University, or an Alumnus, or a resident of Athens.
Respectfully submitted,
Ben. C. Yancey
Chairman
Sam Barnett.
The Committee on the University High School, Mr. Barrow Chairman, made their Report, which was referred, and subsequently taken up, amended, and adopted, and is as follows:
The Committee appointed to enquire (m.s). into the condition of the University High School, have discharged, as well

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as they could, the duty assigned them, and respectfully ask leave to make the following report:
The property consists of sixteen acres of land inclosed by a plank fence. The building on the High School-building proper, kitchen and smoke house of stone, barn and two double framed servants houses of wood. The fencing is fast going to decay, and extensive repairs are even now required to place it in proper condition. The High School building contains 36 rooms, 1 Library room, 1 office, 1 dining room (m.s.) 1 chapel, 3 Lecture rooms and 29 bedrooms.
There is a Library of about 100 volumns belonging to the school.
The building is well preserved with the exception of the roof and the rooms in the upper story which are badly damaged by leakage from the roof. This roof is of slate, and your Committee are informed was badly put on and has leaked from the beginning. During the occupancy of the building by the Federal soldiers, the lead was torn up from the.gutterings, and many of the slates broken by trampling over them. Repeated efforts have been made under the direction of the President by different men to repair the roof, but with out success-and serious fears are entertained, the expense of a new covering will have to be undergone before it can be made water tight. It is indispensible that is should be thoroughly over hauled at an early day, as the leakage is doing great injury to the rooms on the upper floor. Much of the repairing done up to this time, both to buildings and fences has been paid for from the private purse of the President. This ought not so to be. The out buildings are all in good repair.
The property represents an expenditure of some

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$20,000 consequently deserves the careful attention of the Board, and is entitled to its fostering care. With the exception of the desks which are good, the furniture of the establishment is limited in quantity, and of the poorest quality. All the furniture of any value, through out the building is the private property of the President. Even the stoves to warm the dormitories belong to him.
The Corps of Instruction under the Chancellor, comprises the following gentlemen, all of five attainments and willing to do their duty.
Prest. Benj. T. Hunter, Math & Physical Science
A.L. Hull, Lat. Greek, Book-Keeping, Drawing
F.A. Lipscomb, French & German
The Institution is considered to be self-sustaining, and these gentlemen look to the tuition money for their compensation. There have been 95 students connected with the Institution during the past scholastic year; 70 is the highest number in attendance at any one time. There were 50 attending at the close of this term. Of the 95 in attendance during the year, 46 were from Athens, 40 from elsewhere. Of the 49 non-residents 22 were from the low country of Georgia and Florida, and of 7 from other States. All studied Mathematics, Spelling, Reading, and writing. 50 studied Latin, 15 Greek, 7 French, German, none. Your Committee are satisfied the instruction given is comprehensive and thorough and Students are admitted to classes in the University upon certificate of their fitness by the President. In view of this, it is recommended that students in High School be admitted to the same privileges as are accorded to students of the same grade in the University. The regulation of the Board requiring non-resident students in the Institute is productive of great embarrassment to the President, and it is thought, of ill-effect to the student.

(pge 319 a/b?)
Under the regulation as it now stands, to rid himself of a boarder, he is compelled to cut off a student from the school. A man may be a most offensive boarder, and at the same time, an unobjectionable student.
There is, at the High School, the property of the President, a small printing press, with fents of type English, German, French, and Greek. Beautiful specimens of printing done in most of these languages, and by students of the school, are to be seen there. It is thought to be a well advised move, that the Board should purchase a press suitable for printing octavo size, with necessary type, and direct that all printing required by the University be done by Students on this press, paying for it, at current rates, and further direct that the Art of Printing in all its usual branches be taught regularly to a class in the school.
The Art of Telegraphy is daily growing in importance, and attracting increased attention. It is suggested that a Battery be brought and located in the High School, and that a Telegraph line be established, connecting with Prof. Browns Lecture room, and that the Art of Telegraphy be regularly taught. A surveyors Compass, a chain is much needed in the School. All which is respectfully submitted.
David C. Barrow
Chairman
In view of the foregoing report, the following resolutions were adopted. Resolved, That all furniture in the Dormitories of the High School belonging to the University be sold by the President. Resolved, that the President of the University High School be authorized to grant such privileges of boarding

(319c)
out of the School, and studying in their rooms to such students as he may desire.
Resolved, That a Printing Press capable of printing octavo size be bought at a cost not exceeding two hundred dollars and placed in the High School that the printing of the University during the next fiscal year, be done thereon, and that the Art of Printing be regularly taught in the School.
Resolved, That from any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, a suitable Battery shall be bought by the Treasurer and placed in the High School, that a Telegraph line be established connecting this Battery with Prof. Browns Lecture room, and the Art of Telegraphy be taught.
The Chancellors communication was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.
The Board then adjourned to 10 oclock tomorrow morning.
Saturday July 30, 1870 The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Barnett appeared and was added to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.
D. Moore submitted the following resolution, which was adopted
Resolved, that the resolution and Rule requiring the Chairman of the Standing Committees to report on the first day of the Session of each annual meeting of the Board is not applicable from the nature of things to the Committee on Laws and Discipline, who look mainly to the annual Communication of the Chancellor to guide them in the subjects for deliberation and report.

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Excuses were made for the absences of the following members, to wit, Messers. Tombs, Beckworth, Crawford, Nibet, Miller, Prence, Hall, & Brown.
The Standing Committee on Finance called up their Report which was adopted and is as already recorded.
The Committee on Buildings and Apparatus called up their Report which was further discussed, amended, and adopted as follows:
The Committee on the College Buildings and Apparatus beg leave to report that they have discharged their duty by an inspection of all the buildings belonging to the University and find them in a good condition having during the past year undergone all the repairs necessary; therefore will need but a small appropriation for the ensuing year. The apparatus of the different departments are as reported last year. The condition of that of Natural Philosophy and Chemistry is such that must finally result in great injury to both, being packed in small places, here and there. It is known to each member of this Board, that both of these Departments require rooms for their sole use, and that there rooms should be so arranged, that each Instrument should have its place, and the student so placed, that at one glance he should be enabled to cover the whole area of observation. Now in order to do this, it becomes absolutely necessary, that such rooms should be provided. We therefore, earnestly recommend, that this Board at this meeting authorize the Prudential Committee to so alter and enlarge the old Philosophical Hall as to meet this demand. This can easily be done by adding to the East end two rooms for the reception of the Apparatus of each Chair, leaving the whole body of each floor for Lecture rooms. At this point, we are aware, that the question will arise, from whence will the means to do it come. Your Committee believes

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that this most desirable [ ] can be accomplished by the proceeds of the sale of certain lots belonging to the University; to wit, one in front of Mr. F.M. Lucas, the old town Spring lot in the rear of the Stores, and the upper town Spring lot. The objection, heretofore made, to the sale of the second named lot was, that it is a portion of the 37 acres constituting the College Campus. This is a mistake. From an accurate survey, you will perceive, that as the Campus was laid off, without this lot, there is over 38 acres. This Board, then, have the entire control, and can order the sale; and your Committee earnestly recommend the sale, and that the proceeds be appropriated to said purpose.
We also recommend both on the score of comfort and learning that coal be substituted in all the lecture rooms instead of wood.
We, therefore, recommend, that in the event of D. Lipscomb leaving his house, we remove D. Mell to the same, and alter D. Mells house into two first class lecture rooms. This can de done at a small cost by removing the inside wall and substituting iron pillars for supports.
And lastly, we recommend, that at an early day, application be made to the Ligislature for permission to sell a large portion of the Campus, by running a street from Jackson Street to Lumpkin Street, including for sale all the Professors Houses south of the new Street. This will put us in possession of some twenty five or thirty thousand dollars now yielding almost nothing. Upon an examination of the income from this property you will learn the fact, that in a series of years, it not only yields nothing, but becomes an expense. If therefore your Board should not concur in the view of your Committee in the sale of the property, could it not be well to abolish the rent and require
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occupant to keep in order his expenses?
There are many improvements which your Committee intended to recommend, but the present state of the finances will not authorize as to do so.
R.D. Moore Chairman
So much of the above Report as relates to the abolition (m.s.) of the rents of Professors Houses was laid on the table.
The Board adjourned to 4 oclock this afternoon at which hour it was again in session and adopted the following Resolutions introduced by Mr. Hill, chairman of the Committee and Laws and Descipline.
Resolved, The Board of Trustees have heard with much satisfaction the very able and cheering report of the Chancellor of the University; that the Board concur the value of special schools, and the further enlargement of the University and the multiplication of its Departments, and the Chancellor and Faculty are hereby authorized and requested to continue their labors in perfecting the system of an enlarged University, with all the scientific and professional schools to the fullest extent practicable.
Resolved, That the Chancellor be requested to prepare and report to the next meeting of this Board a complete system of independent DepartmentsThe Professors in each Department to be supported by the sale of tickets.
Mr. Thomas submitted the following resolution, Resolved, That the Prudential Committee be authorized to sell any portion of the Southern part of the 37 acres as they may deem but for the interest of the Institution, a majority of the resident Trustees concurringprovided the consent of the Legislature to the sale is obtainedand provided there is no prohibition in the deed conveying the land to the University; and it was adopted.
D.Moore submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, That a Committee of three be appointed to apply to the Legislature for leave to sell a portion of the Campus as contemplated in the Report of the Committee on Building and Apparatus.

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Under this Resolution, the Chair appointed Messers Vason, Brown, and Miller.
Messers. Moore and J.A. Billups were appointed on a Committee to invite distinguished strangers to seats on the platform.
The Chairman and Secretary were constituted a Committee to secure the Services of the Sheriff and his police force to preserve order during Commencement, and the necessary appropriation is hereby made to cover expenses of said services.
The Committee in the Law Department, Mr. Cobb, Chairman, made their Report, which was adopted, and is as follows: Athens, Georgia, July 1870 To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, Gentlemen,
Your Committee in the Law Department have the honor to report that this School is in a most flourishing and gratifying condition. The success of the most efficient instructors is fully exemplified by the increased number of students now in attendance. It would be most gratifying to you, were you often enough in Athens to witness the enthusiasm and ardor of the Students in prosecuting their studies in this Department. Col Mitchell dvotes almost his entire attention and wonderful industry to them; and his Department is one in every way worth of the fostering care and encouragement of your body.
From his Report, you will perceive, that the number of students in attendance during the year were twenty. Of these, three were graduated by consent of the Prudential Committee and nine are now recommended for the Degree of Bachelor of Law. There are at present eight in the Junior Class ready to rise [ ] Seniors. The Department is really in need of Standard Reports

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for use in the Moot Court; and the Professors have wished for us to devise ways and means to procure them out side of the ordinary income of the University. This, we were at a loss how to do, until an example was set by one of your body, the Hon. Iverson L. Harris, who this morning presented the Library with five editions of:
Modeychs [sic] Life of Jefferes [sic]
Norths Lives of the Norths, and a fine
Photograph of himself. If every official and friend of the University would follow his generous example, we would now have shelves growing with volumns.
And we would recommend that a committee be appointed to carry out this plan.
These duplicate volumns in the Library that are recommended (as suggested by the Professors of that Department) should be sold by him, and the money invested by him in other works.
Respectfully submitted
Lamar Cobb Chairman
The Chair appointed the Committees recommended in the foregoing report to increase the Law Library to consist of Messers. Cobb, Hill, and Mitchell.
The Board adjourned to 9 oclock, Monday morning.
Monday, August 1, 1870 The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Mitchell submitted the following paper, which was referred to the Committee on Laws & Discipline: Whereas it is highly desirable to advance the cause of liberal, professional, and practical education in the University of Georgia: Resolved that each religious denomination be invited to endow one or more Professorships in this

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Institution upon such term as may be agreed upon, by the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, and such religious denomination.
The Committee of Laws and Discipline asked and obtained leave till tomorrow morning to make their report on the Chancellors annual communication.
Mr. Vason submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, That a Committee of five be appointed to adopt such measures as may be deemed prudent to secure to the University of Georgia the Congressional appropriation of 30,000 acres of land for each Representative and Senator in Congress, wheretofore made by Congress; and the chair appointed as said Committee of five,
Messers. Brown, Dougherty, Miller, Lewis, and Vason. D. Moore submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to attend the next meeting of the State Agricultural Society with a view to securing its cooperation in procuring for this Institution the land grant of Congress to the several States. The Chair appointed as said Committee D. Moore & D. Miller.
On motion of I.A. Billups, The subject of Secret Societies said to exist in the Institution was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.
The Board then repaired to the College Chapel to witness the Sophomore Exhibition in declamation, after which they returned to the Library and adjourned to 9 oclock tomorrow morning.
9. A.M. August 2, 1870

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The Board met according to adjournment, On motion of Mr. Mitchell,
The College Chapel was authorized to be tendered to Rev. D. Hamilton to deliver his lecture on physical education.
The Committee on Laws & Discipline made their various Reports which was adopted, the first as already recorded, and the second as follows:
The Committee on Laws and Discipline have had under consideration the Report of Chancellor Lipscomb to the Board of Trustees.
The Committee are greatly gratified with the Chancellor disclosing the beneficial workings of the systems heretofore authorized by the Board.
Except to continue and enlarge the system already in operation, the Committee do not deem further positive legislation practicable with the means in hand. The Committee therefore recommend the passage of the accompanying resolutions by the Board. (See Resolutions 4 pages back.)
The committee on Laws & Discipline reported back the paper referred to them, on the subject of endowing Professorships by the religious denominations, without recommendation, and it was laid on the table.
The Board then repaired to the Chapel to attend the Junior Exhibition in original declamation and the delivery of prizes to the two champions among the Sophomore declamation (m.s.) and returned to the Library, and on motion of Mr. Mitchell,
Resolved, that Degrees be conferred upon the several seniors as recommended by the Chancellor.

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The Board then adjourned to 4 oclock P.M. at which time it again assembled when the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted the following Report drawn up by the Chancellor, which was adopted by the Board:
Report on Commencement alluded to in Chancellors communication.
1.
Commencement Day This shall be in the first Wednesday of August of each year.

2.
Commencement Sunday This shall be observed according to the old and established mode.

3.
Monday shall be appropriated to the Society of the Alumni; the Alumni Nation (m.s.) shall be delivered, the Alumni meeting for business held; and dinner had as the Society may order.

4.
Tuesday; the third day of Commencement exercises shall be devoted to the two Literary Societies (Dematheman and Phi Kappa). A literary address shall be delivered before the Societies by some distinguished man who shall be elected as heretofore by the Societies.

5.
Commencement Day shall be Wednesday, which day shall be appropriated to the announcement of the names of the Graduates in the several Departments, and the names of those on whom Degrees are conferred; also to the delivery of certificates and Diplomas and the awarding of medals and honors as hereinafter named, and such others as may be established from time to time.

Addresses from Graduates as follows;
1.
Orations not to exceed two (2) from Masters of Art.

2.
Orations not to exceed two (2) from Bachelors of Arts.

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3. Orations not to exceed two (2) from Bachelors of Science. All the addresses shall be submitted to the Faculty for criticism and approval one month before the final examination.
Medals and Honors
1.
Sophomore Exhibition shall be held at the close of the Term (Fall). A medal shall be given for the best Reader or best Declaimer as the Faculty may decide, which shall be presented on Commencement Day.

2.
In the Sophomore Class, there shall also be a medal for the best essay on any subject by a member of said class. And further, a scholarship, allowing free tution for one year in the University, shall be given to the best student of said class to be ascertained by the Faculty.

3.
Medals, at present awarded to the Sophomore Declaimers, are to be given to the Literary Societies for the best Debater; one to each Society; the award to be made by the Society; and the medal to be presented in the night of the annual celebration during Commencement.

4.
A medal to be given for an essay exhibiting the greatest original research on any literary or scientific subject; the award to be made by the Faculty and to be presented at Commencement. All Essays that compete for this medal must be submitted sixty (60) days before the close of the long term; and said medal shall be open for competition to every member of the University.

5.
Two (2) medals, or, one medal and one scholarship for one year, shall be given to the best student in the Scientific, or in the Literary Departments (one in each Department) and shall be open to competition of Junior class or classes; and shall be awarded by the Faculty.

6.
Monday and Tuesday evenings shall be appropriated to the Society celebrations and

speeches made by orators selected from among themselves. Submitted in behalf of the Faculty
Andrw. A. Lipscomb Chancellor

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After much discussion and interchange of views, on the subject, Mr. Thomas submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved, That the annual session of the University shall be ten months of one Term beginning on the first day of October and terminating on the first Wednesday of August, which shall be Commencement Day; but this resolution shall not take effect till after the end of the next Collegiate year ending August 1871.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolution which was adopted.
Whereas con-fraternity among the Boards of Trustees of the several Colleges of Georgia is eminently desirable;
This Board appoint one or more of its members to attend to the Commencement exercises of the respective male Colleges of the State;
And that our Secretary communicate this Resolution to said several Boards of Trustees, and invite, on their part, reciprocal action. Mr. Barnett was added to the standing Committee on Laws and Discipline.
Adjourned to 9 oclock tomorrow morning.

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August 3, 1870 The Board met according to adjournment, and a letter from Joseph E. Brown was read tendering his resignation, which was unanimously declined.
The following persons had the Degree of Bachelor of Arts conferred on them by the Board, viz;
C.L. Bartlett, M.C. Becks, W.A. Broughton, O.A. Bull, A.S. Campbell, W. Dessan, A.M. DuBose, D.R. Fitzgerald, J.M. Goss, J.D. Hammond, N.E. Harris, R.W.
Handwick, R.A. Hemphill, W.B. Hill, J. Hutchings, J.B. Hutchinson, W.E. Jackson,
W.M. Jackson, R.H. Johnson, T.J. Jones, C.A. Key, E.C. Long, W.S. McCarty, R.T. McMullan, J.A. Morris, J.T. Olive, J.A. Robson, H.C. Reney, J.W. Roquemore, J.B.B. Smith, M.M. Solomon, M.D.C.M. Summerlin, J.B. Strong, W.D. Tammell (m.s.) A.E. Trimble, G.W. Vines, J.W. Waddell, R.J. Willingham, A.T. Woodward.
The following persons had the Degree of Bachelor of Law conferred on them in February last by the Prudential Committee, and the same is now confirmed by the Board, viz:
Davenport Jackson, Mahlon M. Richardson, V.A. Wellborn, Samuel B. Hoyles, James A. Pendleton, William D. Trammell, Howard B. Van Epps, John R. Webb, and Hamilton Yancey.
The following persons had the Degree of Civil Engineer conferred on them by the Board viz:
J.M. Edwards and R.S. Woolfork..
The Board conferred the Degree of Master of Arts on D. James S. Hamilton and
A.O. Bacon in course, being our Graduates and admitted Henry Moore ad eundem (m.s.) being a graduate of another Institution.
The Board conferred on Rev. Ferdinand Jacobs the degree of Doctor of Divinity, and on Hon. L.C. Lamar the Degree of Doctor of Laws.

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These Honary Degrees were conferred after due examination and upon recommendation of the Committee on Honorary Degrees.
The Board then repaired to the Chapel to witness the Commencement exercise, and at their conclusion returned to the Library, where Mr. Mitchell submitted the following Resolution, which was adopted,
Resolved, That a Committee of three be appointed to watch over and promote the interests of the University of Georgia before the Legislature of Georgia.
Mr. Cobb was added to the Prudential Committee.
The memorial of the Committee of the Stockholders of the Lucy Cobb Institute praying that said Institute be relieved of the debt due for the purchase of money of the lots on which it is situated; and also the resolution offered by Mr. Barrow, that the interest on the debt of $800.00 the original purchase be remitted, upon condition, that said $800.00 is paid on or before Jan. 1871, were both referred to the Prudential Committee for action in the premises.
The Chair appointed as the Committee of three before the Legislature Messers. Brown, Vason, and Miller. The Board then adjourned sine die. John Billups
Wm. L. Mitchell, Secy. Senior Trustee Mending [sic]

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University of Georgia
Library, July 28, 1871
The Board of Trustees met this day, and commenced the annual stated meeting, present, Mr. Charles J. Jenkins, Vice-President in the Chair, Messers, Barnett, Barrow, Cobb, Cooper, Crawford, Harris, Hill, Miller, Mitchell, Moore, Thomas, Vason,, and Yancey.
The roll was called by the Secretary, and prayer made by the Chancellor, Rev. Andw. A. Lipscomb D.D.L.L.D.
The minutes of the last annual meeting were read, and then the Chancellor read his annual communication and accompanying Reports of Professors. The Chancellors communication is as follows:
University of Georgia
July 25, 1871
To the Board of Trustees,
University of Georgia
Gentlemen:
The number of students this year in the University has been 260. Compared with the session of 1869 1870, this shows a numerical decrease of the matriculates.
The statistics of the different Departments of the University as given in the catalogues of these two sessions (69th & 70th), explain how this falling off has occurred. Last winter the High School was

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suspended because of the resignation of President Hunter, and, for several months, despite of the most active measures by the Prudential Committee, no one could be had to take charge of the Institution. The pupils of this school number the present year 63, against 95 the previous year. If the difference 32 be added to the roll of matriculates this school session, we have the same Total as last year, viz: 292.
Owing to the monetary condition of the country and especially of the rural districts, I had expect a larger diminution of students than we have actually experienced. At no previous time have I known our citizens so embarrassed for means to educate their sons at the University, and, to an unusual extent we have had to accommodate them by taking notes for tuition. This, however, has been so well managed by the Treasurer of the Board as to avoid all difficulty in the fiscal affairs of the University.
Some of the Departments not withstanding these adverse circumstances, have made an advance on the attendance of the year previous. This, in the Engineer School, we have had this session 17 against 10 the last session, and in the School of Modern Languages there has been a marked gain on last year. What is also gratifying, the distribution of students under the new system so far as it has taken effect, shows about the

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same ratio as before in the various departments. For instance, the School of Ancient Languages leads every other Department, 157 students having been enrolled therein for instruction, while in the school of Modern Languages 92 have been under training.
The general attention to study and to the prescribed routine of the University has been quite as good as at any former period. In some respect, we have not had as much order and quiet among the students as we have enjoyed in recent years. But the most of this has taken the form of petty irregularities and youthful heedlessness, and should be regarded, I think as exceptional to the characteristic tone of opinion and feeling among our students. Although the class of improprieties to which I have alluded has given my colleagues and myself no small solicitude, yet it is a satisfaction to know that these evils have not assumed such a shape as to injure seriously the work of teaching and learning. No doubt, somewhat of the evil should be attributed to the fact, that during this year we have had a younger class of students, and hence, if our income justified it, I should not hesitate to urge the importance of advancing the age of admission into the higher classes of the University.
If affords me great pleasure to assure the Board of the

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entire fidelity and earnest devotion of the Professors to their respective Departments.
The past year has been in large measure a year of peculiar toil, and in some degree of peculiar trial. It has been a year of transition, which necessarily required much patient thought and efforts. So great a change could not occur without some change in our traditionary ideas, no our established habits, and more particularly in the interrelations of the Departments to one another. Each study under the new system is more or less individualized on its own ground, as well as associated with other studies, while each Professor is also much more individualized as to his own position and official functions. Aside from its other merits, the new scheme would indicate its superiority to the former system by intensifying the value of each branch of knowledge and, at the same time, by enhancing the personal and official power of each Professor. But, in this process of transformation, which amounts to an organic revolution, the Professors have evinced (m.s.) a nurtuality of thoughtfulness, a steady considerateness, and a desire for reciprocal support, which I cannot too highly commend. Certain it is, that the new scheme of organization will much more severely tax the energies of the Professor both as men and as instructors; it will largely augment their individual responsibility and equally tend to abate one of the

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worst features of the old system, viz; the action of the Faculty in matters that should never concern them as a Faculty; while, in a similar ratio, every Professors intellect influence, and authority, will be brought to bear much more immediately and effectively on every student within his reach. I have therefore watched the initial stages of this change with deep interest. I have masked (m.s.) its effect on Professors and students. Every means within my command, has been honesty employed to form a correct opinion as to the prospective operations of the new system and as the result I say to you with the utmost emphasis, that both as respects Professors and students, it is the only system which can claim to stand upon the basis of a just, broad, and philosophic mode of thought. On this account, I may be permitted to congratulate the University that my colleagues have so resolutely entered into the work of expanding the interests of the Institution, and that their exertions promise to yield results even larger than any of us expected.
Nothing is harder than to get men to accept a scientific idea as the foundation of an educational system. On no subject do the most of cultured men think so lightly, so superficially, and often so irrationally. The human mind, its nature and laws, its means and ends,

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its latent capacity and active ability, its needs, its resources, its possibilities, its startling insensibility to its own instructs, and its still more shameful stolidity [sic] to the inspirations that through the senses and the heart with their might accesses of doome [sic] hope; the human mind as the image of God in dominion over material nature, and yet more the redeemed mind as the image of God himself; this is seldom considered as the conditional ground work in any scheme of education. Nor are the relations relations of the mind to physical circumstance and to the marvelous developments of civilization its twofold growth towards the material universe and towards human brotherhood; its amazing complications with the human race and the progress of race ideal and race welfare as contra distinguished (m.s.) from national connexions [sic]; nor are these relations investigated with reference to education in any spirit of becoming thoughtfulness.
Most of our cultivated men bestow no more attention on these facts than did the men of three centuries ago, when the human intellect was scarcely competent to entertain a rational idea on the relations of nations to one another and their common relations to material nature. Parents resign this subject to Teachers, and Teachers throw it back on their ancestors.
The consequence is, that nothing has been so enslaved to the dogmatism of the past,

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so fettesed by antiquated precedents as Education. It has failed to be a science because it has had no scientific thought as its basis. Public confidence has steadily declined in the popular and prevailing modes of education; so much so that the number of undergraduates in all the colleges of this country in propostion to the population is only about one-half of what it was thirty years ago. I learn from an eminent authority on this subject that the students in attendance on all the colleges of New England at the present time, do not exceed by one hundred those in attendance in 1938. Thus too, in the state of New York, the population within twenty-two years has increased about fifty percent, and yet the absolute numerical increase of undergraduates has been but ninety-four, and that too with twelve colleges in 1870 instead of six in 1848.
Facts such as these are not isolated as to places nor accidental as to times and circumstances. They are common, they are palpable, they are everywhere felt by intelligent men. Amid the wonderful increase in population and wealth, amid the universal stir of mind from the impulses of the age, and the sudden competitions and swalries [sic] of nations in their industrial pursuits, here is the strange and humiliating fact that education is relatively losing its position

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and is falling far behind the material and numerical progress of the day. No doubt several causes exist for this decline in education. But so far as I can ascertain, the main cause is dissatisfaction with the old and accredited mode of education.
The leading feature of that system was disciplinary studies. It regarded the mind as a power to be evoked in formulated [sic] activity, as a set of faculties to be subjected to methodical training, and it suited its curriculum to the end proposed. If this idea be taken on its own merits, if it be discussed on its abstracts grounds, if it be viewed as a philosophy of thought contemplated as mere thought, I do not see how it is possible to weaken its force or even impair its utility when utility is accepted in its evidest signification. But the question is not as to the merit of the idea just stated. Admit the idea and yet it cannot follow that it is the only idea in education, or that the idea itself is even adequate to organize an entire scheme of education. The error consists in claiming that this is the supreme principle of education, but if it were not an error, it would simply be impossible to organize it into a consistent scheme of education, because its curriculum has been so enlarged as to reduce mere disciplinary study to a subordinate position.
On the other hand, the system which we have adopted,

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does not reject the idea of disciplinary studies. It gives prominence to these studies and guards them against all depreciation. At the same time, it maintains the importance of acquiring knowledge as knowledge both for its own sake and for its practical value in the business of life. Within a certain limit, it ordains a curriculum for disciplinary service, and, in this respect, consults the wants of that time (m.s.) of life when this class of studies should receive a rigid and enforced attention, while beyond that limit, it allows the free exercise of the elective principle as the only principle, on which, the full and complete development of intellect as a final preparation either for thought or action, for man as a student or man as an actor on the worlds arena, can possibly be attained. Without the slightest compromise of any interest in education, without rejecting a constitutive element in the accepted ideal of manly and generous culture, without, even the semblance of adjudicating the respective advantages of this or that curriculum, it simply announces that the arbitrary and absurd distinction between studies that give discipline and studies that give knowledge, shall not be recognized as the basis of its organization. But, after all that has been said in the controversy between the Classics and the Physical Sciences,

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I think that much of it is an idle dispute.
The South is, there is no such essential unlikeness between the two, as to lay philosophical foundations for opposite systems. All knowledge sightly acquired (m.s.), is disciplinary, all correct training involved knowledge. Different aspects of the same fact are often exaggerated until they are arrayed in hostility, one against the other. And, hence, each system asserts its Truthfulness and force just as you approach the intellect either from the side of material nature or spiritual nature. If you enter it through the senses, the, the Physical Sciences have the argument, since in this exclusive view, the mind as cognizant (m.s.) of external phenomena, interpreting physical laws, and divinely commissioned to re-instate man in his lost sovereignty over the world of matter, must lean on Physical Science for its strength and support. On the contray, if you regard the intellect on its spiritual side; if you descend into its subline instricts [sic] from the remoter heights of moral sentiment; hence, Language has the argument. In this light I can see (how our blessed Lord should be called the Word of God and I can see) too, why so much of his ministry should have been devoted to the Physical improvement or his race. And for this reason, I hold that a scheme of education can only be

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philosophically true and complete which acknowledges the mutual claims of Languages and Science, and admits each to equality of privilege.
Another view of this subject, a more direct and immediate view, may now be presented. The real question for us to answer is, How can the University of Georgia send out the wisest and largest number of men to solve the problems of the day, to meet the issues of the day, and to promote the true civilization of the day?
To furnish such men, is the work assigned us to perform. If so, we must adopt our education to the times and circumstances of Georgia, keeping in view of the fact, that in this aspect of education, we train men not minds. To make men is a much easier and nobler thing, than to make learned and brilliant, intellects. If we confine ourselves to mere development of mind as the specific end of education, the old system will do this admirably; but if we give education a scope wider and closer in sympathy with the spirit of the age and the urgent wants of our civilization, then we must vigorously push the policy which has been already adopted.
The real point, then, to ascertain is in what respect, in what connections, in what interests, is Georgia suffering by reason of uneducated mind. Certainly not in the learned Professions.

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For our Pulpits, for our Bar, for other spheres of professional life, we are not dependent on a foreign supply. Here we have the culture, the talent, the genius, which the century demands. Outside of these select departments of mind which are always certain to create their own supply and are therefore fully competent to meet their own necessities, you find an immense field in which, little has been attempted and skill less accomplished. Industrial pursuits have been left to take care of themselves; educated power has not been sent into workshops and factories and fields; capital and labor have been ignored; the vast questions of economic science that press on the heart of humanity no less than on the intellect of patriotism have been coldly dismissed and as a necessary result, our intellect as available for practical affairs is steadily decaying; our civilization, in several of its most vital interests, is rapidly passing into other hands; and the last element of a peoples sovereignty, intelligent labor, is dying fearfully in our midst. Never has Georgia seen a period when she was so dependent on others and never a time when the very vitals of her civilization were so seriously threatened.
These obvious [sic] have been slowly, calmly, thoughtfully, formed. Against them the pride of my intellect and the pride of my southern blood have

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protested, but protested in vain. Few facts have forced me to these conclusions. Amid this humiliation, I take comfort in the reflection, that we are beginning to see our responsibility in this matter. And the first thing for us to see clearly is that the University of a state is the main agency to form and maintain among the citizens of that state, just and proper ideas on the subject of education. Instead of confirming her efforts to the instruction and training of young men, a great function but not the greates, she ought coincidently with this professional motive to be constantly and zealously engaged in operating on the adult mired of the state in behalf of the sentiment of education. She must teach the people what they need, what kind of an education they need, and the grounds on which they need it. The law of demand and supply fails here. You can only create a demand by furnishing beforehand a supply and hence your initial step is to provide for the education of such men as shall go forth and practically demonstrate the urgent necessity under which the state labors for their services.
Without such a policy, you can never create a public opinion in Georgia on the subject of education.
The argument in favor of cultivated intellect as such will never reach the mass of the people, nor will it indeed be effective even among educated people

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who find themselves at this time in the anomalous condition of pioneers in a new civilization with the traditions assages and habits of a former civilization beginning among them. But if you send forth men who carry the dignity and skill of intelligent minds into industrial life, every man of them will be an organized public opinion on the side of a state University.
The scheme of education which you have so wisely inaugurated has practically made a new University, and on this vantage gromed, you can make an appeal to the state of Georgia. Feeling the change in her circumstances and the skill greater change in her condition, admitting the fact that in the varying fortunes of a country the educational institutions must also vary; believing, too that amid so many diversities of taste and capacity it is eminently fit to foster a system of instruction which shall offer the greater good to the greates number, you have put the University on a foundation, in the best sense, popular. It is thoroughly just to all. It is thoroughly Catholic to all. So much for the theory, a stronger postion you could not occupy, to enlist public sympathy for your support.
You have seen by the last Annual Catalogue and the recent circular, that the Faculty are ready to act

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on these views in the enlargement of the University. The present resources of the University are taxed to the utmost; and hence, if we expand, we must have an increased income. On the existing basis of operation, our revenue from Tuition is not likely to be greater for in the kind of education we are giving Georgia has already a larger ratio of students than is usual to population. Indeed, as the State grows older and the complexity of civilization advances, our tuitional fees will tend to decrease unless provisions shall be made for practical and scientific education. The only plan therefore open to us, is to secure such aid from the State as shall enable us to do the work contemplated; and as this aid, if devoted to the objects specified in this scheme of education, would be more of the nature of an investment than an expenditure, I can see no reason why the State should be unwilling to furnish the capitol for so remunerative a business. For the want of this education, she has already lost much.
Every year, she will lose more and more, until she learn in bitter experience that ignorance is infinitely more costly than learning. So well satisfied is my own mind that intelligent labor must hereafter be the foundation of all sovereignty; so fully convinced and that every nation is progressing in this

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direction, that I despair of any people, no matter what its political creed or moral code that is not building on this cover stone.
But there are other grounds, on which, this argument may rest. Other universities are amply endowed. Recent munificence has immensely augmented their resources, and some of these are now in a position to outstrip their old competitors in the race of usefulness. I glance at a few of them. Harvard University has a working capitol of $4,047,500; North-West University $1,230,000; Brown University $560,000; while the University of Virginia is reported as having a capiaol of $1,100,000.
Recent legislation in Mississippi and Alabama has made ample provisions ofr University support in those too States. A general sentiment, indeed, seems pervading the country, that if we have a University education, it must be provided for by munificent outlays of money.
The conclusion from these facts, is clear enough. Because of their large means, these Institutions will meet the demand for a cheap, broad, and varied education, and our work is large measure will saso out of our hands. This state of things is simply inevitable. I deplore this as the last extreme of intellectual humiliation. The intellect of a people is essentially its own, and its first earthly necessity is to keep it as its own. If

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this greatest of providential musts is delegated by proxy to others, not a vestige of manhood will remain. I believe it important to educate our sons in our ideas, but still more in our associations of life, and even yet more in the spirit of our life, and, in this view, I pray you see to it, that Georgia is not left an alien and a stranger on her own soil.
What is most desirable to accomplish in our University, is this expansion of education with free Tuition, Assuming that the means of supporting such a system can be supplied, nothing will so promptly and effectually elevate the standard of education as its entire deliverance from the conditions of a mercantile calling. The tone of discipline, the spirit of the students, the exactions of study, the voidening range of benefits to our impoverished people, the closer alliance of the state itself with the affairs of the University, would soon attest the vast change which this single principle of Free Education would effect, nor can I imagine a more fortunate day for Georgia than the day, when the University will open its doors for the gratnitors [sic] education of her worthy young men.
Aside from other views of this subject, the position of the University neither allows it to form a State sentiment respecting Education, nor to do its work simply as a business interprise.

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The mass of the people will never appreciate the State University as a State Institution if they have to deal with it as with any other business establishment. On the other hand, its recognized connections with the state interfere with its freedom of action as a mere business. Much of the want of interest in the University and many other difficulties in the way of our progress, spring from this embarrassing attitude. Nor can we ever place ourselves under proper circumstances to rally Georgia in our behalf until we become in fact as well as in theory a State University. Free Tuition is an absolute condition to perfect power over the public mind.
It is hardly necessary to call your attention to the importance of securing the Land Scrip issued by the U.S. Government to promote Agricultural and Mechanical Education or in the language of the Congressional Act, to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the general pursuits and professions of life. The arguments in favor of appropriating this fund to the University has been so ably presented by Porf. W. Leroy Brown in the July number of the SOUTHERN FARM AND HOME, that I need not occupy your time with discussion. The objects of this Fund can be best subserved (m.s.) by giving it to the University, the machinery of education

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already existing here can readily be made subservient to its highest utility; every dollar of it can thus be made more productive, and the specific ends of the grant as to the kind and quality of the instruction be more fully and wisely attained.
The education of Agriculturists and Mechanics as such is neither possible nor expedient, and hence our main aim should be to educate men together so that they can act and interact on one another. All real education has common characteristics which can only de developed by common fellowship in the acquisition of knowledge and the formation of similar tastes; and for this reason, if economic questions were set aside, it will be a most hurtful if not a fatal policy to educate farmers and artisans as classes of men by themselves. Public opinion will never sustain such an unwise discrimination; public interest will be sacrificed by it; and it is more than likely that young men themselves will rarely consent to be educated under such an exclusive system. Aside from these news, it certainly would be a most short-sighted measure for Georgia to do anything which would divide public attention and still more public support between her university and other Institutions, and more especially to do the very thing which would arrest the progress of the University in the line of direction on which it has so successfully entered.

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You will learn from Prof. Charbonniers Report herewith presented of the increased prosperity of the Engineer School. During the year, larger accommodations have been provided, and from private sources, I have obtained some valuable Engravings for the use of the School. A library also has been commenced. The steady growth of this school, its admirable management by Prof. Charbonnier, its auxiliary aids from other departments, and the success of its graduates, combine to make it a most important interest of the University.
Instruction in Telegraphy has been given by Mr. T.R. Rusk to three pupils at the High School who have taken 225 lessons, and to sixteen students of the University, chiefly in Engineer School, who have had 111 lessons.
The resignation of Mr. Hunter as President of the High School caused a suspension for several months of the school, but meanwhile the building, which had been greatly out of repair, was much improved both for domestic and educational purposes. It was opened early in April with Mr. W.M. Lumpkin as Prest. And Mr. A.L. Hull as Professor, and under their excellent supervision, has done as well as could have been expected.
Reviewing the past year, I am warranted in saying to the Board, the my colleagues

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and the friends of the University in the State, have put forth more efforts in her behalf than at any previous period within my observation. These exertions have been considerate, earnest and practical, and very masked results have already ensued. One fact is clear: the University is getting into a position to organize its strength, to assert that strength, and to render it fully effective. Much of this is unquestionably due to the revived energies of its Alumni. If this good work go on until our Alumni are thoroughly united, a most vital point will be gained. Nor need I impress upon you the immense importance of organizing the Alumni influence in such a co-operative form as to realize its full, constant, and energetic action. Of all the agencies that widen the scope, intensify the vigor and perfect the power of a University, I consider the Alumni influence much the strongest as it certainly is much the best.
As an appendix to this project I present the names of candidates for different Degrees:
For the Degree of A.B.
H.C. Ansley, W.T. Armstead, I.A. Barclay, W.A. Bell, R.E. Bemer, E.H. Briggs,
I.L. Brooks, A.W. Carswell, T.H. Cunningham, B.A. Denmark, G.R. Glenn, R.H. Goetchins, J.L. Hand,

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J.L. Hardeman, I.T. Heard, G.A. Howell, C.T. Key, I.G. Johnson, P.H. Mell, D. Monroe,
A.A. Murphy, R.W.H. Neal, T.C. Newton, E. Newton, G.G. Randell, E.G. Simmons, J.J. Swann, J.F. Waller, W.E. Ware, G.W. Warren, J.E. Yonge, P.K. Yonge
For the Degree of Bachelor of Law Washington Dessaw, Wm. A. Brougjton, Walter B. Hill, Benf. H. Hill, Jr. Charles
D. Hill, W.B. Hinton, James L. C. Kerr, Stephen Clay King, Henry Hull Lonton (m.s.), Richard W.H. Neal, Charles W. Oeidell, Brittain H Fabor, Robert Whitfield, Fletcher P. Wethington..
For the Degree of A.M. Class of 1867
G. Legare Comer, W. Allen Fort, Malcome Johnston, Samuel Spencer, T.H. Ward
Class of 1868
A.H. Alfriend, George Bancroft, H.D. Bune, I.L. Brown, W.A. Carlton, E.B. Connell, A.H. Cox, W.L. Dennis, J.E. Donalson, Charles DuBose, Rev. G.T. Goetchuis (m.s.) C.M. Groman, H.W. Grady, R.B. Hodgson, B.P. Hollis,

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D. Jackson, L.E. LeConte, M.V. McKibben, P.W. Weldon (m.s.) W.R. Minins, Rev. H.P. Myers, W.F. Parks, F.B. Phinizy, I.W. Rhodes, I.H. Rucker, R.A. Russell, W.B. Thomas,
W.W. Thomas, Robert Tombs, H.A. Whitmare, S.F. Wilson, Hamilton Yancey.
For the Degree of Civil Engineer Joel Hurt, E.K. Lumpkin, T.J. Nlikeel, J.L. Saunders, J.B.B. Smith
For the Degree of A.B.
John W. Brumby, J.R. Crance, J.O. Waddell,
A.M.
M.J. Hammond Esq. Atlanta, H.H. Jones Esq. Macon, Washington Dessaw, W.B. Hill, J.B.B. Smith
For Honorary Degrees Batchelor of Law Alex S. Erwin Esq. Athens
D.D. Rev. W.B. Howe Asst. B. E.-S.C., Rev. J.A.O. Clark

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In concluding this report the painful task devolves upon me of announcing the death of Ex-Gov. Wilson Lumpkin and Hon. E.A. Nisbet, so long and so worthily your associates and fellow workers in this Board. Of late years, you have seldom met without having to mourn the final departure of some one or more of your members, but it has rarely happened that age and experience and faithful services have combined so strikingly as in these instances, with integrity and ability to hallow the memory of the dead.
To your for-giveness, I must for the unusually length of this communication. Never before have I felt so deeply the mutual responsibilities under which the present state of our affairs, impose on our hands.
Without doubt, we have reached a turning point in our history, and hence I am so urgent that this most auspicious period should not escape unimproved. Despite of the Aimes, I do believe that Providence is opening our way to results unequaled in our past career, and unanticipated even now by the most hopeful thinkers among us. The time has come for great thoughts, for great purposes, for great schemes. I want to see you bold and daring. I want to see you act on the principle, that education in Georgia involves consequences

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incomparably more momentous than mere learning and skill. I want you to take hold of the heart of Georgia and arouse that heart to shape itself to the mighty issues which hang on its future. And therefore with an emphasis I have never felt, I pray God to guide and bless your deliberations.
I have the honor to remain
Your Obt. Servant,
Andw. A. Lipscomb
Chancellor.
On motion, so much of the Chancellors communication as refers to the death of Messers. Lumpkin and Nisbet was committed to Messers Jenkins, Harris, and Mitchell.
The Standing Committees reported in part, and the annual communications of the Chancellor with reports of Professors was referred to appropriate committees. Mr. Jenkins was unanimously elected President of the Board. Mr. Cooper was unanimously elected Vice-President.
The Board then adjourned to 10 oclock, tomorrow morning.
July 29, 1871 The Board met according to adjournment, when Messers Brown, I.A. Billups, Hall, James Jackson, and Seward appeared and took their seats.
Two petitions were presented and read, one from patrons of the Institution and the other from students of the University in relation to the vacation and praying that the winter vacation be restored, and referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline. D. Miller moved that the Board proceed to the election of two trustees to fill the vacancies occasioned by the death of Gov. Lumpkin and Judge Nisbet, which being

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The resignation of Col. John Billups was read and accepted, his resignation being the result of bodily infirmity, the same was accepted with the expression of the warm sympathy of the Boards. Whereupon the Board resolved to fill the vacancy also, and the Board then proceeded to ballot for three members, and upon counting the votes it appeared, that Hon. Dunlop Scott of Rome, Hon. John J. Gresham of Macon, and Hon. Dawson A. Walker of Dalton, were duly elected Trustees of the University of Georgia, and the Secretary was instructed to telegraph Messers. Scott and Walker, and request them to attend, if practicable, in person, our meeting on Monday morning. It was announced that Mr. Gresham would be present tonight.
The Committee in the University High School made its Report, which was laid on the table for the present.
The Committee on Laws and Discipline made its Report on the petitions in relation to the vacation, referring the subject back without any recommendation for the present.
The Report of the Finance Committee, which had been submitted under the rule on the first day of session, was taken up and adopted, and is as follows.
The undersigned Committee appointed to examine the Treasurers account for the past fiscal year, report that they have discharged that duty, and find that the ordinary receipts wer $24,010.03, that the disbursements were $25,350.95. ($410.75 of which was for refunded tuition) for which proper vouchers were shown. They find further that there have been extraordinary receipts as follows:
From the State the annual appropriation due for the year 1865 $8,000.00. From collection of matured Geo. Bonds belonging to the Terrell endowment fund $2,750.00.
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From sales of lots in Athens $1,779.40 aggregating the sum of $12,529.40 of which amount $9,300.00 have been invested in Geo. R.R. and Mont. The P1: R.R. Bond and $1,5000.00 in well secured promissory notes, and leaving a cash balance from this source of $1729.40 which added to the balance resulting from ordinary receipt and expenditures of $1,969.50 as appears in the Treasurers account, makes the entire cash balance in his hands $3,698.90.
In the further discharge of the duties of their appointment, the Committee submit the following estimates of Income and Expenditures for the next year.
From the State From Tuition From Rents From Terrell Endowment From Interest on Bonds
Annual Catalogue Advertising Stationary & Postage Insurance Music Hire of Servants Periodicals Prize Medals Repairs Models for Engineer & Math Dept. Scientific Books for Depts. of Nat. Phil & Chemistry Apparatus for Dept. Nat. Phil

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Do. Chemical Dept. For Library, Miscellaneous Books Incidentals Salaries Estimated Income

$ 8,000.00 12,000.00 1,300.00
1,370.00 550.00 23,220.00

Extimated Expenditures 200.00 400.00
100.00 352.00 200.00 250.00
100.00 200.00 800.00 200.00
300.00 500.00

400.00 300.00 350.00 21,500.00 $26,152.00
The foregoing exhibit shows that whilst the expenditures for the past year have exceeded the estimates of the Finance Committee by the sum of $1,680.95, yet they were $1,329.33 less than the year preceeding. The entrenchment was urged by the Finance Committee to their last Annual Report as imperative in consideration of the well nigh exhausted state of the Treasury. In view, however, of the very considerable and unexpected increase of the amount in the hands of the treasurer since the last meeting of the Board, your Committee have largely increased their estimate as compared with several years preceeding for several items of expenditure which are deemed necessary for the preservation of the College buildings, and indispensible to the efficiency of some of the Departments of the University, if they are kept up to the standard of public expectation and in character with similar Institutions elsewhere.
Respectfully submitted:
S. Thomas
R.D. Moore Ben. C. Yancey Committee
The Report of the Committee in the Library was taken up amended, and adopted, and is as follows:
To The Honorable Board of Trustees
University of Georgia
Your Committee in the Library is not able to make a full report, in consequence of the absence of Mr. Barnwell, late Librarian. His family has removed to South Carolina, and he was a few weeks since suddenly called from his duties as Librarian by the illness of one of his family.

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The Chancellor has been aided by some young gentlemen of the College in getting in books from the rooms of Collegiates and having them placed in appropriate departments. It is not at present accertainable what books if any are in hands other than students or in whose possession of any we thus wit.
The general appearance of the Library is the same as at your last meeting.
The Committee think judicious advertising of our University very desirable, and would therefore recommend an appropriation of few hundred dollars. This sum to be expended under direction of the Prudential Committee.
Respectfully submitted
Ben. C. Yancey, Chairman
The Board adjourned to five oclock this afternoon.
The Board met according to adjournment, and took up the Report of the standing Committee on the Law Department, which was, after discipline, adopted, and is as follows:
To the Board of Trustees University of Georgia Gentlemen: Your Committee on the Law Department have the pleasure to report that this Department is in a most prosperious
condition as will be seen by this Report of the Professors Wm. L. Mitchell herewith enclosed and to which your earnest attention is respectfully called.
We beg leave to call your attention particularly to that part of the above mentioned Report that refers to the conferring of the Degree of Doctor of Juris-prudence upon distinguished lawyers as an honorary, and suggest that in our opinion the time has arrived for the proper conferring this Degree.
The energy, ability, and earnest zeal in this Department calls for the special commendation and thanks of your Honorable Board. All of which is respectfully submitted,

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Lamar Cobb, Chairman
July 28, 1871
The Report of the Standing Committee on the University High School was taken up, discussed, amended, adopted, and referred to the Prudential Committee for action, and is as follows:
The Committee on the High School report,
That by means of an appropriation of the Prudential Committee expended under the direction of the Chancellor, the main building has been put in good condition with the exception of the roof which still leaks, and it is believed can never be made wate tight until a new one is put on, and your Committee recommend its thorough repair, or a new one if necessary.
The premises are neat and well kept, showing that care is bestowed upon them.
During the fall term of 1870 the School was in a flourished condition, but at its close Mr. Hunter resigned his office as President, and owing to various unforeseen causes the vacancy was not filled, nor did the School open until March 1871; consequently nearly all patronage was cut off from abroad, and most of the local patronage distributed to other schools.
However the School opened in March under the direction of Mr. W.W. Lumpkin as President and Mr. A.L. Hull as Professor, and met with better success than was anticipated. Forty five scholars have been in attendance during the past term. The people of Athens area friendly to the School. President Lumpkin and Professor Hull are qualified, popular and successful teachers, and under the fostering care of this Board its success is but a question of time.
As touching the school for Telegraphy the wishes of the Board have been carried out, but it has had to share in the disaster occasioned by the resignation of President Hunter, and the delay had in filling the vacancy.
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Owing to the same causes, the School for teaching the Art of Printing has not been put in operation.
It is recommended that lightning rods be placed upon the building for its protection and that a sum sufficient for that purpose be appropriated, and that the Prudential Committee have the building insured.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
July 28, 1871 David C. Barrow Chairman
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution which was adopted. Resolved,
That the Degree of Bachelor of Arts be conferred upon John R. Crane, who was prevented from completing his course by going into the army after he had entered the Senior Class. Mr. Crawford submitted the following Preamble and Resolution which adopted.
Whereas the future welfare and success of the University of Georgia is a matter of the deepest concern to the Board of Trustees, and whereas they desire to avail themselves of the well known interest felt by all its friends everywhere, but more especially by the Alumni of the Institution, Therefore be it resolved,
That this Board will appreciate in the highest degree their continued efforts and co-operation with [ ] as for the advancement of the College, and would at all times receive with pleasure and suggestions of an advisory character which they in their wisdom may feel desirous to make.
On motion of Mr. Hull a committee of three was appointed to present the foregoing Preamble and Resolution to the Alumni Society at its meeting on Monday morning next in this building.
The President appointed Messers. Hull, Crawford and James Jackson, that Committee.

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The Degree of Bachelor of Law was conferred upon Alex. S. Erwin, and a Diploma to be issued to him accordingly.
The subject of vacation was called up by the Standing Committee on Laws and discipline, when the Board adopted the following resolution.
Resolved,
The there shall be two vacations, one from the first Wednesday in August to September 15th; and the other from December 15th to January 15th, and that the same take immediate effect.
Mr. Jenkins was appointed in place of Mr. Nerbit deceased a member of the Committee in Honors.
Messrs Moore and Billups were appointed a committee to invite distinguished guests upon the platform.
The Secretary was directed to employ the Sheriff with the usual police force to preserve order during the week and to pay the necessary expenses of the same.
The Board then adjourned to Tuesday next at 9 oclock A.M. appropriating Monday and the Chancellors Lecture Room in this building to the Alumni Society.

Vol. IV of Minutes of the Trustees of the University of Georgia
(August 1858 August 1877)
PART II: COVERING YEARS 1871 1877
pages 1-364 of the original holograph volume or pages 248-634 of the typed transcribed source
put into electronic form by Susan Curtis starting: June 14, 2010 finished: June 23, 2010
personal notes: 1. The first typist used m.s. for misspelled words, but corrected some of the misspellings. This typist left the (m.s.) designation for those that were corrected and used [sic] for those that were not. A second typist began on page 585 and from that point on the use of sic was used exclusively. 3.The words conferred, referred, authorize, connection often were spelled as confered,
refered, authorise and connexion respectfully and were left as they appeared (not highlighted).
Page numbers in this version refer to the page number found in the original holograph minutes (not those of the typed transcription) and are indicated as: (pge 1) The typist, however, did not indicate where pages started, but rather just indicated what page he was on when he started a new transcription page. Therefore this typist has indicated pge xx a when a holograph page appears on more than one page of the transcription.
Penciled in remarks from the source text are preserved in this edition in parentheses and italicized. Any changes made by the current transcripting party are in brackets.
As with previous volumes begun on Sept. 27th 2006, indentations have been standardized.
(i.e. in the typed source text new paragraphs are sometimes indented, sometimes not, and dates are sometimes on the right side of the page, sometimes in the center for the purposes of this version they have, unless they are otherwise deemed unique, been aligned as per their first instance in the current volume).

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Tuesday morning Aug. 1, 1871 The Board met according to adjournment when Messrs. Gresham and Scott appeared and took their seats for the first time.
The Report on Apparatus and Buildings was taken up and partially discussed, and laid on the table for the present; after which the Board took a recess to repair to the Chapel to hear the oration of Mr. Thornton of Columbus before the two literary Societies, Demonthenian [Demosthenian] and Phi-Kappa, and at its close, returned to the Library and resumed business.
Gov. Brown submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted.
Resolved,
That the Board will apply to the next General Assembly to so change the charter of the University as to add four trustees to the Board, and to give the election at the said trustees to the Alumni Society; the four to be elected at the first meeting of the Society after said amendment of the charter, one for one year, one for two years, one for three years, and one for four years, so that one vacancy shall occur a each subsequent annual meeting of the Society; and each trustee elected by said Society after the first election shall hold for the term of four years.
Resolved, That a Committee of three be appointed by the chair; of which Hon. Dunlop Scott shall be chairman, to

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secure said amendment to our charter. The Committee named for the above purpose consists of Messers. Scott, Chairman, Brown, and James Jackson. Gov. Brown, by request of the Board, communicated his Resolutions to the Alumni Society now in session in this building.
The Report on Apparatus and Building was taken up, amended and adopted and is as follows:
The Committee on College Buildings and Apparatus report that they have had the same under consideration and inspection. Your Committee find the Professors Houses and enclosures all needing repairs, which in some instances are absolutely necessary for the preservation of the property. We also find that on some of the lots the want of water is very pressing, and if we determine to keep the property, some provision should be made to meet this want, and we repeat the recommendation made some years back, that cisterns properly constructed and filled in the winter, the summer rains being cut off, will meet this end. We recommend for the above objects, the sum of eight hundred or a thousand dollars be appropriated. The apparatus of the different Departments is all very deficient, and it is amazing how the Professors can succeed in using most of it at all.
By referring to the report of the Professors of Chemistry and Geology, you will see that he asks for the sum of four hundred dollars, which sum your Committee deem very moderate, considering the wants of this Department, and recommend it be

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appropriated.
The Professor of Natural Philosophy asks for the sum of five hundred dollars for the purchase of new apparatus to illustrate heat, electricity, etc. which have recently [been] introduced. This sum we also recommend be appropriated.
The tow [two] Professors jointly ask for the sum of three hundred dollars to purchase scientific works and journals absolutely necessary for advancement in their Departments. Your Committee recommend that this request be granted.
The Professors of Mathematics and Civil Engineering ask for the sum of two hundred dollars to be expended in the purchase of such models as may be used by both Departments. This we also recommend to be granted.
R.D. Moore Chairman
On motion of Mr. Mitchell the several Degrees both these in course, and the Honorary Degrees were conferred as the same are set forth in the Appendix to the Chancellors Report.
D. Miller submitted the following resolution, which was adopted, Resolved,
That the Secretary and Mr. Barnett on the part of the Trustees and the Faculty be authorized and required to make our our complete scheme of education including all its Departments, Elementary, Professional, and Industrial, to give the Legislature and the Public, full information in relation to the University.

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Gov. Brown reported that he had communicated our Resolutions in relation to the four Trustees from the Alumni Society and the amendment of our charter for that purpose to said Society, which Society received the same with satisfaction.
On motion of Mr. Scott, the Board appointed Messers. Jenkins, Toombs, and Basthy [sic] a Committee to memorialize the Legislature on the subject of endowing this Institution fully, so as to enable it to meet the wants of our people and to maintain a portion equal to the best Universities of the country, and to draft a Bill to carry these objects into complete effect.
Excuses for absence were made for Messers. Toombs, Daugherty [Dougherty?], Beckwith, Pierce and accepted by the Board.
On motion of Gov. Brown,
The Board requested each member to attend, for a few days, upon the Legislature, at its November session, to lend his personal influence, in procuring proper legislation, to carry into effect the projects of the Board and to secure the desired endowment.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell,
The Board appointed the members who may attend the State Agricultural Society soon to assemble at Rome, a Committee to represent this Board before that Society.
Mr. Barnett moved, That when this Board adjourns, to adjourn to meet in Atlanta on the 8th day of November next

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at 10:00 A.M. which was agreed to.
The Board then adjourned to meet to-morrow morning at 9:30 oclock.
August 2, 1871 The Board met according to adjournment, when the Committee on Laws and Discipline made the following report which was adopted.
The Committee on Laws and Discipline have considered the Report of the Chancellor communicating the action of the Faculty in organizing the Departments of Agriculture, Engineering, and Commerce, and recommend that the entire action of the Faculty in the premises be approved, satified [sic], and accepted by the Board of Trustees.
Benj. H. Hill
Chairman
University of Georgia
The object of this Circular is to exhibit more fully the Courses of Study pursued in the Departments of Agriculture and Commerce, in the University of Georgia, as they are now organized.
The schools of the University are now independent of each other, and to complete the course in any one is a question of qualification alone, and not of time. These Schools, each under its Professor, have been so co-ordinated as to present, in addition to the Classical and Scientific courses required by academic degrees, I.A. Course of Agriculture: 2. A. Course [??]

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and 3. A Course of Commerce.
Agriculture Faculty
A.A. Lipscomb D.D. Chancellor
W.L.
Jones M.D. Chemistry, Agriculture, etc.

W.
Rutherford, A.M. Pure Mathematics.

W.L.
Brown A.M. Mechanics, Physics, etc.

L.H. Charbonnier A.M. Applied Mathematics Charles Morris A.M. English and Literature
M.J. Smead Ph.D. Modern Languages
W.L. Mitchell A.M. Law of Titles, Contracts, etc.
The following studies are embraced in this Department. Upon the completion of this course the student will be awarded a CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY IN AGRICULTURE. Students who can not pursue the full course will be permitted to select such parts as they may prefer, for which they may be prepared.
First Year. 1. Algebra. 2. Geometry. 3. English and English Composition. 4. Book-Keeping. 5. French.
Second Year. 1. Trigonometry. 2. Measuration 3. Surveying and Leveling with practical exercises. 4. Geometrical Drawing 5. Descriptive Geometry. 6. Rhetoric and English Literature. 7. French. 8. Elements of Chemistry, inorganic and organic. 9. Elements of Astronomy. 10. Mechanics of Solids, Liquids, and Gases. 11. Physics, including Heat, Light, Electricity and Magnetism, etc.
Third Year. 1. Agricultural Chemistry, 2. Agriculture,

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its Principles, its Methods, and its Products. 3. The preparation of Manures and Composts. 4. Analytical Chemistry, with Laboratory practice in analysis. 5. Rural Engineering, or Mechanical and Geometrical principles applied to agricultural machines, to inigation [irrigation], to road-making and drainage. 6. The Law of Titles, Contracts, and Accounts, 7. Botany, 8. Physiology vegetable and animal. 9. Minerology and Geology. 10. French . 11. Architecture, including principles of farming, building materials, etc. 12. Meterology.
In the Lectures delivered to the Students in Agriculture the following subjects are discussed:
1. A Knowledge of Physical, Chemical, and Physiological Laws involved in the growth of Plants, essential to successful experimenting.
2.
Composition of Plants (Organic constituents and inorganic),

3.
Sources of these constituents.

4.
Analysis of soils by means of plants.

5.
Supplies of Deficient Constituents ( Farm Yard Manners [Manures] Commercial Manners) [Manures]

6.
Chemical principles involved in rotation of crops

7.
Physics and Chemistry of Tillage.

Engineering Faculty
A.A. Lipscomb D.D. Chancellor
L.H.
Charbonnier A.M. Applied Mathematics

W.
Rutherford A.M. Pure Mathematics

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W.L.
Brown, A.M. Mechanics, Physics, etc.

W.L.
Jones M.D. Chemistry and Geology

M.J. Smead Ph.D. Modern Languages.
In this Department, two Degrees are offered: 1. Civil Engineer 2. Mechanical Engineer.
Civil Engineer
This degree will be conferred on these students who obtain CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY in the Schools of 1. Pure Mathematics 2. Natural Philosophy and Astronomy. 3. Chemistry and Geology. 4. Applied Mathematics and 5. A CERTIFICATE OF MERIT in the French language and Literature.
Mechanical Engineer
This Degree will be conferred on those students who obtain CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY in the school of: 1. Mathematics. 2. Natural Philosophy. 3. Chemistry and Geology, and a CERTIFICATE OF MERIT in 4. Applied Mathematics.
The course of instruction in this School enables the student to acquire such a theoretical (m.s.) and practical knowledge of the Science as to be qualified for entering, at graduation upon the duties of his profession.
The mode of instruction is partly by means of text books, but principally by lectures. The student is required to write these off, using his notes and such books of reference as have been recommended; and he is thoroughly examined, in daily recitations, on the matter of the lectures. At stated times written examinations take place, in which entire subjects are

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reviewed.
Throughout the course the application of the theory is enforced by requiring the solution of practical Problems, by Exercises in the field, and by the construction of original Drawings, with necessary Bills of Materials and Specifications. In Surveying, the student uses the chain, Surveyors Compass, Transit, Theodolite and Level, in the field, under the direction of a Professor, and is required to make accurate surveys and plats of the same. The different operations of Road Surveying, such as Location, Leveling, Side-Staking, Laying of Curves, etc. are taught mainly by actual field practice. In Natural Philosophy the student has access to the five set of apparatus belonging to the University; in Geology, to the extensive collection of minerals attached to that Department.
The course of Drawing includes all the principles required in the practice of the professional Engineer and Architect.
Applicants for admission for the first year of the course proper, will be required to have a thorough knowledge of Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigometry Trigonometry, with the usual English branches. Any one applying for admission, after that time, will be examined, in addition to these subjects, upon all the studies pursued by the class, up to the time of his application. But graduates of the University, who desire to study this special branch, will be admitted, on presentation of their Diplomas, without further examination at the beginning of the second year of the course, and can with proper application

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and diligent study, complete the course in one year. The studies are pursued in the following order:
First Year
First TermAnalytical Geometry; Geometrical Drawing; Plan Drawing; Tinting, Lettering, etc; Surveying commenced; Chain Surveys; Natural Philosophy; French.
Second TermFull and complete course in Surveying with field practice; Differential and Integral Calculus; Theory of Higher Equations; Plats of Surveys; Topographical Drawing; Natural Philosophy; Chemistry; Descriptive Geometry and Applications; Shades and Shadows; Geometrical Drawing; Strength of Materials commenced; French.
Second Year
First TermStone cutting; Theory of Perspective; Materials used in Construction; Perspective Drawing; Theory of Strength of Materials, Chemistry; Astronomy
Second TermTheory of Stability of Retaining Walls, of Arches, and Drawing of Lands; Hydrodynamics; Steam Engine; Theory of Flywheels, of Water Wheels; Plans and Elevations of Engineering Constructions, Graphic of Stone-Cutting; Architectural Drawing; Machine Drawing; Chemistry, Astronomy.
There is, for students not ready to commence the studies of the first year, a Preparatory Course. In this are taught Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry, with appropriate English studies.
Architecture

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There is no technical course in Architecture established, but the course in Civil Engineering includes all the principles of Drawing necessary for working out Designs and Detailed Drawings, with writing of Bills of Materials and Specifications; while the Lectures on the Strength of Materials, and in the Theory of Frames are more than sufficiently comprehensive to enable the student to properly proportion a structure.
Mechanical Engineering Requirements for entering are the same as for the Civil Engineering course.
The studies of the first year are the same as for the Civil Engineering course, with the exception of Surveying, the course of instruction in this last being more elementary. The applications of Descriptive Geometry are substituted instead.
Second YearLectures and Recitations on the following subjects: Theory of Strength of Materials; Theory of Framing; Theory of Steam and Locomotive Engines; Pattern Making; Moulding in Sand; Machines Shop Practice; Drawings of Machinery; General Principles of Machinery; Natural Philosophy, and Chemistry.
Partial Course
Student will be allowed to attend any part of the course, and will, after satisfactory examination upon the subject or subjects studied, be entitled to a CERTIFICATE setting forth the fact of their proficiency on the particular subjects selected by them for study.
Text Books

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Davies Trigometry; Davies Descriptive Geometry; Davies Shades and Shadows Loomis Analytical Geometry and Calculus; Davies Surveying; Haupts Bridge Construction; Haswells Hand Book; Mahans Civil Engineering; Law and Barnells Engineering; Dempseys Drawing Districts and Lands; Gillespies Roads and Railroads.
The following Books in the Library of the Department will be consulted by the Student during the course:
Weisbacks Mechanics; Mahns Stone-cuttin [cutting]; Institutes of Civil Engineers Trautwine on Embarkments; Gillespies Surveying; Tredgolds Carpentry; Nicholsons Builder; Hand Book of Rail Road Curves; Minnifies Drawing; Benjamins Architect; Hambers Iron Bridges and Girders; Johnsons Practical Draftman [sic]; Simms Practice of Levelling; Gilmores Lines and Cements; Rankines Engineering and the scientific parts of the well known Weales series. The library is also supplied with the current scientific papers, and folios of plates, illustrating fine engineering constructions.
Commerce
Faculty
A.A.
Lipscomb, D.D. Chancellor

W.
Rutherford A.M. Pure Mathematics

L.H. Charbonnier, A.M. Geometrical Drawings, etc.
M.J. Smead Ph.D. Modern Languages Charles Morris A.M. English and Literature
P.H. Mell D.D. Political Economy

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W.L. Mitchell A.M. Commercial Law
The following studies are embraced in this Department. Upon the completion of the course there will be given a CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY in Commerce.
First Year1. Algebra. 2. Geometry. 3. Mathematics of Exchange, Insurance, and Annuities. 4. Geometrical Drawing 5. Book-keeping. 6. English and English Composition. 7. French. 8. German.
Second Year1. Rhetoric and English Literature. 2. French 3. German. 4. Book-Keeping. 5. Commercial Economy, or the management of Books, Insurance and Joint Stock Companies, Railroads, Canals, Telegraphs, etc. 6. Elements of Commercial Law, or Law of Bills, Notes, Contracts, Insurance, Corporations, etc. 7. Political Economy.
School of Applied Chemistry
The School has not yet been established. As soon as means can be obtained it is designed to establish it, with a complete working laboratory. It will include the following subjects:
1. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, with Practical Exercises in the Laboratory. 2. Working of Mines and Production of Materials. 3. Manufacture of Iron, Steel, etc. 4. Analysis of Minerals, ores, etc. 5. Chemical Technology, or the manufacture of Acids, Alkalies, Salts, Glass, Pottery, Dyes, Drugs, Leather, etc.
The Committee on Laws and Discipline made the following report which was adopted.

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The Committee on Laws and Discipline, to whom was referred the annual report of the Chancellor of the University, having considered the same recommend the adoption by the Board of the following resolutions:
1. Resolved,
The Board of Trustees have heard with lively satisfaction the annual report of the Chancellor, and hereby tender to the Chancellor and the Faculty, the warm and cordial appreciation entertained by the Board, of the earnest ability, fidelity, and zeal with which they have discharged their respective duties, during the year in the general administration of the affairs of the University, and is[in] the efficient performance of the functions of the several Professorships.
2. Resolved,
That the Board of Trustees express their entire concurrence in the wisdom and correctness of the views of the Chancellor, so ably expressed in his report, teaching the extension of the field of usefulness of the University, and to do most earnestly hope that the State will, by appropriate and early legislation, enable the Board to provide every facility for the most thorough education in all schools (to) science additional to the regular curriculum, to be found in the first class Universities in Europe or America.
3. Resolved,
That the Board of Trustees express their thorough conviction that the University ought to furnish education to

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the children of the State, free of all charge for tuition, and do hereby avow their anxiety and readiness to do so as soon as the General Assembly shall provide an endowment sufficient to authorize them.
4. Resolved,
That if the esteemed Chancellor of the University shall move among the people, and confer with them in such manner as he may deem best on the important subjects discussed in his report, during the remainder of the year, such action will accord fully with the desires of the Board; and we direct that all expenses incurred by him, be paid out of the funds of the University.
5. Resolved,
That the report of the Chancellor be printed, and as widely distributed among the people as the funds of the institution will allow.
And hereby gratefully acknowledging their valuable assistance and co-operation hitherto, the Board would feel additional gratification, if the religious and secular, especially the Agricultural press of the State will give all practicable circulation to the views so ably presented in said report.
The Board now took a recess to attend the Commencement exercises in the Chapel where the Degrees were conferred as stated in the appendix to the Chancellors Report, the medals delivered, and other interesting exercises had, when the Board

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returned to the Library and resumed business.
The Board proceeded to appoint a member to attend the next College Commencements of the other Colleges of the State according to its resolution of 1870; and appointed Hon. Dunlop Scott to Oxford; Hon. James Jackson to Mercer; D.H.V.M. Miller; to Oglethorpe; and Hon. Mark A. Cooper to Bowden; hereby authorizing each Delegate to appoint some other member of the Board his Alternate, should he be unable from any cause to perform this pleasant duty.
The President Mr. Jenkins having assigned the Chair, submitted the following report in relation to the death of Messers. Lumpkin and Nesbit [Nisbet], which was agreed to:
Our deceased friend Wilson Lumpkin has born in Va. January 14, 1783. Early in life his parents removed with him to Oglethorpe County, Georgia and while yet a youth he became identified with his adopted State, by entering an active life as assistant Clerk of the Superior Court. In his nineteenth year he professed faith in Christ and connected himself with the Baptist Church. He died December 28, 1870.
Through his long and varied life, reaching beyond the ordinary limits of earthly years, he was not only actively but closely connected with public affairs of Georgia. His sympathies were warmly enlisted in behalf of public objects, so much so that he seemed to possess a natural temperament as well as an intellectual and moral attitude for public action. Nature gave him a bias in this direction and circumstances

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favored its growth and activity. Beginning his career as assistant clerk of the Court in his sixteenth year, he filled numerous offices, having served as Governor of the State two terms and subsequently as Senator in the U.S. Congress. The period, in which, he lived was a period of profound interest in the domestic and federal politics of Georgia, a period of welfare of thought, a period too of intense feeling; but amid all its scenes of storm and struggle, this distinguished man was firm in his convictions, resolute in purpose and earnest in feeling; a natural leader among men by virtue of a hardy independence and an unyielding selfreliance which drew others to him in sympathy and support. From 1831 until his death, he was a Trustee of this University, and during a portion of this long term of service was President of our Board. Nor is there any thing in his useful and patriotic life more significant of his interest in whatever enabled the people of this Commonwealth, nor anything that leaves a serene light on the pathway of his extended years, than the devotion which he always showed to this University.
Judge Nesbit [Nisbet] was a native of Green county in the State of Georgia, where his parents continued to render until after the accession of the Rev. Moores [Moses] Waddel to the Presidency of Franklin College. Immediately upon the reopening of the Institution, under the auspices of that distinguished Educator, after a long suspension, the subject of this memoir was matriculated, entering the most advanced class, and was

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graduated in 1821. Soon after his matriculation his parents removed to Athens, where they continued to reside until their death. Of the College life of the distinguished Dead, we remark only that it developed strikingly the mental endowment, and the traits of character which shone so conspicuously in after life. Having chosen the legal profession for his occupation he was not long in acquiring the qualifications necessary to his admission to the Bar. Soon thereafter he established his residence in Madison and entered assiduously (m.s.) upon the practice. His advancement in the profession was unusually rapid, for success commensurate with rare abilities, high moral rectitude, attractive social qualities, and untering [sic] industry in his vocation, waited upon his efforts.
At an early age he was returned by the citizens of Morgan county to the General Assembly, where his sterling power as a debater, speedily advanced him to the front rank, side by side with the veteran law givers of our State. His reputation steadily grew as his service in that capacity lengthened. But an appreciating Public, as, unfortunately for the State, was too much then practiced, quickly transferred him to a broader sphere of action, though not to a more dignified, or more important position, to the Congress of the United States. There he had to crop weapons with more numerous, more practiced, and more distinguished contestants, in the arena of debate and here is in the forum and senate at home, he ably served his

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constituents and more widely illustrated his personal endowments and merits. After a comparatively short service in Washington, he voluntarily withdrew from public life, removed to the City of Macon, and for years devoted himself with renewed energy and increased success to the practice of the Law.
At an early day, (in what precise year we know not) he made a public profession of religion in the Presbyterian Church wherein he was until the day of his death a bright and shining light. Throughout his life he was a student, finding recreation in the various fields of literature, and well known and appreciated as a contributor to sundry literary periodicals.
Upon the organization of the Supreme Court of Georgia in the year 1845, the eminence Mr. Nebit [Nisbet] had acquired at the Bar, and his elevated moral character indicated him as one of the three fitting men to put that tubunal [tribunal] into operation, and to commend it to popular favor, confessedly wanting in its infancy. For the accomplishment of this desideratum, the profession and the whole people of Georgia render a full and voluntary tribute of gratitude to the illustrious two, Lumpkin, Warner, and Nesbit [Nisbet] which after the sole survivor shall have passed away, will perpetually embalm their honored memories. [dont understand reference to Warner]
The voluminous Reports of that Court during the eight years of Judge Nesbits [Nisbets] connection with it are at once the abiding record and the limitless publication of his fame as a Jurist. As a politician his portion was always well definedhis course markedly integrity and consistency. Ambition he

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certainly had, but it was an elevated aspiration, which could not have been satisfied by personal advancement, without commensurate service done the country. Though ever ready to respond to that countrys call, he never preferred claims to office or place. Intrigue was foreign to his nature. He could not stoop to practice the most venial wiles and not of the demagogue to secure either personal promotion or party success. In public as in private life he yielded unvarying conformity to the golden rule Do your duty and leave consequences to God.
His eloquence was not unpassioned [impassioned] , but it had a charm like that of his daily life; it was pure, logical, flowing, forcible, often adorned by a graceful imagery, which, while it fascinated the common mind, and delighted a refined taste, never failed to illustrate and enforce the argument.
There are among us some, who knew him in quiteless boyhood, in expanding youth, and in mature manhood; and who walking by his side through these successive stages of lifefirst lovedthen loved and trustedthen loved, trusted, and honored him.
Where the assumption warranted by the teachings of Inspiration, we should not hesitate to say that Eugene A. Nesbit [Nisbet] was born a Christian. Certain is it, however, that the pure minded moral youth, by advances imperceptible to others, reopened into the steadfast Christian man.
Throughout a life exceeding three score years he exemplified a purity, a force, and a symenetry [symmetry] of character rarely observable

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among men, beautiful in contemplation, and worthy of all imitation by the young.
Your Committee recommend the adoption of the following resolutions:
Resolved, That in the demise of the Honorable Wilson Lumpkin and the Hon. Eugenius A. Nesbit [Nisbet], the public servantsthe Church militant [militant], two pillars of her templeand the University, two wise and faithful Servants.
Resolved farther, that we their surviving and sorrowing co adjutors, will place this memorial upon our Records, as a feebel [feeble] but abiding tribute to their worth.
Mr. Barrow submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
The Board having learned that the services of Mr. Benjamin T. Hunter can be procured by Mr. W.W. Lumpkin President of the University High School, and that Mr. Lumpkin would be pleased to have the approbation of this Board therein, and the Board knowing that Mr. Hunter has peculiar gifts in promoting the industrial arts, it would be gratifying to the Board to see established in the University High School, a school preparatory to the Industrial Schools now made a part of the University System.
While the University High School is entirely self sustaining, and so must these preparatory schools be, the Board would recommend Mr. Hunter to the Public as altogether a suitable gentleman to Superintend and mangage [manage] them. Be it.

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resolved by the Board that Prof. Benjamin T. Hunter be invited cordially to accept the position tendend [tendered] him of Superintendent of Industrial Schools of the University High School.
The Board hereby authorized the Faculty to close the examination one week before the annual meeting of the Board so as to have ample time to make every suitable preparation for the meeting of the Board and the exercises of Commencement week.
The following communication was received from the Alumni Society and ordered to be entered upon our minutes:
University of Georgia
Athens, August 2, 1871 To the Honorable the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
Gentlemen,
As a Committee appointed for the purpose, we have the honor in behalf of the Alumni Society to acknowledge the receipt, through Messers. Hall, Crawford and Jackson of the resolution adopted on the 29th ult by your body expressing your appreciation of the efforts of this Society for the advancement of the interests of the University; and also the receipt through Gov. Brown if the resolution adopted by the Board on the 1st inst. to apply for such amendment to the charter of the University, as will authorize the election by the Alumni Society of four additional Trustees of the University.
We are directed by the Society to express to your Honorable body our sincere appreciation of the confidence manifested by this voluntary offer upon your part to allow this Society a

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voice in the management and control of the University. We do not flatter ourselves that we will be able in any manner to supply that in which your wisdom and experience may be deficient, if such deficiency this be; but we are satisfied that this action will effectually vitalize and energize the efforts of the members of this Society in behalf of the University, and we pledge their earnest co-operation with you in your endeavor to have the University so endowed, as to make her the pride the pride of the State and the peer of any similar institution upon the continent.
Respectfully,
Wm. Hope Hall
A.O. Bacon Pope Brown.
On motion, The Prudential Committee were instructed to furnish the Chancellor with a private Secretary to aid in his voluminous correspondence, and to fix his salary.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That a medal be and the same is hereby established for Porf [Prof] Waddells Department in the Ancient Languages and Literature.
The Board then adjourned to meet in Atlanta on the 8th of Nov. next at 10 A.M.
Wm. L. Mitchell, Secy C.J. Jenkins, Prest

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Atlanta, Ga. November 8th 1871. Chamber of Commerce.
The Board met according to adjournment; present, Hon. Charles J. Jenkins President in the chair, and Messsers. Barnett, Billups, Cobb, Coopper [Cooper] , Dougherty, Gresham, Hall, Hill, Lewis, Miller, Mitchell, Moore, Scott, Vason, Yancey.
Prayer was made at request of the President, and the minutes of the last meeting at Athens were read, confirmed, and signed by the President.
The following communication from the Chancellor was read: University of Georgia, Nov. 7th 1871.
To the Board of Trustees of the University, Gentlemen, The exercises of the University were promptly resumed Sept. 15th, and all the Departments are now in regular operation. The number of Students in attendance this session is 185. Of this number, forty five are new matriculates in the more advanced classes.
Under the new system, the order and regularity of the Students, the attention to duty, and the general spirit of the University, lead me to hope, that the present scheme of instruction and discipline will be beneficial to the intellectual and moral character of our young men. So far as we can rely on just theoretical principles in the organization of University

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education, we now have a broad and philosophic basis for our work; and if we had the means to execute the plan which you have so wisely adopted, I can conceive of no difficulty that can arrest our rapid progress unless it be the immature age of some of our students. But this is a difficulty which, in course of time, the system itself will obviate. Nor can I doubt, that among its other good results, this system with [will] insensibly educate our people to see the great importance of keeping their sons at home until they have sufficient age and experience as well as proper academic instruction to desire the maximum of benefit from the higher modes of education; while, at the same time, it will react on our local schools and increase both their scope and efficiency in the sphere which they occupy.
A new Chemical Laboratory has been established under the supervision of D. Jones and Prof. Brown, aided by Prof. Hunter. Rooms have been fitted up to teach students the practical work of Analytical Chemistry. The means at our Command were very small, but we labored to economic their outlay in such a form as to lay a good basis for this new Department.
The feeble state of Rev. D. Mells health, consequent on protracted illness during the past summer, has made it necessary for me to take charge of his Department; and I have therefore been unable to carry out your wishes in respect to visiting different parts of the State for the purpose of representing the interests of the University. But for this providential

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interruption; I should certainly have devoted myself to the work you desired me to perform. I am happy to say, that D. Mell is recovering and that he will probably be able by the opening of the next Term to resume these duties, in which he is so justly distinguished both by ability and fidelity.
Arguably to a resolution passed at your last Session, I have the honor to present you a Report from the Faculty, giving the present and the prospective organization of the University. Of the present plan I need say nothing as you are familiar with its details. The prospective scheme for the development of the University is simply an extension of those principles, on which we are all agreed, the structure of an intelligent, diversified, and comprehensive civilization must rest. No argument is required to show, that such a scheme of education and only such can touch the vital mind of a State at all points and thereby supply a quickering [quickening] impulse at once string [sic] wide and uniform in its action. The scheme proposes to educate the representative intellect of our people in all departments of active life; to give the unity of intellectual culture to all organized purposes and pursuits; and to secure that crowning virtue of a Christian civilization, in which, each interest of science and art, each division of enterprise and labor, each kind of talent, or genius, may help and further every other and thereby coalerce [coalesce] in one common good.
The educational work which this scheme contemplates, commends

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itself to confidence and sympathy on the ground, that it acknowledges the claims of mind as mind. It provides for intellect as intellect. It reaches the community as a community. It acts on the State as a State. If men can only advance by coming nearer together in a great common likeness; if the growth of society can only be redeemed from sordedness [sordidness]and selfishness by the participancy of the Messers. in the advantages of knowledge, skill, and wisdom; if a State is made truly strong and noble by the condition of her people as a people; these ends can not be attained otherwise than by some such system of education.
I need hardly say to you that this vast work can only be done by the State. Even if it could be accomplished by any other agency, it would not be desirable, for a State can never feel that she is a Statecan never look upon herself with lofty self-respect, lean with heroic firmness on her own appreciated might, unless she has made the education of her people, a Supreme concern. The First attribute of a State is the consciousness that she has provided for the intelligence of her people; nor can anything avail her in the stead the eof if she neglect the most sacred because most providential of all her traits.
If the present opportunity is lost to arouse Georgia to this great task, I fear, that the most hurtful consequncy [consequence] will follow. The new formative circumstances, on which we have been strangely coast [cast], cannot last much longer. Our ideas, our purposes, our plans, will soon harden into fixed shapes; the epoch of brave inspirations will have passed away; providential

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monitions will sink into their retributive silence; and the most splendid occasion that any community ever had to endow its intellect by endowing its University, will have fled perchance for ever.
Gentlemen; These ideas were yours before they were mine. Your generous public spirit and your earnest devotion to the welfare of the University; have long since ripened there opinions into connections [convictions?]. I can only remind you of their transcendent importance at a time like this and say in conclusion, that I feel the profoundest assurance that you will be true to this great trust because you are true to your own hearts.
I have the honor to remain,
Your obt. servant,
Andw. A. Lipscomb
Chancellor.
The Secretary next read various papers and letters for the information of the Board and among them the Report of the Faculty referred to by the Chancellor, which was subsequently ordered to be laid before the General Assembly and then in view of its voluminous character decided not to be presented to that Body.
The President Mr. Jenkins then called the Vice-President Mr. Cooper to the chair, and proceeded as the Chairman of the Committee appointed at Commencement for the purpose, to make report of the Memorial to the Legislature on the subjects of the land scrip donated by Congress to the State and of the

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endowment of the University, which paper or memorial was received and adopted by the Board upon the motion of Mr. Dougherty, and is as follows:
To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Georgia in General Assembly met:
The memorial of the Trustees of the University of Georgia, through the undersigned, a Committee of their body, respectfully she [here] with,
That the Institution entrusted to their management is the foster-child of the State; that it was designed by its founders long since gathered to their fathers, to be a fountain,
whence successive generations of their porterity [prosperity] might draw the varied knowledge necessary to qualify them for usefulness in any reputable occupation. It has discended [descended] to this generation, as an heritage, and with it has come the responsible duty of giving from time to time such mature and enlargement as advancing civilization demands. The endowment of the University has never been such as to enable it so compete successfully with like institutions in many States of the American Union.
Whitst [Whilst] your Memorialists have been earnestly striving with means so limited, not only to prolong its feeble existence, but to increase its usefulness, other and older Colleges and Universities heretofore fairly sustained, have within a few years received additional endowments and have entered upon broader and more thorough systems of education. The wisdom of this policy will be clearly apparent, when we reflect that

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human labor and enterprize [enterprise] do not proceed now as they did a century past. Then animal, muscle aided by very simple implements and directed by comparatively meager intelligence, extorted from the earth. A hardly earnes [earnest] subsistence, and tardily wrought from raw material crude and costly fabricks for general use. In this day science has fully illustrated her claim to be entitled the hand-maid of art. Every secret which the former extructed [extracted] from the still partially explored kingdom of nature is made subsidiary to the rapid advance of the latter. Mechanism has come to the relief of muscle, but mechanism is successful only when constructed and operated upon scientific principles. Even the primal and most honorable pursuits, long regarded as incapable of large developmentthe culture of the earthhas emerged from the condition of mere manual toil. By careful analysis, soils are made to disclose their capabilities and deficiencies, that the former may be promptly utilized, and the latter supplied by appropriate fertilizers. And improved implements of husbandry have greatly inhanced [enhanced] production. In one word, no man capable of connecting cause and effect can have failed to discern that liberal education promotes success in every branch of human industry, the aggregate of which is the true measure of social properity[propriety] and advancement.
We have said that the University is the foster-child of the State, and we would press upon the General Assembly the consideration that this acknowledged relation has the direct

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effect of averting from her individual benefactions. The possession of large wealth, imbued with public spirit and willing to contribute of their abundance to the cause of education are usually governed by local interest on denominational preferences, and however widely they may differ in selecting the objects of their bounty, they will be found fully agreed in this one proposition, that an Institution founded by the State may be very safely left to the liberality of its powerful and opulent founder. However strongly this logic may be commended by its Universality, we may be pardoned for saying that this [thus] far the University is not an exponent of its truth. If, however, its manifestly withering effect upon her destinies may awaken her revered Mother to a more lively sense of parental obligation, we shall have no occasion to question its soundness. Your memorialists encouraged by many indications, that the People of Georgia have really come to a more just appreciation of the public importance of thorough education, within our own borders, and are prepared to furnish the means indispensible to that end, have modified and are still modifying the course of instruction so as eventually to raise the Institution to the standard of dignity and carefulness implied in its title. Witst [Whilst] the usual curriculum of collegiate education, enlarged and improved, is continued, we propose to establish higher schools in which, those who have passed through that course, may acquise [acquire] proficiency in particular sciences intimately connected with their selected future employments. We aspire not alone to prepare our youth

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for the learned professions (as they are popularly denominated) nor alone for the political area [arena] We propose annually to present for the approval and profitable employment of our people, geologists, engineers, manufacturers, miners, planters, and teachers, prepared to apply practically in those several avocations, science imparted to them in your University. Such men are needed in all the pursuits of life. Some such are needed to illustrate Georgia and to guard her interests and rights in the councils of the nation. More especially are they all needed at home to raise higher the standards of morals and of intelligence, to frame and administer good State Government, to establish in a firm basis, law and order, and to develop the vast natural resources of our beloved State. We live in an age, when knowledge leads on the march to power. The more enlightened a People, the greater their power for good. Let it be proclaimed from the house top as an uncontroverted truth, that any people who neglect or carelessly promote the great cause of education, elect to bring up the rear of advancing civilization.
Moreover, if adequately sustained by the Representatives of the People, your memorialists propose to open wide the doors of the University to the youths of Georgia desiring to take a course of scientific study independent of a college curriculum and complete their education free of charge for tuition. Surely this is an enterprise worthy of Georgia, if she is worthy of the title of the Empire State of the South. Such things

(pge 391)
are done elsewhere, why not in Georgia! Why should she be dependent upon other States for education of her children and for experts to conduct every branch of industry?
To accomplish these results, your memorialists say to you in all candor, few greater means will be required than are now at their disposal.
These means may be provided in part, if it seem good to the General Assembly, by placing in the hands of the Trustees of the University the land grant from the United States, for the founding and support of an agricultural and mechanical College in this State. Your memorialists are aware that for this endowment there are several earnest and formidable competitors. Two courses are open to the General Assembly in the disportion [disposition] of this fundeither to divide among the applicants for it or some of the, or to bestow it in a judicious preference upon one. We respectfully submit that the division of it among several Institutions would probably render the portion of each insignificant to accomplish the end in view. It need scarcely be urged that one well endowed Institution of learning is more competent to impart through education, than several insufficiently fostered. Each of the latter might, to some extent, subserve local convenience and interest, but we doubt not the General Assembly will take a more enlarged view of the subject. If the fund is to be employed by our agency only, we may, without disparagement to other applicants, venture to say that through the instrumentality of the University, its best application may

(pge 392)
be anticipated, and at the same time it may be exclusively devoted to the purposes designated in the grant. In this proposition we are sustained by the following considerations:
1st; This policy, we are informed, has been adopted by the best, by several States of the Univ. 2ndly. We represent an Institution new in operation the extension of which might be more quickly and less expensively affected than the organization abinitio of another. There are now delivered annually in the University courses of lectures entirely pertinent to the education proposed. 3rdly. There is now appurtenant to the University, though quite separated and apart from what are usually denominated the college buildings, an edifice well adopted [adapted] to the purpose with farming lands attached. 4thly. We flatter ourselves that the reputation earned by the University in its part management with meager resources, will command for the newly organized agricultural and mechanical college a larger popular confidence that [than] would be accorded to an untired [untried] organization.
But whether the General Assembly does or does not concur in the view here presented we respectfully urge that additional endowment from the resources proper, of the States is requisite for the University. If the land grant be entrusted to it, that must necessarily be applied exclusively to the branches of education to which it is devoted and such would be the steadfast purpose of your memorialists. If other-wise, we should

(pge 392a)
still be mindful of this leading, overshadowing branch of industries in our country. To do this and to provide preparatory instruction in other branches secondary only to that, but of growing importance, without exacting payment therefore, or becomes a States Institution, the resources of your memorials to must be exhausted.
The apparatus absolutely necessary to illustrate the natural and the exact sciences however can [care] fully guarded, are subject to the wear of time and use its accident. Improvements are also being constantly invented, so that constant outlay is demanded to repair losses and keep pace with progressive the sciences. [progress in the sciences]
The College Library cannot be suffered to remain stationary; all new books recognized as valuable contributions to the sum of human knowledge should have a place on its shelves. Buildings require constant repair. Eminent Chancellors and Professors should receive salaries large enough to raise them and then [their] families above want or the fear of it, and their number should be such as to avoid the premature exhaustion of their vilot [violent?] energies by over exertion. Your memorialists respectfully suggest that an additional endowment of five hundred thousand dollars is required to put the University on a proper basis. But it is not necessary that the present or any future generation be burdened to contribute so large sum. By issuing what may be termed University Bonds, with a long time to sum, and renewable at the pleasure of the State with interest coupons attached,

(pge 393)

payable semi-annually, with such restrictions as the wisdom of the General Assembly may suggest; the burthen [burden] of this additional endowment may be so distributed over coming years as not to be semibly [sensibly] felt.
In conclusion, we would remind the General Assembly, that we plead for no class, or sect, or special branch of industry. Our plea is in behalf of Georgia, in her entiretyin behalf of Georgians now living and to be born in the course of timein be half of their enlightenment, as the surest guaranty of their enduring properity [prosperity] and happiness.
Respectfully submitted by Charles J. Jenkins Robert Toombs Incpt E. Brown Committee.

After which, the Board took a recess to 4 oclock this afternoon, when it again assembled, and Mr. Hill submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved. That the Committee on the memorial to the Legislature for endowment be instructed to present through some member of each house of the General Assembly a copy of the said memorial.
Mr. Hill submitted the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved, That the President appoint a committee to draft a Bill, for the desired endowment and to represent the Board after its adjournment, in all matters before the Legislature, on the subject of endowment with full discretionary powers to shape the course of legislature [legislation] according to the emergencies

(pge 395)
of the care, keeping in view the great necessity of an endowment at this time.
The committee named by the President are Messers. Hill, Dougherty, Miller, Brown, James Jackson, Cooper, and Yancey.
On motion, Henry R. Jacksons resignation was laid on the table till the annual meeting. Mr. Billups offered the following resolutions:
Resolved, that while this Board earnestly desires to establish a University suited to all the educational wants of the State, it is not expedient or desirable for the present at least to interfere with or alter the curriculum or discipline of Franklin College as they existed prior to the action of the Board in relation to a University.
2nd
. Resolved, that the Faculty be and they are hereby instructed to restore and preserve that curriculum and discipline particularly in regard to the number and times for daily recitations, and the regulation prohibiting students from leaving their rooms or going about the streets of Athens during the hours required to be devoted to study.
3rd
. Resolved, that the public exercises of Commencement week shall be the same and on the same days, as before the present year, viz. on Monday morning Sophomore prize declamation, or [on] Tuesday morning Junior exhibition, and on Wednesday the usual Commencement exercises.
4th
. Resolved, that should it be found necessary, Thursday of that week be devoted to the public exercise of the

(pge 395a) 396?
University proper. 5th
. Resolved, That no student under ----years of age shall be admitted to the University.
Mr. Yancey then submitted the following resolution as a substitute for the first of the foregoing five resolutions. The substitute was adopted and the other four resolutions were laid on the table.
Resolved, That whilst this Board earnestly denies [desires] to establish a University suited to all the educational wants of the States, it is expedient to require three recitations of each Students (the Professional Classes excepted) each day, to be distributed through the day; and to require the Students to remain in their rooms, during proper study hours, when recitation is not being had.
The following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That the thanks of the Trustees of the University of Georgia are hereby given to the Chamber of Commerce of the City of Atlanta for the use of their Hall this day, and that a copy of this resolution be transmitted to that Body by our Secretary.
The Board then adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell, Secretary.
Atlanta, Ga. March 30, 1872
The Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia met this day in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol, in accordance with the call of the President at the Solicitation of several

(pge 397)
Trustees, and upon a call of the roll, the following members were present, viz. Barnett, Brown, Billups, Cobb, Cooper, Hill, Jackson, Mitchell, Moore, Miller, Scott, Thomas, Toombs, Walker, Yancey.
Prayer was made by Chancellor Lipscomb, who by request proceeded to state his views in relation to the organization of a College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts under the Act of Congress and of our General Assembly, and submitted his views in the following paper which was debated, amended, and on motion of Mr. Toombs, finally adopted as follows:
Whereas, by an Act of Congress approved July 2, 1862, entitled, An Act donating lands to the several States and Territories which may provide Colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts; there was given to the several States for the purposes above mentioned an amount of land equal in quantity to 30,000 acres for each Senator and representative to which said States are respectively entitled by the apportionment under the census of 1860.
And whereas, the State of Georgia by an Act approved March 20, 1866 accepted said grant of land agreeably to the conditions therein specified;
And whereas, the State of Georgia by an Act approved Dec. 12, 1866, empowered his Excellency, the Governor of Ga. to receive and sell the said land scrip, and to invest and appropriate its proceeds for the maintenance of such a College as contemplated by the aforesaid Act of Congress;

(pge 398)
Therefore, be it resolved, by the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, that a College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, distinct in its organization and specific as to its objects is hereby established in conformity with the Act of Congress above named; and that the fund accruing from said land scrip is hereby set apart and devoted to the exclusive support of said College;
And, further, be it resolved, that the organization of said College is as follows:
I
Title The name of this College shall be, The Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts.
II Government
The administrative details of this College, such as concern its Discipline and Schedule of Study shall be entrusted to the Chancellor of the University of Georgia, and to its corps of Officers as hereinafter named, agreeably to such general provisions as the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia shall ordain for their control as its agents in the fulfillment of this trust.
III Officers
The officers of this College shall be as follows, viz. 1st: A President, who shall be charged with the special

(pge 399)
oversight of the College under the direction of the Chancellor, and, who in addition to such duties and responsibilities as appertain to a preciding [presiding] officer, shall engage in such branch or branches of practical instruction, as shall be in his judgment, best calculated to advance the interests of the College confided to his care.
2nd
. A Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture, who besides performing the usual duties of his chair, shall deliver each year, in different parts of the State, such popular lectures on Agriculture and Horticulture as may be found practicable.
3rd
. A Professor of Analytic and Agricultural Chemistry. 4th
. A Professor of Mineralogy and Economic Geology. 5th
. A Professor of Natural History and Physiology. 6th
. A Professor of Industrial Mechanics and Drawing. These Professors shall have charge of their respective Departments of Instruction and perform such duties as may be allotted them in the completed scheme of organization hereafter to be effected.
7th
. A Professor of Physical Geography and Meteorology with the assigned duty, in addition to his work of instruction, of making, as far as possible a Physical Survey of the State with reference to the development of its natural resources.
8th
. A Professor of the English Language who shall give special attention to the
training of the Students in these branches that constitute an English Scholar. 9th
. A Professor of Military Tactics.

(pge 400)
IV
Engineer Department
The Civil Engineer School, now part of the University of Ga. And under control of Prof. Charbonnier, is hereby transferred to the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, the Professor to be a member of the Faculty of Instruction in said College, and to perform the duty of Professor of Military Tactics.
V. Free Tuition
Free tuition in this College is hereby guaranteed to as many students, residents of the State, as there are members of the General Assembly of Georgia. In addition to this free tuition in the College, all such students are likewise entitled to the advantages of the different Departments of the University of Ga. without charge.
VI.
Co-operation of the University
The Chancellor is hereby instructed with the other officers of the existing organization of the University, to render such services to this College as may be possible without conflict with their present duties; and to sustain, as far as practicable, its schedule of studies under a provisional arrangement until the organization of its Faculty of Instruction shall have been completed.
VII.

(pge 400)
Rules and Regulations
The rules and regulations of the Board of Trustees as applicable to the University, are hereby extended to this College, except as otherwise ordered in this act of organization.
VIII.
Opening
The Chancellor is hereby instructed to open this College by the 1st day of May next in the University Buildings, and the High School Building and all other Buildings of the University necessary for the purpose are hereby put at his disposal, and he with [herewith?], if possible, make such arrangements, as will secure boarding for the students at a sum not exceeding $1250 for the College year.
Mr. Toombs, upon the adoption of the foregoing plan of organization, moved, that a committee of seven, of which the President shall be chairman, be appointed, to wait on his Excellency, James M. Smith, Governor of the State, and submit in writing a copy of the plan to him and request him to appropriate to the University of Georgia the fund arising from the Agricultural land keep. The President appointed the Committee to consist of Messers. Jenkins, Chairman, Toombs, Brown, Cooper, Hill, Miller, and Jackson. Before, however, it was practicable to copy the paper and prepare the application, the Board resolved to wait on the Governor in a body, and so headed by their President, the Board proceeded to the Executive Chamber, where they were properly received by his Excellency, and Hon. C.J. Jenkins

(pge 401)
expounded fully and in detail the object of the visit and was replied to by the Governor in term, entirely satisfactory assuring the Board that after careful investigation he had resolved to turn over the fund arising from the land scrip to the University of Georgia as no less a matter of duty than a matter of sincere gratification, and that he would at once and on this day have the proper orders entered on record. Whereupon the Board returned to the Senate Chamber, and resumed their business, when Gov. Brown submitted the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved,
That this Board will now proceed to organize the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts by the election of Professors to serve till the meeting of the Board in Athens in August next, with the distinct understanding that the said organization is provisional and temporary only; and that such Professors of the University as may be elected Professors in the new College will be expected to serve till the permanent organization without increase of their present salaries.
Gov. Brown also submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the Secretary of this Board be instructed to give notice that the permant [permanent] organization of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts will be made

(pge 402)
at the meeting of this Board in Athens in August next, and that applications will or received in the mean time for the different Professorships in said College.
The Board then transferred to the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts the following Professors of the University of Georgia, viz.
1.
Wm. LeRoy Brown, President

2.
Wm. Rutherford, Prof. Mathematics

3.
Wm. Lewis Jones, Terrell Prof. of Agriculture

4.
L.W. Charbonnier, Prof. Civil Engineering and Military Tactics.

The Board then adjourned to 3 oclock P.M. when the Board met and Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That a Committee of three be appointed by the President of this Board to confer with the Chancellor on the practicability or organizing a company which may furnish loans of money to students of the enterprize [enterprise].
Committee are Messers. Mitchell, Thomas & Cobb.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell.
The Chancellor was requested to deliver to the Governor, the engrossed copy of our plan of organization, which he accordingly delivered and the Governor passed the following orders with the preambles and correspondence accompanying the same, all under the Executive seal and of [on] file in the office of the Secretary of this Board. The documents are as follows
(pge 403)
Executive Department State of Georgia Atlanta, Ga. March 30, 1872.
Hon. Chas. J. Jenkins, Chairman Comtee Trustees etc. Atlanta,
Sir, Your letter of this date asking that the fund arising from the sale of the land scrip, donated to this State by Act of Congress approved July 2, 1862, be committed to the University of Georgia, and the resolution adopted by the Trustees of the University, organizing an Agricultural and Mechanical College, have been received and carefully examined.
I have given the subject, of the proper disposition of this fund, much thought of late, and am glad to find that the programme of the College, submitted by the Board of Trustees, is in conformity with the provisions of the Act of Congress making the donation.
Upon investigation, it appears that unless the College is established, and goes into operation, before the 2nd day of July next, the grant will cease, and the State become bound to repay the fund to the United States.
The Legislature failed to take action organizing and locating the College, and consequently, I find the grave responsibility devolved upon me, to take such steps as will save the fund to the State.

(pge 404)
For the reasons briefly stated in the accompanying Executive Order, I have deemed it wise and proper to grant the application made by the Board of Trustees, and to commit the important trust of using and applying this fund as the law directs, to the University of Georgia.
With an abiding confidence that the great trust now confided to the University will be so managed as to vindicate the action this day taken and rebound to the lasting benefit of the whole people of Georgia, and especially of the Agricultural and Mechanical interests, I remain, dear Sir, with great respect
Your friend and obt. servant James M. Smith
Executive Department Atlanta, Georgia March 30, 1872.
Whereas by the Act of Congress approved July 2, 1862 entitled, An Act donating lands to the several States and Territories which may provide Colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, there was granted to the several States an amount of public land, equal in quantity to Thirty Thousands acres for each Senator and Representative, to which said States were entitled by the apportionment under the census of 1860;
And, whereas, by a Legislative Act, approved March 10, 1866, this State accepted the grant, agreeably to the conditions therein specified, thereby undertaking that the donation, made

(pge 405)
and accepted as aforesaid should be kept, used, and applied, as prescribed in the said Act of Congress;
And, whereas on the third day of January, 1872, the Hon. Benjamin Conley, exercising the executive powers of the Government, sold the land scrip, previously issued to this State under said Act of Congress, to one Gleason F. Lewis, for the sum of two Hundred and forty three thousand dollars, a part of which, to wit, Fifty Thousand Dollars, has been paid, and the remainder of which is to be paid within eighteen months from and after the day of Sale;
And whereas, the time allowed the States accepting said donation, to establish a College or Colleges, under the provisions of said Act of Congress, will expire on the Second day of July 1872, when by the terms of said grant, if a College, such as is therein described, shall not have been established, the grant will cease, and this State will be bound to repay to the United States the proceeds of the donation aforesaid;
And whereas, by a Legislative Act of this State, approved, December 12, 1866, entitled, An Act to provide a college for the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, in the State of Georgia, under Acts of Congress approved, respectively, July 2, 1862, and April 14, 1864, the Governor is authorized to receive and sell the land and scrip to which the State was entitled under the Act of Congress approved July 2, 1862, and to invest the proceeds of such sale, as he may (seem) [deem] best, in bonds of this State, and disburse the interest of said

(pge 406)
investment for the support and maintenance of a college, such as in contemplated by said Act of Congress, and to provide rules and regulations for the organization, governance and operation of said College, until the next meeting ensuing Session of the General Assembly of this State, and to do and perform all other such Acts as may be necessary and proper to secure to the State of Georgia the full benefits contemplated by said Act of Congress, as far as the same may be found practicable;
And, whereas, the University of Georgia is the only Institution of learning in this State, having the power by law to organize and establish a College, in all respects such as
is described in said Act of Congress, and the Board of Trustees of said University having established a College, distinct in its organization and specific as to its objects, in conformity, in every respect, with the Act of Congress above (seemed) [deemed] as follows, that is to say:
I
Title The name of this College shall be, The Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts.
II
Government The administrative details of this College, such as concern its discipline and schedules of study, shall be entrusted to the Chancellor of the University of Georgia, and to its caps [corps] of officers, as hereinafter named, agreeably to such general

(pge 407)
provisions as the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia shall ordain for their control, as its agents in the fulfillment of this trust.
III Officers The officers of this College shall be as follows, viz: 1st
. A President, who shall be charged with the special oversight of the College, under
the direction of the Chancellor. 2nd
. A Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture, who, besides performing the usual duties of his chair, shall deliver, each year, in different parts of the State, such popular lectures on Agriculture and Horticulture, as may be found practicable.
3rd
. A Professor of Analytic and Agricultural Chemistry. 4th
. A Professor of Mineralogy and Economic Geology. 5th
. A Professor of Natural History and Philosophy. 6th
. A Professor of Industrial Mechanics and Drawing. 7th
. A Professor of Physical Geography and Meterology, with the assigned duty, in addition to his work of Instruction, of making, as far as possible, a physical survey of the State, with reference to the development of its natural resources.
8th
, A Professor of English Language, who shall give special attention to the training of
the Students in those branches that constitute an English scholar. 9th
. A Professor of Military Tactics.
IV

(pge 408)
Engineer Department. The Civil Engineer School, now a part of the University of Georgia, and under the control of Prof. Charbonnier, is hereby transferred to the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, the Professor to be a member of the Faculty of Instruction in said College, and to perform the duties of Professors of Military Tactics.
V Free Tuition in this College is hereby guaranteed to as many Students, residents of the State, a there are members of the General Assembly of Georgia; and in addition to this free tuition in the College, all such students are likewise entitled to the advantages of the different Departments of the University of Georgia, without charge.
VI
Cooperation of the University The Chancellor is hereby instructed, with the other officers of the existing organization of the University, to render such services to the College, as may be possible, without conflict with their present duties, and to sustain as far as practicable, its schedule of studies, under a provisional arrangement, until the organization of its Faculty of Instruction shall have been completed.
VII
Rules and Regulations The Rules and Regulations of the Board of Trustees, as applicable to the University, are hereby extended to the College, except as otherwise ordered in this Act of organization.
VIII
Opening The Chancellor is hereby instructed to open this College by May 1, 1872, in the University High School, and such other University Buildings as may be necessary; and to make such arrangements, if possible, as shall secure Boarding for the students, at a sum not exceeding $125 for the college year.
C.J. Jenkins,
Prest. Countersigned Wm. L. Mitchell,
Secretary.
And it appearing to me, that the College organized by the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, as here in before set forth, is in conformity with the provisions of said Act of Congress; It is Therefore,
Ordered, That the two hundred and forty three thousand Dollars, derived from the sale of the land scrip, of the State of Georgia, approved 18th day of January, 1872, bearing seven per cent interest, and that the money so invested shall remain for ever undiminished, (except as hereinafter excepted) and the interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated to the endowment, support, and maintenance of the College organized by the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, as herein

(pge 409)
before set forth; That the leading object in said College shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including Military Tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, in such manner as the Legislature of this State may prescribe. The annual interest accruing upon said Bonds shall be regularly applied, without dimination [diminution], to the purposes herein before set forth. An Amount not exceeding ten per centum upon the sum of Two Hundred and Fifty Three Thousand Dollars, may be expended for the purchase of lands, for sites as experimental farms, when authorized by the Legislature of this State, and not otherwise. No portion of said fund, nor of the interest thereof, shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretence whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings. An annual report shall be made, under the direction of the Board of Trustees of the University, to the Governor of the State, who shall lay the same before the General Assembly, at its next Session, recuding [recording] any improvements and experiments made, with their cost and results, and such other matters, including such industrial and economical statutics [statistics], as may be supposed useful. The said Board of Trustees shall, also cause one copy of said report to be transmitted, by mail free, to each of the other Colleges endowed under the provisions of the Act of Congress aforesaid, and also one copy to the Secretary of the Interior.
It is further Ordered, that the Board in which said fund

(pge 410)
shall be invested, as aforesaid, shall be turned over to the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia; that upon receiving said Bonds, or any of them, the said Board of Trustees shall cause each of the same to be impressed with the seal of said University, and that upon no pretence whatever, shall said Bonds, or any part thereof, be disposed of by said Board of Trustees.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the Executive Department to be affixed, the day and year above written.
James M. Smith
L.S. (seal By the Governor
J.W. Warren, Secy. Ex. Dept.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following paper which was adopted.
Whereas His Excellency, James M. Smith, Governor of Georgia has by the foregoing Executive orders, under the authority of the Legislature of this State, appropriated Two hundred and Forty Three Thousand Dollars, the amount of the sale of the land scrip donated by Congress to this State, to endowment, support, and maintenance of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and directed the Bonds as invested to be turned over to the Trustees of the University of Georgia, and whereas, in so doing, he has performed a high and noble service to the people of Georgia, Therefore,
Resolved, [duplicate page bound in volume, not reproduced here] (pge 411)
That the high trust confided to this Board is duly appreciated and accepted upon the terms specified in the Governors letter and Orders aforesaid, with a determination on their part to make the same accomplish all the benefits to the State of which they are as the States Educational Representatives Capable.
The Board then adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell C.J. Jenkins,
Secy. President
Athens, Georgia, August 2, 1872

The Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, met this day in the Library in annual stated meeting, present, C.J. Jenkins, President, and Messers. Billups, Barrow, Cobb, Crawford, Hall, Hull, Lewis, Hammond, Mitchell, Moore, Thomas, Yancey, Jackson, Vason, Pierce, Toombs, Pope, Barrow, Cooper.
The Chancellor made the opening prayer, and the minutes of the Atlanta meeting were read and confirmed.
The Chancellor then read his annual communication which is as follows:
University of Georgia, August 1, 1872.
To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia,
Gentlemen,
Three hundred and eighteen students have been matriculated in the University for the year 1871-72; of this number ninety four entered the New State College, and fifty four the High School. The attendance of students has

(pge 413) missing 412
been quite as large as the evoking capacity of the University allowed; and, indeed, in some Departments, the burden of labor and responsibility has been greater than is consistent with the highest efficiency of our institution of learning. Under the circumstances that have limited the teaching force and the material accommodations of the University, our property has been encouraging; while the efforts of the Professors, whose duties have been increased by the enlargement of the University, are worthy of the warmest commendation. As often as I have witnessed the integrity and zeal of my colleagues, I have never seen them more ready and earnest in doing extra duty than during the year now closing. Such work, done in such a spirit, is always certain of success, and I am not surprised therefore that the results of this Session have been fuller and more satisfactory than I have hitherto seen.
The ill health of the Vice-Chancellor, Rev. D. Mell has unfitted him for any official service since your last stated Session but the duties of his chair have been discharged, so that the usual curriculum has not been interrupted. He is now abroad on a tour of health, and I have hope that he may be so far restored as to give us the invaluable aid of his administrative wisdom and active cooperation in the prospective expansion of the University.
The sudden death of D. Smead, Prof. Mod. Lang. during the Fall Term was an occasion of very deep regret to my colleagues and myself. His singular devotion to learning, Singular even

(pge 414)
among scholars; his simplicity of purpose, integrity of aim, and thorough conscientiousness in the minute details both of professional and private life; the masked unworldiness of his character and his ardent [love?] of culture for its own sake, made him an admirable man for the position which he so honorably filled. After his death, immediate measures were taken for the continuation of the Department, its duties having been regularly discharged through the remaining of the Term. On the opening of the January Term, these duties were assumed by Prof. Wilcox, who had been provisionally appointed by the Trustees present at a called session to fill the chair of Modern Languages. This gentleman, who has acquired a high and deserved reputation as a Prof. of Modern Languages has evinced a constant and scholarly solicitude to build up his Department. About eighty students have been under his care, and he has spared neither pains nor skill to advance their education.
The experience of the last year has shown me more clearly than ever what is needful just now to expand the University and especially what is needful to make thoroughly effective the power we possess. At present, we are working under disadvantages which abridge our usefulness. One of those difficulties is the want of accommodations for classes and especially the lack of working men. In this respect the capitol [capital] and income of the University are not distributed so as to secure an adequate return of profit. If you take your annual outlay of $24,00 for the support of the University (independently of the self-sustaining

(pge 415)
Departments, and then compare with it the exceedingly defective arrangements which constitute the machinery of the University, you will see the disproportion existing between the two. Such an outlay requires, on a mere business view of expenditure, a corresponding outlay in accommodations and similar means of help, and in no other view can it be regarded as a wise appropriation of money. Education is largely a matter of machinery as well as of men; ample conveniences, abundant room, every possible auxiliary in the form of models and apparatus enter into the question of educating the mind; and because of the want of these things, the best Professors diminished in worth, and even his meager salary partly thrown away. Good men and good tools must go together; if we employ the best men, we must give them the best facilities for their work, or much of their value is neutralized. On this subject my views are so decided that I do not hesitate to affirm, that the working force of the University would be doubled or trebled simply by supplementing it in the way pointed out.
I beg, therefore, to call your special attention to the plan submitted herewith for the change of the Old College into Lecture Halls and working Rooms as [and] also to the suggestions made by Col. Brown, Pro. Prest. Of the State College on this subject.
Next to this, I counder [consider] the establishment of an office, similar to that filled by the Proctors of the Universities, a most important step to be taken. The duties of this office

(pge 416)
should embrace the superintendency of Buildings in course of erection a reconstruction; the care of the grounds and other property; the supervision of the Public Boarding House, and the management of the Board money of the Students; the control of servants and of purchases for the University, and the general external care of the University. As far as possible, all these things should be completely detached from the Teaching Departments of the University; Professors should have no connexion with them; nor should the time and attention of the Chancellor be consumed by their endless details. For some years past, this class of duties has greatly increased, and under our new organization, it will increase yet more; and moreover they are duties that will involve in the future much of the order, stability, and growth of the University. Experience has fully taught me, that at these points we need the most careful vigilance and untering [untiring] energy. If such an officer can be secured, I can not doubt that he would prove a great safe guard to the interests of the Institution and more particularly would he be a protection again certain evils, to which University Students are not more than ever liable. I need not specify to the Board what qualities of personal influence and what business talents, such an officer should possess. The insensible government of an Institution like ours, one that proposes to deal much more with the occult forces of character than with the superficial impulses of youthful conduct, is the main strength of real discipline; and every day of my life in your service has only more deeply convinced me,

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that the spirit of a University, the spirit of bravo truthfulness, of tender sympathy, and of disinterested magnanimity, is far more mighty in the control of students than technical rule and mechanical authority. The world as it gets older is harder to govern by mere law. Advanced civilization fights against old restraints and will continue to fight against them. The growth of Popular Education will make men more self-asserting and less reverent of the outward symbols of rule. This is emphatically true of University government. Young men are harder to govern but easier to control than I have ever known them; and I therefore beg to impress on the Board, that if they establish the office which I have named and elect a man to fill it, they should have special reference to the qualities of the incumbent as well as his qualifications for a responsibility as delicate as it will be arduous.
The third point, to which, your attention is called, is the subject of Medals and Rewards, which at a previous session of your Board, was referred to me for consideration. The time has now come when the Board can act a divisedly [advisedly] in this matter and I therefore recommend to your favorable notice, a Resolution of the Faculty which I herewith submit. The largest and best Institutions of learning have tried these methods of developing talent and stimulating scholarship with eminent success; and it is more popular now with the most distinguished Teachers than ever before. If we had the money, I should heartily favor a large expenditure in this way; and even at the present time,

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you might make a judicious oulay [outlay] of $500 a year for such an object. To attract students to the University; to elevate scholarship; to raise the time of thought and feeling among out young men and to give additional features of distinction to graduation in the University; I am well satisfied that nothing is comparable with this plan. The limited experiment which we have made in this connexion, satisfies me that you will act wisely to be liberal in this direction, and if it accord with your judgment to leave the details of the arrangement to the Faculty, or Faculties, they can be so managed as to blend with the present scheme of education, and thereby enhance its utility and completeness.
I am gratified with the results of the University in enlarging the scope of education and perfecting its methods by means of occasional written Recitations and Examinations. A great deal of such work is now done here and it is most beneficial work. Education by the pen is the best education, and while it might be extravagant to say, that it is the only education worth having, it is entirely time to affirm that no other education will make a thinker whether he be a speaker or writer. The stress laid on public speaking among us had been most hurtful; it has dwarfed and superficialized our intellect, it has leveled towards the sea-line, not towards the mountain-line; and as a necessary sequence to this excessive indulgence in Popular Oratory, our writing ability has steadily diminished. What we most need in the progress of civilization are writers.

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not talkers; a sound, stable, conservative public opinion; and yet more the subtle agencies that legislate for legislation and create the shaping might of a peoples spirit; are almost wholl [wholly] due to writers; and writers not talkers are the perpetuated climax of the greatest of inventions, the Printing Press. The fruits of this system of writing in the University have been really remarkable and I therefore ask as freely as possible to advance its objects.
Three points have now been briefly discussed; First the proper accommodations necessary and desirable and the appartenances requisite in models, etc. to give the University full command of its existing resources and to utilize to the utmost compass the annual outlay in salaries and other expenses. Secondly, the creation of a new office similar to that of Proctor for the greater security and order of the University; and Thirdly, an increase of Medals and Rewards to stimulate scholarship, and particularly to encourage writers.
Taken together these additions to the scope and energy of the University will impart a new vitality to its old modes of action while they will certainly give a larger freedom and buoyancy to its prospective work. I consider the University so well established, its hold on our people so much increased, its future so firmly assured, that you will be warranted in devising bold and decided measures for the policy of a new era in an our affairs. A public Institution like our will never win the fullest measure of public confidence nor assure public

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enthusiasm unless it commands public admiration by a fearless and even daring course of action. Nothing now is so much wanted as a financial policy which shall indicate a strong conviction on your part of the merits of the University, and at the same time, an equal connection that the people of Georgia mean to rally in its support. A wise debt would be far preferable to the very unwise poverty under which, the University of Georgia is now oppressed; and if such a debt enabled you to now broadcast even the State the seeds of truly educated mind, I have faith enough in our people to believe that they would promptly and cheerfully pay the debt. You must not wait for the demand to create the supply; no grand Institution was ever created on the basis of such a narrow and selfish Political Economy. The true course for you to adopt, is to create the demand by first creating the supply; for just as Christianity was given to the world and the world taught by its presence and power to appreciate its doctrines and then sustain its Institutions, so higher Education must be antocendently [antecedently] diffused and a sentiment thereby awakened which will support your liberal schemes. A plan will probably be submitted to you for raising mone [money] in Scholarship Bonds. It has my hearty approval, but I warn you against suffering that this will raise adequate to your wants. As an auxiliary, it will contribute something; yet will [with] the field opening before us, it will fall far short of your urgent necessities.
Agreeably to your instructions at the session in Atlanta

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March 30th, I took immediate steps to organize the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. After an informal conference with members of the Board who could be seen, it was thought advisable for me to travel through the State for one month and make known the scheme and objects of the new College. Towards the end of April, sickness arrested me in this tour and on the third of May I returned to the University and resumed my duties. Through the energy of this local Board of Trustees and the Pro Prest. Col. Brown, assisted by members of the Faculty, all the preliminary arrangements were concluded for a most successful inauguration of this beneficent scheme. Great praise is due to these gentlemen for the skill and promptitude, with which, they organized this College; and it has no parallel in the history of this fund in other American States and none, I believe, in the general annals of education, I can not speak too highly of their manly and generous conduct.
The operation of this scheme of education as now incorporated into the University, promises results both as to quality and quantity which I do not think can be exaggerated. It practically creates a new Georgia for the exception of the manifold advantages of knowledge. The larger part of the young men who will avail themselves of its opportunities, would never enter any College of a merely literary and Scientific kind; nor indeed will the great mass of our people sustain an Institution on any such limited and exclusive basis. The kind of knowledge and culture, which we admire and prefer, they do not admire and

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prefer; and hence as it is the business of a State University to furnish an education or educations adopted to the whole people seeking them in their respective spheres, respecting them [their] organic tastes and doing its utmost to elevate and dignify their individuality as it lies embedded in their position, and callings, I do esteem it an occasion to congratulate you that this new work of Education has been so happily commenced. So far from this kind of education being antagonistic to the older and more restricted method, it would be much closer [in] accordance with the facts to regard it as an inevitable sequel to its long continued and long honored usefulness. Had no classical and scientific learning demonstrated its marvelous excellence, its capacity to refine and enable, its varied uses in fitting the mind to be mind and to exercise all the prerogutives [prerogatives] of mind, no such broad and comprehensive system as Industrial Education, could ever have been developed. Nor is there any more danger of a tilitarianism [totalitarianism] in the latter than in the former. Sordidness and mercenary passions do not characterize knowledge but ignorance. Education, no matter what its form or shape, no matter the language either living or dead of its text-books or what the materials and contents of its instructions; is essentially and for ever the same spirit, the same air, the same inspiration, the same grandeur. Aside then from the immediate consequences to the Industrial Interests of Georgia, I can imagine nothing better calculated to revive and extend the offices of classical culture, nothing more precisely adapted

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to enlarge and ennoble Professional education, nothing more fertile in unalloyed good to the Pulpit, the Bar, and the other learned Professions, than just such a scheme of Education as you have now initiated. If culture and taste do not permeate the middle and lower classes of Society as the natural or rather the providential effect of classical and Scientific Education, then its great Social power is last and it sintes from an intelligent and mediatorial force into a flimsy and futile accomplishment. The old system of education will therefore be made socially more operative and effective than ever before, since an atmosphere will be created through which, its light may be diffused.
On the other hand, the new scheme will do an immense work upon its own ground and in its own distinctive way. The effect on the University will be imprecedented [unprecedented] in its career, for it will bring to its active and zealous support the workshops, foundries, and mines and quarries of Georgia. It will put a new and living Georgia at its back. Twenty years hence, the most of the wealth of Georgia will be in Factories and machine-shops; and if we can, by timely sympathy and generous Sagacity, identify them with the University, we shall accomplish two objects, viz, make the old curriculum of Education wider and nobler, and Secondly, fertilize a vast region that is now little else than a dead Sahasa [Sahara?] of intellect. Not only then will it enable the old University to attain its select ends more uniformly and much more generally than hither to, but you

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will find that this new phase of Education will prove complementary to the earlier while filling a void that has long existed in Southern Civilization.
The main value of this fund (originally $243,000-), is in the demonstration which it will permit you to make of perfected contact with the great average mind of Georgia and the consequent formation of a genuine public taste and sentiment in behalf of the University. It will give you friends where you most need them. It will give you power where power is most reliable, most energetic, most permanent. But the means necessary to take full advantage of the vast possibilities now within your grasp, are not in this fund, and hence, they must be supplied from other sources.
I am happy to announce to you, that, Athens has given $25,000 in Bonds bearing 8 per cent interest, to the University. One of her citizens, Mr. Bloomfield, aided by other residents in the Town, has shown a most praise-worthy spirit in the improvements effected on the Campus. These instances of sincere and productive sympathy with the University must be very significant of the spirit that would soon spring up over Georgia if we could once get the University abreast with the times and in close fellow-ship with the hearts of our people. The limited range of the University has been the real drawback to its properity [prosperity]. Fortunately for her future, this narrow sphere of wholesome popular action, has been widened. If rested in with complacent

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content, it will do but little good. The supreme consideration at this juncture should be to put the University in an attitude and give her an outfit that will enable her at once to educate 500 young men and send out 100 of them as Graduates, each year; and, if this be done, you will soon have a public spirit created which will supply the means for a magnificent Institution.
You will bestow very careful consideration on the wise suggestions of Col. Brown, Provisional President S.C. in the Report which was forwarded to you. He has given this whole subject so much mature reflection and is so thoroughly conversant with its details that it is unnecessary for me to add any thing to what he has presented. I beg your attention also to the Report of Capt. Charbonnier, whose special Department as to character and merit, is all that could be desired. I submit too the Report of Col. Mitchell of the Law Department.
During the past year the High School has not been as prosperious [prosperous] as formerly, but this has been owing to causes over which, no control could be exerted. Its President, W.W. Lumpkin, assisted by Messers. Hunter and Hull, are intelligent, conscientious, and attentive men; and the School has not declined because of any neglect or mismanagement. The decline has simply been owing to circumstances which neither they nor we could resist; and as I have been a personal witness of their interest in the School, and their solicitude to sustain it, I can bear a sincere testimony to their coustancy [constancy], and fidelity in the midst of oppressive discouragements.

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Among the auspicious signs of a renewed interest in the University, the recent attendance of the Board of Visitors is entitled to special mention. Eight of these gentlemen, several of whom were experienced Teachers, spent seven days here in the careful prosecution of the work, which his Excellency, J.M. Smith, Gov. of Ga. had entrusted to them. Every facility was afforded them to see the real workings of the Institution; class papers were freely submitted to them, principles or organization and methods of instruction were discussed; so as to give them a clear insight into our condition. The thoroughness with which they did their work, was very gratifying to us all; and I am sure that the effects on the students, will be decidedly good. Much benefit would result to the University, if we could annually have such an inspection of its scholarship; and as some permancency would be necessary to qualify a Board of Visitors for this task, I have felt anxious to see the same Board continued for several years in existence. Should Gov. Smith feel at liberty to adopt this plan, I doubt not, that the influence of this Board will be much increased, and that it will open a most important channel of communication between the University and our citizens.
Reviewing the operations of the last year and calling to mind the perplexing uncertainties, that at your last annual session hung over the fortunes of the University; and looking now at what has been achieved by your exertions and what fuller issues are likely to ensue as a providential recompense for your

(pge 426)
fidelity to a great trust, I feel that there is abundant reason for me to congratulate you on the growth and prospects of the University. Now that the first step, always, the most difficult, has been taken, it will be a deplorable mistake, should we fail to press the advantages recently gained and that too under circumstances of striking significance. Not only during the past year, but at other times, since its re-opening, this Institution has been subjected to trial; on all sides, its external management and internal conduct have been exposed to an unsparing scrutiny; but it has steadily grown and, this day, it is stronger than ever before both in the respect and affections of our people. Judging by what I have seen, it seems to me, that the most formidable barrier in our way is not prejudice and hostility but a general ignorance of the University, which it is most desirable for us to remove.
Since your last Annual Session, it has pleased God to remove from this world, Col. John Billups, who for many years was closely identified with your Board as an active and hearty co-laborer with you in the nurture and guardianship of the University. Although not a member of your body at the time of his decease, yet all his sympathies were with you and with you to the last day of his existence. Living in our midst, a citizen honored and beloved, a man who kept a live [alive] in his noble nature the high sense of personal integrity, of courteous bearing, of manly obedience to his own lofty instincts,

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I recall him to-day as one whose image brings a sad tenderness to your meeting and whose departure reminds the most of us how soon we must go hence and be no more.
All of which, is respectfully submitted.
Andrw. A. Lipscomb Chancellor.
Excuses were made for the following absent members and sustained, viz. Messers. Beckwith, Harris, Gresham, Miller, Dougherty, and Scott.
Messers. Billups and Moore were appointed the Committee to invite distinguished strangers to the platform. Messrs. Mitchell and Cobb were appointed the Committee to secure the services of the Sheriff and his police force to preserve order during the period of the Commencement week.
On motion of Mr. Crawford, the following resolutions were adopted, and the Secretary instructed to furnish a copy through Prof. W. LeRoy Brown to the parties:
Resolved, That the thanks of the Trustees of the University of Georgia are due Mr. Robert L. Bloomfield, an enterprizing [enterprising] and liberal citizen of Athens and the gentlemen he invited to aid him for the substantial improvements made on the Campus including the new fences and the repairs to the Iron Fence in front; and also
Resolved, That Prof. Brown be requisted [requested] to act as our organ in communicating this action.
The various Reports of Prof. Brown, Mitchell, and

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Charbonnier were read by the Chancellor and properly referred with his Annual Communication to their appropriate Standing Committees.
The Finance Committee reported a scheme of Education Bonds which was adopted and is as follows:
The Finance Committee take the liberty of submitting to the consideration of the Board a scheme of raising funds for the use of the University, by the issuing of Bonds with coupons attached in sums of $1000, $500, and $100. It is understood, that a similar scheme has been eminently successful in Kentucky, where $500,000 have been raised in this way.
The Committee submit a form of Bond to be used, as part of this Report.
It is very desirable under our present circumstances to have the command of funds sufficient to buy such apparatus as is now demanded by our new circumstances, and such books as the Professors will need.
The form of the Bond could readily be varied to suit the different objects aimed at by the Board.
The Committee present this subject, thus early in our session, that Wm. LeRoy Brown, President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts may go to work in this direction at once, and see what he can accomplish in the premises. They recommend the adoption of this scheme to the Board.
All of which is respectfully submitted by the Committee-
S. Thomas

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R.D. Moore,
B.C. Yancey, Committee
Ordered, That the Secretary be and he is hereby authorized and empowered to issue Educational Bonds of the University to be signed by the President and Secretary of the Board in money not less than $100 nor more than $1000 redeemable in tuition in from one to ten years according to the amount of the Bond in the following form to wit:
Form of the Bond.
$1000. No. 1 University of Georgia
This certifies that ____________________ has paid one thousand dollars for five hundred dollars, or one hundred dollars per annum for each pupil, upon the presentation of the coupons hereunto attached.
The time of the admission of Pupils and their qualifications shall be subject to the regulations of the Faculty and the Board of Trustees.
This Certificate is transferable by the holder, and shall be null and void upon the redemption of the coupons hereunto attached.
Given this __________________ day of ___________ A.D. 18__ by authority of The Trustees of the University of Georgia.
Wm. L. Mitchell C.J. Jenkins Secretary President

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Style of Coupon
$100. No. 1 of Certificate No. 1 _________________ day of __________ 18___. This entitles the holder to tuition for the year 1872-73 in the University of Georgia, subject to the conditions of the Certificate of stock of the same date and number.
Wm. L. Mitchell
Ten such coupons are to be attached to each $1000 Bond, and Five coupons of like import to each $500 Bond, and one such to each $1000 Bond.
The action of the Prudential Committee in relation to the appointment of Cyprian
P. Wilcox, Professor of Modern Languages was confirmed.
The Board then adjourned till to-morrow morning at 10 oclock, and the Reports of the Standing Committees as far as made were referred as usual.
August 3rd 1872.
The Board met according to adjournment, and Messers. Jackson, Barrow, Hall, and Vason appeared and took their seats.
A letter to the Secretary and a Report to the Governor by the Board of Visitors were read.
A communications from the Georgia Medical College at Augusta on the subject of becoming the Medical Department of the University was received and read and referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline; and the Committee on Laws and Discipline was enlarged by adding thereto Messers Vason, Crawford, Hall and Billups.

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On motion Prof. Cyprian P. Wilcox was unanimously elected Professor of Modern Languages.
On motion, the resignation of Henry R. Jackson heretofore tendered, and that of Dawson A. Walker now tendered, were accepted, and the board proceeded to fill these vacancies, when it appeared, that James M. Smith, the Governor of the State, William Hope Hull were unanimously elected.
The President appointed Mr. Cobb, a committee to wait on Mr. Hull, who is in town, and invite him to take his seat.
On motion of Col. Billups,
The Secretary was instructed to inform Gov. Smith by telegram of his unanimous election and request his acceptance. Mr. Hull appeared and took his seat, and the Governor Smith accepted by telegram, which was read to the Board.
On motion of Col. Billups, Mr. Hull was put upon the Committee of Laws and Discipline in his place.
On motion of Mr. Hall,
The Building Committee was instructed to report up on the subject of a supply of water on the Campus; but this proposition was reconsidered, and the same Committee, on motion of Mr. Yancey, was instructed to contract for a full supply of water on the Campus, at a cost not to exceed a thousand dollars.
Mr. Jackson submitted the following resolution, which was adopted-
Resolved, That the Committee on Laws and Discipline be instructed to enquire into the propriety and feasibility of

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increasing the Salaries of the Chancellor and Professors of the University
On motion, The Board then adjourned till Monday Morning 9 oclock.
August 5th 1872 The Board met according to adjournment, when Messers. Cooper, Seaward, and Toombs appeared and took their seats.
Prof. Wm. Louis Jones tendered his resignation, which was accepted, and the subject of that Professorship referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.
The Committee on Laws and Discipline reported in part, and the Report was taken up by paragraphs and after discussion and eight amendments was adopted, and is as follows:
The Committee on Laws and Discipline beg leave to make the following partial Report:
1. In regard to the proposed increased accommodations for Lecture Rooms, that in the present State of the finances of the University, it is impracticable to do more than to fit up the basement of the Old College for Laboratory purposes. The upper Rooms of the Library building can be made to subserve all other necessary purposes. The procurement of needful furniture on an economical scale is recommended.
2.
The Committee recommend, that the amount for Medals be increased to $400.

3.
The suggestion of the Chancellor as to the appointment

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of visitors is approved, and it is recommended that His Excellency the Governor, be respectfully requested to make the appointment for three years, and one third of their number go out each year.
4.
In regard to the proposed connection with the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta and the University, this Committee recommends that our Board assent to the same, and appoint a Committee on our part to arrange details.

5.
They further recommend the appointment of a Committee of Conference with the other Universities and Colleges of the state on the part of this University, and the request of similar Committees on their part, to confer with each other, with reference to the establishment of harmonious and intimate relations, and such adjustments as may be mutually advantageous.

6.
It is recommended that hereafter Annual Reports from the Librarian, Treasurer, and members of the Faculty in reference to the operation and work of the proceeding year be made to the Board at its Session at Commencement.

Saml. Barnett, Chm. pro. tem.
The President appointed the Committees under the 4th and 5th Items of the foregoing Report, being by request of the Board Chairman of the Committee on the Medical Department: Under the 4th Paragraph, Messers. Jenkins, Moore, & Barnett Under the 5th Paragraph, Messers, Barnett, Peerce [Pierce], Vason, Jackson, Lewis, Hall, and D. Barrow.
It was announced during the discussions, that the

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Chancellor, from extreme ill health was disposed to retire, and after some conversation, this subject was pretermitted; and the Standing Committee on the Library reported. Their Report was adopted, and is as follows:
Honorable Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia. Your Committee on the Library are gratified to be able to report the arrangement of the Books to be admirable. The present Librarian, Prof. Lipscomb by great personal trouble has gathered in, over two hundred books which had been taken out, during several years past and carelessly left by Students at their respective boarding houses in town, as each left college. In view of this careless practice of some Students the Faculty have adopted a regulation that no Student shall receive his Diploma or Certificate until his receipt for books (now required to be given) shall be redeemed. It is recommended that this Regulation be affirmed by the Board of Trustees.
The Committee find some valuable books which need rebuilding [rebinding]. They are such books as are most generally read by students. Much farther [further] use in
the present condition of broken covers would seriously injure them. It is desirable that some forty books more or less be re-bound.
It is recommended that the sum of one hundred dollars be appropriated for the purpose of re-binding; and that Prof. F.A. Lipscomb be charged with the execution of this duty; Also That the Librarian be instructed to report to the next annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, the broken sets of

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books, the missing volumns [volumes] , the practicability of replacing the lost volumns [volumes], what additions may be made, by gift of books, in the interval, and what books are important to be added.
Respectfully submitted.
Ben. C. Yancey Chm.
The Board then adjourned to meet after the delivery of the Speech before the Alumni Society by Mr. Toombs.
August 6, 1872
The Board met according to adjournment, and Messers. Lewis and Pierce appeared and took their seats.
The Committee on Laws and Discipline further reported. To this Committee had been referred the Reports of the Finance Committee, of the Committee on the University Hill [High] School, and of all matters on the general interests of the University. At this point Mr. Mitchell in behalf of D. Mell now in Europe for the restoration of his health expressed his appreciation of the Boards indulgence during the past year, his desire to remain connected with the University in his Professor in all which the Board acquiesced.
The Degrees were then voted to be conferred as recommended by the Faculty, viz.
Bachelor of Arts.
A.B. Adams, I.C. Avery, J.A. Aycock, W.A. Blount, M.C. Davis, E.F. Dupree, C.E. Harman, R.N. Holtzclaw, I.F. Jackson, W.H.C. Loyd [Lloyd?], I.M. Mason, I.L. McWilliams, B.F. Payne,

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R. Peters, L. Phinizy, D.A. Small, C.J. Swift, B.F. Thompson, W.B. Walker, B.S. Walker,
A.M. Williams, A.P. Whittle, W. Wynne.
Bachelor of Science
C.A. Atkinson
Civil Engineers Robert E. Brunce, Wm. R. Davenport, P.H. Mell, Henry L. Collier, Edward Hunter.
Bachelors of Law Charles L. Bartlett, A.B. Howell Cobb Glenn, Arthur H. Gray, Andrew J. Lamar, John
W. McCalla, A. Azmon Murphy, A.B. , George G. Randell, A.B. Tinsley W. Rucher,
Abner T. Smith, John Thomas Tooley, George C. Tamlin, Philip K. Yonge, A.B., I. Ernest Yonge, A.B.
Masters of Arts
G.R. Glenn, A.B., A.A. Murphey, A.B., P.K. Yonge, A.B., J.E. Yonge, A.G [A.B.?].
The Board then adjourned to 5 oclock this after-noon, when Nathaniel J. Hammond, Alumni Trustee for few years and Pope Barrow Alumni Society according to the amended charter of the University by the Legislature at its recent session, appeared and took their seats, A.O. Bacon was elected by the Alumni Society for two years and
J.C. Rutherford for one year under the same amended Charter, but are not present.
The Board then proceeded to the consideration of the Report

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on Laws and Discipline and made some progress, and adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
August 7, 1872
The Board met according to adjournment, and resumed the consideration of the Report on Laws and Discipline in relation to a change of vacation, which subject was indefinitely post poned.
The Board at this point repaired to the Chapel to witness the Commencement exercises, the orations, the conferring of the Medals, Certificates of Scholarship, and Degrees as contained in the list already copied, and then returned to the Library and proceeded with the business before them, and discussed, amended, and adopted the Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline as follows:
The Committee on Laws and Discipline further futher report,
1.
That they appreciate the views of the Chancellor in the suggestion us [as] to the Proctor, or other officer, with such duties as those proposed, but at this time are not prepared to recommend the appointment for want of the necessary means.

2.
In regard to the High School, they recommend that the matter be entrusted to the Prudential Committee, whose local information best qualifies them to deal with it, to make such use of the buildings for educational purposes as a boarding house, or as Dormitories for Students, or for any other purpose or consideration deemed advisable.

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The Prudential Committee may if they deem it proper appropriate a sum not exceeding $1,200chargeable to the Agricultural fund for the education of Agricultural Students not fully prepared.
3. They submit the appended estimates of resources of the University, and recommend the following appropriations:
Estimates of 1872-1873 Resources.
Cash in hand $ 900.00
Cash from State dues Cash from Tuition Cash from Terrell Endowment Cash from Rents 8,000.00 12,000.00 1,300.00 1,300.00
Carried forward Brot forward Cash from Agricultural land fund $23,500.00 23,500.00 3,900.00

Cash from Interest on Athens Bonds for $25,000 2,000.00 Loan from general investment to Agricultural fund 11,000.00 Estimated resources for the year $40,400.00
Appropriations. Salary of the Chancellor 3,000.00 Salary of the Vice-Chancellor 3,000.00 Salary of the President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture & the Mechanic Arts 3,000.00

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Salary of the Professor of Latin $2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Greek 2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Modern Languages 2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Mathematics 2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Belles Lettres & Librarian 2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Meta Physics & Ethics 2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Civil Engineering 2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Chemistry 2,250.00 Salary of the Professor of Three Instructors C500 1,500.00 Salary of the Professor of Secretary & Treasurers $1,000.00 Salaries aggregate $ 29,500.00 Annual Catalogue $ 200.00 Advertising & Printing 200.00 Stationary [Stationery], Postage, & Books 200.00 Insurance 352.00 Music 100.00
Servants Hire 200.00 Periodicals 100.00 Medals 400.00 Incidentals 400.00 Repairs 1,200.00 Balance due W.J. Land for Chemical Apparatus 1,300.00

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Improvement & work on basement of Old College 800.00 For securing water on Campus not exceeding 1,000.00 For re-binding books in Library 100.00 For paying traveling expenses of Rev. W. Milburn 100.00 For Furniture & Desk for Drawing 300.00 For Engineering Models not exceeding 200.00 For Books for Natural Philosophy & Chemistry 300.00 For Apparatus in Natural Philosophy 400.00 For Apparatus in Chemistry 300.00 For Books for Library 300.00
$8,452.00 Add Salaries 29,500.00 Sum total of Appropriations for the year $37,952.00
4. The Committee recommend that the Salaries of the Professors be fixed at $2,250.00 for the present, and raised to $2,500.00 whenever the funds of the Institution will warrant it. Upon this basis it will be necessary to fill the following Chairs:
1. The Chair recently filled by Prof. Wm. Lewis Jones resigned, to wit, that of Natural Science, and of the Terrell Professorship of Agriculture, and to give instruction in General and Analytical Chemistry with the applications of Chemistry to the Arts.

(pge 439)
2.
That a Chair be created of Industrial Mechanics and Physical Geography, the Incumbent charged with instruction in Military Tactics and the Duties of Vice Chancellorship at a salary of $3,000.

3.
The Department of Ancient Languages be divided, and the following readjustment made of the duties of the Professors named, viz.

4.
The Chair of Latin to be filled by Prof. Wm. Henry Waddell.

5.
The Chair of Greek to be filled by Prof. Charles Morris.

6.
The Chair of Belles Letters [Lettres] to be filled by Prof. F.A. Lipscomb, who will discharge, also , in connection with the duties of his chair, the duties of Librarian.

7.
The three Instructors to be elected by the Faculty, one in pure Mathematics, one in Applied Mathematics, and one in English Studies.

The greater portion of the Agricultural fund not having yet been realized, and the Chair of Agriculture requiring very peculiar qualifications, the election of it is delayed, till the reception of this fund, and time thus gained for information and better solution.

8.
If any Professor elected declines to serve, the Prudential Committee are empowered to fill the vacancy till the next meeting of the Board.

9.
In filling the vacancy of the chair of Prof. Jones, the election is only for the term of one year, but with the

(pge 440)
understanding that if satisfactorily filled, the election will then be confirmed.
10.
That the appropriations made by order of the Board are specific, intended for the precise purposes named in the appropriation Act, and not transferable to any other purpose.

11.
In regard to appointments to the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, it is recommended that they be made on the recommendation of some Trustees contiguous to the residence of the appointee on the basis of real scholarship, merit, and promise, without reference to the wealth or poverty of the appointee, to avoid unpleasant discriminations, on such evidence of fitness as to satisfy the Trustees. Upon proper application, each county will be entitled to as many appointees as it has members in the House of Representatives, and each Senatorial District to one appointee. Upon failure of suitable application, then appointments can be made from other Districts or Counties, having reference to their distribution as nearly as may be from the different sections of the State.

12.
That the Chancellor having expressed his earnest desire and urgent necessity to be relieved from the action duties heretofore discharged by him in connection with his office, this Board with the highest appreciation of his past services and of his present great value to the University, and with sincere regret at the state of health which interferes with his immediate and personal relations to the discipline of the

(pge 441)
University, and does hereby devolve upon the Vice-Chancellor, D. Lipscomb, as Chancellor still retaining his official relation to the University.
Saml. Barnett
Chm.
On motion of Mr. Thomas, the sum of one hundred dollars was appropriated to Rev. W. Milburn to cover his expenses in travelling to the set of the University to preach the Commencement sermon.
On motion of Mr. Toombs, the Board then proceeded to the following elections, which resulted in electing Wm. LeRoy Brown, President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. Edward Porter Alexander, Vice-chancellor and Professor of Industrial Mechanics and Physical Geography. H.C. White, Professor Natural Science, and Terrell Professor of Agriculture, and of General and Analytical Chemistry with its applications to the Arts.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolution, which was adopted. Resolved, That all the Students of the University of Georgia be subject to discipline under the Vice-Chancellor and Commandant.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the Prudential Committee be authorized, from any excess of funds beyond appropriations made, to

(pge 442)
appropriate such sum or sums of money which my be necessary to meil [meet] exigencies.
The name of Rev. John N. Waddell D.D. Chancellor of the University of Mississippi was announced to the Board for the Degree of Doctor of Laws at the next annual meeting according to the present cautions [cautious] plan of conferring these high literary honors, and that of Rev. W. Battle President of Mercer University for the Degree of Doctor of Divinity.
The President appointed the Standing Committee as follows:
Laws and Discipline Messers Hill, Smith, Toombs, Barnett, Pierce, Hull, and Dougherty.
Finance. Messers Thomas, Brown, Miller, Vason, Gresham, D.C. Barrow.
Library Messers. Yancey, Hall, Crawford, Cooper, Scott, Bacon and Rutherford.
Buildings Messrs Moore, Seward, Beckwith, Lewis, Mitchell, and Pope Barrow.
Law Department Messrs Cobb, Jackson, Billups, Harris, Lewis, and Hammond.
The Board then adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell C.J. Jinkins, [Jenkins] Secretary Prest.

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Senate Chamber, Atlanta, Georgia October 24, 1872.
The Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia met in this place according to the call of the President of the Board at the request of the Prudential Committee, present,
C.J. Jenkins, President, and Messers. Cooper, Billups, Yancey, Hill, Gresham, Scott, Pope Barrow, Cobb, Hammond, Hall, Moore, Smith, Mitchell.
The meeting was opened with prayer by the Secretary and the minutes of the annual meeting confirmed.
The following communication from the Chancellor was read:
University of Georgia October 22nd 1872.
Hon. C.J. Jenkins, President Board of Trustees, Sir: The first Term of the Annual Session 1872-1873 opened at the appointed time.
The number of new matriculates was larger than usual, amounting to fifty (50, The entire matriculation in the Departments of the University, outside of the State College is one hundred and thirty which is apparently less than the attendance for several years past in the Fall Term. But it will be remembered, that the Engineers School has been transferred to the State College; and, furthermore, that the High School is not in operation. The ordinary classes are quite as

(pge. 444)
full as we could expect at this early stage of the Session.
The number of students in the State College is one hundred and twenty seven, and they are being instructed by their Professors and their assistants with regularity and thoroughness. The total attendance in all Departments is Two hundred and fifty seven. (257)
The number of students in the Schools of Mathematics, Physics, Logic and Belles Lettres, and also in Chemistry is proportionally greater than hitherto; while in the schools of the Greek Language there are sixty-two (62); in Latin one hundred and three (103), in Modern Languages, One hundred and twenty-five (125); and in the Engineer School, forty (40).
From this statement, it will be seen that there are 165 young men in the Classical Schools; 125 in the Modern Languages and 40 in Engineering, and moreover, it is quite clear, that the introduction of the recent courses of study has not injured the old and approved curriculum.
We have nothing to fear from the expansion of Education. The danger lies altogether in the opposite direction. The unity of Education can be far better preserved on a broad and diversified system than on a system narrow and restrictive, for in the one, the unity rests on completeness and in the other, on a one sided partiality. Considering our small means, the present scheme of Education, which your wisdom and your energy have established, is working out the most satisfactory results.

(pge 445)
The intersection of one Department or another; the strong hold each Professor has on his students; the mutuality of check no less than the mutuality of stimulation, every school has in relation to the co-ordinate schools, and the effect on Professors, and students in being parts of a soide [solid] and comprehensive system, and thus Liberalizing the tone of teaching and learning; are unmistakable signs of what the new scheme will accomplish.
Professor White has entered with great earnestness on his Department. The working class among his students is now organized, and during this week will begin Laboratory practice. This class consists of sixteen young men, most of whom are mature enough to make Practical Chemists with proper attention to their specific tasks. I rejoice most heartily in this small beginning of an enterprise, which contains with in itself much of future good, and I am, more than ever convinced, that if we created and offer the facilities for general scientific culture, we shall find our young men prompt and anxious to avail themselves of all such opportunities. In our day, Chemistry has something to do with every kind of industry, with every sphere of activity, with every form of life; and especially has it [its] close and vital connections with the Industrial Civilization demanded at our hands.
Viewed in this light alone, we have much to hope from every effort made to interest our young mind [minds] in behalf of a scientific education. So soon as our people can be brought

(pge 446)
to see that educated men, and educated men only can reproduce our lost wealth and put Georgia abreast with the world, so soon as they see and feel this supreme fact; we shall enter on a career of real and permanent success.
For my own part, I despair of any fundamental change in our fortunes, I despair of any solid basis for peace and prosperity, I despair of any genuine growth, until we
everywhere believe and every where act on the belief, that educated men alone can resuscitate Georgia. A state cannot be built up as a state was built up fifty years ago; The world is getting old and wise and powerful very fast: ten years now make a century. And the proof of all this lies in the vastly enhanced power of educated men the whole world is passing into their hands; and so our Heavenly Father ordains it. If this is true, then, the measure of our power will always be the measure of our education; but how many of our citizens believe this with the might of their soul? Our present position, despite of some adverse circumstances is exceedingly favorable for a great and immediate effort to increase the resources of the University. If we can combine now, right now, in one zealous resolute and enthusiastic exertion in its behalf, we can soon put the University in the highest vantage ground. I speak understandingly when I say that such an effort will soon place us in the had of Southern Institutions as it respects the greatest element of power in a State University, viz. the power to act directly, efficiently and thoroughly on the mind

(pge 447)
of the State itself and through that mind to develop all its resources.
I am much gratified with the operations of the new State College, Its President, Col. Brown and its officers understand their duties and discharge them with entire fidelity and untiring devotion. The two Assistants Mr. Barnett and Mr. Hunter are very skillful and earnest in their work. Taking into consideration, the fact, that we have had less than five working months for organizing and developing this new scheme of Education, that the materials in many instances were gathered from workshops and fields and hence unused to academic life, that domestic arrangements had to be made for their accommodation and that this had to be accomplished with the ordinary resources of the University, I feel fraud [proud] of the manly spirit and energetic zeal of my colleagues, to who[whom] we are indebted for the prosperous state of this beneficent Institution.
On no account should the two schemes of Education be dissevered. So far from being antagonistic they help each other. So far from being incongruous they are in perfect harmony. A specific and independent Education in Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts will be just as hurtful as any other sort of specific Education. The harm is in the petty exclusiveness, the meager individuality, the insulated personality, that all such systems generate.
A community can never be made a wise and compact community, if a single class is educated in a single thing, for the strength

(pge 448)

and grandeur of a community must always lie in the ideas and feelings, which, despite of the inevitable laws of social, distinctions, are shared alike by all. If our young mind does not experience this coalescence of thought and sentiment by means of education it is certain that no subsequent contact will ever issue in any union of opinion and action.
Apart from this great social effect, nothing can be more beneficial than to bring together young men, who propose to themselves voidely [widely] different sphere of educated life.
The competition then, is between mind and mind and not between Professors and trades. Furthermore, we shall give dignity to labor when we give intellect to labor, and this can only be done, by educating our young men together for all the honorable pursuits of business. I have the honor to present herewith the Report of Prest. Brown on the State College.
Our Faculty have requested me to announce to you, that they have passed a Resolution, asking the Board of Trustees to enact a Law, that each student shall pay an annual fee of five dollars for the use of the Library; and also that all students occupying the College dormitories pay an annual fee of five dollars as Room Rent.
I have the honor to remain Very Respty Your Obt. Servant, Andw A. Lipscomb Chancellor

(pge 449)
The various papers for the consideration of the Board were read in relation to
1.
The North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega.

2.
The resignation of the Vice-Chancellor.

3.
The negro interest in the landscrip fund.

4.
The claim of Dr. Jones for salary to Sept. 15, 1872.

5.
The thanks of certain gentlemen for Improvemerits.[Improvements]

6.
The claim of Messers. Hunter & Hull.

The Dahlonega business was on motion of M. Yancey taken up and debated
The following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That the thanks of the Trustees of the University of Georgia are due and hereby tendered to D. James Hamilton, Rev. M.H. Henderson, Messrs. R.L. Bloomfield, J.A. Hunnicut, John White, John Kettle, John W. Nichols, J.W. McCulla, Cobb, Erwin, & Cobb, and Center and Reaves for the substantial improvements made to the University through then [their] liberality in building the fences around the campus.
The following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That the President be authorized to receive from the Governor such amount of Georgia 7 per cent Bonds as the cash now in hand may realize at a price not more than 90 cents on the dollar, or to pay interest on such amount as the cash would have taught [brought] last July when the same came into his hands.
On motion of Mr. Yancey the following Committee was

(pge 450)
appointed to confer with the authorities of the North Georgia Agricultural College in relation to establishing a branch Department of the University at Dahlonega to wit Messrs. Yancey, Hull, & Graham.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following paper as having been agreed upon touching the North Georgia Agricultural College which was agreed to, to wit
Basis of an agreement to be hereinafter put in form when satisfied by the Board of Trustees, between the University of Georgia and the North Georgia Agricultural College:
The North Georgia Agricultural College conveys to the Trustees of the University of Georgia the uses and control of the buildings and real estate for such length of time as the Trustees of the University of Georgia shall continue to perform her part of these stipulations.
The University of Georgia shall pay annually two thousand dollars from the interest of the Agricultural Fund donated by Congress so long as the same remains intact in the hands of the Trustees of the University of Georgia to pay one or more teachers in the Institution of the Principal to be elected by the Trustees of the University of Georgia.
The control of details and the management of the Institution and the appointment of subordinate teachers shall be in the hands of the local board subject at all times to the revision and control of the Trustees of the University in whom is the ultimate power of legislation.

(pge 451)
This management is on condition that after the year 1875 one hundred male students be kept at the Institution in Dahlonega a proportionate sum to be paid for a less number, but to cease when the average number for one year shall be reduced below fifty.
The expenses of repairs of buildings, furnishing, warming and the pay of teachers beyond the two thousand dollars shall be raised by the local board and the Trustees of the University shall not a liable for any debt of said college beyond the two thousand dollars hereby pledged.
Nothing herein contained shall prevent the North Georgia Agricultural College from deriving the full benefit from any appropriation hereafter made by Congress for establishing a school of mines in connection with said Institution or any other appropriation given for its benefit by Congress.
Benj. C. Yancey. Chair Com.
W.P. Rice Chair on the part of the North Ga. College.
Mr. Yancey submitted a resolution that the board will elect at its present session, a Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture, which was adopted.
The Board then adjourned to 7 P.M. The Board met according to adjournment. On motion of Mr. Hammond, the Treasurer was instructed to pay D. Jones salary to the middle

(pge 451a)
of September 1832 [1872?] at the rate of $2000 per annum.
On motion of D. Moore, the election of Vice-Chancellor was post-poned to the annual meeting in August next it be-ing understood that the Chancellor will perform the usual duties heretofore performed by him.
On motion of Mr. Hammonds, Resolved, that the Annual Report of the Trustees to the Governor by prepared by the Prudential Committee and Chancellor. On motion of Mr. Yancey, Resolved, That $200 or so much thereof as may be necessary, be appropriated by the Board for advertising and printing as an additional appropriation.
On motion of Mr. Yancey, the Board went into an election of Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture at the usual salary of $2,250.
D.E.M. Pendletion [Pendleton] was proposed, and on counting the ballots, he was found to be duly elected. The Board declined to elect at this meeting a Professor of English Language and kindred subjects.
On motion of Mr. Yancey, the Board then went into an election of President for the Branch Department of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts at Dahlonega, and

(pge 452)
that his salary be $1,500 and a residence in the College buildings, to commence when he enters upon his duties. Hon. David W. Lewis was elected (7). Capt. Charbonnier was appointed to take charge of the Department of Military Tactics.
The Board then adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell C.J. Jenkins,
Secretary Prest.
Athens, Ga. August 1, 1873

The Trustees of the University of Georgia began their stated annual meeting this day at 10 oclock A.M. W.C.J. Jenkins, President in the chair. Prayer was made by the Chancellor, Rev. Andrw. Al Lipscomb D.D. LL. D. upon calling the roll, the following members answered to their names, viz. C.J. Jenkins, President and Messers, Mitchell, Moore, Lewis, Yancey, Vason, Jackson, Crawford, Billups, Thomas, Cobb, Gresham, Hull, Bacon, Rutherford, and the following members during the meeting viz. D.C. Barrow, Beckwith, Toombs, Brown, Pierce, and Hall, and the following members elected at this meeting, viz. Hanes [Harris] and Gordon.
Excuses were made and sustained for Messers. Miller, Hill, Cooper, Hammond, and Pope Barrow.
The Chancellor made a verbal Report, not being able from Providential causes to prepare the usual written communication; but read, in liew [lieu] thereof, several of the Reports of Professors to him upon their respective Departments.
The Standing Committees were called upon for their annual

(pge 455) missing pages 453-454
Reports, when the Chairman of the Finance Committee of Three, made their Report which was laid on table for the present, to be called up at any time.
The Committee on the Library reported, and the Report was taken up and adopted, and is as follows:
August Session 1873.
The Honorable, the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
The Committee on the Library report it in about the same well arranged condition. No increase of books as no appropriation could be made for that purpose.
The usual small appropriation for periodicals is all that has been done for several years; Save a small appropriation made at your last session, to re-bind books that were being injured for want of backs. A portion of the books needing re-binding has been neatly re-bound. It is recommended that the appropriation of two hundred dollars be made towards continuing the re-binding, and unexpended balance of last years appropriation to be a part of the present one.
Respectfully submitted, Ben. C. Yancey, Chairman
Mr. Cobb, Chairman of the Committee on the Law Department made as their Report, the Report of the Professor of Law to the Chancellor of the University, which was taken up and adopted, and is as follows:

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To the Chancellor of the University of Georgia.
Sir:
I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Law Department.
The number of Students in the Department during the last University year 18721873 was sixteen, of whom, one was graduated in the Winter, and nine more are now to have their degree of Bachelor of Law publicly recognized, to wit, Wm. A. Blount, Charles A. Davis, Idus. L. Fielder, Daniel R. Grower, John E. Hartridge, John L. Johnson, Andrew A. Lipscomb Jr., Thomas C. Milner, Percy W. Wilburn, James Whitehead. This class has some superior material and I shall be disappointed, if it does not become lininent [eminent] in the Professor [Profession] .
As I have heretofore remarked the great want of this Department is a large Library, especially, of Reports. Something might be done to enlarge this by our friends of the Professors buying second hand law books as opportunity occurs, and they can generally be bought very cheaply; and then by a judicious system of exchanges, a valuable law library be formed. In this point of view, any number of duplicates would be acceptable, as they could be exchanged with some of the large establishments now dealing in second hand law books.
The State Reports of the different State have become too numerous for the purchase of the Profession, and too expensive, and several enterprises [enterprises] have recently been set on foot, in consequence thereof, to call out all that professor [professes] a general

(pge 457)
value beyond the borders of the particular State, which called matter will be contained in one or two volumns [volumes], and I venture to suggest that authority be given to buy these annual volumns [volumes] for this Department.
I have recently purchased and now present to the Trustees of the University of Georgia the following second hand law books, viz,
Tuckers Commentaries, 1vd.; Christans Blackstone, 4 vd; Philips on Insurance 2 vd.; Park on Insurance, Hughs on Insurance, Condys Marshall, 2 vd.; Eden on Injunctions, Roper on Legencies, 2 vd.; Coke upon Littleton, 3vd.; Chittys Pleadings, 3 vd.; Phillips Evidence, 2 vd.; Connyer on Contracts, Story on Bailments, Story on Contracts, Easts Reports, 16 vds.; Barrows Reports, 5 vd; Canes Reports, 3 vds; Peaks Cases, Vesey Sr. Chancery Reports, Condensed Reports U.S. Supreme Court, 3 vd.; Broken broughs Circuit Court Reports, 2 vd; Dallas Reports, 2 vd; American Digest, 5 vd; American Chancery Digest, Philips New Digest of Ala Rpts., Alabama Reports, Stewards Report, Smiths Carolina Reports, 2 vd; Sterip Equity, 2vd; Story on Conflict of Laws, Govn. on Partnership, Chitty on Bills, Gilberts Law of Evidence, Wheeler on Slavery, Cobb on Slavery, Churchs Digest, 2vd.; Smiths Leading Cases, 2vd; Cruises Digest 5 vds; Georgia Digests, 9 vd; Freemans Pleas, 2vd; Maul & Lelwyns Reports, 5 vd, Danford and Easts Reports, 8 vd; Millers Digest Ga. Reports, U.S. Equity Digest, 10 vd; Morgans Verde Micum, 2 vd; Moores Index, 2 vd; Harrisons Chancery, 2 vd; Maddox Chancery,

(pge 457a)
Pleaders Assistant, Tollers Executors, Condutor Generals, Reevs Mannual[Manual], Jacobs Law Dictionary, 6 vd; Bacons Abridgement, 7 vd; Laws of U. States, 3 vd. Making all one hundred and fifty two volumns of various merit, but nearly all worth a place in our Library.
I have the honor also of reporting that John C. Reid, Esquire, attorney at law, of Lexington, Georgia, has presented our Library with a copy of his recent work on Criminal Law in one volumn [volume], and that A.O. Bacon, Esquire Attorney at Law, of Macon, Georgia, has presented to our Library a copy of his new Digest of the Supreme Court Reports in two volumns [volumes] , and request that these gifts of Messers. Reid and Bacon be suitably acknowledged.
All of which is respectfully submitted. Wm. L. Mitchell Professor of Law.
University of Georgia July 30, 1873
Mr. Billups submitted the following Resolutions, which were adopted:
Resolved,
That the explanation offered by Chancellor Lipscomb be and the same is hereby accepted as a satisfactory excuse for his failure to present a written Annual Report to this Board.
Resolved further,

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That the Board mindful of the depressing nature of the causes which have produced this result, hereby express their earnest sympathy for the Chancellor in his situation; and that the Secretary make known to him the substance of these resolutions. The Committee on the details propose to consummate the connection of the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta with this University reported through their Chairman Mr. Jenkins. The Report was taken up and adopted, and is as follows:
Augusta, Ga. July 5th 1873.
The proposed union between the Medical College of Georgia and the University of Georgia shall be accomplished as follows:
Article 1st: The Medical College of Georgia shall hereafter by styled, The Medical College of Georgia, being the Medical Department of the University of Georgia..
Article 2nd . The control of its affairs shall be vested in the local board of Trustees having power to fill vacancies in their own body and in the Medical Faculty.
Article 3rd. The local board and the Faculty shall determine the granting of Medical diplomas, and such Diplomas shall be signed by the Chancellor and Medical Faculty, sealed with the seal of the University of Georgia, and delivered to the graduates in the city of Augusta.
Article 4th. The expenses of the Medical College shall be borne by the local board who shall have the disposal of its receipts. No liability for its debts or expenses shall be incurred by the University of Georgia.

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Article 5th. An ultimate power of control over the regulations and appointments of the Medical College shall be in the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, to be exercised when they deem it necessary.
Article 6th. An Act of the Legislature may be applied for to sanction the charge [change] of name, its union with the University on the terms above stated, and such other changes as may be necessary.
C.J. Jenkins LA. Dugas Committee
R.D. Moore Jas. B. Cumming Committee Henry F. Campbell
The resignations of Iversond, Harris and Samuel Barnett were read; whereupon Mr. Crawford submitted the following resolutions which were adopted:
Resolved, That the Board of Trustees has heard with deep regret the letters of Messers. Harris and Barnett tendering their resignations as members of this Body.
Resolved,
That in accepting their resignations the Board tenders to these gentlemen the sincere sympathy of each individual member in their affliction, and greatly regrets the necessity which forces them to submit the same.
Resolved, That the Secretary be requested to furnish to each of these gentlemen a copy of the foregoing resolutions.
(pge 460)
The Insurance papers read by Mr. Yancey were laid on the table.
The death of Wm. Dougherty being announced on motion of Mr. Hull, a committee was appointed to report a suitable notice for our minutes. The President appointed on said Committee Messrs. Hull, Jackson, and Crawford. On motion of Mr. Cobb, the President appointed on the Committee to invite distinguished visitors to a seat on the stage., Messrs Moore and Billups.
The Secretary was instructed to provide a suitable police force for Commencement week.
The Board then adjourned to 5 oclock P.M.
Friday August 1, 1873 5 P.M.
The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Beckwith appeared and took his seat.
A communication was received from the Faculty on the subject of vacations, and on motion of Mr. Crawford was made the order of the day for 10 oclock to-morrow morning.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted:
Resolved, That the Standing Committee on the University High School be discontinued, as that school is no longer in existence.
Resolved, That the President appoint a Standing Committee on the Department of Agriculture and Horticulture, the Chairman which shall be a resident Trustee.

(pge 461)
On motion of Mr. Vason,
The Board resolved to visit the experimental station of the Agricultural College to-morrow at 5 P.M. and the Secretary was instructed to notify Prof. Pendleton, and provide the proper conveyance for the members.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Laws and Discipline be appointed by the President at the beginning of each annual meeting, and that this Rule go into effect at once, and that the old rule be abolished so far as it concerns this Committee.
Whereupon the President appointed the Standing Committee on Laws and Discipline for the present Annual Meeting. The Committee consists of Messrs. Hull, Beckwith, Moore, Greshman [Gresham], and Vason.
The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
August 2, 1873. 9 A.M.
The Board met according to adjournment. W.D.C. Barrow appeared and took his seat.
On motion of Mr. Billups, The Secretary was instructed to express to Messers. Reid and Bacon the thanks of the Board for their presents to the Law Library.
The order of the day was taken up, to act, the subject of vacations as presented by the Faculty.
Mr. Billups moved to postpone indefinitely, which motion was lost, Mr. Jackson submitted the following resolution which

(pge 462)
was adopted:
Resolved,
That the application of the Faculty be referred to the Committee on Laws & Discipline with instructions to bring a Report granting the application, in so far as the vacation is concerned and that this vacation extend from Commencement to the first Wednesday in October and attiring the law to that effect.
Resolved,
That the said Committee be also instructed to modify the law so far so [as] to change the Society days from Saturday to Wednesday afternoon, and to have recitations on Saturdays.
Mr. Lewis submitted the following Resolutions which were adopted.
Resolved,
That Gov. Jenkins, Wm. L. Mitchell and Martin J. Crawford with the Chancellor be appointed a Committee to take into consideration the subject of Education in all its grades for the whole state and to export whether any policy can be agreed upon by this Board and what that policy or system should be which they recommend to the Authorities of the State.
Resolved, That the Commissioner of Education for the state, Prof. Orr, be requested to co-operate with this Committee.
Resolved, That they Report at the next meeting of the Board.
(pge 463)
Mr. Billups submitted the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the Resolution adopted by the Board at its session in Atlanta in Nov. 1871 in regard to the distribution of recitations throughout the day was intended to alter the plan then in force and to require at least one recitation by each class between the hours of three and six oclock in the afternoon of each day.
The Board then adjourned till Monday morning next at 9 A.M.
Monday, Aug. 4, 1873 9 A.M.
The Board met according to adjournment, The Committee to prepare a minute upon the death of Mr. Dougherty submitted this report which was adopted nem. con. and is as follows.
Once more the hand of death has caused a vacancy in our ranks. William Dougherty Esq. one of the oldest members of our Board and a distinguished citizen of our State, has been called from earth. Of his character as a citizen, and of his career in the Profession in which he filled so great a place, we need not on this occasion speak. These things have been commemorated in public testimonials of his fellow citizens and of his professional brethren and the Judges of our highest Courts.
It is for us to Just on record our appreciation of his

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services to the cause of education, and of the pleasant memories that will ever attend his name, in the hearts of those who enjoyed the benefit of his sagacious counsels, and the delight of his general and pleasant companionship in the writings of this Board. Therefore,
Resolved,
That in the death of William Dougherty, the University of Georgia has lost a steadfast and able advocate; the Board of Trustees a wise a judicious adviser and valuable co-adjuton [adjutor] in their as possible [responsible?] duties; and we, the members there of, a friend and companion whose presence was ever welcome, whose cheerful urbanity was a source of unalloyed pleasure, and whose memory we will long cherish and respect.
Resolved,
That the Secretary be directed to send a copy of these proceedings to the family of the deceased with the assurance of the deep sympathy of this Board.
Wm. H. Hall,
Chairman
The Committee on Laws and Discipline reported.
A Communication from the Chancellor, Rev. Dr. Andrew A. Lipscomb, was received, in which he tenders his resignation, to take effect August, 1814 [1874] and which being read, was laid upon the table for the present.
The Report of the Committee upon Laws and Discipline was taken up, discussed, and amended, and pending the discussion

(pge 465)
the Board repaired to the Chapel to witness the Sophomore prise [prize] declamation; After which the Board returned to the Library room and resumed the discussion of the report of the Committee upon Laws and Discipline and struck out so much the report as recommends that no election of a Professor of the English Language and Literature be made at this time, the report was then adopted and is as follows.
We recommend the adoption of the following Resolutions.
Resolved,
This Board will contribute five hundred dollars per annum for two years towards the employment of additional instructors in the North Georgia College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. We have considered the question referred to us upon the policy of admitting one student from each county into the University on certain termsand we report that in our judgment it is inexpedient to alter the present system of free tuition and we recommend that such action be not taken.
In obedience to your instructions we report the following, to be made apart of the Laws of the University.
Vacation in the University shall extend from Commencement Day to the first Wednesday in October, and other vacations are abolished.
The regular scholastic duties shall be performed and recitations had on Saturday as on other week days; but each Wednesday afternoon shall be allowed for the meetings of the two Literary Societies.

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Every student who shall not be a member of one of the two Literary Societies and attend the Sessions shall be required to meet the Porf.[Prof.] of Belles Lettres or such other officers as the Chancellor may designate in the College Chapel or such other place as may be convenient, during the time given to meetings of said Societies, to the [be] engaged in such exercises as may be by him prescribed.
During the foregoing action of the Board, a recess was taken to attend the address of Hon. Alexander H. Stephens before the Demosthenian and Phi-Kappa Societies in the College Chapel at 4 oclock this after-noon and so the Board adjourned accordingly.
August 4, 1873
The Board met after Mr. Stephens Speech and resumed another branch of the report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline, which after discussion and amendment was adopted and is as follows:
The Committee on Laws and Discipline beg to submit the following report thus far submitted as to them:
Your Committee has attentively considered all the suggestions embodied in the report of the President of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and recommend the adoption of the following resolution,
1. Resolved,
That this Board will proceed to elect an Assistant Instructor of Mathematics in the State College of Agriculture

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and Mechanic Arts, whose duty is shall be to teach Mathematics and to drill all the Students in the Scholastic Department in Military Tactics under the supervision and control of Prof. Charbonnier as the head of the military department of the University, The Salary of said Instructor shall be $1000 per annum.
2. Resolved,
That all the Students of the Scholastic Departments of the University shall be required to wear an uniform, to be selected and prescribed by the Faculty.
3. Resolved,
That the Georgia State Agricultural Society be empowered to fill twenty Scholarships in the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts free of tuition, in such manner as the Society may deem best, and that the Secretary be instructed to notify the Society of this action.
4. Resolved,
That the President of the State College be authorized to issue written certificates of a right to fill two scholarships in said College for one year, or one for two years, to every subscriber of one hundred dollars theretofore, or hereafter paid into the treasury, which certificate and right shall be transferrable.
5. Resolved,
That each student occupying a room in either of the College buildings be required to pay ten dollar [dollars] per
(pge 468)
annum for room rent to be used exclusively for repairs.
The Report of the Finance Committee was referred back to the general Committee on Finance.
The Board then adjourned to 9 A.M. to-morrrow.
August 5, 1873 9 A.M.
The Board met according to adjournment.
Messers. Tombs, Brown, Pierce, and Hall appeared and took their seats.
The following communication was received from the Chancellor.
University of Georgia. August 4, 1873.
Hon. C.J. Jenkins
President
Sir: I have the honor to report the following gentlemen as recommended by the Faculties of the University for the Degree named, to wit:
Bachelor of Arts
R. Adams, Ga. H.W. Barrow, Ga., J.T. Buchanan, Ga., G.A. Niles, Ga., R.H. Randle, Ga., J.D. Scott, Ga., W.M. Slaton, Ga., W.A. Whittle, Ga., E.L. Anthony, Texas, C.M. Beckwith, Va., T.D. Huff, Ga., M.L. Parker, Ga., S.A. Reid, Ga., J.R. Shannon, Ga., H.F. Strohecker, Ga.
For Master of Arts.
R.J. Willingham, Ga.
For Bachelor of Science.
E.W. Montgomery, Ga.

(pge 469)
For Civil Engineer.
S. Barnett, Ga., J.G. Beasley, Ala, G.W. Gignilliat, Ga.
For Civil and Mining Engineer.
E. Hunter, Ga., P.H. Mell, Ga., R.B. Trippe, Ga.
For Bachelor of Law
W.A. Blount, Fla., I.L. Fielder, Ga., I.E. Hartridge, Fla., A.A. Lipscomb, Jr. D.D.
P.W. Milburn, N.Y., C.A. Davis, Ga., D.A. Grower, Ga., J.L. Johnson, Ga., T.C. Milner, Ga., James Whitehead, Ga.
I beg to remain your Obt. Svt.
A.A. Lipscomb Chancellor
On motion, the foregoing degrees were conferred by the Board as recommended.
On motion of Mr. Cobb, the Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline was reconsidered and amended so as to fix the salary of the AssistantInstructor of Mathematics and Drill Master at $750 per annum.
The Board then repaired to the chapel to hear Bishop Pierces address before the Alumni Society, after which the Board returned to the Library and resumed its duties. Mr. Mitchell submitted the following Preamble and Resolution, which were adopted.
Whereas Governor John Milledge did donate to the Trustees of the University of Georgia the tract of land on which much of the city of Athens is situated, from which large sums of

(pge 470)
money have been realized and appropriated to the various uses of the Institution;
And whereas D. William Terrell did donate to the Trustees of the University of Georgia the sum of twenty thousand dollars to found a Professorship of Agriculture and Agricultural Chemistry, and whereas it is meet and proper that such acts of beneficence should create a perpetual tie between the donors and this corporation, and Scholarships or educational adonorsous present a suitable means of such a tie, Therefore
Resolved,
That a Scholarship or the right of sending a pupil prepared to enter the University of Georgia free of tuition fees be and the same is hereby conferred upon the respective families of Governor John Milledge and D. William Terrell, in honor of their beneficence, and that said scholarships be enjoyed at present by Mrs. John T. Milledge, widow of John Milledge, and by Mrs. Edgar G. Dawson, wife of Mr. Edgar G. Dawson, daughter and only child of D. William Terrell, and that said ladies have power to convey said Scholarships respectively by deed, will, or otherwise to their descendants, but not to strangers to the blood of Governor John Milledge, or to be blood of D. William Terrell, provided, nevertheless, that should either of said ladies fail to make such conveyance, then the said scholarship shall be regulated by the statue of distributions of the State of Georgia, but exercised by the eldest heir at

(pge 471)
law according to the common law of advowsons, and transmitted till the blood of the said Governor John Milledge and D. William Terrell or either of them shall become extenct [extinct].
On motion of Mr. Vason, the Board went into the election of three trustees to fill the vacancies occasioned by the death of W. Dougherty and the resignations of Mr. Samuel Barnett and Honorable Iverson L. Harris.
Mr. Young L.G. Harris was elected to fill the vacancy of Mr. Dougherty, and on motion of Mr. Yancey the same was made unanimous. Col. John Scriven was elected to fill the vacancy of Mr. Barnett, and Genl. John B. Gordon was elected to fill the vacancy of Judge Harris.
Mr. Young L.G. Harris was elected to fill the vacancy of Mr. Dougherty, and on motion of Mr. Yancey, the same was made unanimous. Col. John Scriven was elected to fill the vacancy of Mr. Barnett, and Genl. John B. Gordon was elected to fill the vacancy of Judge Harris.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted.
Resolved,
That the election of Professor H.C. White, as Professor of Natural Science, and Terrell Professor of Agriculture, and of General and Analytical Chemistry with its applications to the Arts, (who was on trial for the year) be confirmed, and declared permanent Professor.
Resolved, That the action of the Special Session of this Board at Atlanta, in October, 1872, be confirmed as required by the Statute.
Mr. Hull submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.

(pge 472)
Resolved,
That Professors Rutherford and Brown be charged with the matter of procuring a supply of water for the Campus, and for that purpose be empowered to use the amount appropriated; Provided, that existing contracts be respected, and that no expenditure be made without a guaranty of success.
Messers. Bacon and Thomas were appointed a Committee to inform Messrs. Harris and Gordon of their election, and invite them to take their seats as Trustees, and they accordingly appeared and took their seats at the board.
The Board then adjourned to 5 P.M.
August 5, 1873. 5 P.M.
The Board met according to adjournment, when Mr. Yancey called up the subject of going into the election of Professor of the English Language and Literature, which was further debated and then laid on the table.
On motion of D. Moore, the Board went into the election of Assistant Instructor in Mathematics and Drill Master, when it appeared that Capt. James Bonham was duly elected.
The Report of the general Finance Committee was again submitted, read, and adopted and is as follows:
The Finance Committee respectfully report that they have audited the Treasurers acct. for the past fiscal year and find that the receipts were $32,295.60 and that the expenditures were $32,962.26 for which proper vouchers were shown. The

(pge 473)
disbursements, it will be seen, exceed the income by the sum of $666.66. The cash balance in the hands of the Treasurer is $1896.00 against $944.24 in the last annual report. This increase is owing in part to a credit of $312.00 taken by the Treasurer for that amount of past due Rail Road Bonds and coupons not paid, but charged as cash in his account, and the further sum of $255.33 with which his cash balance was credited last year on account of supposed unsettled claims against the Indigent Soldiers fund which has not been presented and is now incorporated with the general cash balance, the remainder of $385.05 being tuition fees paid by the maimed soldiers. If the appropriation of the income arising from the Land Scrip Fund is restricted by the Act of Congress, the Committee suggest that the disbursements on account of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts be kept separate from the disbursements on general account, and would further recommend as an equitable arrangement, that the salaries of such of the Faculty, to wit, the President of the State College, who is Professor of Natural Philosophy, the Professor of Mathematics, Professor of Modern Languages, and the duties of their respective chairs in both the State College, and the Academic Departments, be an equal charge upon the Income arising from the Land Scrip and General Fund.
If these suggestions are approved as a basis of apportionment, the expenditures for the fiscal year on account of the Georgia State College were $10,234.15 and from the Terrell Endowment of $1,400 which in the opinion of your Committee

(pge 474)
properly belongs to the State College Department, making $11,634.15 as the entire income of that Department for the past fiscal year, there remains a balance of $3,856.48 which with the balance of $1,279.00 on last years account makes an aggregate of $5,135.48 which may be properly considered as a charge upon the future Income of the Land Scrip Fund for the benefit of what may be termed the General Fund of the University.
The Committee in the further discharged of the duties of their appointment submit the following statements of the assets of the University together with estimates of Income and Appropriations for the next fiscal year.
Assets of the University.
Cash balance in hands of the Treasurer $ 1,896.66
Rail Road Bonds, General Fund 10.000.00
Rail Road & Ga. State Bonds, Terrell Endowment 20,000.00
Ga. State Bonds Land Scrip Fund, 70 56,000.00
Ga. State Bonds Land Scrip Fund, 80 96,000.00
Amount in hands of the Governor arising from
Land Scrip not invested, yielding 7 per cent 90,202.17
$274,098.83
Estimated Income.
From the State $ 8,000.00
Terrell Endowment 1,400.00
Rents 1,600.00
Interest on General Fund 700.00
Tuition Fees 11,000.00
(pge 475)
Interest from LandScrip [Land Scrip] Fund $17,914.15
$40,614.15
Appropriations
Annual & Triennial Catalogues 350.00
Advertising & Printing 400.00
Medals 200.00
Re-binding Books in Library 200.00
Music 100.00
Insurance 352.50
Hire of Servants 400.00
Periodicals 100.00
Stationery & Postage 200.00
Fire-wood 150.00
Repairs 1,200.00
Incidentals 200.00
Furniture for Chemical Department 250.00
Instruments for Engineer Department 400.00
Scientific Books for Library 200.00
Fitting up Armory Room 100.00
Supplies for Department of Agriculture 650.00
Salaries under present organization 30,750.00
Supply of water for Campus Grounds 1,000.00
$37,202.25

The Committee also recommend a further appropriation of $331.00 to be refunded the President of the State College for that amount advanced from collections on account of an Apparatus

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Fund and expended in repairs on the New College Building.
The proportion of the above appropriations to be charged to the Land Scrip Fund, if the basis of apportionment before stated is approved may be thus stated:
For Half Annual Catalogue $ 125.00
For Half Advertising and Printing 200.00
For Hire of Servant 200.00
For Periodicals 60.00
For Incidentals 100.00
Instruments for Engineering Department 400.00
For Furniture for Chemical Department 250.00
For Scientific Books 200.00
For Fitting up Armory Room 100.00
For Supplies for Agricultural School 650.00
For Salaries 12,875.00
$ 15,260.00

If the amount of these appropriations be deducted from the Income from the Land Scrip Fund and Terrell Endowment, which for the next fiscal year will amount to $19,341.15, these [there] will remain a resulting balance of $4,054.50, which may be applied to the payment in part of the balance of $5,779.03 as before stated, advanced during the past two fiscal years from the General Fund for the State College, thereby securing a fund which may be appropriated to needed repairs and improvements of the College Buildings, not contemplated in the foregoing estimates for repairs, or in such other manner as may be

(pge 477)
deemed advisable.
The Committee deem it proper to state that the donation of $25,000 of Bonds made by the City of Athens to be used in building a Laboratory for the State College, to which reference was made in the last Report of the Finance Committee has not yet been received; the Bonds, however, have been executed and are withheld until the city authorities can obtain such legislative sanction as they deem necessary for their issue.
Respectfully Committed [Submitted?]
S. Thomas
R.D. Moore Athens, Aug. 1, 1873 Benj. C. Yancey.
Com.
The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
August 6, 1873. 9 A.M. The Board met according to adjournment.
A communication from the Executive Department of the State containing the views of the Board of Visitors on the subject of vacation was received and read, and on motion laid on the table, as this Board had already acted upon and disposed of that subject substantially as recommended.
Mr. Hull submitted the following resolution[s] which were adopted. Resolved, That the Prudential Committee be authorized to receive the donation of Bonds from the City of Athens, upon the terms

(pge 478)
on which they may be given and be authorized to select a site and cause the proposed building to be erected as speedily as is consistent with proper economy.
Resolved,
That the sum of one hundred dollars be appropriated as additional compensation to Mr. Edward Hunter, the Instructor in the Engineer School for his services for the ensuing year.
On motion of Mr. Toombs,
Messers. Crawford, Mitchell, and Harris were appointed a Committee to negotiate with the Trustees of the late George R. Gilmer in relation to the funds in their hands dedicated by him in his last will and testament to the preparation of Teachers, with power in said Committee to act in the premises and bind this body.
Mr. Cobb submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved, That the Faculty be instructed hereafter to award two medals to the Sophomore Class for Declamation.
The following communication from the Chancellor having been received and read, was suffered to lie over till to-day.
University of Georgia August 1, 1873.
Hon. C.J. Jenkins President of the
Board of Trustees, etc.

(pge 479)
Sir:
I beg to announce to you my determination to retire from the Chancellorship of the University, at the close of the next University year, August 1874. At that time, I shall have been in your service, fourteen years.
If I were younger and stronger, I would still try to administer the affairs of the University in your name and as your trust, and so long as you desired it, I would labor to advance the cause which you have so much at heart.
But I am conscious, painfully conscious, that age and feeble health, are beginning to unfit me for my present duties, while I am yet more sensible of the fact that these graving [growing] infirmities will soon incapacitate me to bear the burden of solicitude and anxiety which is now resting upon me. Every year this burden must increase as the University enlarges; and I therefore feel that the good of the University, its growth and power, require me no less than duty to myself, to resign my office.
You have done every thing that considerate kindness and generous sympathy could suggest to lessen my toils. You have denied me nothing I wished; you have given me more than I could have dared to ask. But while this only adds a keener pang to my heart in separating from you, it also teaches me that I should do you a wrong and the University a wrong to remain in a position, for which, I must necessarily become more and more unfit, every year I continue to live.
Because of this conviction, I resign. It is a conviction,

(pge 480)
nothing less, and it is final.

This is the most painful step of my life, but I must take it. I have therefore to ask, that you allow me to return my office, one year hence, into your hands.
I have the honor to remain, Your obedient servant, Andw. A. Lipscomb Chancellor.

Mr. Toombs submitted the following Resolutions, which were adopted.
Resolved, That, The Board of Trustees have received with deep regret the resignation of the office of Chancellor of this University by the Rev. Dr. Lipscomb, an office which he has so long filled in the most trying period of its history with great ability and fidelity, and to the satisfaction of this Board, and advantage of the University.
Resolved,

That the Prudential Committee are hereby authorized and directed to take the subject of his successor under careful consideration, and to report to the next annual meeting of this Board, the name or names of some suitable persons or persons whose services can be obtained for that office.
Mr. Vason submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved, That the Faculty exercise discipline as far as

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practicable through a police committee of their body; while each Professor is expected to do all in his power to preserve good order; Provided, however, that this measure shall in no respect impair the power of the Faculty as the ultimate growing body.
Mr. Jenkins in behalf of the Committee on Honorary Degrees submitted the following report which was adopted.
The Committee on Honorary Degrees to whom were referred, at the last annual session, nominations as hereinafter mentioned submitted the following resolution.
Resolved,
That the Degree of Doctor of Laws be conferred upon the Rev. John N. Waddel, Chancellor of the University of Mississippi; and the Degree of Doctor of Divinity upon the Rev. A. J. Battle, President of Mercer University.
A.A. Lipscomb
C.J. Jenkins.
The Board then repaired in a body to the Chapel to witness the Commencement exercises, consisting of Addresses, announcement of Certificates of Merit and Proficiency, Presentation of Prize Medals and Delivery of Diplomas. After which the Board resumed duty in the Library Room.
On motion, Mr. Harris was added to the Prudential Committee. Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,

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That at future meetings of this Board of Trustees, on Friday preceeding Commencement, when a quorum is present, no matter for consideration shall be postponed for action till a larger number of absent Trustees may come in.
Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the members of this Board resident in Atlanta and such other members of the Board as may happen to be present together with Mr. Bacon of this Board who is a member of the Legislature, and Prof. Brown of the University, be a Committee to take charge of the interests of the University involved in any policy which may arise, or are likely to arise in the Legislature at its next Session, and that they are authorized fully to act in such measures according to their best judgement [judgment] for the interests of this institution, the power embraced by this resolution not to extend to the giving up of any rights or powers hitherto acquired.
The President appointed the Standing Committee as follows:
Committee on Finance. Messers. Thomas, Brown, Miller, Vason, Gresham, and D.C. Barrow.
On Library. Messers. Yancey, Hall, Crawford, Cooper, Scott, Bacon, and Rutherford.
On Buildings.
(pge 483)
Messers. Moore, Seward, Beckwith, Lewis, Mitchell, Pope, Barrow.
On Law Department. Messers. Cobb, Jackson, Billups, Gordon, Lewis, and Hammond.
On Department of Agriculture & Horticulture Messers. Yancey, Lewis, D.C. Barrow, Crawford, and Scriben [Scriven].
Messer. Crawford submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the Judges of the Sophomore Prize Declamation shall hereafter be chosen from the Audience which may be present at each Commencement, and that they be presented as heretofore.
The following resolutions were adopted.
Resolved, That the semi-annual convention of the State Agricultural Society at their approaching meeting in Athens be permitted to hold their sessions in the College Chapel.
That the ladies of Athens be permitted to use the Lecture rooms in the Library Building for the purpose of the proposed receiption [reception] to the members of the convention of the Agricultural Society.
The Board then adjourned. Sine die. Wm. L. Mitchell, C.J. Jenkins, Secretary Prest.

(pge 485) missing 484
Athens, Georgia, July 31, 1874.
The Trustees of the University of Georgia commenced their Stated Annual Meeting, in the Library, this day at 10 oclock, A.M. Mr. C.J. Jenkins, President in the Chair.
Prayer was made by the Chancellor, Rev. Andrew A. Lipscomb, D.D. L.L.D. Upon called the roll, the following members answered to their names; to wit:
C.J. Jenkins, President, and Messers. Cooper, Mitchell, Miller, Lewis, Hill, Brown, Toombs, Yancey, Vason, Rutherford, Jackson, Crawford, D.C. Barrow, Thomas, Cobb, Gresham, Hull, Gordon, Harris.
And during the meeting, the following members appeared and took their seats: to wit: Messers. Billups, Beckwith, Scott, Smith, Seward, Hammond.
And during the meeting, the following members were elected and took their seats; to wit: Mr. Ferdinand Phinizy in place of D. Moore deceased, and Mr. Charles T. Goode, by the Alumni Society, in place of Mr. Bacon, who declined a re-election.
Excuses were made and sustained for the absence of Messers. Bacon & Scriven.
The minutes of the last meeting were read, and no objections made upon the question of their correctness being put by the President, he signed them,
The Chancellor then read his annual communication, which is as follows:

(pge. 486)
University of Georgia, July 28th, 1874. Hon. C.J. Jenkins, President of the Board of Trustees,
Sir,
The number of students in the University during the past year, was Two Hundred and Sixty Six. Of the matriculates, Two Hundred and Fifty were from Georgia.
The monetary panic, which set in just before the Session began, explains the falling off in the number of Students. At no time in our history, have we had so encouraging and apparently so well assured a prospect for Students as we had early last September. But the financial embarrassment prevented many of the old students from returning. Our main loss was in the class of students. Monetary troubles always act upon Universities to hinder the return of former matriculates, and our experience in the Seventy Third Session illustrates this fact. The ratio of new students was greater than usual, and but for the disasters that befell the country would have been without precedent in our career as an Institution of Learning.
If then, the power of a University be measured by a steady advance in new patronage, the past year of the State University despite the diminished attendance is an argument on the side of its prosperity. It is only when a University loses old friends and fails to make new friends, that its fortunes are threatened. Our losses were in the advanced classes and were

(pge 487)
due to the fact, that many students, driven by the pressure of the times, were sufficiently educated to go forth into the world and make their own support.
During the session, more cases requiring discipline have occurred than I have known in any previous year. On the other hand, we have had less illness, fewer disorders as growing out of idleness, more study and choser [closer] study, a higher average of improvement, and a larger mass of satisfactory results, than ever before realized. This looks somewhat inconsistent. But in reality no inconsistency whatever exists. It is just the way things go on in this world and especially in this exceptional world, to which young students belong. The most of the disorders to which I have alluded, an [are] precisely of that class of evils which almost invariably go with the rapid growth of intellect and the constant excitation of the nerves. So far as the Faculty could arrest these evils they have arrested them. Discipline has been prompt, energetic and effective; and while it has been the aim of the Faculty to rely upon the discipline of influence, conscious that that is the wisest and surest method to develop a true, noble and broad minded manhood and the only method to build up the intellectual power of a University, yet they have not failed to use the discipline of authority whenever needed. I know of no way to bring out the good that will not bring out the bad. Sunshine and shadow, wheat and tares, Christianity and sensualism, will work out their fearful antagonisms and no Powers, humor or superhuman

(pge 487a)
can prevent it. The use of power is to check the evils as they appear to reduce them to the lowest possible degree and destroy their contagious action and above all to keep the eye fixed upon consequences far beyond the punishment of the offender. Punishment is the weakest influence in a University. Punishment in a Community like that gathered within a University, can only be determined when every other agency of power has gone before it and failed to reach its end.
I had expected when the present system expanded into the form which you gave it at the last session of the Board, that deem such consequences would enuse [ensue] as have ensued. I have not been disappointed. The increased demand on the vital energy of students, the heavier draft on their time and attention; the corresponding advance in vigorous modes of teaching and learning; and the severes [severest] tests precisely such a state of things as we have had the past year. But the change made was in the natural order of progress, and with its obvious defects some of which are incidental and hence removable, I think the present system better than the one which it displaced. Without doubt, it has enhanced the ever existing tendency of disscipation [dissipation] among the students and especially to certain kinds of disscipation [dissipation]; but nevertheless, the change on the whole, is decidedly beneficial and on no account, should be seriously disturbed. What evils exist are manageable. I believe too, that the disorders of the past session, are not likely to recur, and my reason for so thinking is that the present system, if judiciously

(pge 488)
executed must master the student by mastering his whole time, his entire attention and his undivided intellectual force. Indirectly in this way, the University will exert a moral control by exerting an intellectual control. The University will make the student and the student will make the man. This is the only wise methods of working. The basis of genuine and powerful discipline lies in the complete occupancy of the students mind in the systematic action day by day of the inspirations of thought, and in the energy and rapidity with which you convert his fitful, wayward spontaneous impulses into fixed will and fixed habits. The average college Boy is a third an animal and such an animal he is to furnish the raw materials for a great and noble manhood. But how can you touch the slum [sum] bring might of soul within him; how to waken it, how give it, how give it consciousness, how handle it and shape it and arm it an [and] fortify it for life and struggle and heroic duty. Only through the intellect. Almighty God has opened that door to his soul and baned [banned] every other.
I have extended these remarks because of my conviction, that the public mind needs enlightenment on this subject. Unreasonable expectations an [are] entertained as to the capacity of their position and services to guard the morals of students; and these are hurtful both to Parents and Colleges. While I would not lessen in the slightest Tegsee [Degree] that exalted sense of moral responsibility which is the main source of Preachers strength, and while I believe that he cannot be too watchful

(pge 489)
over the habits of his student, yet I am likewise persuaded that this function of his office requires the utmost sagacity no less than the most persistne [persistent] patience. The popular notion that a college officer is in loco parentis is simply absurd and, indeed the ideal of discipline which even some intelligent persons hold sums [seems] to one thoroughly extravagant. What a well ordered University has to do and ought to do is never to allow the presence of any evils that interfere with its legitimate work of education beyond this as a matter of discipline it ought not to undertake to go. If it labor wisely and deligently [diligently] within this limited sphere, it will find an immense task on its hands. According to this, discipline is merely co-operative with teachings training as a means of culture; and hence it has been the aim of our Faculty to direct its discipline in this natural channel.
Despite then of some drawbacks the past year, the discipline has recomplished [accomplished] written examinations, demonstrate, that large results have been attained. The standard of education is just as high as the people can bear and higher than nine tenths of them can appreciate. Ideals in education must not be too exalted for the people with whom you are dealing. We make a fatal mistake by putting our standard above the reach of average mind. A much greater capacity for work, a frur facility in composition; an [are] some of these results. Wishing to give you in this report, my final estimate of the scholarships attainable

(pge 490)
under the present system of the University, I have taken more than ordinary pains to satisfy myself of the facts, and I here record a judgment, slowly and carefully formed that our progress in this respect ought to gratify every friend of the University.
I urge on the Trustees the importance of appropriating an annual sum, not exceeding two hundred and fifty dollars, for the publication of specimen papers written by students as tests of scholarships. Not only would this be the most truthful way, to advertise the University, but it would give what is most desirable: vis, the proper data for ascertaining both the kind and degree of advancement, made year by year in the different Departments. Within the last few years, the studies of the Senior Classes in several of our schools, have been equal to the addition of an entire session of the [three?] months to the curriculum, while in the variety and versatility of mental culture, the same enlargement is perceptible of meanwhile the progress in skill and compass of instruction on the least of the Professors has been equally marked. But these facts sum [seem] to be unknown. Nothing has so pained me during my connection with the University, as the ignorance, even among the educated portions of our citizens, if [of] the work doing here; and I therefore beg the Trustees to take this matter under consideration.
By means of this State College, we have been enabled the past year to indicate the partial service to the State, which it is the power of the University to render. Especially have the researches and labors of D. Pendleton and Prof. White had

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the effect to turn public attention to the University as an organ of influence and authority in questions of service. To set in this way on the mature intellect of the state; to make the Univ? a source of practical intelligence and guidance in the affairs so nearly concerning our material growth; this is most desirable, way,[nay] essential to our success. I look with pride on this aspect of our recent history. Of one thing, I am satisfied, that the only way to create a public sentiment, at this time in behalf of education is through Art and Science as related to the physical, social, and moral well being of our people. To effect this end the Univ. must act on the great middle class mind of Georgia and act on it through the very best instrument we could have[,] the State College. By means of this great agency not only will hundreds of our atisens [artisans] be brought into living sympathy with us, who could otherwise have been lost to us, but the most convincing sort of proof will be afforded of the immense advantages of the Univ. to the welfare of our population. In your own hands, Gentlemen you have now a power, for transcendent good. Though [Through] the State College you can gain a ready and complete access to the heart of Georgia and turn that heart to your support.
The time has passed when you could rely on the higher and cultured classes of society to sustain a great University. Professional men and professional interests cannot build up such a University. Whether for good or ill the day has gone

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when this was possible. In every thing, the natural history of power is to pass in its final stages of development from the few to the many. By laws as sure as the decrees of Jehora,[Jehovah] this movement of power fulfills its purpose, and have [has] the wisdom putting the University in vital contact with the popular mind of the commonwealth. On this account, I regard the Land Scrip Fund as chiefly valuable because it enables us to test the Commonwealth, as well as the intellectual utility of practical Education. Looking also to the fact that in the short space of two years and three months, enough has been done to excite the nature of other States and call for unqualified praise for the energy and judgment which you have shown in the management of this enterprise; looking too, to the great fact that we shall soon send out from this College a number of the best trained young men that ever honored an Alma Mater, most of whom, but for this beneficent provision, could never have been educated; looking at these things, I feel it a cause of honest and hearty gratulation that we have witnessed this new epoch in our history.
President Browns Report will show you what he needs to advance his work. Dr. Pendletons Report will also make known to you in what manner you may promote his further success. On no subject, permit me to say, on no subject should your action be so earnest and liberal as on this interest of the University. In no direction can you employ any available means to remunerative an outlay. Every dollar you can appropriate

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to the expansion of this Department, will amply repay the Univ. because it will sense what is most wanted in Georgia; I mean a specific Education growing out of our sectionality and so thoroughly localized as to take the definite impress of the State. Teach your young men, your old men, what Georgia is, what her Geography and what her Topography mean, what her resources are, how these resources are to be used, teach your people to be their own architects, Engineers, miners, Machinists, Manufacture Georgia brains as well as Georgia Cotton; and you will soon have this commonwealth in your grasp. Give a Georgia education and you will have money enough for all your wants as a University.
Among the new features introduced into the University are the Lectures on Parliamentary Law by Rev. Dr. Mell, and the Lectures on Commercial Law by Wm. L. Mitchell Esq. This additional work was cheerfully undertaken by these gentlemen and most successfully performed. Without interfering at all with our regular schedules, these Lectures have proved a most valuable supplement to our courses of Instruction and must augment the practical worth of the education within the reach of our students. In connexion with this topic, I would state that the Students show, an increasing aptitude to profit by Lectures in unison with Text studies, which extends in a striking degree to facility and strength in Composition. The pen, not the voice is the absolute test of the scholar, the pen, not the voice is the secret fountain form of statesmanship in our changing day and

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of all other constructing and governing agencies; and I have therefore watched with keen solicitude the very signal progress of our students in this-the greatest of means to cultivate our own minds and the mind of others.
On the opening of the session last Fall, measures were adopted to carry out your action in respects to Military drill. Prof. Charbonnier assisted by Capt. Bonham has had charge of this Department. These gentlemen have given entire satisfaction in the discharge of this duty. All the students, except such as have been specially excused, have been drilled three times each week, each drill three quarters of an hour. The order and obedience of the students on drill have been commendable and the attendance has been quite uniform. If arrangements can be made to obtain arms, the interest of the students in the drill can be maintained, but otherwise it will be impracticable.
The Medical College of Augusta having been made by your action the Medical Department of the University, I attended its opening exercises on the first Monday of Nov. 1873. There were one hundred and sixty-five students in attendance on the course of Lectures, of whom one hundred and twenty were Partial or Chemistry students and forty four full students. At the Commencement, March 2, 1874, the Degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred on fourteen gentlemen. My duties in the University allowed me only a short visit, but intercourse with the faculty a the knowledge gained by the working of the college made a very strong impression on my mind as to the advantages

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of this connexion.
Greatly to my regret, I was unable to attend the commencement at Dahlonega. The visit to this college a year ago interested me deeply in his [its] behalf. I saw there, what seemed to me a germ of great power for that portion of the State a germ we ought to foster and rejoice to foster. The eagerness of the students to learn[,] their enthusiasm, their self-denying habits; the sympathy of the people with the enterprise; the energy and hearty spirit of the President and his assistants; evinced a degree and genuineness of vitality, I had not expected so early in the history of the Institution. When these are such materials, where there is such free naturalness of ambition and endeavor, we may confidently believe that Education will prove itself a positive agency of Providence.
In retiring from my office, as Chancellor, of the University, you will permit me to make some remarks of a general nature.
First of all, it seems to me that you have great reasons for gratitude to our Heavenly Father that under his benignant Providence, you have been able to manage and direct the affairs of the University with such signal results. By your wisdom and especially the highest of all wisdom that of foresight; by your calmness and moderation; by your vigilance and energy; you have succeeded in these troubled years in guiding the University through danger and trial and in bringing it to its present position. Year by year, I have seen a growing concentration of thought, a deepening zeal, a wider outlook, a clearer

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sagacity, and that most efficient of all qualities a more fervent moral earnestness, in discharging the high trust God has laid upon your hearts. Critical periods have been passed through unharmed. Again and again, conjectures have arisen when a lapse in discretion would have been injurious, perchance fatal. Through these perils, Providence has led you, and He has led you by means of your thoughtfulness, your singleness of aim, and your habitual anxiety to do what was best for the University.
The wisest use of prosperity is to look back on its course and see how it has been attained. Since in this way, we make past success a groundwork for more fruitful gains in the future; it may not be amiss for me to remind you that you owe your fortunate administration of the Univ. affairs to your inflexible purpose to be simply Trustees, excluding from your deliberations every sentiment and feeling not official and acting each with the other in mutuality of end. This principle is again among you. A self perpetuating body such as you are, secures the supremacy of this principle, for if it failed you could have no common nexus to bind you together.
Next to the unity prevailing among you, I doubt not, that you are indebted for your prosperity to the economic skill with which, you have used the limited income at your disposal. This is to be said to your credit that you have made your money go farther and work harder than the same amount in any University, of which I have any knowledge, and I rejoice in

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you for doing it. Small as your means have been, you have kept out of debt; and you have made every year pay its own expenses. Now that your resources are larger, the same sound judgment will doubtless control your expenditures. Perfect what you now have before you add anything new, Several Departments are recent; they have a vast deal of talent power within them, and it would therefore be good policy for you to expand them to the utmost of their capacity. Nor should the fact be overlooked, that you have avoided all experiments in Education and indulged in no theories that might have been hazarded the usefulness of the University. Changes have been made but not on a priare spenlations [speculations]. You have most wisely incorporated new schools into the University and otherwise modified its structural operations, and yet, amid these changes, you have full[y] retained the organic character of the University. The old trunk of the tree with nearly a century in its heart, and the old branches, counting their historic years, are still here and you have merely added grafts to be fed by the parent stock. The identity of the Institution has been in no wise impaired, so that you have united two things which in Education should never be separated vis: the conservation of the past and the growth of the present. I implore you to adhere to your traditions, hold on to your ground[;] it is made soil and belongs to you by a charter from Providence. Keep the old Classical course and its associated branches of study as the basis of the University; introduce as I have often urged. All possible helps for

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scientific education; adjust these to one another; and then you will grow into a University. Which while not boasting, that it embodies the spirit of the age, may yet congratulate itself on cherishing the spirity of ages.
Gaining from this brief review of fourteen years, I can only give a glance at the future. Just at this time your position as Trustees is one of new responsibility new in kind as well as in degree. You have enlarged the University and with in the best sense, popularized it, not to the unreasoning instincts of the multitude, but in such a manner as to make it appeal to the different tastes and capacities of intellect, eater for instruction, I dislike any other sort of popularisation.
You are now fully ready to begin a great work and what is that sort of work? It is to educate the grown up population of Georgia to support the University. It is to bring them to understand precisely its merits and induce them to appreciate those merits. At this point we have failed; and while I feel that the failure has been chiefly due to circumstances, nevertheless I feel saddened by the fact. But if we fail hereafter, the plea of circumstances will not dull the edge of misfortune. Misfortune it is, and despite of its valed extinuations, humiliating. On your account, on account of my noble colleagues, on my own account, I feel it like a personal sorrow. It is the single dark spot on our annals, and far [for] one my heart burns to have it wiped out.
The most essential, the most commanding, the most enabling

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function of this University is to mold and impress the mature mind of Georgia so that it shall be the reflex of your mind. Viewed in this light Gentlemen, you are a Faculty above the ordinary faculty unrecognized it may be, but none the less a Faculty, whose task it is to form public opinion, to breathe into it a public son, and bind it by the heart strings to the University. Dismiss from your thoughts the illusory idea, that the main work of this University is annually to qualify a certain number of young men for an intelligent and useful life. It has this to do. But this is the smallest part of its business, and when this education of your young men has been faithfully completed, what does it amount to as a force of public sentiment, when they are every where thrown into communities either cold or callous or downright hostile to the University.[?] The natural result is that the Alumni of the University[,] its legitimate scheme, its strongest aim of support, its refuge and hope, its last resource when imperiled are well nigh paralyzed. The most painful aspect of this want of sympathy on the part of the State is in the fact that our Alumni are made almost powerless, so that the most of them are neither recruiting officers to fill up our ranks or privates to do our fighting.
All this can be changed. You have in this University as now organized, both the mind and the machinery to do this work acting on the State. You can reach the Farmers and Planters, that is certain. You can reach manufacturers and
mechanics; that is certain. You can reach nearly all the Industrial Interests that is certain. Direct action on the State, is what we want and what we must have. Indirect action has proved inadequate. But if we united them, educating the young men and the mature men, we shall soon revolutionize the sentiment of Georgia. Benin,[Begin] at once to publish with your own imprint every important fait [fact], every new idea elicited by cautious experiment and exhaustive research. Begin an Industrial Museum of the State. Begin now to connect your classes more closely with workshops, mines, and factories. Let the Ligislature [Legislature] alone, act immediately on the people, act on them through the University, for there and here only are your lives and fulcium.[fulcrum]
From these views I turn by natural force of association to the memory of one who so lately and so intensely shared with us the hope of uniting this University and the heart of Georgia in warm and enduring fellowship. Nine months ago, God called him suddenly away, and the void which he then left, has seemed each month to grow wider in its reach and more solemn in its silence. With the entire University, his earnest and generous spirit blinded; with the State College, full of faule versalitity; [false versatility] quick to see and quick to feel; talking and acting with easy and interchange of power; rich and strong in hopeful boood [bond] ; vital in every part; resolute towards every thing eight [right] and equally courageous to resist every thing wrong; a brother in

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friendship; a Christian in the Charity of manifold services and in consecration to the crop; Dr. R.D. Moore has bequeathed us a name, a memory, and example, an inspiration which we shall not willingly let die.
One year ago, I gave you notice of my resignation as Chancellor of the University. It is the saddest step of my life, made the sadder by the consciousness that fourteen years of toil and struggle have failed to afford me, what most I coveted, to enjoy
an adequate opportunity to testify its deep and under[utter] sense of the unwavering constancy of your sympathy and regard.
The prayer of my heart is, that God may bless you for the kindness which you have shown me, and blended with that prayer, the sincere wish an [and] ardent hope, that my successor may be more useful than I have been.
I have the honor to remain, Your Obedient Servant Andw. A. Lipscomb Chancellor.

The Reports of Wm. LeRoy Brown, President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and of E.M. Pendleton, Professor of Agriculture were distributed, being in print, instead of being read, and those of the Professor of Law, of the Prudential Committee, and of the Finance Committee were read, and all five laid on the table.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolution, which was

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adopted:
Resolved, that it be the order of the day at 5 oclock P.M. on Monday next to go into the election of a Chancellor and Professor of Belles Lettres and Oratory, or so soon thereafter as the Board may be in Session.
The following extract from the minutes of the Faculty was received and read, and on motion of W. Mitchell, ordered to be entered upon our minutes as a proper testimonial of the Chancellor.
It being known that Dr. A.A. Lipscomb who for fourteen years past has filled the office of Chancellor of the University of Georgia has submitted his resignation to the Board of Trustees, the members of the Faculty, prompted by the recollection of his long and useful service to the University, by a grateful recollection of his friendship and ready sympathy with each individual member, and by admiration of his exalted character and great abilities have unanimously,
Resolved,
1.
That in the resignation of Dr. Lipscomb, so long their official head and intimate friend, the Faculty feel that a common bond of Union and sympathy in their official capacity and social relations has been severed.

2.
That while they are duly sensible of their own loss, in view of his devotion to the University and to the cause of Education in the South, they desire to express their due appreciation of the loss to the University of a head under whom it has flourished and expanded, and to the public at large

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of a true and earnest worker in the cause of general education.
3.
That in consideration of the great interest involved while it has sumed [seemed]proper to the Chancellor to offer his resignation to the Board of Trustees, the Faculty express their earnest hope that he may be induced by the Board to withdraw his resignation by relieving the office of those duties that are incompatible with his declining health.

4.
That whither he go out from them or remain with them, the Faculty do hereby, express to him these [their] warm and abiding interest in him, his welfare and happiness.

5.
That a copy of these Resolutions be forwarded by the Secretary to the Chancellor and to the Board of Trustees.

By order of the Faculty. Extract from Minutes William Henry Waddell. Univ., Geo. Sec. Faculty July 24th 1874 Univ. Geo.
The Committee on General Education of which Mr. Jenkins is Chairman, appointed at the last annual meeting, was discharged, upon his statement, that the times are unpropitious for action, and that nothing ought to be undertaken, while the Civil Rights Bill is pending before Congress, and until that controversy is settled favorably for the South.
The President appointed the Committee on Laws and Discipline, viz Messers. Hull, Gresham Vason, Toombs, and Miller.

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The various Reports were appropriately referred.
The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock tomorrow morning.
August 1, 1874 The Board met according to adjournment. The minutes of yesterday were read and amended.
Mr. Yancey made a Report on the Library, and also a Report on the Department of Agriculture, both of which were laid on the table for the present. Messers. Billups and Beckwith, appeared and took their seats.
The Report on the Library was taken up and adopted, and is as follows:
The Committee on the Library have nothing new to report. The struggle of the University since the war to recover from her financial losses entailed upon her by the disaster of the war, and extend her Educational Advantages to our people have not permitted appropriations to the purchase of books which are demanded by the progress of the age.
The Committee can merely report the general good order in which the library is preserved and arranged; as its tasteful arrangement is manifest to the eye of the Board as it occupies, for business, the library room.
The appropriations, to rebind the books with broken backs made at your session of 1872 was partially used by the librarian; but the work was not completed. At your last session therefore a similar appropriation was made. None of it has been used in consequence of the illness and subsequent death of the librarian, our lamented young Professor I. Lipscomb. The

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Committee recommend an appropriation of two hundred dollars for the binding of such books as may be necessary.
The duty of selecting books to be bound and contracting for the work to be devolved upon the Chairman of this committee; called to his aid, as he may require the assistance of the librarian.
It is the duty of the Chancellor to appoint the librarian, the compensation fixed is one hundred dollars per annum. It has been his custom, to select in former years, a number [member] of the faculty.
Your Committee advise the appointment to be made by the Chancellor of some young man in indigent circumstances, who will discharge the duties of the position, in connection with his prosecution of his studies in the University.
It shall be the duty of the librarian to be in the library room between the hours of 8
A.M. and 12 M and 2 P.M. and 5 P.M. each day of the collegiate term Sundays excepted, except when engaged in recitation.
For such services such librarian shall receive a compensation, one hundred dollars, payable quarterly, and in addition be entitled to instruction in each and all of the departments of learning taught in the University without charge therefor.
The Chancellor shall make the appointment annually; may continue the same person and the appointment and shall have the power of removal for inefficiency or misconduct.
Respectfully submitted

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Benj. Yancey Chairman.
The Report on the Department of Agriculture was taken up, discussed, amended, and finally re-committed, And Messers. Brown and Cooper added to the Committee on the Agricultural Department and the Committee had leave to retire.
Mr. Miller submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the Secretary be requested to prepare and submit to the next annual meeting of this Board a compilation of the Laws, Rules, Of Order, and Resolutions now of [in] force for the Government of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
Mr. Toombs submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved,
That a select committee of five be appointed by the chair to enquire into and report upon the propriety of reducing the tuition fees in Franklin College, and also to enquire into and report the question of tuition in the State College of Agriculture, and to report as early as possible.
The President appointed the Committee of Five to consist of Messers. Toombs, Vason, Jackson, Harris, and Lewis.
Mr. Gordon laid on the table the following letter: Athens Ga. July 31st 1874. To the Hon. Charles J. Jenkins,

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President Board of Trustees
University of Georgia
Dear Sir,
The Commission appointed, by his Excellency James M. Smith, under a resolution of the General Assembly, approved, March 2nd 1874, to perfect a plan for the unification of the University of Georgia and the Denominational Colleges etc. have the distinguished honor to inform you and the Board of Trustees, that we are now present and respectfully request permission to submit the plan agreed upon by us, at such time to-day as you may appoint.
With assurances of distinguished consideration, We are, your Obt. Svts.
J.O. A. Clark
J.B.
Gordon

D.
Wills

J.E. Brown
B.H.Hill

Which was taken up, read, and on his motion,
Rev. J.O.A. Clark D.D. was invited to submit the plan of unification with remarks, which he proceeded to do, and on motion of Mr. Toombs, the plan was referred to a committee of seven appointed by the Chair, consisting of Messers. Toombs, Gordon, Miller, Beckwith, Brown, Mitchell, and Crawford.
On motion of Mr. Miller, Hon. W. Price, President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia College of Agriculture

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and Mechanic Arts at Dahlonega, a Department of this University, made the annual report of her Institution, which was laid on the table for the present, and subsequently referred to the Finance Committee.
Mr. Miller submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the President be requested to appoint, annually, a Committee of Three Members of this Board, any of whom is authorized to appoint an alternative member, as a Board of Trustees to attend the Commencements of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega, who shall report to the the next ensuing meeting of this Board.
The President appointed as the visiting Committee for the next Commencement at Dahlonega Messers. Miller, Billups, and Hill.
The Report of Prof. Rutherford on the supply of water on the campus was read by Mr. Harris and referred to the Finance Committee.
Mr. Cobb, Chairman of the Committee on the Department of Law, reported back the Professors Report, and moved its adoption, which was agreed to and is as follows:
University of Georgia July 28, 1879 To Rev. A. A. Lipscomb. D.D. L.L.D. Chancellor.

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Sir:
I have to report that there have been connected with the Law Department of the University during the past school year fifteen students, of whom, there are eight entitled to Diplomas as Bachelors of Law vis, J.B. Conyers, T.D. Hightower, J.C. Parks,
L.W. Thomas, H.B. Everett, Walter M. Jackson, LW. Schofield, and I.M. Moon. The present Junior Class consists of five members.
Upon Rev. P.H. Mell resuming his course of Parliamentary Law, the classes in this Department attended with great interest a [and] profit. It is understood that ours is the first Institution of Learning in the world that attempted this branch of science, for a science it is, if exact definitions and important principles constitute science, as they are supposed to do.
Dr. Robert M. Smith has delivered to the Law classes, an admirable course of written lectures upon Medical Jurisprudence, which have greatly advanced the Law Students in these important subjects. This has been a free will offering on his part to the advancement of the interests of the University, which entitles him to the thanks of the Department and of the Board.
I cannot close this Report, without expressing my own and the acknowledgments of the Law Classes to you, for your able and most valuable lectures upon the laws of thought, freely laborated [elaborated] for their benefit.
And I must express in this brief Report, how I have missed the countenance and presence of one incessant co-laborer,

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Dr. Richard D. Moore, whose death has cast such a gloom over us all.
Rescat in Pace! Yours, Very Respectfully, Wm. L. Mitchell.
Mr. Yancey, chairman of the Committee on the Department of Agriculture, made the Report after re-commitment which was adopted and is as follows:
The Committee on Department of Agriculture may discharge much of its duty by referring to the Report of Prof. E.M. Pendleton Orof of said Department to Chancellor Lipscomb.
Laid Report has been referred to this committee. Our report will be our action upon such reference.
It illustrates the importance of a well conducted scientific experimental station to teach the principles of Agricultural Science as applicable to our Southern soil, products and climate. The various analyses necessary to perfect the experiments should be made in our own University. This would manifestly rebound not only to the reputation of the University but add largely to the number of students who would seek here to acquire Agricultural knowledge.
The present experimental form [farm] embraces only some twelve acres of land. These are devoted to experiments with our Agricultural products. The value of the value of the experiments do not depend upon the extent of grown [ground] occupied, but upon the

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accuracy with which such experiments are conducted. These experiments may be ordered as valuable to the farming community on a farm of this size as upon one of far larger extent. It is not an object of our experimental station to make money. The object like similar stations in France, Germany and England is solely to develop agricultural science. The questions of sales is a subordinate one. The experiments should be conducted with reference to contributions to science acting upon this principle, profit to any extent, cannot be realized on so small a farm.
The question of enlargement of the farm, should in the opinion of the committee be left for future consideration, when we have settled the question of title to the land sold to Mr. L.J. Lumpkin, for which full payment has not been made, and the committee recommend that the Prudential Committee be instructed to take early steps to have the question of title between the University and Mr. Lumpkin about the lands west of the present farm settled by the courts if necessary.
To meet expenses of the present farm for the perusing [ensuing?] year the committee recommend an appriation [appropriation] of five hundred dollars, if so, much be needed.
The fencing around the present farm and college building needs repair, To that end, an appropriation of five hundred dollars is recommended to put said fencing in a substantial condition if so much be necessary to that end.
Respectfully submitted.

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Benj. C. Yancey Chairman
Messers. Billups and Cobb were appointed the Committee of Invitation; and the Secretary instructed to request the Mayor of the City to detail a proper Police force to preserve order in the College Campus and Buildings during Commencement week.
The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock on Monday morning next.
August 3, 1874.
The Board met according to adjournment.
Messers. Smith and Seward appeared and took their seats.
Mr. Cooper submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, That the Room Rent of the two College Buildings, or so much there of as may be necessary, be and is hereby appropriated to the construction of appropriate water closets, in each Building, and that the Prudential Committee shall cause such appendages to be fitted up in a suitable and proper manner.
Mr. Brown offered a resolution germain [germane] to the business of the select committee on Tuition Fees, which was referred to that Committee and on motion he was added to the same committee.
On motion of D. Miller, the Board went into the election of a Trustee to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of D. Moore, and upon counting the ballots, it appeared that W. Ferdinand Phinizy was duly elected.

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Messers. Billups and Harris were appointed a committee to notify him of his election; and W. Phinizy appeared and took his seat.
W. Harris was appointed by the President, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Apparatus.
The Board now took a recess to attend upon the oration before the Literary Societies by Col. Charles T. Goode, in the College Chapel, after which the Board returned to the Library and resumed business.
W. [R.] Toombs Chairman of the Committee of seven on Unification, submitted the Report through W. Gordon, which was adopted, as is as follows:
Resolved,
That the Board of Trustees approve and adopt the general plan for the unification of the Educational interests of Georgia, presented by the Commission of Five appointed by the Governor.
Resolved 2nd, That Section 8 be so changed as to require those educated free of tuition in the Normal School of the University, to teach in the public schools of the State, if any shall exist, or if not then in some school within the State, a term of years equal to that spent in such Normal School, or at the amount of the tuition charged for said length of time in other Schools of the University.
3rd, That Sections 20 and 21 be so changed as to require that the money appropriated by the State to the University for

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its Schools, shall be distributed to the different schools in proportion to the number of pupils pursuing the College curriculum at the time in each respectively.
4th, That Section 23 be so changed as to make no other requirements of any College or Colleges which may hereafter apply for admission into the University of Georgia, than such as shall satisfy or be prescribed by the Board of Regents.
Upon motion of Mr. Crawford,
The Board authorized the Chancellor to confer upon the following students the Degrees named as recommended by the respective Faculties of the University:
I. Bachelor of Arts

I.A. Baker, W.E. Johnston, F.T. Myers, E.L. Brinson, C.Z. McCord, A.D. Scofield;
II Bachelor of Science. F.J. Amiss, W.R. Power, A.T. Moreland, D.C. Barrow;
III. Civil Engineers. G.A. Illges, Fort West, B.C. McKinney
Civil & Mining Engineer.
D.C. Barrow;

IV Bachelor of Law. I.B. Conyers, T.D. Hightower, E.W. Scofield, J.G. Parks,

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H.B. Everett, J.M. Moon, L.W. Thomas, W.M. Jackson.
V. Master of Arts. W.S. Morris, C.A. Atkinson.
The Board then repaired to the Chapel to attend the Sophomore Prize Declamation, and at its close returned to the Library and resumed business.
The President announced the order of the day, to wit, the election of the Chancellor and Professor of Belles Lettres and Oratory, which was postponed on the motion of Mr. Brown, till the Report of the Committee on the reduction of tuition fees shall be submitted and acted on.
Mr. Harris, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Apparatus submitted his Report, which was adopted, and is as follows:
To the Board of Trustees University of Georgia,
The Committee on Buildings beg leave to report, that the dwelling houses belonging to the University and in the occupancy of Professors are in a tolerable state of preservation, but needing repairs and some of them repainting.
The house and Lot occupied by Prof. Morris and known as the Chancellors place, needs special attention, particularly in repairs to the out buildings and a new inclosure [enclosure] for the premises.
The garden and lot connected with the dwellings are all

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out of repair, none of the fencing having been renewed since the war[,] none of it refitted further than has been absolutely necessary to protect the premises from the incursions of stock.
The following estimates of repairs now necessary to be made considered reliable, having been furnished by a competent person, after actual inspection[;] a smaller sum would answer for temporary repairs of fencing and out buildings, but would not do the work in a secure and substantial manner.
The estimates are,
For fencing Chancellors lot $430.00
For Repairing stables on same 64.00
For Recovering and painting and
Other repairs of Chancellors house 369.00
$ 863.00
Fencing for Prof. Waddells lot 39.30
Fencing for Prof. Rutherfords 217.80
Fencing for Prof. Wilcoxs 68.00
Fencing and Painting for Prof. 150.00
Browns
Fencing on line between lots of
Profs Brown and Rutherford 42.00
Same on lien between lots of
Profs Wilcox and Rutherford 93.00
$1,473.10
The condition of the roof of the Old College as well as that of the building known as the New College demand immediate attention. It cannot longer be deferred with safety. The singles are old and very combustible, insomuch that the roof

(pge 514)
of Old College has been on fire several times within the last few years and once or twice since your last annual meeting. Fortunately these dangers have always occurred in the day time, but even then, but for the prompt efforts of the students and firemen[,] the building would most probably have been lost to us.
Careful estimates, furnished by competent workmen, shown that for the coverings of the two buildings with slate or tin, an appropriation of about fifteen hundred and fifty $1550 will be required.
Estimates, made by a resident carpenter show that it would require about $800 to re-cover the buildings with shingles.
Your Committee recommend that the higher price be paid for the covering to be done with slate as being much the best in point of security as well as of appearance and the cheapest in the end.
Since your lat session, the sum of $23,500 has been realized from the sale of the Bonds donated to the University by the city of Athens including six months interest upon the bonds. With this sum in hand, the Prudential Committee have made contract with capable and reliable mechanics for the erection of a building for the use of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts which is now in progress of construction.
The building is to be 100 + 50 ft outside measurement. Three stories high with basement. It will be covered with a mansard roof and slated. The first floor will be occupied by the Prof. of Natural Philosophy and the third by the Engineer

(pge 515)
Department. The building is to be of brick, rough cast with cement and will be necessarily plain on account of the limited amount to be expended on it. The whole work is expected to be finished by the middle of November next, that being the time stipulated in the contract and the cast will be about $22,600.
All which, is respectfully submitted Young L.G. Harris Chairman.
The Committee on tuition fees, etc. reported and several amendments were offered, when the Board adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
August 4, 1874.
The Board met according to adjournment, when Mr. Toombs Chairman of the Committee on Tuition fees, etc, read his Report, at the conclusion of which, the Board repaired to the College Chapel to hear the address of Genl. John B. Gordon before the Alumni Society, and at its close returned to the Library and adjourned to 4 oclock this after-noon.
August 4, 1874
The Board met according to adjournment.
Mr. Charles T. Goode having been elected by the Alumni Society Trustee in place of Mr. Bacon, who declined a re-election, for the ensuing four years, appeared and took his seat.
Mr. Scott also appeared to took his seat.
The Board resumed the consideration of the election of Chancellor and of Professor of Belles Lettres and Oratory, and

(pge 515a)
On motion of Mr. Cooper all the papers proposing alterations and uniting the two offices were laid on the table; and on motion of Mr. Brown, the Board resolved to go into the election of Chancellor to serve for one year. Rev. Henry H. Tucker D.D. put in nomination by Mr. Brown, and no other person being nominated, the Board proceeded to ballot, and upon counting our the votes, it appeared that Rev. Henry H. Tucker D.D. was duly elected.
On motion of Mr. Brown, the Board then went into the election of a Professor of Belles Lettres and Oratory, to serve for one year. Rev. Eustace W. Speer D.D. was put in nomination by Mr. Brown, and no other persons being nominated, the Board proceeded that Rev. Eustace W. Speed D.D. was unanimously elected.
Mr. Brown then submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That this Board will now proceed to elect a Professor of History and Political Science for one year, at a salary of fifteen hundred dollars per annum. Genl. Wm. M. Browne was duly elected.
Mr. Brown submitted a resolution, which was amended and adopted and is as follows:
Resolved,
That the Salary of the Chancellor of this University be reduced to two thousand five hundred dollars, and the Salary of the President of the State College of Agriculture & Mechanic

(pge 516)
Arts to two thousand five hundred dollars.
Mr. Hull, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted his Report, and the Board adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
Commencement Day, Wednesday, August 5, 1874.
The Board met according to adjournment.
Mr. Jenkins read the following memorial paper, a tribute to the memory of D. Richard D. Moore, which was unanimously adopted by a rising vote:
Time moves ever onward with steady unfaltering step, and close in his wake follows Death striking down with relentless purpose and unfailing aim his unwarned victims. These are the effective instrumentalities of Change, that universal law impressed upon human affairs. Change as progressive as time and often as saddening as Death passes upon individuals, upon society, and upon all the varied phases of human association. We, who meet here annually in corporate capacity for the discharge of public functions, are almost yearly called upon to make mournful records of changes we were powerless to avert.
The cooperation [corporation] lives on through fleeting decades, but its constituent members are one by one passing away and one by one coming in by legal succession. Go back, but thirty four years, and there remains not one of this to narrate from personal knowledge, any prior scenes transpiring in this body. Its acts [are?] on all record, but that record is a sad memorial of individuality wholly changed.

(pge 517)
One year ago, there mingled in our deliberations a brother, whose seat, during the term of twenty three years had never once been vacant, whose seat in the service of the University, was a rising tide that knew no ebb, whose labors in her behalf were commensurate with his zeal, whose sound judgment and clear discernment of the eight[right] impacted inappreciable value to his labors. Since the[n], time has transferred an entire year form[from] the indefinite picture to the measured calendar of the past. Death has been hurling his shafts minute by minute striking down as well the good and the useful, as the vicious and the worthless and lo! the change that has passed upon this Board. On this, one annual assemblage, there is no occupant of that seat, so long, so faithfully and so honorably filled. The name of Richard D. Moore is called, but for the first time we enrolled it, there comes no responsive here. And why because that name, with which we have long associated all that is virtuous, all that is unselfish, all that is patriotic, all that is honorable, all that is neighborly as defined by the God man [good man?]has been transferred to the roll call of the spiritual world, and we surviving denizens of earth, surviving Trustees of the University of Georgia must call it no more either to active duty or to congenial fellowship. We can but recognize the change with sadness; in humility how to the Dispensation. How mantle, all of Richard D. Moore that remained to us, we have already as in duty bound cast upon other shoulders. There have been other tributes to

(pge 518)
his memory, all Athens and her surroundings sent up a wall wherein were blended the voices of manhood, womanhood, and childhood for the lost citizen, friend, counselor and Good Physician.
The Church militant, in the vineyard in which he toiled, from manhoods dawn to lifes evening, repining not, still grieves as those may, who have hope. These lamentations we recount, because we have been prompted by the same pure, earnest, intelligent, unselfish manhood whose loss we deplore.
And now, we are informed, that his surviving family, as an earnest of their recognition of his life long devotion to our University have presented to it his Library a touching and abiding memorial, which links him and them with us.
Therefore,
Resolved,
That the foregoing, with the accompanying resolutions be entered upon the minutes of this Board as a feeble though heartfelt tribute to the memory of our deceased Brother.
Resolved, further,
That a copy of the same be furnished his surviving family, as a grateful acknowledgement of these [their] liberal donation and an expression of profound sympathy in their bereavement.
Mr. Hill, Chairman of the Standing Committee on Honors, recommended, That the Board confer upon Col. Frank Schaller of Tennessee, the Honorary Degree of Master of Arts, which was agreed to.

(pge 519)
The Board then repaired to the College Chapel to witness the Commencement Exercises, where the Several Degrees herein before recorded were publickly [publicly] conferred by the Chancellor; and then the Board returned to the Library and resumed business.
Mr. Brown submitted the following resolution, which was adopted,
Resolved, That it be made the duty of the Chancellor for the ensuing year to give instruction in the Evidences of the Christian Religion, and to teach Logic.
Mr. Crawford submitted the following resolution, which was adopted,
Resolved,
That notice be now given that at the next annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, the offices of Chancellor and Professors be declared vacant and the Board will proceed to remodel and elect officers to fill the same in conformity to law.
Mr. Thomas, Chairman, submitted the following report, which was adopted,
The Finance Committee, to whom was referred so much of the Report of the President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College as asks an increase of the amount of the present appropriation from the Income of the Land Scrip Fund, report, that they have respectfully considered the same, and whilst they duly appreciate the work already accomplished by the North Georgia Agricultural College, and ardently desire

(pge 520)
that the means of its usefulness should be enlarged, yet as the resources of the University are inadequate to its present wants or its future expansion the Committee report adversely to any present increase of the amount of the existing annual appropriation.
S. Thomas, Chairman
The Board then adjourned to 4 oclock, this after-noon.
August 5, 1874
The Board met according to adjournment.
Mr. Hill submitted the following resolution which was adopted,
Resolved,
That the thanks of the Board of Trustees are hereby tendered to the Citizens of Athens for their generous donation to the University, of City Bonds to the amount of $25,000 for the purpose of constructing a Laboratory and especially are they due to these gentlemen whose earnest and disinterested services in behalf of the University contributed so largely to the result: -and that the Secretary of the Board communicate this action to the people of Athens through the Press, or in such other mode as he may consider fit and proper.
Mr. Cobb submitted the following resolution which was adopted,
Resolved, That the President of the State College be allowed his residence free of rent.

(pge 521)
Mr. Hull, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted the Report, which was amended on motion of Mr. Yancey, and then adopted, and is as follows:
The Committee on Laws and Discipline submit the following Report:
We are gratified to be informed by the Report of the Chancellor that greater strickness [strictness] of discipline has been exercised during the past year, and that good has resulted in an improvement of order among the students.
In the opinion of your Committee, the watchful oversight and restraint of a judicious and firm enforcement of rules, is not second in importance to any duty devolving upon the Faculty.
The maxium [maxim] which prevail in the Universities of Europe, by which all control over the Student is abrogated outside the Lecture room, are not applicable here. Our Institution through [though] an University in name and in law yet invites and receives students of an age that needs guidance and restraint, and we are not filling the measure of our duty if we do not endeavor to guard their morals and check every gross impropriety by admonition and punishment. While we do not propose a system of espionage or to convert professors into a detective police, we do not hesitate to say that no gross breach of morals or conduct degrading to the character of a gentlemen [gentleman] should ever be overlooked when known by the Faculty to exist.
In furtherance of proper discipline your Committee also recommend that the following be adopted as an additional law

(pge 522)
of the University.
No student against whom charges are pending before the Faculty shall be allowed to withdraw from the University until such charges are determined; and when charges are made, and the statement of the young man on trial is taken by the Faculty, such statement shall not be conclusive; and whenever such statement shall be supposed to be untrue, it shall be investigated.
We have considered the Report of the President of the State College of Agriculture and congratulate that officer upon the success of that Department.
We can not concur in all the recommendations of President Brown. Desirable as it might be in itself to have an Adjunct Professorship of Chemistry and Industrial Mechanics, the funds of the College would not warrant as in creating such an office. Moreover, the State has made a large appropriation to employ experts to test and analyse [analyze] fertilizers and it will not be so necessary that the Professors here should undertake it.
The same reasons apply to the proposed Professorship of Natural History and Physiology. We do not recommend its creation.
While we would at all times be thankful for any aid which the Legislature might bestow, our past experience in applying for favors in that quarter is not such as to encourage as [us] in the effort to obtain them now. We not therefore recommend that any action be taken by your body with a view of influencing the Legislature at present.
In accordance with views of Pres. Brown we recommend
(pge 523)
the following as Laws of the University.
Each student of the Scholastic Departments of the University, or of the State College of Agriculture shall pay annually at the opening of the Term the sum of Five dollars. The fund thus raised shall be devoted to the increase of the Library and to furnishing a Reading Room for the use of the Students.
There shall be no public presentation or awarding of any medal or other distinction, by any Society or body of students, or any other authority save the Faculty of the University.
Wm. H. Hull. Aug. 4, 1874. Chairman
Mr. Gordon submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted.
1.
Resolved, That the Senior Class be required to attend the Lectures delivered to the Law Class upon the Constitution.

2.
Resolved, That Genl. R. Toombs be requested to deliver during each scholastic year five Lectures upon Magna Charta, which all the classes in the College and University shall be required to attend the lectures to be delivered either upon five successive days, or otherwise as may be arranged, & at hours when the students are not necessarily engaged in their regular college duties.

Mr. Toombs, Chairman of the special Committee on tuition fees, etc. called up his Report, which was considered by sections, amended, and adopted and is as follows:
The Committee to whom were referred the subject of tuition

(pge 524)
in both Franklin College, and the State College of Agriculture and also to take into consideration the Professorships of Belles Lettres and Greek beg leave to report:
1st
. Your Committee recommend that the first of August the Professorship of Greek be abolished, and the study of Greek shall be attached to the Professorship of Latin under the name of the Professorship of Ancient Languages.
2nd
. That tuition in Franklin College be reduced to Seventy-five dollars per annum, thirty five dollars to be paid at the beginning of the first Term, and forty at the beginning of the 2nd Term.
3rd
. That the privilege of free tuition shall hereafter be restricted to the number to which each county and Senatorial District may be entitled and who shall be actually resident of the County or District entitled to send a student or Students, and shall not extend to such Students as are in exess from any particular county or district.
4th
. That all such students as are not embraced in the original agreement between the Trustees and the Governor upon the acceptance of the Agricultural land fund shall pay forty dollars per annum tuition, fifteen dollars for the first Term and twenty five dollars for the last Term. That the Students of the Engineer Department shall pay seventy five dollars tuition.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolution, which was adopted,

(pge 525)
Resolved,
That the Chancellor shall require each Student on application for matriculation to sign a pledge to join no secret Society other than Demonthenian [Demosthenian] and Phi-Kappa Societies.
The Report of the Finance Committee was taken up and adopted, as is as follows:
The Finance Committee respectfully report, that they have through their Chairman, audited the Treasurers account for the past year and find the receipts were $38,656.89 and that the expenditures were $34,100.31 for which proper vouchers were exhibited. Of these disbursements $15,952.05 were made on account of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and are charged to the income arising from the Land Scrip Fund and the Terrell Endowment, leaving a balance of income from those sources of $3389.59 to be applied to the discharge in part of the amt. heretofore advanced from what is termed the General fund acct. of the State College as appears in the last annual report of the Finance Committee. From the above statement it will be seen that the receipts have exceeded the expenditures by the sum of $954.58 which, with the cash balance in the hands of the Treasurer as shown in his last annual statement leaves a resulting cash balance of $2908.49 [unsure of blurred numbers] now in the Treasurers hands of this sum $947.40 on acct. of the Genl. Fund and the balance on acct. of the Land Scrip Fund as above stated.
This cash balance with vested funds in the hands of the Treasurer shows the assets
of the University to be as follows.
(pge 526)
Land Scrip Fund
Bonds of State of Geo 8 c/o $ 96,000
Do of State of Geo 7 56,000
Do in the hands of the Gov. bearing 7 c/o 90,202.17
$242,202.17
Terrell Endowment.
Bonds of State of Geo. 7 c/o 16,000
Do Ga. R.R. & Bank Co. 7 4,000
$20,000
General Fund
Bonds of Ga. R.R. & Bank Co. 7 c/o 5,000
Do State Ga. 8 c/o 3,250
Dr. Lipscombs Notes 7 c/o 1,500

$ 9,750 Aggregating $271,952.17 The Com in the further discharge of the duties of their appointment submit the following estimate of income and recommend the following appropriations for the next
fiscal year.
Estimated Income.
Annual payment of the State $ 8,000.00
Int. of invested Gen. Fund 715.00
Rents 1,300.00
Tuition Fee 8,500.00
Int. on Terrell Endowment 1,400.00
Do. Land Scrip Fund 77,914.14
$97,829.14
(pge 527)
Appropriations.
Salaries $ 31,600.00
Catalogues Annual & Triennal[Triennial] 500.00
Advertising & Printing 500.00
Medals 300.00
Music 100.00
Insurance 200.00
Servants 600.00
Water 500.00
Books & Periodicals 400.00
Agricultural Department 200.00
Stationary [Stationery] & Postage 250.00
Wood 150.00

Apparatus & Chemicals for Physical & Chem. Depart. 300.00
Models & Instruction for Eng. Dep. 200.00
Incidentals 300.00
Repairs 2,000.00
$ 38,100.00
As these [their] are certain restrictions upon the appropriation of the income from the Land Scrip Fund and it is therefore desirable that that fund should be debited with as large appropriation of the salary acct. as is legitimate and proper releasing thereby so much of the income of the Genl. Fund which can be made available for the repairs and preservation of the College buildings and property and for which by the terms of the grant, the
(pge 527a)
income of the Land Scrip Fund cannot be appropriated, the Com. in conformity with the policy suggested in the last Annual Report of the Finance Com. and approved by the Board as an equitable apportionment of the income arising from the Land Scrip and Genl. Fund recommend that as the Prof. of Nat. Philos. serves the State College with the Univ. besides discharging the duties of the Presidency of the State College, The Land Scrip Fund be divided with 2/3 of his salary that as the duties of the Chancellor embraces every Department of the Univ. 1/3 of his salary be charged to the same fund and that the Prof. of Moral and Mental Philos. discharges the duties of his chair in both the State College and the Academic Department his salary be an equal charge upon the Genl. and Land Scrip Fund, under this arrangement the amt. paid in salaries from the Land Scrip fund and the Terrell Endowment will be increased from $13,850 to $15,350 and the amt. paid from the Genl. fund reduced from $17,363.33 to $13,238.33.
If these suggestions are approved the proportion of the above appropriations to be
charged to the Land Scrip fund may be stated as follows:
Salaries $ 16.350.00
Catalogues 200.00
Advertising and Printing 300.00
Servants 200.00
Books & Periodicals 200.00
Wood 80.00
(pge 528)
Stationary [Stationery] & Postage 125.00
Supplies for Agricultural Department 200.00
For Chem. & Physical Department 300.00
For Eng. Department 200.00
Incidentals 150.00
$ 18,565.00

If the amount of these appropriations be deducted from the income of the Land Scrip Fund and the Terrell Endowment which for the current year will be $19,314.14 there will be a resulting balance of $749.14 to be applied to the further liquidation of the amount due the General Fund, to which reference has been made.
The Committee further report that the income received for Room rent from the State College Students amounting to $374.50 has been judiciously expended under the supervision of Pres. Brown in the repair and improvement of the Chapel and College Buildings, for which an itemized statement with proper vouchers was submitted to the Treasurer.
As it is deemed advisable by the Professor of Agriculture to make some additions to the lands adjourning [adjoining] the University High School and Experimental Farm, with a view to extending the Agricultural experiments which have attracted such favorable notice, and as Chancellor Lipscomb owns 5 1/10 acres adjourning [adjoining], purchased some years since solely with a view to the protection of the then University High School from objectionable settlements in the vicinity, your Committee recommend that the Prudential

(pge 529)
Committee be empowered to negotiate with Chancellor Lipscomb for the purchase of the same.
As the duties of the late Prof. F.A. Lipscomb have been faithfully discharged since his death by his father Chancellor Lipscomb in addition to his other duties, it is recommended by the Committee that his salary to [at?] the close of the College year to paid to the legal representative of the deceased.
Since the last annual meeting of the Board the $25,000 City Bonds donated by the citizens of Athens to the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts were delivered to the Prudential Committee and sold at 90 cents on the dollar, realizing thereby with six months accrued interest, the sum of $23,500 out of which there has been paid on account of the Laboratory Building in process of erection the sum of $1,602.63 for which satisfactory vouchers are exhibited, leaving in the hands of the Treasurer a cash balance belonging to this specific fund of $21,897.37 from which, is [in] the General Funds, if it is not sufficient, the Committee respectfully recommend that upon the completion of said Building, the Prudential Committee be authorized in accordance with the suggestion of the President of the State College to make such substantial recognition of the valuable services of Prof. Charbonnier in the preparations of the Drawings, Plans, and Estimates for said Building and the supervision of the erection of the same, as may be deemed proper.
Respectfully submitted.
(pge 530)
S. Thomas
July 30, 1874 Chairman Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the Secretary and Librarian be directed to select the duplicates of such works and maps as can be well spared from the College Library and the same are hereby presented to the College at Dahlonega.
Mr. Brown submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That no student in this University shall board at any place where he pays more than twenty dollars per month for board, lodging and fire.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution which was adopted: Resolved,
That three Scholarships be granted to the Talmadge High School near Milledgeville, one a year, to enter the Sophomore class, and remain in the Institution three years without paying fees for tuition, and upon the same terms as other free students, in order to secure to the University, the patronage of that Institution.
And on motion of Mr. Seward the like privilege was extended to Fletcher Institute at Thomasville.

(pge 531)
And on motion of Mr. Gordon, the like privilege was extended to Kirkwood School near Atlanta.
The President appointed the Standing Committees.
1.
Committee on Finance. Messers. Thomas, Brown, Crawford, Phinizy, Cooper, and Smith.

2.
Committee on Library. Messers. Yancey, Hall, Scott, Pierce, Rutherford, & Goode.

3.
Committee on Buildings. Messers. Harris, Seaward [Seward], Beckwith, Mitchell, and Pope Barrow.

4.
Committee on Law Department. Messers. Cobb, Jackson, Billups, Gordon, and Hammond.

5.
Committee on Department of Agriculture. Messers. Yancey, Lewis, D.C. Barrow, and Scriven.

Mr. Hull submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That in parting with our late Chancellor D. Andrew A. Lipscomb,
We desire to express our high appreciation of his eminent attainments his lofty character as a gentleman, scholar, and Christian, and distinguished usefulness to this University.
He carries with him our best wishes for the restoration of his health and for his prosperity and happiness.

(pge 532)
Resolved,
That the Secretary communicate this resolution to D. Lipscomb.
On motion of Mr. Toombs, the Prudential Committee were instructed to report to the next stated annual meeting of the Board the plan for the re-organization of the Departments of Study discussed at the annual meeting in the year 1869 and voted down by a majority of one.
On motion of Mr. Tombs, The propriety of restoring the Junior Exhibition at Commencement was referred to the Prudential Committee. The Board then adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell, Mark A. Cooper,
Secretary Prest.
Atlanta, Ga.
Feb. 5, 1875

The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in the Reading Room of the Kimball House this day at 12 M. under the following call of their President.
Augusta, Jan. 22, 1875.
At the request of several members of the Board of Trustees of the University, it is ordered that a special meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Ga. be held at Atlanta on the fifth day of Feb. (Friday) at 12 oclock, meridian, and that the Secretary notify the members of the Board severally of this call.
C.J. Jenkins,

(pge 533)
Pres. Board of Trustees Attest. University of Ga.
W.L. Mitchell, Sec.
The President, not being present, Wm. L. Mitchell Esq. Gen. Trustee present, was called to preside in terms of the charter. On motion of Mr. Brown, The opening prayer was made by the Chancellor Rev. K.H. Tucker D.D.
Mr. Lamar Cobb by request officiated as Sect. Opon [Upon] calling the roll the following members answered to their names Messers. Mitchell, Brown, Yancey, D.C. Barrow, Gresham, Vason, Jackson, Billups, and Cobb, and Mr. Lewis appeared at a later hour.
The following communication was received, from the President of the Board, Augusta, Feb. 3, 1875. To the Board of Trustees, of the University of Georgia. Gentlemen, At the request of several members of your Body, I have called upon you to convene in special session in Atlanta on Friday, the fifth inst.
It appears that his Excellency Gov. Smith, in his message to the General Assembly, now, in session, recommended a radical change in the Government of the University nothing less than the entire removal from the trust of the present members of the Board, to consist of nine members, only; It appears further, that a bill to carry out his views, has been brought before the Senate.
This suggestion emanating from the Executive of the State,
(pge 534)
himself, a member of the present Board came, I presume, to those who requested the call of this extra session, quite as a surprise, as it certainly came to me. It is indisputably a very strong movement, pregnant other [neither] with great good, or great evil to the Institution. Hence, to my mind the propriety of convening the existing Board for the purpose of considering it, and determining whether it becomes them to take any, and what action, pending the measure, was sufficiently apparent.
The fact that His Excellency will doubtless be present, at your sitting and will have an opportunity of presenting fully to his colleagues his views, and of hearing theirs touching the proposed change, seemed to under the call eminently paper[proper]. I trust, your consultations will end in some harmonious action highly beneficial to the Institution. I feel very sure, that not only His Excellency but each one of you will feel, as I do, that his own personal connection with its management is a matter of no moment whatever, compared with its advancing usefulness, and permanent prosperity.
I refer to the proposed change as the paramount reason for convening you, not unmindful that there may be also, other subjects touching the general weal of the University requiring your consideration. It seems to me required by the respect I owe you, thus to communicate the reason of the call, as I am prevented by bodily infirmity from meeting you.
I trust I may be pardoned for making a single suggestion to which, if approved by you, the General Assembly may be

(pge 535)
disposed to give favorable consideration, should they determine to remodel the Board. It is that the reduction of the number of Trustees (if reduction be deemed advisable) to nine, would be rather excessive proving. It was from the beginning, deemed advisable, and I think experience has proved it so, to have a sufficient number of trustees resident, at the seat of the University to constitute a supervisory, (or as designated in our college law) a prudential Committee to act in emergencies during the recess of Board. Should this Committee be hundred to three (which would be the smallest number compatible with the object) it would have but six for the State at large, and it may well be questioned whether that would be satisfactory to the patrons of the Institution.
Again, it would be unreasonable that all the nine would generally, if ever, be present at the annual meetings, owing to Providential and other causes.
If a majority were made a quorum to transact business, you would probably occasionally have but the quorum, five hardly enough, I apprehend for the large interests, committed to them.
Still again, whenever the number actually in attendance, amounted to a bare quorum, the supervisory or prudential Committee would probably be in a majority; and although regarding it as a very useful instrumentality it would be undesirable that it should have such power in the annual meetings, for the simple reason that it, as well as the Faculty should be supervised by the General Board.

(pge 536)
I, am, gentlemen Very Respectfully, Your Obt. Servt.

C.J. Jenkins Pres. Board Trustees.
Mr. Yancey introduced the following Resolutions which were adopted, Resolved,
That the Committee on Education of the respective Houses of the Gen. Assembly of Georgia. Such members of the Legislature as may desire, are invited to meet with this Board at 5 P.M. at Reading Room Kimball House for conference in regard to the best interests of the University.
Resolved,

That the Board, express its readiness for furnish to said Committee all information with-in its power, and under every facility to said committee to gain information.
The following communication was handed by the Chancellor.
University of Ga. Feb. 5, 1875.

To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia Gentlemen,
I beg leave, most respectfully, to suggest the propriety of rescinding the Resolution of last August, consolidating the Professorships of the Latin and Greek languages. The ground on which I make this uncommendation [recommendation] is

(pge 537)
is simply this, that it is impossible for one officer to discharge the duties of two chairs. It
a Tutor be employed to assist the Prof. of Ancient Languages, I remark, 1st
. That the gain in point of economy will not be very great. 2nd
. That the duty would not be so well performed. 3rd
. That however well, the duty might be performed, neither the students nor the
public would be satisfied. 4th
. That if we have only one professor of Ancient Languages, we shall be outranked by other colleges in our own state and probably be [by] every other Institution of equal pretentions in the United States.
I call attention to this subject at this early day, for the reason that Prof. Morris, who fills our Chair of Greek, is now about to form other engagements, and if action on your part be delayed until your regular meeting in Aug. next, his valuable services will be lost to the Institution.
He is an able, faithful, skillful, successful teacher, whose place it would not be very easy to fill, and we shall incur great risk in exchanging him for another. Should you see proper to adopt my suggestion, we can doubtless retain this excellent officer in our service. I have the honor to be, gentlemen of the Board of Trustees,
Your most obt. servant,
Henry K. [H]. Tucker
Chancellor.

(pge 538)
To carry into effect the foregoing recommendation of the Chancellor Mr. Yancey introduced the following resolution which was unanimously adopted,
Resolved,
That so much of the Report of the Committee on tuition fees, at the last annual session of the Board of Trustees as recommended that the Greek Professorship be abolished after next Aug. which was adopted, be resounded; and said chair be declared permanent, to be filled as other chairs at next annual meeting of the Board.
Mr. Yancey introduced the following resolution which was adopted,
Resolved, That from first of January past the rent of house occupied by Prof. Willcox [Wilcox] be reduced to two hundred dollars per annum.
Mr. Billups introduced the following resolution which was adopted,
Resolved, the Prudential Committee, be and it is hereby instructed to re-assess the rents to be paid by the different Professors, occupying houses belonging to the University and report to the next annual meeting of this Board and that such assessments be made not upon original cost of the houses, but upon the present value, desirableness and location.
The Board then adjourned till 4 P.M. Feb. 5, 1875, 4 P.M.
The Board met pursuant to adjournment. Mr. Billups

(pge 538a)
introduced the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved, That the Board regard with favor, the petition of the students in regard to restoring to the two Literary Societies of the University, the whole of Saturday for
debate and other exercises and that at the annual meeting in Aug. that question shall be submitted to the full Board for action.
That from 1st March next, to general meeting in Aug. the Chancellor and Faculty are advised and requested to have but one recitation for each class on Saturday and that shall be before 10 oclock A.M. and the remainder of the day be given to the two societies.
Mr. Yancey introduced the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the Championship debate, between the Demosthenians and Phi Kappa Societies may be allowed and the time for it, during Commencement Exercises, may be appointed by the Faculty.
The hour of five having arrived, the Education committee from the Gen. Assembly were introduced.
A communication was received from the Governor with accompanying resolution, requesting him to furnish, furthwith[forthwith] a report of the action of the Board of Trustees of the State University at their last annual meeting, also a copy of the Report of the Treasurer of said Institution and of the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts.
Mr. Yancey introduced the following Resolutions which were

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adopted.
Resolved,
That the Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of Trustees respond to the first resolution of the Gen. Assembly communicated by His Excellency the Gov. in furnishing a report of the action of the Board of Trustees at their last annual meeting, also a copy of the Report of the Treasurer accompanied by the report of the finance committee of this Board.
Resolved, further,
That the Board of Trustees are ready to respond to the second Resolution in such form as the Committees on Education therein referred to, desire. The conference then opened by the Chairman having the official letter of Mr. Jenkins read by the Secretary and addressing the meeting upon points previously suggested by the Board.
Mr. D.C. Barrow submitted the following Resolution which was adopted.
Resolved that the Sect. be required to leave his records with some discreet person for the use of the Education Committees of the Senate and House of Representatives if they so desire, to which Resolution, said Committee promptly responded that it would be unnecessary to leave the records as they were already sufficiently informed.
On motion the thanks of the Board were returned to Col. Cain Chairman of the Senate Committee and to Capt. Carleton member of the House Committee for their encouraging speeches.[,]

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and here the Conference ended.
Mr. Lewis introduced the following Resolution which was adopted.
Resolved,
That if there be any arms which we have and that can be spared to Dahlonega the Chancellor and Prudential Committee investigate and are hereby authorised to wit in the matter.
On motion of Mr. Gresham the Board then adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell Mark A. Cooper Secretary Prest.
Athens, Georgia, July 30, 1875
The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in stated annual session, in the Library of the University, at 10 oclock, A.M. ad was called to order by Hon. Mark A. Cooper, Vice-President, when the following members answered to their names:
Mark A. Cooper, Vice-President, in the Chair, & Messers Mitchell, Brown, Crawford, Cobb, Harris, Miller, Yancey, Billups, Hull, Phinizy, Lewis, Vason, Hall, Smith, Hammond, Hill, Jackson, Thomas, Gordon, Rutherford, and during the session the following members: D.C. Barrow, Pope Barrow, and Alexander R. Lawton.
Excuses were made and sustained for Messers. Jenkins, Toombs, and Gresham.
The minutes of the last stated annual meeting in this place and of the called meeting in Atlanta, were read as recorded, and no objection being made to their accuracy, were duly signed;

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previous to which prayer was made by the Chancellor Tucker, and after which, he read his annual communication, which is as follows:
Annual Report of the Chancellor. July 28, 1875
To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
Gentlemen, I have the honor to lay before you the following report on the condition and history of the University for the past collegiate year.
Number of Students
The number of students in attendance has been two hundred and twenty nine, showing a falling off of thirty seven from last year when the attendance was two hundred and sixty six. The decline in numbers has not been greater than in most other Colleges in the Southern States and is owing I think to financial causes. The number of new students last October term unusually large, perhaps larger than ever before being fifty one in Franklin College and forty four in the state College making a total of ninety five.
The proposition [proportion] of former students who returned was not so large as frequently before. Such has been the tendency for several years; and it is likely to continue; the reason of which I think is simply this; that in these days of poverty many are anxious to attend College who cannot afford to remain long enough to graduate; they stay with us a year and do not return.
It is worthy of note that the number of those who pay

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for tuition is larger, than the number of those who do not pay; and that the falling off has been almost wholly in the State College, these having been one hundred and one this year against one hundred and thirty two last year, showing a decline of thirty one; while in Franklin College these have been one hundred and fourteen this year against one hundred and nineteen last year. Thus far a decline of one in Franklin College, there has been a decline of six in the State College. I have doubt that the only reason of this is the financial pressure has been felt more severely by one class of students than by the other.
Order and Discipline
In regard to the order and discipline of the students I have to make a report which is both surprising and gratifying, out of the whole number of students in both Colleges there has been one case and only one of intoxication. With this exception not a solitary instance of open vice of any kind has come to my knowledge. Three or four students have been subjected to discipline for delinquency in study, but for no cause more serious than this.
Nor has this been because improper conduct has been allowed to pass unnoticed. The utmost vigilance has been exercised by my colleagues and myself, but no case has come within our knowledge where severe discipline could have been properly inflicted. Within a few days or weeks after the opening of the October term, these [there] was on two or three occasions a good deal of boisterous and unbecoming, but not vicious conduct on
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the campus and on the street; but since that time with rare exceptions these [there] has been almost perfect quiet; indeed the order has been so remarkable as to attract very general notice of the citizens of Athens. Since the occasion referred to or about that time no citizen has complained of any annoyance, and during the whole year no student has been put under arrest; no personal collisions have taken place among Students; no officer has been treated with personal disrespect or otherwise than with utmost deference and courtesy; and as to College tricks as they are called, which are so common when large bodies of thoughtless and broclicksome [frolicsome] youths are collected together almost absolutely nothing of the kind has taken place. Very early in the term I did hear of one instance of the kind, but I did not see it nor did any other member of the faculty. There has been no disturbance in Churches or at other public gatherings; no voystering [boistering?] songs are heard upon the streets or in the campus by day or by night, and seldom if ever has any large collection of students blockaded the sidewalks.
The door of my office is always unlocked and generally wide open; I am frequently absent from it hours and even days at a time; my books and papers lie upon the table open and unprotected; but nothing has ever been misplaced or touched, and no student so far as I know or believe has ever crossed the threshold on any improper errand.
In regard to all the matters that have been spoken of I take pleasure in bearing my testimony that I have never seen

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a body of young men so orderly and well disposed. It may well be doubted whether another college in the United States can show so splendid a record. Candor however compels me to say that a state of things so extraordinary cannot be expected to last always. I have no idea that we shall ever see another such year. I am equally candid in saying, and I desire to say it with emphasis, that I do not claim the credit of these remarkable results.
No man could exert so powerful an influence over so large a body of young men for so long a time as to restrain them so completely within the bounds of propriety. Nor do I believe that this year of quiet has been a year of accidents. It has not been the result of mere chance. It cannot be that a multitude of accidents, occurring day by day and hour by hour for ten months at a time, has brought it to pass that among two hundred and thirty youths at the most throughtless [thoughtless] period of life these [there] has been such perfect order as to justify the truthful record that I have made. That would indeed be miraculous. I attribute it rather to the good Providence of God, which has ordered the fact that the venerable Institution may indicate its humor and maintain its usefulness. Having presented this very agreeable statement, it becomes my duty to set forth another state of facts by no means so favorable, and in striking contrast to what has been said. In the chapel and in the recitation rooms, there has been much disorder. During the short period set apart each day for religious service many of the students engage in
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conversation or in reading books, letters, or newspapers. On two occasions students have actually so far forgotten the proprieties of the occasion as to smoak [smoke] cigars in the presence of the faculty during divine service. Stamping and scraping with feet, whistling and making other hideous noises where [when] announcements have been made or during recitation, have I grieve to say been not very uncommon. Having never seen such disorder before in all my experience as a College officer, I have been greatly shocked by it, and have done what I could to try to prevent it. The difficulty is, that in most cases if not in all, it is impossible to identify the offenders. Hence they can be reached only by public addresses; and students who would be capable of such conduct are not easy to effect by anything that can be said. In order effectually to reach them, something must be done; and circumstances are such that nothing can be done. Hence the evil would seem to be without remedy. I have endeavored to create such a state of public opinion among the students as to make such conduct unpopular, and in this way to check if not suppress it. To some extent, I have succeeded, and with the exception of an occasional outbreak these [there] has been a marked improvement within the last six months. This habit of disorder has become traditional and chronic in the college; generation has handed it to generation; and it is in vain to hope that it can for several years may diminish the evil; but so long as we have two hundred or more students of all classes and of all grades of culture, more than half of whom can so seat

(pge 546)
themselves that they cannot be identified in disorder, no human skill or sagacity can entirely control them. It is proper for me to say that from frequent conversations with my esteemed colleagues of the Faculty, I think they do not agree with me as to the extent and degree of the evil which I have described. If this report had been written by any of them, the facts above mentioned, if referred to at all would have been stated in milder terms. But I conceive it to be my duty to describe the facts not as they appear to others, but as they appear to me; and I am the more ready to do this because the very flattering account which I have given of the department[deportment] of the Students in other respects would produce a one sided and false impression on your minds unless accompanied by the unfavorable statements just made. It is your right to know the condition of the Institution exactly as it is; and which I have been happy to present the bright side of the picture, I shall still be honest enough to present the dark side. It is certainly remarkable, that the bright side should be so very bright, and that the dark side should be so very dark. But the facts are exactly as I have stated them. I think I could suggest a plan which would entirely suppress the disorders spoken of; but as that plan would involve the expenditure of money, I forbear to set it forth at present. In the mean time patience, forbearance, hope and effort will at least prevent increase of the evil and perhaps may greatly diminish it. The Institution has done and is doing a great and good work not withstanding the defect. Perhaps after all it
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is not more imperfect than human institutions usually are.
The Faculty
The Faculty I am happy to say is a harmoneous [harmonious] body. Differences of opinion have in-variabily been discussed with calmness and with courtesy; no high debate has occurred, no unpleasant word has been spoken. Our action has generally been taken with surprising unanimity. On one occasion only during the year has the presiding officer been called on to give the casting vote.
This remarkable coincidence of opinion on the uninumerable [innumerable] points that have come before us, is the more surprising when it is remembered that the Faculty consists of men brought up in different schools and under different influences, a world wide apart, and that they are thrown together in close relationship, and in the daily management of troubles once [troublesome?] affairs, without the slightest reference to their adoptioness to each other and each one an independent thinker and calling no man master. Again I think the Providence of God has kept us from evil.
Course of Study.
I learn from the minutes of your last meeting that the Prudential Committee was then instructed to take into consideration the expediency of making some change in the course of study and in the general organization of the students.
As this matter was referred to a committee of your own body, it is not pertinent for me to discuss it; but I will venture so far upon this ground as to say, that while in my opinion certain changes could be made to advantage, it would be

(pge 548)
expedient to postpone such action for at least another year. The present crisis is not favorable to great change of any kind. The more conservative our course the less ground we shall afford for evil. I would respectfully suggest that the same committee be continued with instructions to report at your next annual meeting. The subject will then have been under consideration, two whole years, and if action should then be taken no one could say that it was not deliberate. The present system will also have had farther and fairer trial, and perhaps by that time it may be thought best to return it as it is; or perhaps to retain it substantially with such modifications as experience may suggest.
One of the defects of the present system is, that students in their anxiety to get through college take a larger number of studies than they can persue [pursue] to advantage. I think it would be well to authorize the Faculty to fix a maximum of study according to their judgment, with liberty to vary the same in extraordinary cases if they think proper.
Logic
Last year the duty of giving instructions in Logic was assigned to the Chancellor. This was very gratifying to me, for I love labor and Logic is a favorite science of which I have made a specialty for the last twenty years. But with my present experience I think it best not to divide the chain of Metaphysics, and I am sure that it would be agreeable to the Professor in that Department to have Logic restored to his chain.

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I therefore respectfully recommend that this change be made.
Evidences of Christianity.
The duty of giving instructions in Evidences of Christianity was also assigned the Chancellor. It was found impossible to introduce this as a class study, these [there] being no room for it. But being determined to carry out your wishes, I delivered a course of Lectures on this subject to all the Students on Sunday afternoon.
In this there were several advantages. 1st. All the Students are instructed and not merely a simple class; 2nd . No time is lost from other Studies; to which I may add that the mode of treatment was better adopted [adapted] to our Students than that usually found in books.
Literary Societies.
For some years these [there] has been a general decline taken by the students in the literary Societies. This has been owing I think to two causes, 1st. The existence of innumerable sub-societies; 2nd . The largely increased amount of study required of the students.
A remedy for the first was provided by your legislation of last year requiring students on entering College to pledge themselves not to join any of these sub-societies. I have had no difficulty whatever in enforcing the law and I have no doubt that in a year or two the Societies will assume the position of interest and usefulness they formerly held.
Weekly Holidays.
It [At] a called meeting of the Board held in February a petition

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was received from the students asking for the whole of Saturday as a holiday; in response to which the whole of Saturday after 10 oclock was given them with the instruction that at the present meeting their petition might be granted in full. Of the wisdom of the Board in giving them all of Saturday after 10 oclock I am sure there can be no doubt. But it is by no means clear to me that it would be wise to give them the whole day. The present plan for the arrangement of the holiday, works admirably well, and I am of the opinion that any change would be for the worse. I will not occupy your time with a statement of the reasons for this opinion but will cheerfully set forth the same before the committee on Vacations should I be called on to do so.
System of Medals.
The system of medals adopted some years ago has I think failed of accomplishing the object proposed. It was thought that it would operate as a general stimulus on all the students to exertion. In practice it is found that very few of the students act with the least reference to the medals. Sometimes these [there] are only two or three contestants, sometimes only one. The reason of this is that in a few weeks after the classes are assembled, it is very easy to see who are likely to take the lead. There may be some little rivalry between two or three of these leaders; but the rest of the students knowing themselves to be distanced take no interest in the matter. Thus as to them, the medal as a stimulus is a total failure, and as to the few who might succeed in obtaining it they are invariably students who need

(pge 551)
restraint rather than stimulus and with them the medal is worse than a failure. The system involves considerable expense, and I think it might well be disposed with. But as there is some difference of opinion on this subject in the Faculty I would at least recommend that it be left optional with each officer whether he will give medals in his own department or not.
The medals given in the Societies to the best debaters, are the cause of a great deal of trouble, and I think are productive of no good whatever. I am informed by many of our best students that electioneering treating and intrigue have more now to do with the matter than merit in debates[,] in fact that the latter is well nigh ignored altogether. If the medals could be awarded by the Faculty, sure good might possibly come from the system, but as the matter now stands I think it is an unmitigated evil. Fortunately we have had no great trouble this year, but last year half a dozen or more fights grew out of the campaign for medals, and the system has in itself the elements of disorder and strife.
Chairs of Latin and Greek.
At your last regular meeting in August the chairs of Latin and Greek were consolidated; and at the called meeting in February that action was virtually rescinded. I beg leave most respectfully to express by earnest wish that the action of the Board in February be confirmed at the present meeting. My reasons for taking this view were set forth at the time and it

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is not necessary to repeat them now. But if called on by the Board or by any committee to whom the subject may be referred I shall be happy to respond.
Catalogue.
I think that the patronage of the Institution would be increased if it were more thoroughly advertised. The number of catalogues ordered to be printed was one thousand. Each student would take pleasure and pride in distributing them and if allowed four of [or] five apiece the whole edition would be exhausted. No better agents for the distribution of catalogues could possibly be found than the students themselves; each one of them has friends and former school-mates being the very class of persons whom we are most anxious to reach. The cost of an additional thousand catalogues could not possibly exceed seventy-five dollars. Now it is not unreasonable to suppose that one in a thousand of thee catalogues would bring us a student; and of nine hundred and ninety-nine of the thousand should bring a student, the tuition fee of that student for the first year will pay the whole additional expense; and his tuition fee for the second year will be one hundred per cent in the investment; and if the student would bring brothers, friends or school-mates to us, the profit will be largely increased. If we knew where to place then the number of catalogues might be almost indefinitely increased and the investment would be a paying one I am quite sure that at least three thousand can be placed to advantage and I recommend that, that number be published. It must be

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noted however that the income from this enterprise could not be expected before year after next. I think that the size of the Catalogue could be diminished without impairing its efficiency and this will reduce the expense.
Library.
The condition of the Library is by no means satisfactory. Many books are missing and no trace of them can be found. Large and valuable sets have been broken and thus rendered comparatively worthless. I have endeavored to prevent further loss but am sorry to say that I have not entirely succeeded. Under authority conferred by yourselves I appointed a most excellent young man Mr. R.W. Hodge, librarian. He seems to have been attentive and faithful, but with all his care and with mine superadded, a few volumes have not yet been returned. From my present experience I am firmly persuaded that it is inexpedient to allow any book to be taken out of the Library room by any person whether officer or student on any pretence whatever. If this rule be thought to be too rigid, it might be relaxed so far as to permit persons to remove books on depositing the value of the same in money with the Librarian. All the large libraries in the world are kept together in this way. College students need books more for reference than for reading; for the latter they have but little time; and for the former sufficient opportunity can be offorded [afforded] without permitting the books to be removed. I recommend legislation to the above effect; and I know that in my opinion on this subject some of the most experienced

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members of the Faculty coincide.
Address to the Legislature.
On entering on the duties of my office I applied myself to the Code of Georgia to ascertain how far if at all my duties were affected by its provisions. I learned to my surprise from sec. 1205 that The Chancellor has the authority to appear before them in person on the condition, interest and wants of the University. Availing myself of this provision I addressed both houses of the General Assembly. His Excellency the Governor and their Honors of the Supreme Court being in attendance on the 3rd of February last.
On thousand copies of my address were printed by order of the Lower House, and I printed an additional thousand at my own expense. I asked for no appropriation, but the Legislature was liberal enough to pass a Bill giving Fifteen thousand dollars to the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, which Bill was promptly signed by his Excellency the Governor. Two copies of my speech have been sent by mail together with a copy of the Catalogue to each member of the Board of Trustees.
Medical Department.
On the _____ of March last I attended the commencement of the Medical Department in Augusta and by authority of its Board of Trustees conferred the degree of Doctor of Medicine upon twenty seven graduates.
Dahlonega. I also attended part of the Commencement exercises of the

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North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega. It afford me pleasure to bear by testimony to the great value of this branch of our institution. A large number of Students have [been] faithfully instructed by competent teachers; and I am informed that there are now as many as two thousand children under the instructions of the former pupils of this Department. The money expended there by your liberality, I think is most wisely spent. I cannot conceive of anything that would more insure to the benefit of that hitherto neglected portion of our State. Doubtless, moreover, the school at Dahlonega will in a few years become a valuable feeder to the Higher Departments of the University; I think it would be well to instruct or at least permit the Chancellor so spend a week or ten days at this school once a year, and to deliver a course of lectures to all the students inviting the Faculty and the public to attend.
Moore College
On the 19th day of June last the new building known as Moore College was opened and publicly dedicated to Science and the Mechanic Arts, by reading the Scriptures and by prayer and other appropriate exercises. Lectures to which the public were invited were delivered on four successive days, by Professor Brown, Charbonnier, White, and Pendleton. The Lectures were abel [able] and appropriate, the attendance was large, and the occasion was one of profit as well as one of pleasure and enthusiasm.
In the latter part of June a course of Lecture[s] on the

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Constitution of the United States was delivered at the University by Hon. B.H. Hill.
It is needless to say that the lectures were instructive and valuable but I may add that they were highly appreciated by the Students and also by the Faculty and the Citizens who attended. I trust that the distinguished gentleman will repeat his lectures from year to year and thus contribute a valuable share to the education of our youth.
Reports Submitted.
I herewith submit the reports of President Brown of the State College and of Professor Pendleton of the Agricultural Department, and of Professor Mitchell of the Department of Law. Each document explains itself and needs no comment from me.
There are two points however in regard to the Agricultural Department, which I conceive to be of much importance. 1st That the certificate of the Professor of Agriculture be required for at least some one degree conferred by the University. That these should be a Professorship in the University, whose certificate not necessary to any degree whatever, is an anonalus [anomalous] condition; and would seem to imply what certainly cannot be meant, that the professorship is superfluous and useless. To say the very least it degrades that Professorship below the rank of the others. Of course I must think that this has been merely our oversight and now that attention has been called to it, I doubt not that a remedy will be applied. I furthermore suggest that a room

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in More College be assigned to the Professor of Agriculture to be used as Lecture room, and also as an Agricultural Museum. That this department should have no showing whatever in a building erected so largely in its interest, is certainly calculated to excite criticism to which it might not be easy to reply.
The Faculty recommend that the following degrees be conferred on the persons named to-wit:
Bachelor of Philosophy George D. Case
Bachelor of Science
P.A. Stovall, F.P. Vincent.
Bachelor of Engineering Mr. Erwin, W.H. Fleming, J.M. Hodgson, M.S. Moore, C.R. Twitty.
Civil and Mining Engineering
S.W. Cozart, and Carlisle Terry
Bachelor of Arts
T.C. Carlton, H.G. Dickinson, W.H. Doughty, W.C. Forster, D.H. Hardy, R.M. Hodge,
M.T. Hodge, W.T. Huguley, J.I. Inghram, D.R. Keith, J.H. Lumpkin, H.R. Mitchell,
H.H. Mobley, D.W. Rountree, P.G. Smith, H.N. Starnes, W.W. Struges, G.H.P. Tanner,
J.H. Worrill, W.C. Worrill,
Master of Arts.
G.F. Gober
Bachelor of Philos 1

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Bachelor of Science 2 Bachelor of Engineering 5 You will be pleased to observe that the number of graduates is larger than ever before since the introduction of the new system and as large indeed as the classes usually were before this system was adopted. It is worthy of note too that the number of graduates in the classical department (including the Bachelors and the Master of Arts) is more than twice as large as all the others put together.
Civil and Mining
Engineering 2
Bachelor of Arts 20
Master of Arts 1
Total 31

The Faculty also recommend that the degree of Bachelor of Law be conferred on Messers. Henry W. Barrow, James M. Bellah, Frank S. Haralson, Rufus Hardy, John C. Hart, James H. Hoskinson, Robert T. Howard, Samuel G. McSendon, John A. McWhorter, Robert S. Summerlin, John C. Williams and Boykin Wright =12
I beg leave to call attention to the Latin Diploma for the degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence proposed by the Professor of Law and recommend that is be adopted.
In conclusion Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees I beg leave to say that it is with diffidence that I have trespassed so long upon your valuable time, and made so heavy a draft upon your attention but on reviewing my, report, I do not see that any part of it could with propriety be omitted.

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With considerations of profound respect and praying the blessing of God on your deliberations I have the honor to be Gentlemen,
Your Obt. Svt. Henry C. [H]. Tucker
University of Georgia July 28th, 1875
At the close of reading the Chancellors communication, the following Reports were read and referred to their appropriate Committees; viz. Reports of Prudential Committee, of Finance Committee, of Committee on the Agricultural Department, of Committee on Law Department, and of Committee on Library. Prest. Browns Report being printed was distributed, and its reading disproved with. The election of Chancellor and Professor was made the order of the day for to-morrow at 11.
The President appointed the Standing Committee on Laws and Discipline, as follows:
Messers. Hull, Hill, Vason, Hammond, and Miller.
The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
Saturday July 31, 1875
The Board met according to adjournment.
Excuses were made for the absence of Messrs Jenkins, Toombs, and Gresham, and sustained.
A communication was received from the Prof. of Mathematics with the papers of two students competing for his medal, which was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline with

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instructions to report promptly as the propriety of granting an additional medal. The Committee reported adversely to the proprition [propriety] which report was adopted.
Mr. D.C. Barrow appeared and took his seat. Mr. Miller moved to reconsider the action of the Board yesterday in relation to the order of the day for the election of Chancellor and Professors, which motion was lost.
The Report of the Finance Committee was taken up, and a motion made to adopt, which motion was, however, suspended, in order to adopt the following resolution offered by Mr. Brown, to wit,
Resolved, that each election of Chancellor and Professors made this day be made subject to the right of this Board to fix the salary of each after said election, to abolish any or either of said poritions [positions[, or to suspend the functions and pay of any said poritions [positions], or to readjust the branches to be taught by each and to attach the duties heretofore performed by any one to another, and reduce the number of Professors in such manner as this Board may think best, or to reduce the Salaries prorata, or in such other way as may be thought advisable by the Board. The power herein reserved are declared to be and to have been the law of this Institution, and this resolution is adopted as a declaratory resolution.
Mr. Hill moved to suspend the order of the day, which motion was carried.
The Report of the Finance Committee, which had been under

(pge 564) missing 562-3
consideration upon a motion to adopt, was then laid on the table, and the suspended order of the day, by unanimous consent, was taken up, and on motion of Mr. Brown was rescinded [rescinded]; whereupon Mr. Gordon moved to proceed now with the election of Chancellor and Professors; and Mr. Hill moved to amend by striking out the word Chancellor, and pending this motion, the Board adjourned to 4 P.M. this afternoon.
July 31, 1875
The Board met according to adjournment.
A communication was received from the Chancellor recommending that the oration of Mr. Van Epps before the two Literary Societies be delivered in connection with the Junior Exhibition on Tuesday next in conformity to the wish of the Professor of Belles Lettres and Oratory. The recommendation was concurred in by the Board.
The motion to strike out the word Chancellor was lost, and then Mr. Gordans resolution or motion was adopted; but before the balot [ballot] began, the President announced as the Committee of Invitation to seats in [on] the State [Stage] in the Chapel, Messers Billups, and Cobb; and instructed the Secretary to have the usual police arrangements secured through the mayor of the city.
The Board then proceeded to balot [ballot] for Chancellor & Professors with the following results Rev. Henry H. Tucker, D.D. was duly elected Chancellor; Rev. Eustace
W. Speer D.C. Professor of Belles Lettres and Oratory; Williams Rutherford A.M. Professor of Mathematics; William M Browne A.M. Professor of History and

(pge 565)
Political Science; William Henry Waddell A.M. Professor of Latin Language and Literature; C.P. Willcox [Wilcox] A.M. Professor of Modern Languages; E.M. Pendleton
M.D. Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture; L.H. Charbonnier A.M. Professor of Civil Engineering and Applied Mathematics; Charles Morris, A.M. Professor of Greek Language and Literature; P.H. Mell D.D. L.L. D. Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy and Logic; H.C. White, C & M.E. Professor of Chemistry, Natural Science, and Terrell Professor, etc.; Wm LeRoy Brown, L.L.D. Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy and President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts; W.W. Lumpkin, Professor of English Language and Literature.
Before all the elections above recorded were concluded, to wit after the election of L.H. Charbonnier, the Board adjourned to 9 oclock, Monday morning.
August 2, 1875
The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Pope Barrow appeared and took his seat.
The Board then confirmed the minutes of the meeting at Atlanta and concluded the election, beginning with the Professor of Greek.
The Board granted three Scholarships to each, the Carroll Masonic Institute and the Gordon Institute, the former situate[d] at Carrollton and the latter at Barnesville, and six Scholarships to the Boys High School of Atlanta upon the same terms as those prescribed for the Talmadge High School, last year.
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The Board then repaired to the Chapel to attend the Sophomore prize declamation, after which, they returned to the Library and resumed business, but before coming to any conclusion, adjourned to 4 P.M. this after-noon.
August 2, 1875
The Board met according to adjournment, and suspended the business on hand, and adopted a motion made by Mr. Brown that $150 be appropriated to pay for the music of Commencement.
The Board then adjourned to 9 Oclock to-morrow.
August 3, 1875
The Board met according to adjournment, and on motion of Mr. Yancey proceeded to the election of a President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, which resulted as already recorded.
The President filled the Committee on Literary Honors by the appointment of Chancellor Tucker on the part of the Faculty, and so the Committee consists of Rev. Henry H. Tucker D.D. Mr. Charles J. Jenkins of the non-resident Trustees.
The Board then proceeded to the election of a Professor of English Language and Literature, which resulted as already recorded, and his salary was fixed at $1000 per annum payable as the other salaries, quarterly.
Mr. Smith introduced the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved,

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That the Prudential Committee be and are hereby authorized to apply and funds on hand not otherwise appropriated to improving and beautifying the College grounds.
The Board then repaired to the College Chapel to attend the Junior Exhibition of original Speeches, and to hear the oration of Mr. Van Epps, after which the Board returned to the Library and resumed business.
The following resolution was adopted.
Resolved,
That when the Board adjourns to-day, it adjourn to meet in Prof. Waddells Lecture Room at 5 oclock P.M. or as soon there after as the Alumni Society shall adjourn, in order to attend the meeting of that Society, of which each Trustee is exoffico a member, and also that this room may be prepared for the Chancellors reception to be given by him to-night to the Public.
Reports were made by the Committee to visit the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega, and by the Local Board there, and referred to the Finance Committee.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, The various Degrees recommended in the Chancellors Report, were conferred upon the young gentlemen named therein. The Board then adjourned to 5 P.M. or to the close of the meeting of the Alumni society.
August 3, 1875 The Board met according to adjournment, and proceeded to

(pge 568)
fill the vacancy in its ranks by the death of Mr. Dunlop Scott and Mr. Alexander R. Lawton was unanimously elected.
The following resolution was submitted by Mr. Mitchell and adopted:
Resolved, That the three Instructors be dispensed with, and that the Treasurer pay their Salaries to the two now in office for the quarter ending September 30, 1875.
Mr. Gordon submitted the following Resolution which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the Salary of the President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts be reduced to $2250 and House rent free, and that the Salaries of the other Professors of the University be $2,000, and the Salary of Mr. W.W. Lumpkin just elected be $1,000.
Mr. Brown submitted the following Resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the Chancellor and Prudential Committee be and they are hereby instructed to re-adjust and apportion the labors and duties of the Professors of this University, and so divide the labors as to make the burdens fall equally, or as nearly so as may be, upon the different Professors, and that they have power at any time to assign any duty to any Professor, which, in their judgment the interest of the University may require.

(pge 569)
Mr. Brown, in behalf of Chancellor Tucker, tendered to the Board, the rent of the House and Lot appropriated to his use, as a donation to be added to our income, for which, on motion of Mr. Gordon, the thanks of the Board are hereby expressed to D. Tuck, and the Secretary instructed to communicate the same to him.
The Report of the Committee on Buildings was taken up and adopted and is as follows:
To the Hon. Board of Trustees,
The Committee on Buildings report, that the buildings used for educational purposes as well as those known as Old College and New College are in a fair state of preservation, care having been taken to make repairs that were absolutely necessary.
Agreeably with instructions of the Board at the last session, the old and New College Edifices have been covered with slate, involving an outlay of about $1700.
The handsome new structure known as Moore College was completed, with the exception of the basement in June last, when the furniture and Apparatus belonging to the Departments of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and Engineering were removed there to. The Old laboratory building is now occupied by Prof. Pendleton of the State College of Agriculture and used for purposes connected with his department.
The dwelling Houses and lots belonging to the University and occupied by its Professors are for the most part in tolerable

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condition, although some of them need painting and other improvements.
At the last meeting of the Board a considerate sum was appropriated for the improvement of the Presidents (Chancellors) House and the adjoining lots. Only a very small proportion of this amount has been expended, for the reason, that when the recommendation was made, it was expected that the Chancellor would occupy the premises. As he decided not to do so, it was thought inexpedient to make the improvements which had been contemplated.
That property is much out of repair; a new covering for the dwelling house is indispensible to its preservation, and for this purpose specifications had been prepared and proposals invited, but before the day on which the bids were to have been opened, the Prudential Committee decided in view of some uncertainty as too the amount intended to have been placed at their command, not to make any further contract or expenditure until after the present session.
Under present circumstances, and while several rooms in this building are occupied by boarders, this Committee does not recommend any considerable outlay upon this place, but it is absolutely necessary to recover the main building before the ensuing winter.
The fencing around the several lots connected with the place as well as the long line running from East to West on the entire Southern boundary of the College Lands must be refitted and
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repaired before cold weather, or there will be danger of losing that part of the lumber which escaped the depreciation of the last season.
As it is not possible to foresee the contingencies which occasionally demand prompt attention and expenditure, even in preference to others for which specific provision has been made, and as accurate estimates can rarely be made in advance, of the cost of repairs to be made, this Committee venture to suggest, most respectfully, that the Board set apart for the general purpose of repairs, such sum as may be within, the means at command, to be disposed of in the best judgment of the Prudential Committee for the purposes indicated.
As the duty of supervising the buildings and grounds of the University and of superintending the repairs, frequently requires more time and personal oversight than can be given by any member of this Board who has other business engagements, this Committee beg further to suggest, that some suitable person from among those who are connected with the Institution be appointed by authority of this Board as Inspector of the Buildings and Grounds, whose duty it shall be to render such aid to the resident Board touching the repair and preservation of the property of the University as may be required and that said Inspector be allowed for this service such limited compensation as this Board shall think right and proper.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Young L.G. Harris Chancellor

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And thereupon Mr. Brown, in order to carry out the suggestion of the Report submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the Prudential Committee are authorized to appoint Prof. L.H. Charbonnier or some other suitable person connected with the University, Inspector of the Buildings of [and] Grounds of the University, whose duty it shall be to render such aid to the resident Board touching the repair and preservation of the property of the University as may be required, and that he be paid for such service two hundred and fifty dollars in quarterly installments.
The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
August 4, 1875
The Board met according to adjournment.
Mr. Lawton appeared, was introduced by the Committee appointed for the purpose, and having been welcomed by the President, took his seat as a member.
Mr. Hull, chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted his report, and propositions to amend were made, and pending their discussion, the Board repaired to the Chapel to attend the Commencement exercises, when the Degrees were publicly conferred by the Chancellor by the authority of the Board, after which the Board returned to the Library, and resumed the consideration of the Report by sections, and with slight amendments it was adopted as follows, first by sections and then as a whole:

(pge 573)
To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia:
The Committee on Laws and Discipline submit the following Report:
We have examined the recommendations of the Special Committee on a course of study, and the views of the Chancellor on the same subject, and we recommend that no change in the present system be made at this time, save that the Faculty be required to practice the Students in Declamation.
We concur in the recommendations of the Chancellor on many of the subjects discussed in his Report, on all which we offer appropriate resolutions.
We have considered the portions of the Report of the Committee on Agriculture which were referred to us and offer resolutions embodying our views thereupon.
We report back the Compilation of Laws made by the Secretary and recommend that it be approved.
We recommend the adoption of the following resolutions.
1st
. It shall be the duty of the Faculty to require each Student in the University to exercise in declamation once in two months in presence of the Professor of Belles Lettres or of English Literature.
2nd
It shall be the duty of the Faculty to fix a maximum number of recitations per week to be attended by any student; to which, nevertheless, they may grant exceptions for special reasons.

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3rd
. Instruction in Logic shall be a part of the duties of the Professor of Ethics and Metaphysics.
4th
. The granting of Medals for proficiency in the studies is abolished.
5th
. The form of Diploma for the Law School presented by the Professor is approved and adopted.
6th
. In addition to the Degree of Bachelor of Science, shall be established the Degree of Bachelor of Agriculture to be conferred on those students who in the course of Agriculture as prescribed in the Catalogue would be entitled to the present Degree of Bachelor of Science. For the Degree of Bachelor of Agriculture shall be required the Certificates of the Professors of Agriculture, of Chemistry, and Geology, of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, and of Modern Languages.
7th
. No student of the State College enjoying the benefits of that endowment shall be permitted to enter on the third year course in the schools of Engineering or Chemistry, without a certificate of Merit from the Professor of Agriculture.
8th
. The graduates of the Lumpkin Law School shall be deemed graduates of the Law Department of the University, and entitled to the Degree of Jurisprudence on the same terms with other graduates.
9th
. The Compilation of Laws reported by the Secretary is approved and three hundred copies are ordered to be printed for the use of the University, any additions or alterations made at this Session to be included in the Compilation.

(pge 575)
Respectfully submitted, Wm. H. Hull Chairman. Form of Diploma for the Degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence.
Couratores [Curatores]
Universitatis Georgiae,
Legibus Reipublicae constitutas omnibus et singulis
has praesentes literas lecturis,
Salutem.
Notum sit quod nobis placet _____________________
Legis in Scholia Legis Baccalaureum, et hujus Universitatis Alumnum qui probe [probare] se gessit et causas amplissime egit, Titule Graduque Jurisprudentis Doctoris adonare, eique omnia jura et privilegia ad istum gradum pertinentia dedimus et oncessimus.
Cujus rei, quo major esset fides et testimonium plenius communi sigillo nostro et Chorographis Scribas, Chancellarii, et Legis Scholae Professorum hujus Institutiones, Diploma hocce muniedum curavims.
Datum ex aedibus Universitatis Athenae, Die ____________Anno Domini
Scriba Cancellarius.
Professores

(pge 576)
Compilation.
The Secretary of the Trustees of the University of Georgia, in obedience to the request of the Board at its last stated annual meeting, begs leave respectfully to submit the following Compilation of the Laws, Rules of Order, and Resolutions now of force for the government of said Board.
1. The Board is clothed with all the powers formerly exercised by the Senatus Academicus and by the Board.
The Trustees have power,
I. To elect their own officers, such as President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, or such of them as they may require, and also all other officers they may deem necessary for their organization.
II. To elect a Presiding Officer of said University, who shall be styled the Chancellor of the University of Georgia, and in case of a vacancy in his office, unsupplied to create such office and make such arrangement for the conduct of the Institution as them shall seem meet.
III. To elect or appoint professors, tutors, stewards, or any officer necessary; to discontinue or remove them, as the good of the University may require; and fix their salaries.
IV.
To prescribe the course of studies to be pursued by the students, the terms and manner of graduating, and of conferring all the Degrees.

V.
To establish all such Schools of learning or art as may be useful to the State, and to organize the same in the way most

(pge 577)
likely to attain the ends desired.
VI. To call on all persons who may have or have had any funds, property, papers, or books belonging to the University, to deliver them up, and make settlements.
VII.
To adjust and determine the expenses of the institution.

VII.
To exercise any power usually granted to such incorporations necessary to its usefulness, and not in conflict with the Constitution and laws.

2.
The Trustees of the University of Georgia are a body Politic with power to hold and acquire real and personal estate with power to leave and otherwise manage the same for the good of the University. All money or property granted by the State or individuals for the advancement of learning in general is vested in such trustees.

3.
The Board consists of twenty eight trustees Citizens of Georgia and when any vacancies occur the same are filled by the Board and of four Alumni Trustees also citizens of the State one of whom is elected at each annual meeting of the Alumni Society to hold for four years. Nine Trustees constitute a quorum to transact all business within the authority of the Board, and should the Board be reduced below a quorum, the Governor shall fill the vacancies till the quorum is complete, and then the quorum shall fill the remaining vacancies.

4.
The Board shall meet annually at the seat of the University in Athens, on the Friday before the first Wednesday in August of each year at ten oclock in the morning.

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5.
The President of the Board and two of its members may appoint a meeting at any time and place by giving to the other members at least ten days notice, by letter or otherwise; provided that nothing done at such special meeting shall be binding, after the rising of the next annual meeting, useless [unless] then confirmed.

6.
When the President or Vice-President does not act, the Senior trustee present shall preside, and is [in] all other respects discharge the duties of the chair; when the Board is divided the presiding officer shall give the casting vote, or may vote to make a tie.

7.
If any member of the Board being within the State shall fail to attend any two successive annual meetings, his seat becomes thereby vacant unless he is specially excused by the Board for good cause shown. And it shall be the duty of the Secretary to report to the Board at its annual meetings any such failures without excuse, to enable the Board to decline such vacancies, and fill the same, if the way be clear.

8.
It is the duty of the trustees to make an annual report of their business to the Governor, which must embrace a statement of their receipts and expenditures on account of the University, the number and names of the students, their different studies, the tuition money, and all information and suggestions which the Board may think conducive to the good of the University and the cause of general education in the State.

9.
The Chancellor and Prudential Committee are charged with the duty of making the report just specified.

(pge 579)
10.
All officers elected or appointed for the University shall be of the Christian religion, but no person of any religious denomination shall be excluded from equal advantages of

education and the immunities of the University on account of the speculative sentiments in religion, or being of a different religious profession from the trustees or Faculty.

11.
The oaths prescribed for the members of the Faculty are abolished.

12.
The Chancellor has authority to address the General Assembly once at each session in person on the condition, interest, and wants of the University.

13.
The following Degrees have been established in the University to wit,

I. Bachelor of Arts for graduates in the regular Arts course.
II. Bachelor of Science for graduates in the regular scientific course.
III. Bachelor of Law for graduates in the Law School.
IV.
Civil Engineer for graduates in the Engineer Department.

V.
Civil and Mining Engineer for graduates in the same Department.

VI. Master of Arts for each graduate, of the University or of another College, of three years standing, and for such graduates as have passed a year in the University schools, after graduation, all being of

(pge 580)
moral character. This Degree is also conferred as an honorary Degree in special cases.
VII. Doctor of Philosophy upon students in the University Schools of two years standing and proficient[s] in two or more of them. This Degree may be also conferred as an honorary Degree in special cases.
VIII. Doctor of Jurisprudence for graduates of the Law Law School after seven years successful practice of the Law and being of good moral character. This Degree is also an Honorary Degree in special cases.
IX.
Doctor of Medicine for the graduates in the Medical Department of the University at Augusta.

X.
Doctor of Divinity for persons of the clerical profession distinguished for learning, ability, and character.

XI. Doctor of Laws for persons of learning, ability, and character without reference to profession.
The University may confer such other Degrees and Honor as may tend to the promotion of the Arts and Sciences.
14. There is a Special Standing Committee appointed by the President of the Board, consisting of three members, one from the Faculty, one from the Trustees resident in Athens, and the third from the non-resident Trustees, to which shall be referred all applications for Honorary Degrees, that the same may be carefully examined and reported at each annual meeting.

(pge 581)
15.
Any Bachelor of Law upon presenting his Diploma properly signed and sealed by the authority of the Board is entitled to a license, without examination, to plead and practice

in all the Courts of Law and Equity in this State, except the Supreme Court, and be demanded of any of the Judges in term time.

16.
All the Doctors of Medicine, graduates of the Medical Department of the University at Augusta are entitled to practice their profession in all its branches.

17.
By the authority of the Board of Trustees there shall be established, in connection with the University, an Institute combining the instruction usually given in academic and to the lower classes in Colleges, and by the same authority there may be a reduction of the number of years usually spent in Colleges prior to graduation. University Schools for professional education, including the application of Science to the industrial arts as well as to the more abstruse and recondite, sciences, and especially for the promotion of Medical and Legal education, not omitting the application of Chemistry to Agriculture, and Mathematics to Civil Engineering.

18.
There are reserved and set apart for the University Campus not subject to alienation, thirty seven acres, of the tract of land donated to the University by the late Governor John Milledge.

19.
The permanent income of the University originally and after the sale of the lands granted by virtue of the Act of 1784 and sold under the Act of 1815, and acknowledged as a debt in

(pge 582)
in the Constitution of 1868 is fixed at eight thousand dollars, which the Governor is required to pay semi-annually by his warrant on the State Treasurer out of any money not otherwise appropriated. This is a permanent and not an annual appropriation.
20. By Act of Congress approved July 2, 1862, it is Enacted. That all moneys derived from the sale of lands aforesaid by the States to which the lands are appropriated and from the sale of land scrip herein before provided for, shall be invested in stocks of the United States, or of the States, or some other safe stocks, yielding not less than five per cent upon the par value of said stocks; and that the money to invested shall constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain for ever undiminished (except so far as may be provided in section fifth) and the interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated by each State, which may take and claim the benefit of this Act, to the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least, one college, where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the Mechanical Arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life.
Section V. And be it further enacted, That the grant of land and scrip hereby authorized shall be made on the following conditions, to which as well as to the provisions herein before

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contained, the previous assent of the several States shall be signified by Legislative Acts:
First. If any portion of the fund invested, as provided by the foregoing section or any portion of the interest thereon, shall by any action, or contingency, be diminished or lost, it shall be replaced by the State to which it belongs, so that the capital of the fund shall remain forever undiminished; and the annual interest shall be regularly applied without diminution to the purposes mentioned in the fourth section of this act, except that a sum, not exceeding ten percent upon the amount received by any State under the provisions of this Act, may be expended for the purchase of lands for sites or experimental farms, wherever authorized by the respective Legislatures of said States.
Second. No portion of said fund, not the interest thereon shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair or any building or buildings.
Third. Condition fulfilled.
Fourth. An annual report shall be made regarding the progress of each College, recording any improvements and experiments made, with their costs and results, and such other matters, including State industrial and economical statistics, as may be useful, one copy of which shall be transmitted by mail free, by each to all the other Colleges which may be endowed under the provisions of this act, and also one copy to the Secretary of

(pge 584)
the Interior.
21. The Legislature accepted the donation by Congress, by an Act approved March 10, 1866, and by a subsequent Act approved December 12, 1866. It is Enacted, That his Excellency the Governor of this Sate, be and he is hereby authorized and requested, in such manner as he may deem best, to apply for, receive and sell the lands and land scrip to which the State of Georgia is entitled under an Act of Congress entitled An Act donating public lands to the several States and Territories which may provide Colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, approved 2nd July 1862 by virtue of an acceptance thereof, as signified in an Act of this State, approved 10th March 1866, to invest in like manner as he may deem best, the proceeds of said sale, in the bonds of this State, and disburse the interest of said investment for the support and maintenance of a college such as contemplated by said Act of Congress, to provide rules and regulations for the organization, governance, and operation of said College, until the next ensuing session of the General Assembly of this State; and to do and perform all such acts as may be necessary and proper to secure to the State of Georgia the full benefits contemplated by said Act of Congress, as far as the same may be found practicable.
By an Executive order bearing date March 30, 1872, the Fund arising from the sale of said land scrip was turned over to the Trustees of the University of Georgia as the same should be invested in Bonds by the Governor from time to time, and said

(pge 585)
Trustees upon receiving any of said Bonds were to cause each Bond to be impressed with the seal of the University and under no pretense whatever, where said Bonds, or any part thereof, to be disposed of by said Trustees. The seal of the University is impressed upon all the Bonds received, to wit, upon $50,000 of Georgia 70 and $90,000 of Georgia 80. The remaining $90,202.17 are in the hands of the Governor paying 7 per cent semiannually, in January and July.
22.
On the fourth day of July eighteen hundred and sixty six the following Resolution was adopted, the same being the stated annual meeting of the Board, viz.

Resolved, That every fourth annual meeting from this date, the Board will vote by ballot and without discussion upon the question of each member of the Faculty continuing to occupy his chair, and upon any member failing to receive a majority, of votes, his chair shall be considered vacant.

23.
All elections must be by ballot, and a majority of votes is necessary to elect.

24.
The President of the Board shall appoint a Committee of Invitation, to which Committee consisting of two members, is entrusted the duty of inviting distinguished persons to seats on the Stage, and any Trustee has the right to point out to said Committee, distinguished persons for such invitation, but not personally to invite, so that due order and propriety may be preserved.

25.
The Board shall annually appoint a Committee of Five to represent the interests of the University before the Legislature,

(pge 586)
before all Constitutional Conventions that may at any time be held, and before the military authorities of the General Government controlled the State, for the purpose of protecting and promoting its interests.
26.
The following resolution is of [in?] force, That the Prudential Committee publish from time to time, in the Gazettes of the States, but without cost, such parts of the Reports and Proceedings of the Board as they may deem calculated to advance the interests of the University and enlighten the Public mind as to the advantages of education enjoyed here.

27.
In all processions of the Board to the College Chapel, the members are required to fall into ranks of Two, and take position according to the date of their election.

28.
When attending any Commencement Sermon, any Public Exhibition of Students, or other exercise of the University held in the Chapel, each Trustee is requested to occupy a seat upon the Stage as his right and privilege.

29.
The Standing Committees, except the Committee on Laws and Discipline, must be appointed a year in advance, and the Chairman of such Committees, except as aforesaid, must be Trustees resident in Athens, whose duty is to collect all facts germain [germane] to the business thereof and have the same ready in writing on the first day of the annual session

30.
The president shall appoint an Auditing Committee of Three to audit the Report of the Treasurer of which the Chairman of the Standing Committee on Finance shall be Chairman.

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31.
The North Georgia Agricultural College is, a Department of the University of Georgia, located at Dahlonega in the county of Lumpkin.

32.
The Medical College of Georgia at Augusta is the Medical Department of the University of Georgia.

33.
The following rule of order is observed and enjoined, That when the Board assembles at the time appointed for its annual meetings, on Friday before the first Wednesday in August, a quorum being present, no matter for consideration shall be postponed for action, for absent Trustees to attend.

34.
There is a Rule that the President appoint, annually, a Committee of Three Members of this Board, each of whom is authorized to appoint an alternate, to attend the Commencements of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega, as a Board of Visitors, who shall report to the ensuing meeting of this Board.

35.
The Secretary is annually charged by the President with the duty of securing a proper police force through the Mayor or otherwise, to preserve order in the College Campus and Buildings during Commencement Week.

The Report of the Committee on the Department of Agriculture and Horticulture was taken up and adopted and is as follows:
To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
Your Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture have the pleasure of expressing their great satisfaction as to the

(pge 587a)
progress made in this Department of the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. The very many experiments made on the form [farm], each year, and published for the benefit of the people of the State, are valuable additions to Agricultural Science, and are being appropriated to the advancement of economic agriculture.
Professor Pendleton upon entering upon the duties of the Chair of Agriculture and Horticulture found the field unexplored and without appropriate Text Books.
But he brought, to the direction of the Experimental Farm, a large practical experience and Scientific knowledge, which made this Experimental Station, at once, of incalculable value to the people; and he created a system of teaching both attractive and instructive to the Student.
From his Lectures during his first two years, Professor Pendleton systematized a Text-Book of scientific Agriculture, for the use of his own classes, a compendium of general Agricultural Science alike useful to any to any Teacher, or private Student.
It is with pride your Committee refers to this Text Book, the work of our own Professor. It reflects great credit upon his energy, industry, and science. The lectures of this Professor before the Agricultural Society of the State have achieved a very large reputation both for himself and the University. At the recent National Agricultural Congress, held at Raleigh, N.C. one of his lectures was ordered to be read. This was a

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marked compliment, and evidence of the high appreciation of his acquirements. He is solicited to deliver lectures, also in other States.
The Committee refers to the special report of the Professor as to a more minute working of his Department. Your Committee suggest to the Board to abolish, in this Department, the Degree of Bachelor of Science and to adopt the more significant one of Bachelor of Agriculture, to obtain which a three years course shall be required, retaining the present schedule for the first and second years, and creating one for the third year, by selections from the present third and fourth year courses; and also to create the Degree of Master of Agriculture to be conferred upon Bachelors of Agriculture who shall take a fourth year course to be prescribed.
These Degrees may be conferred upon farmers of the State who may be considered by the Board to merit them from unusual and distinguished success.
The usual appropriation of five hundred dollars is asked for. Nearly all of this sum is refunded by sales of products of the farm.
Respectfully submitted, Ben. C. Yancey Chairman of Com.
The President appointed the Standing Committees as follows:
Committee on Library. Messers. Yancey, Hall, Holt, Pierce, Rutherford and Stephens.

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Committee on Buildings. Messers. Harris, Seward, Beckwith, Mitchell, and Holt.
Committee on Law Department. Messers. Cobb, Jackson, Billups, Gordon, and Hammonds.
Committee on Department of Agriculture and Horticulture Messers Yancey, Lewis, D.C. Barrow, and Scriben [Scriven] .
The following resolutions were submitted by Mr. Yancey and adopted:
Resolved, That the Analyses required by the Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture shall be made by the Professor of Chemistry and Geology.
Resolved, That analyses, if made for citizens, shall be made gratuitously; and in no instance shall a charge be made therefore by the Professor of Chemistry and Geology.
Resolved,
That the Professor of Chemistry and Geology shall not collect any fee from the pupils in the Laboratory practice for materials used, or any other purpose, not authorized by the Board of Trustees.
Resolved,
That all material used in the practice of pupils in the Laboratory shall be purchased by the Professor of Chemistry, and a proportionate assessment there for be made by him on the students in that Department; and that said Professor report

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said bills and vouchers to the Treasurer, each July.
On motion of Mr. Hull, upon a reconsideration of the subject, the sum of $75.00 was voted to each of the Instructors, Messers, Bonham and Fleming, a compensation for extra services rendered by them.
The Board then adjourned to 5 oclock this after-noon.
August 4, 1875
The Board met according to adjournment.
The Finance Committee to which were referred the Reports of the President of the North Georgia Agricultural College and of the Visiting Committee submitted the following report which was adopted:
The Finance Committee, to which was referred so much of the Reports of the President of the N.G.A. College and of the Visiting Committee as asks for an increase in the present appropriations to said College, but leave to report, that they have duly considered the same, and recommend that the annual appropriation of $500 in addition to the standing appropriation of $2,000 be continued for the next Collegiate year.
Your Committee beg leave to say further that whilst they fully appreciate the growing usefulness of this branch of the University, and recognize its claims upon our fostering care, yet in view of the paramount claims and wants of the University, they recommend that no further increase in the present amount of appropriations be made.
S. Thomas Chairman.

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Mr. Hull, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline, made a verbal Report recommending that the North Georgia College of Agriculture be authorized to grant Certificates of Proficiency to its pupils, but not Diplomas, which was adopted.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the beginning of the term of four years of the Alumni Trustees shall be the day after Commencement day, and the end of the term, Commencement day; which rule applies to those elected to fill vacancies, as well as to those elected for a full term.
The Report of the Committee on Finance was taken up and adopted, and is as follows:
The undersigned in behalf of the Finance Committee respectfully submit, the following Report:
Through the Standing Committee appointed for that purpose the usual examination has been made of the Treasurers accounts for the past fiscal year, from which it appears on account of the University the receipts were $37,858.76 and the expenditures were $38,150.35 for which proper vouchers were shown. Of these expenditures $17,521.90 were made on account of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and were charged to the income from the Land Scrip Fund, leaving a balance from that fund of $392.24. As one half of the salaries, however, of the Professors of Belles Lettres, and of Metaphysics and Ethics were

(pge 592)
charged to the income of the Land Scrip Fund, and it appears from the Report of the President of the State college that no services were rendered in that Department by said Professor during the past College year, it is recommended that the general fund be debited with the entire Salaries in question for the past year, and that the income of the land scrip fund for the past year be credited with the $2250.00 with which it was debited on that account. If this suggestion be approved the disbursements on that account will be reduced by that amount, leaving a balance to the credit of the Land Scrip Fund of $2042 instead of $392.24 to be applied to the discharge in part of the amount heretofore advanced from the General Fund on account of the State College, which as appears form [from] the Report of the Finance Committee of 1873 was $5,135.48. This balance of $2,642.24 with the cash balance of $1,962.09 to the credit of the Land Scrip Fund as appears from the Report of the Finance Committee of last year making the sum of $4,604.33 which it is recommended be appropriated as above indicated, and if adopted would leave a balance of $531.15 still due on account of the advances as before stated made from the General fund to put the State College into operation, and which it is recommended the Treasurer be authorized to liquidate by the appropriation to that purpose of any balance arising from the Land Scrip Fund at the end of the next fiscal year.
The Committee recommend a further re-adjustment of the Salaries to the extent of debiting the State College into

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operation, and which it is recommended the Treasurer be authorized to liquidate by the appropriation to that purpose of any balance arising from the Land Scrip Fund at the end of the next fiscal year.
The Committee recommend a further re-adjustment of the salaries to the extent of debiting the State College Department with half the Salary of the Professor of History and Political Science, and the balance of the Professor of Chemistry, after deducting the income of the Terrell Endowment.
From the foregoing statements, it appears, that the expenditures have exceeded the receipts for income by the sum of $291.58 reducing the cash balance in the hands of the Treasurer to the sum of $291.90 of which $263.57 is on account of the General Fund, and the balance on account of the Land-Scrip Fund as above stated.
The Committee submit the following statement of the assets of the University together with the estimates of Income and appropriations in part for the next Collegiate year.
Assets of the University.
Land-Scrip Fund.
Bonds of the State of Georgia, 8 c/o $96,000.00 7 c/o 56,000.00 In hands of the Governor paying 7 c/o 90,202.00
Terrell Endowment. Bonds of the State of Georgia 7 c/o 16,000.00 Bonds of Ga. R.R. & Bkg. Co. 7 c/o 4,000.00

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Total $20,000.00
General Fund
Cash balance in hands of Treas. 2,617.90 Bonds of the State of Georgia 8 c/0 3,250.00 Bonds of Geo. R.R. & Bkg. Co. 7 c/o 5,000.00 Bonds of City of Athens 8 c/o 100.00
To which may be added debt of the State of Georgia, paying 8 c/0 $100,000.00 $110,967.90
Estimated Income
Annual payment by the State 8,000.00 Interest on General Fund 618.00 Rent of Professors Houses 1,200.00 Do. of Dormitories 450.00 Tuition Fees 7,000.00 Interest on Terrell Endowment 1,400.00 Interest on Land Scrip Fund 17,914.14
$30,582.14
The following estimate of expenditures in part, embracing such items (save the item of Salaries) as are deemed indispensible, is submitted as an outline for an appropriation Bill, which if approved, can be perfected by the addition of the amount of Salaries after the proposed re-organization of the Faculty, shall have been perfected.
Appropriations. Catalogue, Annual $280.00

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Do. Tri-ennial $300.00 Advertising and Printing 500.00 Music 150.00 Insurance 200.00 Hire of Servants 600.00
Agricultural Department 500.00 Postage 120.00 Stationery 200.00 Fuel 150.00 Incidentals 300.00 Repairs 2,500.00 Salaries 30,100.00
$35,900.00
As appropriations, at previous sessions of the Board have been recommended and ordered, which in the aggregate were considerably in excess of the annual Income, and have given rise in consequence to some doubts as to the wishes and intentions of the Board, and have not therefore, in some instances been applied, it is respectfully suggested that it would be advisable in making appropriations, to consider in every instance their bearing upon the general question of revenue, as well as their necessity or propriety, so that the aggregate appropriations may not exceed the annual Income.
The proportion of the foregoing estimates of expenditures to be charged to the Income from the Land-Scrip Fund may be stated as follows:

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Catalogue in part $ 150.00 Advertising and Printing 250.00 Hire of Servants 350.00 Fuel 70.00 Postage 80.00 Stationery 75.00 Agricultural Department 500.00 Incidentals 150.00
$ 1,625.00
Add Salaries as below specified 14,033.33 15,568.33
To these estimates (if the suggestions of the Committee in reference to the Salaries of the Professors of Belles Lettres, of Metaphysics, and Ethics, History, and Chemistry are approved) are to be added one third of the Salary of the Chancellor, two thirds of the Salary of the President of the State College, one half of the Salaries of the Professors of Modern Languages, Mathematics, History and the entire salaries of the Professors of Applied Mathematics, English Language and Literature, Agriculture, as well as the salary of the Professor of Chemistry, less Income from Terrell Endowment, which with the appropriation to the North Georgia College at Dahlonega will in all amount to $14,033.33.
In the foregoing statements it will be observed that no appropriations are contemplated for the Physical, Chemical and Engineering Departments, or for the purchase of Books or

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Periodicals for the Library, as the annual appropriation of $500 for three years is deemed sufficient to meet the pressing wants of the former, and the tax of five dollars on each academic student, as a Library fee will fully meet the wants of the latter.
An analysis of the foregoing estimates of receipts and expenditures evelopes [envelopes?] the significant fact, that while the income of the Land Scrip Fund upon the basis of expenditures as indicated would admit of a larger expansion and development of the State College, the estimated expenditures on account of the Academic Department being in excess of the Income of that Department, demands contraction and retrenchment unless there is a marked increase in Tuition Fees, or the small cash balance will soon be absorbed, and the University embarrassed with an accumulating debt.
In the further discharge of the duties of their appointment, the Auditing Committee have also examined the Treasurers account of receipts and expenditures on account of the erection of the new Laboratory Building known as Moore College from which it appears that the receipts from the sale of the Bonds of the City of Athens and interest thereon were $23,500.00 and the expenditures were $23,493.30 for which proper vouchers were exhibited, leaving a balance in his hands of $6.70 which will be absorbed by outstanding bills for that amount, which the Committee have authorized to be paid, and the account closed.
In this connection, the Auditing Committee would beg leave respectfully to suggest, that in their opinion, some expression

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of appreciation is due by the Board to Mr. Y.L.G. Harris, for his gratuitous and valuable services in the prompt and satisfactory sale of the Bonds of the City of Athens, enabling the Prudential Committee, thereby, through the skill and talent of Prof. Charbonnier, the Superintending Architect, to erect on such advantageous terms, the most tasteful and useful building ever erected under the auspices of the Board of Trustees.
The Committee further report that the contributions to the Apparatus Fund amounting to $1,510.00 collected by President Brown, have been judiciously expended for the purposes contemplated, for which as itemized statement, with proper vouchers, was submitted to the Treasurer.
Respectfully submitted,
S. Thomas Chairman.
Mr. Hammond submitted the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved,
That the basis for selection of Orators for Junior and Senior days of next Commencement be ability in Oratory and Scholarship both, and this matter is hereby referred to the Chancellor and Faculty under the advice of the Prudential Committee, with power to act.
The Committee on the Agricultural Department made the following additional Report which was adopted:
The Committee of [on] Agriculture to which was referred so much

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of the Chancellors Report as recommended rooms be provided in Moore College for the use of the Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture, for his Lecture Room, and an Agricultural Museum Room, recommend that Rooms be provided for such purpose, and that the selection and arrangement of such Rooms be devolved upon the Chancellor and President Brown.
Ben. C. Yancey. Chairman Committee.
To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
The Committee on the Library report it in usual condition as to preservation. From the resolution of the Board adopted at its last regular session, requiring the payment, by each student of the University, of five dollars to be applied to use of the Library there has been collected the sum of one thousand and twelve dollars. This sum went into the Treasury. The Treasurer turned it over to Professor Wm. Henry Waddell, Secretary of the Faculty of the University, to be invested in Books, the sum of eight hundred and seventy-seven 19/100 dollars.
Prof. Waddells Report to Chairman of this Committee is herewith presented, to be filed, showing an expenditure for Books of three hundred and fifty eight 36/100 dollars; in Bank and partially appropriated for Books not yet received two hundred and sixteen 83/100 dollars; and turned over to President W. LeRoy Brown of State College of
A. & M.A. the sum of three hundred and two dollars. In addition to this sum President Brown received from the Treasurer the sum of one hundred and thirty

(pge 600)
five dollars, making an aggregate sum received by him, of four hundred and thirty seven dollars. The report of President Brown to the Chairman of this Committee is herewith presented, to be filed, showing an expenditure for Books and Periodicals three hundred and forty one 85/1000 dollars, and in Bank to the Credit of the Library ninety five 15/1000 dollars to pay for other Books ordered but not yet arrived. Lists of Books brought [bought] to be filed with the Librarian.
By continuing the collection of this Library fee, and devoting the sum thus raised to rebinding injured volumns [volumes] and the purchase of new books, the Library will be kept in good preservation and valuable additions made.
The Committee ask the Board by the adoption of this Report to direct the money so raised to be applied to binding injured Books and the purchase of New Books and Periodicals and papers for reading room. The Chairman of this Committee, calling to his aid the Librarian, to be charged with selection of the Books to be bound, and the Faculty of the University to select the Books to purchase[d].
Respectfully, Ben. C. Yancey Chr. Committee The foregoing Report on the Library was adopted.
Mr. Yancey, Chairman of the Committee on the Library submitted the following Report of that Committee which was adopted:
To the Board of Trustees:

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Your Committee on the Library, to which was referred so much of the Chancellors Report as referred to the requisition of a deposit of five dollars, for any student, officer, or other person to take Books out of the Library, beg leave to report:
That such a rule will operate to prevent young men reading. Your Committee believe the present rules sufficient.
The Committee recommend that the Resolution to appoint a Pupil, Librarian, adopted a year ago, be resined [rescinded] , and that the Library be put under the care of Professor Morris who will render the service without salary.
Respectfully submitted, Ben C. Yancey Chr. Committee
The President appointed the Committee of Five to attend the Legislature, to wit, Messers, Brown, Phinizy, Hammond, Holt and Lawton; and the Committee of Three to visit the North Georgia Agricultural College at its next Commencement, to wit, Messers. Brown, Gordon, and Hall.
Alexander H. Stephens and Thadeus G. Holt were elected Trustees by the Alumni Society, the former for the regular term of four years on [in] place of Mr. Pope Barrow, who declined a re-election and the latter for three years in place of Mr. Goode deceased.
The Board adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell Secretary.

(pge 602)
Signed by order of the Board M ___ A. Cooper, Vice-Prest.
Athens, October 14, 1875
The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in terms of the following call of their President:
Augusta, 25th Sept. 75
By request of the Prudential Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, it is ordered that a Special Meeting of that Board be held in Athens, at the Library Room of the University, at 10 oclock, A.M.
On the 14th day of October, 1875, to consider important matters occurring since the last annual meeting, which will be brought to their notice by that Committee.
The Secretary will give notice immediately of this call to each member of the Board, and by publication.
C.J. Jenkins, President, etc.
To Col. Wm. L. Mitchell, Secretary Board Trustees Univ. Ga. Hon. Mark A. Cooper, Vice President, took the chair, in the absence of the President, and called the meeting to order.
The following members answered to their names, Messers. Cooper, Mitchell, Yancey, Billups, Barrow, Thomas, Cobb, Gresham, Hull, Harris, Scriven, Phinizy, and Lawton.
Prayer was made by Mr. Mitchell at request of the Chair.
On motion of Mr. Billups, the Board Resolved, to elect A Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, to fill the vacancy of Prof. Brown, subject to ratification by the Board at its sated[stated] meeting in August next.
The Board established the Degree of Bachelor of Engineering, and decided that Students in the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts holding appointments as free State Students, be allowed to enter the Junior Class of the Engineer Department of the University and Study for that Degree without the payment of tuition fees.
The Board also resolved to elect a President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, during this meeting, and then adjourned to 4 oclock P.M.
October 14, 1875.
The Board met according to adjournment, when Mr. Toombs appeared and took his seat.
The Board then proceeded to ballot for Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, and upon counting out the votes, it appeared, that Mr. Montgomery Cumming, was duly elected.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, the Board recognized the appointments of the ten Students to scholarships upon the recommendation of the City Council of Athens, in view of the generous donation of $25,000 to build Moore College, reserving

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the question of permanent scholarships to the meeting of the Board in August next.
The Board then proceeded to ballot for President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and upon counting out the votes, it appeared that Col.
L.H. Charbonnier was duly elected; and the Salary was fixed at $250.00 [2250.00?].
Chancellor Tucker sent to the Board, a written communication of the election of a Mathematical Tutor, which was read and laid on the table.
The Board then adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell Secretary
Signed by order of the Board Mark A. Cooper Vice Prest.
University of Georgia Athens, July 28, 1876.
The Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, met in the Library, this day at 10 A.M. and in the absence of the President and of the Vice-President, Mr. Mitchell, the oldest Trustee present, called the Board to order as prescribed by the Charter, and upon calling the roll, the following members answered to their names, Messers, Mitchell, Lewis, Yancey, Vason, Jackson, Crawford, Billups, Thomas, Cobb, Hull, and Harris; and during the Session, the following members; Messers Toombs, Gresham, Holt, Scriven and Lawton.

(pge 605) missing 604
Hon. D.W. Lewis was called to the Chair and presided during the entire session.
The session was opened with prayer by the Rev. Henry H. Tucker, D.D. LLD. the Chancellor.
Excuses were made and sustained for Messers. Pierce, Miller, Brown, Cooper, and Hammond.
The minutes of the last annual meeting and the minutes of the called meeting in October 1875 were read and confirmed as to their accuracy, the question of ratifying the minutes of the October meeting remaining for consideration at a subsequent period of this session.
The Chancellor then read his annual communication and the Report of the President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and laid on the table the Reports of other Professors and topical sections of his communication for easy reference to the proper Committees.
The following is the Chancellors Communication:
University of Georgia.
Chancellors Report 1876.
To the Honorable
The Board of Trustees
Of the University of Georgia.
Gentlemen,
I have the honor to lay before you the following report on the condition and history of the University during its 75th Annual Session, just about to close.

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Number of Students.
The number of Students in Franklin College has been 104, Franklin State College has been 93, Franklin Law Department has been 6, Total attendance in Athens 203, At Dahlonega 215, in Medical Department 64, Total in all Departments 512.
The decrease since last year in the number of Students in attendance in Athens has been about thirteen per cent, which is a much smaller ratio of decline than was experienced last year or the year before. The causes of decline, I think, are chiefly financial and I am conformed [confirmed] in this opinion by what I believe to be the fact that nearly every Institution of learning has suffered in the same way. I anticipate for next year a continued decline, and can hope for increased prosperity only in the general improvement in the condition of the country.
Order and Discipline
In the general deportment of the students, there has been marked improvement. In regard to their conduct outside the campus, I refer confidently to the resident Trustees, and to the citizens of Athens generally, I think that they will all testify, that they have never seen the students so quiet and orderly. If there has been any riotous conduct by day or by night, I have not heard of it. The crowds which formerly blockaded the side walks to the great annoyance of the passers, by, and to the discredit of the town, have disappeared; and almost without exception the students have been so unobtrusive and gentlemanly in the streets and other public places, that they could

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not be distinguished except by their uniforms from other citizens nor indeed from our best citizens. My pride in these facts may tempt me to over-state them, but ad [as] I desire you to know the truth and the whole truth, I earnestly request that you will make full inquiry in all directions where information is attainable; and as the facts are very public they can be easily ascertained. I am confident in the belief that you will find a more favorable report than you have ever heard before.
On the campus and in the buildings, I am happy to say there has also been a very decided and I even say a wonderful improvement. Stamping and scraping with the feet, and other disorder of like character, formerly so common that they came to be considered normal conditions, have been during the last year, so far as I have seen of rare occurrence, and on no occasion has any great outbreak of this kin come under my observation. In the halls and corridors, where the students have been passing from one lecture to another, there has been a good deal of thoughtless boisteronesness [boisterousness], less than last year it is true, but more than is creditable to the good breeding of the young gentlemen. I have certain plans on hand which I think will greatly diminish this evil, and which I hope will in a year or two remove it almost entirely. In verification of the general statements I have made, I refer to each and all of my colleagues. If there has been any great or unusual disorder in any of the lecture rooms, I have not witnessed it, and on this point each officer can best answer for himself.

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Division of Labor
At the last regular session of the Board, the Chancellor and the Prudential Committee were instructed to re-adjust the labors and duties of the Professors, and so to divide them as to make the burdens fall equally or as nearly so as may be on all. The utmost endeavor has been made to carry out this resolution of the Board; but in practice it has been found impossible to divide the labor with the least approach to equality. The reason of this is that the surplus of studies is in those Departments, in which, a number of the officers are not qualified to give instruction. Take for instance the item of Drawing. With the exception of Prof. Charbonnier, not a solitary officer in the Institution is qualified to give instructions in this branch. Last year, Mr. Hunter discharged this duty with ability and success. Take the item of Military instructions. Well again, Prof.
Charbonnier is the only officer at all qualified. Last year, Mr. Gresham discharged this duty with great acceptance. Take the item of Mathematics; and here is where the surplus is greater and runs over largely. In this Department, only two or three of the Faculty are experts; several others having devoted their lives to other studies, must be in the nature of things, but indifferent teachers in this; and quite a number are utterly incompetent to teach it at all, and they so declare. The few experts are already over crowded with duty; and the consequence is that this important branch is taught by men who thoroughly accomplished in other directions,

(pge 610) missing 609
make no pretensions to distinguished skill in this. The task is hence painful to them, while at the same time the students so [do] not enjoy the advantage of such instruction as they have a right to expect. Besides this, several other Professors while willing to bear their share of the burden, are unable to render the least assistance in the place where it is needed, and their duties of others are greatly increased; and the inequality of labor is probably greater than it has ever been.
The Faculty and resident Trustees have been exceedingly kind in rendering us what assistance they could, in the adjustment of this most embarrassing difficulty, but their combined wisdom has produced no satisfactory results.
Having set forth the facts, in their bearing on the officers and also on the Students as well as on the general interests of the Institution, I submit the case to the judgment of the Board of Trustees, that they take such measures to remedy existing evils as they may think best.
System of Medals.
In last years report, I argued against the System of Medals and my desire was that it should be entirely dispensed with except in the case of the Sophomore Medals for Declamation. The Board did me the honor to take favorable notice of my suggestion. But the legislation on the subject has not been sufficient to remove the evil. I am informed by members of the Board that the intention was to abolish the whole system; but by a strict and even a fair interpretation, the action taken

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will not admit of that construction. I will not repeat the argument of last year; but will merely ask for such additional legislation as will abolish the giving of Medals for any purpose whatever except for Sophomore Declamation. The reasons why this exception may be made I deem it not necessary to state, but they will be cheerfully given if asked for. I beg most especially that the Societies be prohibited from giving Medals for proficiency debate or for any other purpose. Experience has shown that nothing but mischief results from the practice.
Title of Presiding Officer. I beg leave respectfully to suggest the propriety of our additions to the title of the Presiding officer. He is called The Chancellor of the University a title which implies as
it ought, that he exercises a general supervision over the University in each of its Departments. Each of the latter should have a presiding officer of its own; the several inferior organizations, being each complete in itself, while the University is superior to and includes them all. In conformity to this idea, the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts has its President; the Medical Department has its Dean, etc. But strange to say, Franklin College which is the mother of all the other Departments, has in name at least, no presiding officer. True, the duties of that office are discharged by the Chancellor, but that fact ought to be recognized by a proper nomenclature. He ought to be called Chancellor of the University and President of Franklin College. That same officer should be called

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President of this College, is essential to the consistency of the University System, and is necessary to show the distinct existence of each Department. The want of such an officer in name as well as in fact, may lead to much confusion of thought and perhaps so [to] serious misapprehension ever [even] now, people generally and indeed the officers themselves speak of University Students as distinguished from State College Students; whereas in fact they are all University Students, the real distinction being that some are Franklin College Students, and some State College Students; these being two Colleges while there is but one University. The inaccuracy of expression ought to be corrected lest it lead in time, if it has not done so already, to a grave misunderstanding of the facts. The additional title to the presiding officer confers on him no new dignities nor duties, and is asked for only to make our practice conform to our theory. That Franklin College should be the only Department of the University without a presiding officer of its own, is an anomalous fact, and one for which it would be hard to give a good reason.
Two Degrees of the same name:
Bachelor of Science.
By reference to the Catalogue, it will be seen that we have two degrees of entirely different character, called by the same name. Both are called Bachelor of Science; one is conferred by Franklin College, and one by the State College. To obviate the misunderstanding which must arise when the same

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words mean different things, I respectfully suggest that the name of one of these degrees be changed. The degree conferred by the State College requires large attainments in Chemistry and comparatively little in anything else. I therefore suggest, that it be called Bachelor of Chemical Science.
Catalogues.
I am reluctant to trouble you with a repetition of what was said in my former report, but I conceive it to be my duty to say that I think the interests of the Institution require that the number of Catalogues published should be increased. I have caused a copy to be made of what I said on this subject last year and respectfully beg that it be referred to an appropriate committee.
The Triennial.
The tri-ennial catalog so-called has been published in the course of the year. The mission will be obvious when I state it has been nineteen years since a similar publication was made. The present edition is beyond comparison superior to any that ever preceded it. I doubt whether any other college can show a work of the kind more complete or more enhanctive [sic]. The preparation of this catalogue cost are amount of labor of which no one who has not witnessed it, can form an adequate conception. I conpended on it myself no small amount of time and trouble, but what I did, and what all others did, amount to but little, compared with the vast amount of labor bestowed on it by Prof. Waddell. I am sure, that the preparation by that

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gentleman of both his Grammars, one of Latin and one of Greek, did not require more effort or more time. The Board will be astonished to hear what the Professor assures me to be the fact, that it occupied his time hours a day for months.
I respectfully recommend that an appropriation of two hundred dollars be made to recompense Prof. Waddell for this valuable service.
Dahlonega.
Without instructions from the Board, but presuming on their acquiescence, I spent four or five days in the month of May on a visit to the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega. While there I lectured daily to all the Students in presence of the Faculty, giving them such practical instruction as I thought would best supplement the labor of their teachers. I also delivered one lecture to the public.
I cannot speak in too high forms of the indefatigable exertions of the officers of that branch of the University. Great success has crowned their labors, and they are doing a work of untold benefit to the state. I cannot in good conscience discuss the subject without saying, that the supply of teachers is wholly inadequate to the number of pupils.
At least two more teachers could be employed to the greatest advantage, and I cannot conceive of a better investment than the appropriation of Fourteen Hundred Dollars annually for this purpose; and if I though that the funds were accessible, I should urge that the appropriation be made. The case is one

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in which it appears to me, Legislative aid might be properly asked and properly granted.
Medical Department.
I was prevented by sickness from attending the Commencement Exercises of the Medical Department in March last, but am happy to say that this branch of the University is in good condition.
Gordon Institute.
I have received a letter from Charles E. Sambein, Principal of Gordon Institute, at Barnesville, Georgia, setting forth certain difficulties in the system of scholarships, granted to that and several other Institutions. The letter best explains itself; I therefore submit it here-with, and beg that it be referred to a committee with instructions as to report as to cover the case not only of the Gordon Institute but all similar cases.
Free Tuition.
By reference to page 21 of the Catalogue, it will be seen that the Faculty are authorized to admit to Franklin College, fifty young men without payment of tuition fees, but as a remuneration to the State, they are required to teach School for a term of years equal to the time they have spent at the University. To the condition ammened [amended] to this bounty, there are several grave objections;
1st
. It is impossible for the University or the State to enforce it. 2nd
. It is sometimes impossible for the young men to

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perform it. 3rd
. When possible, it is sometimes greatly injurious to the young mans interest and crually [cruelly] inconvenient, for some other business may open to him for [far] more profitable than teaching.
4th
. It does the State no good but harm rather for it forces many into the teaching profession who have neither talk nor talent for it, while it also injures some other business by keeping those out of it who ought to be in it.
5th
. The State College imposes no such conditions and both colleges ought to be
on a footing in point of liberality. 6th
. It is beneath the dignity of the State to receive my remuneration at all from the objects of its bounty. Finally if the obligation is to hang over a man for life, or until it is met, it would be better to grant him a commutation, and allow him to relieve himself by payment of a certain sum of money. But even this is objectionable; for 1st, The money could not be collected. 2nd, It ought not be. I respectfully recommend that the condition be removed. When the University gives, it should give like a king and expect no return, least of all should it so hamper its bounty as to make it undesirable.
Board of Visitors.
The Board of Visitors appointed by His Excellency the Governor remained with us about a week and devoted themselves to their duties with great assiduity and zeal. They not only inspected the examination of the Senior Class, but made careful

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unbended inquiry into the general condition of the Institution. By authority of His Excellency the Governor, this Report has been published, and as it contains important suggestions, I beg leave to commend it to the special attention of the Board. A prescribed copy of said Report is herewith submitted.
Commencement Service
The law requires that the Commencement Sermon shall be delivered by the Chancellor or by some suitable person to be selected by him. As last year [was] the first of my administration, I thought proper to discharge this service myself, with the idea that my discourse besides meeting the demands of the occasion, might to some extent subserve the purposes of an inaugurated address. In future, I think the interests of the Institution would be advanced by obtaining Clergy-men from different parts of the State and from different Denominations. For the present year, I have secured the services of the Rev. John Jones of Atlanta, a well known and distinguished minister of the Presbyterian Church. I recommend that the usual appropriation be made to defry [defray] his expenses.
Gov. Milledge
The governors bounty of Gov. John Milledge to the Univ. of Ga. ought always be held in grateful remembrance. He was one of its earliest and best friends, and practically one of its principal founders. Every one who places a foot on the campus enjoys his hospitality, and the Sale of the six hundred acres presented by him to the Univ. has supplied it not

(pge 618)
inconsiderably with funds.
An appropriate occasion now presents itself to make some small recognition of the service to the cause of education rendered by this excellent man. Some of his descendants having met with great reverses of fortune, are now very poor. One of them, Miss Kate Milledge, his grand-daughter, is said to be an excellent artist. I respectfully suggest that she be employed to execute a portrait of her illustrious ancestor to be placed in some suitable position in the Library Hall. It would seem that the very least that can be done to show a proper appreciation of our indebtedness to Gov. Milledge is to possess and hand to posterity a deliveation of his features. Besides being a proper tribute to the memory of our early patron, the employment of Miss Milledge for this purpose would be a graceful recognition of the native talent, and, to some small extent a just return for favors received. I respectfully suggest, that two hundred and fifty dollars be appropriated for this purpose.
Reports Submitted.
I herewith submit the Report made to your Honorable Body through me by President Charbonnier of the State College with its accompanying Documents. As the report explains itself and is perfectly clear, it needs no comment from me. But I cannot forbear to say, that it is an important document, and that the opinions of this skilful, accomplished, wise, and elegant officer, command my highest respect and I therefore commend his
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suggestions to the careful consideration of the Board.
I also submit herewith a Report of Prof. Lumpkin to Prest. Charbonnier setting forth his operations in his newly created Department. Finding a great demand among the students for instruction in Book-keeping, Prof. Lumpkin volunteered to supply this demand, though it was not provided for; and I am pleased he has rendered in this as well as in his more legislative duties, efficient and valuable service.
I also submit the Report of the Professor of Law, which requires no comment.
Report on Library.
I also submit an important and valuable Report from Prof. Morris, who has acted as Librarian during the past year. The opinion expressed by him as to the proper way of keeping the Library unbroken and in good order, is the same as that offered by me in my last report, which opinion I still entertain. Last year the Library was kept by a student appointed by me under instruction from the Board. The appointment was as good a one, I am sure, as could have been made, and the young man received one hundred dollars, for the service rendered. I am constrained to say that this year, the service rendered has been vastly more efficient and valuable. The former Librarian was faithful it is true, but he had not the dignity and authority of the Professor to sustain him, not yet the experience and skill, and this suffices I think to account for his comparative failure of success.

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So valuable a piece of property as our Library is worth taking care of. It must have cost, I suppose, not less than Thirty Thousand Dollars. It is well known too that no kind of property is so liable to waste and ruin as a Library open to hundreds of borrowers. In our case, the liability is all the greater, because our borrowers are thoughtless, careless boys, forgetful, irresponsible, and having no fixed habitation or home, certainly at least none within practical reach. The past history and present condition of ours Library is an emphatic and painful comment on the truth of what I have said. Hundreds of volumes belonging to us are missing and many valuable sets are broken. I am sure that it would be a wise economy to pay a suitable person a suitable sum, to take charge of this valuable but easily injured property.
Therefore, until Prof. Morris took the Library, the salary of the Librarian has been one hundred dollars. He however has received no compensation. I have no doubt that if requested to do so, he will continue his service without pay, but in view of the great value and necessity of that service, and regarding the great draft made on his time and attention, I feel constrained to recommend that the salary attached to the office of Librarian be restored, and that it date from the beginning of Prof. Morris term. In fact, I think that the salary ought to be larger and that more time ought to be given to the business than Prof. Morris can spare from his other duties. But what is above suggested appears to me to be the
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very least that can be done in view of the importance and value of the interest concerned.
Degrees.
The Faculty recommend the gentlemen whose names are under written for the Degrees attached to their names respectively.
Master of Arts: In course,
W.D. Mitchell of the class of 1860
Bachelor of Arts.
James M. Carlton, Andrew J. Cobb, Richard W. Cone, Arthur W. Davis, Henry G. Genahl, Thomas R. Gibson, Robert P. Hill, Jarrell W. Hogg, John W. Hogg, Bartow W. Hones, Leonidas M. Landrum, William J. Matthews, Robert E. Mitchell, Henry P. Moore, Junius W. Nisbet, Alexander H Reid, W. Olin Sanders, Eugene Thompson, Henry
H. Tucker, Jr. John L M. Tye, Henry B. Walker.
Bachelor of Science in Franklin College, William M. Henry, George D. Thomas,
Bachelor of Science in State College
Joseph S. Cook, James W. Jackson.
Civil and Mining Engineer. Martin B. Morris.
Bachelor of Engineering. Benjamin M. Hall.
Bachelor of Philosophy Thomas R. Rusk.
Master of Agriculture Martin L. Morris, William W. Newton.

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Bachelor of Laws Samuel I. Hale, Hudson A. Jenkins, Bartow E. Thrasher, I. Harvey Turner.
Recapitulated as follows:
Master of Arts In course 1
Bachelors of Arts 21
Bachelors of Science (Franklin) 2
(State College) 1
Civil & Mining Engineer 1
Bachelor of Philosophy 1
Master of Agriculture 2
Bachelors of Law 4
Total 35

You will be gratified to notice that the number of graduates is larger than last year, and larger than ever before since the introduction of the University System.
It is a fact worthy of profound attention, that not withstanding all the popular out cry for Scientific Education, the number of students (Omitting the Law Students), who take the old Classical Degree of Bachelors of Arts is more than twice as large as all the rest put together; and that too when our Scientific Department is as well appointed as any in the Southern States and supplied with officers as able as can be found in the United States, and whose personal popularity and worth are equal to their professional skill and Scientific attainments.

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The Faculty
I congratulate the Board on the happy choice of a Presiding Officer for the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. He has discharged the duties of his office with great acceptance as I believe both to his colleagues and to the students. As for myself, I can freely say that in all my acquaintance, I have never known a man whom I would prefer in that relation.
The meetings of the Faculty have without a single exception, been perfectly harmonious. Differences of opinion have been discussed with dignity and suavity, nor so far as I know has the most scrupulous courtesy ever been violated.
And now, Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees, with by best prayers for the blessing of God on you and on the University, and on all connected with it, I have the honor to be, with sentiments of highest consideration,
Your obedient servant, Henry C. [H]. Tucker, Chancellor
University of Georgia, July 28, 1876
The letters of Gov. Smith, Mr. Phinizy, and Mr. Jenkins were read. Gov. Smiths resignation was accepted, and on motion of Mr. Crawford, the Board proceeded at once to fill his vacancy, when he was unanimously elected, and the Secretary to inform him of his election by the Telegraph and request his attendance. [C.J. Jenkins ??]

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Standing Committees made their Reports, which were laid on the table for future action, viz, those of Finance, of Buildings, and of the Law School.
An Abstract of the Proceedings of the Prudential Committee for the past year was read and laid on the Table with the minutes.
The President appointed the Standing Committee on Laws and Discipline, viz. Messers. Hull, Chairman, Vason, Lawton, Jackson, and Crawford.
The Chancellors annual communications and accompanying documents were referred to their appropriate Committees, and the Board adjourned to 9 A.M. to-morrow.
July 29, 1876
The Board met according to adjournment, when Messers. Gresham and Holt appeared and took their seats.
On motion of Mr. Billups, the Board resolved to repair to Moore College to-day at 11 oclock to see the Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus, and the Medals and Instruments in the Engineer Department now collected there. And at the appointed hour the Board took a recess and went in a body to the building and after going through, returned to the Library and resumed business.
Mr. Vason moved the appointment of a Special Committee of Five to consider the relation of the University to the Legislature; whether the University is subject to ordinary legislation; whether some different and better organization

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may not be devised; which motion was discussed and laid on the table.
Mr. Harris submitted the following resolution which was adopted; ordered that a resolution of this Board on July 4, 1866 declaring that every fourth annual meeting from this date, this Board will vote by ballot and without discussion on the question of each member of the Faculty continuing to occupy his chair; and upon any member failing to receive a majority of votes, his chair shall be considered vacant; be and the same hereby is repealed.
Mr. Gresham submitted the following resolution which was adopted; Resolved, That this Board has entire and full confidence in the ability of Prof. Morris and highly appreciates his valuable services as Professor of Greek in this University; and that the Board would regret to lose his valuable services.
Resolved, That Prof. Morris be requested to with draw his resignation.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution which was adopted; Resolved, That it is the sense of this Board that the Professorships of Greek and Latin ought not be united.
Mr. Jackson submitted the following resolution which was adopted; Resolved unanimously that this Board decline to accept the resignation of Gov. Jenkins, and that a Committee consisting of Judge Vason, Col. Holt, Judge Crawford, Mr. Mitchell and Mr. Gresham be appointed to communicate this action to Gov. Jenkins and to impress upon him the importance of his continuing at the head of this Board, and our earnest desire that he withdraw

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his resignation.
Mr. Thomas submitted the following resolution which was adopted; Resolved, That in accepting the resignation of Prof. Morris, this Board unites in expressing its high appreciation of the ability and earnestness with which he had discharged the duties of his Chair as well as of his estimable qualities in private life; and of its sincere regret at the loss of his valuable services to the University.
The subject as to the time of the speaking of Sophomores and Juniors at Commencement having been introduced by Mr. Cobb, it was on motion, referred to the Faculty.
Mr. Billups submitted the following resolution which was adopted; Resolved, That all regulation, heretofore adopted by this Board on the subject of limiting the amount to be paid by students for Board lodging etc. be and the same are hereby repealed.
Mr. Vason moved, that in the absence of Messers. Jenkins and Hill, members of the permanent committee on Honorary Degrees their places be temporarily filled, which was agreed to, and the President appointed Messers Crawford and Yancey on said committee.
The President appointed Messers. Cobb and Billups the committee to invite distinguished persons to seats on the platform.
Board then adjourned to 4 oclock this afternoon.
July 29th, 1876

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4 Afternoon. Board met according to adjournment, when Messers, Toombs, Lawton and Scriven appeared and took their seats. Mr. Vasons resolution on the Resolutions of the University to the Legislature was taken up, discussed, and adopted.
On motion, the Board conferred the Degrees as recommended in the Chancellors communication.
The President announced the committee of Five under Mr. Vasons resolution touching the relations of the University to the Legislature; Messers. Mitchell, Vason, Billups, Toombs, and Hull.
Mr. Yancey moved to ratify our action in the October meeting and the same was postponed and made the order of the day for Monday.
Board then adjourned till 9 oclock A.M. on Monday next.
Monday, July 31st. 1876 9 A.M.
The Board met according to adjournment, and took up the order of the day, to wit, the ratification of the action of the October meeting, when on motion of Mr. Toombs, that a Committee be appointed to inquire into the expediency of ratifying the October meeting, so far as the election of Prof. Cumming is involved, the motion was agreed to and the President appointed Messers. Toombs, Holt, and Scriven that Committee.
During the discussion of this matter the Board took a recess to attend the Sophomore Prize Declamation in the College

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Chapel, and at its close returned to the Library, and ratified the various acts of the October meeting, except the election of Prof. Cumming. The permanency of the ten scholarships donated to the city of Athens was continued for the present, subject to future action.
Mr. Hull, Chairman of Committee on Laws and Discipline reported in parts, which was discussed, amended, and adopted, and is as follows.
The Committee on Laws and Discipline have considered the recommendations contained in the Report of the Chancellor and of the President of the State College. A number of those suggestions meet the approval of your committee and resolutions embodying such are herewith submitted. Certain others have not been acted on, because the committee wished opportunity for inquiry and reflection, and a further report will be hereafter made.
The Committee have considered the suggestion of the Chancellor on the titles of his office. We think that under the laws as they now stand, the Chancellor is the President of Franklin College, and that the title of Chancellor implies such Presidency. We do not proceive [perceive] any necessity for a change in the Title which would confer no new powers and add no new responsibilities.
Your committee are gratified at the interest manifested in the visit of the Chancellor to the North Georgia College, and with the account of the success and usefulness of that branch

(pge 630) missing 629
of the University. We regret, that the straitness of our finances prevent our recommending any further pecuniary aid to an object so worthy. We offer a resolution, however, to continue the annual appropriation of Five Hundred Dollars.
The Committee cannot recommend at this time any appointment of a Professor of Mineralogy and Geology, or of Natural History and Physiology in the State College.
The Committee submit the following resolutions in accordance with the recommendations of the Chancellor or of President Charbonnier.
First, the Degree of Bachelor of Science now conferred by the State College, shall hereafter be styled Bachelor of Chemical Science.
Second, The Prudential Committee shall hereafter cause to be printed a sufficient number of copies of the annual Catalogue.
Third, The sum of Two Hundred Dollars is appropriated to Prof. Waddell as compensation for his labor in the preparation of the Triennial Catalogue.
Fourth, The condition of teaching School now imposed on the gratuitous instruction of Fifty Students to be admitted at the discretion of the Faculty, may at the request of any such student, be commited [commuted] by the payment of half-rates of Tuition for the time it was received.
Fifth, The annual appropriation of Five Hundred Dollars heretofore made to the North Georgia Agric. Coll. is continued until further order of this Board.

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Sixth, Young men in any of the Schools to which Scholarships have been or may be granted, who may win such Scholarship shall be admitted to any class, for which they may be qualified.
Seventh, The sum of Twenty-five Dollars is appropriated to pay the expenses of Rev. M. Jones in coming to preach our Commencement Sermon.
Eight, The Degree of Mechanical Engineer is added to the Degrees conferred by the University.
Respectfully submitted,
W.W. Hull, Chairman.
The Board then adjourned to 4 P.M. July 31, 1876
The Board met according to adjournment.
Mr. Lewis resolution in relation to several points for the consideration of the special Committee of Five was referred to that Committee without being adopted.
The Board then took a recess to attend the delivery of the oration before the two Literary Societies by Col. Screven [Scriven] in the College Chapel, and returned to the Library after its delivery and adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
Tuesday Morning, 9 oclock. August 1, 1876
The Board met according to adjournment, and took a recess till after the meeting of the Alumni Society, the Junior Exhibition, and the Alumni Oration by Judge Jackson, after which

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the Board returned to the Library, and adjourned to 4 P.M.
August 1, 1876, 4 P.M.
The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Toombs in behalf of the special Committee of five submitted the following paper, which was discussed, and on motion of Mr. Crawford amended by adding the Provis. On the question of agreeing to the amendment, the yeas and Nays were called for, when it appeared that those who voted for the provis. were Messers. Lawton, Thomas, Scriven, Crawford, Hull, Harris, Gresham, Holt, Cobb, and Mitchell. 10. and those who voted in the negative were Messers. Lewis, Billups, Yancey, and Toombs. 4 So the amendment was agreed to and then the paper adopted as amended. It is as follows:
The Special Committee of Five to which were referred certain important matters touching the relation of the Trustees of the University to the General Assembly of the State, and also what changes may be made in the present organization of the Faculty, and especially touching the office of Chancellor, beg leave to report in part upon the last portion of the matters referred to it, by presenting for the consideration and adoption of the Board, the following resolution, to wit,
Resolved, That the Chancellors office be one of honor and distinction without salary, that he preside at all Commencements, and confer the Degrees upon such occasions, leaving the Faculty free to choose their own Chairman; Provided, this resolution is to take effect twelve months from this time.

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Mr. Hull, a member of the Committee, dissented from the original report as it came from the Committee.
Mr. Hull, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline made his final Report, which was subsequently amended by adding the Fifth Resolution, rendered necessary by the adoption of Mr. Jacksons Resolution hereafter recorded.
The Report as amended was adopted and is as follows: (Here insert what is recorded on the opposite page) On the subject of the vacancy caused by the resignation of Prof. Morris and the recommendation of President Charbonnier that additional teaching force in elementary Mathematics be provided, the Committee think that there is a sufficient number in the present Faculty, if properly apportioned to meet the present demands of the University.
We suggest as a solution of the question the following programme in the form of Resolutions.
1st
. The Greek and Latin Languages and Literature shall, until further order, be taught by Prof. Waddell in the two higher classes, and by Prof. Wm. H. Browne in the two lower.
2nd
. Assistance in instruction in Algebra and Elementary Mathematics shall be given by Prof. Mell and Prof. Lumpkin, the details to be settled by the Chancellor. 3rd. The instruction in Rhetoric and Oratory now given by Prof. Lumpkin shall be devoted [devolved] on Prof. Speer. 4th
. Instruction in Logic and Moral Philosophy shall be given by the Chancellor.

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5th
. The 2nd, 3rd, & 4th of the foregoing resolutions are adopted, subject to revision and alteration by the Prudential Committee.
Respectfully submitted, Wm. H. Hull, Chairman.
Further. Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline.
Your Committee have considered the recommendation of the Chancellor to prohibit the awarding of Medals by the two Societies.
The public presentation of these medals has already been prohibited, but they are given privately, in the Society Halls as prizes for the best debaters. Undoubtedly the contest for these prizes may occasionally lead to disorders, but that danger attaches to every distinction or honor, which is given by vote of the Societies, and to prohibit all such, would, as it seems to your Committee, deprive those bodies of interest and efficiency. Some stimulants to exertion should be allowed, and these medals seem as unobjectionable as any. Your Committee decline to recommend any further legislation on this subject.
N.B. The above, beginning Further Report should have been recorded on the opposite page, following the words is as follows.
Mr. Yancey, Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture read his Report, which was adopted, and is as follows:
The Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture have not had

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a conference with the Professor of that Department, or read any Report from him made through the Chancellor. He was called to Baltimore, and is absent by authority, and has, doubtless been prevented from returning as soon as he anticipated.
But the very many valuable experiments which have been conducted on the Experimental Farm, this year, will, in due time, be published for the benefit of the people of the State.
The repairs to the fencing hitherto ordered, have been completed, and the farm is now secure.
As the sales of products of the Farm made by the Professor usually return the annual appropriation, a [or] nearly so, made by the Board for purchase of manures, farm labor, and utensils, your Committee instead of the usual amount of five hundred dollars, ask only the appropriation of one hundred dollars.
Respectfully submitted, Ben C. Yancey Chairman Committee.
The following report was submitted by Mr. Toombs and adopted:
The Committee to report upon the expediency of the ratification of the action of the Board at its called meeting in October in the election of Professor Cumming, beg leave to report, that after a full investigation of the matter committed to them, they recommend the ratification of the action of the Board at said called meeting, with the understanding that the election of Prof. Cumming be subject to the conformation of this

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Board at its annual meeting in August next.
Mr. Yancey, Chairman of the Committee on the Library submitted his Report, which was amended, adopted and is as follows:
The Committee on the Library Report to the Chancellor, by him submitted to the Board of Trustees, announces the he has half completed a list of all the Books in the Library, by which when finished, the Librarian would be able by comparison with a former published Catalogue, to inform as [us], what losses had occured [occurred] .
Your Committee instruct the next Librarian to complete the list thus half finished, make the comparison, with the published catalogue, and report to the Board of Trustees, at their next annual meeting, what books have been lost, that said list when completed be copied in a book.
That the Librarian in each annual Report, report what sum of money has been placed in his hands for the purchase of books and furnish a list of such books purchased during the year, in said report, and that each annual addition of books be listed in the book directed to be kept for that purpose, and when the entire sum placed in his hands for the purchase of books has not been expended, he report the balance of money in his hands, and if in Bank.
Or if the money arising from the assessment of five dollars upon each student is not placed in his hands for expenditure, but should be distributed among the members of the Faculty of the University, for each to select books, the Librarian is

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instructed to get from each of such persons the list of books purchased, with report of comments, if any unexpended, and embody such information in the annual report hereby required of him.
The late Librarian suggest the best method to protect the Library from loss would be not to allow any book to be taken from the Library Room, and that persons be required to examine the books in the Room. But he suggests the difficulty in the case of a Professor acting as Librarian, of his having time to remain in the Library a time sufficient under such a rule.
As the finances of the University will not justify the payment of a competent gentleman to remain most of his time in the Library, under whom such a regulation could be carried out, Your Committee must suggest some other plan. Not more than one volumn [volume] should be loaned at a time. It is recommended, that for the service of Librarian and finishing the Catalogue herein accommended [recommended] , the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, for a year, be appropriated. The Chancellor is charged with the duty of selecting a Librarian.
The Report of Books purchased by Col. Charbonnier, President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts is hereby presented, and the Secretary requested to hand the list of books to the Librarian for record.
The Librarian shall keep open the Library at convenient seasons of the day and for a proper length of time, giving students and others due notice thereof, and he shall be responsible

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for any loss of books taken out under his administration.
Respectfully submitted. Ben C. Yancey. Chr. Mr. Thomas submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That such an amount as may be found necessary, not exceeding $1,000 be and the same is hereby appropriated from the income of the Land Scrip for the purpose of procuring the delivery during the ensuing Collegiate year of public lectures in the Scientific Department of the University by eminent Professors or Lecturers on such subjects as have not been provided for in the plan or organization of the State College; said appropriation to be expended under the direction of the Chancellor and the President of the State College, by and with the advice and consent of the Prudential Committee.
Mr. Cobb submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
The Junior Orators shall be selected by the Faculty as follows:
Four (4) for Scholarship.
The Two (2) best speakers from each Society to sufficiently high in scholarship to rise in their class.
The best writer in each Society upon same terms as above.

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The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning. Wednesday 9 oclock A.M. August 2, 1876
The Board met according to adjournment. On motion of Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Cobb, and others, the Degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence, in course, was conferred upon Albert
L. Mitchell, Lamar Cobb, Henry Jackson, Howell Cobb, Henry D.D. Twiggs, John A. Stephens, Winder P. Johnson, Augustus O. Bacon, Pope Barrow, Wiley C. Howard, W. Robert Gignilliatt, and James J. Turnbull, graduate of the Lumpkin Law School and of the Department of Law in the University, of seven years standing, and maintaining good moral character, according to the statue of the University, in such case made and provided.
The Committee on Honorary Degrees reported, and recommended Rev. John Jones of Atlanta for the Degree of Doctor of Divinity and the same was conferred upon him by the Board.
Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution which was adopted and the Honorary Degree of Master of Arts conferred by the Board,
Resolved,
That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon Eugene H. Beck and Ben. Palmer Gaillard, Professors in the North Georgia Agricultural College, in consideration of their fine Scholarship and their devotion to the profession of Teaching for even four years.
Mr. Thomas submitted the following resolution, which was

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adopted.
Resolved,
That the present proportion of the Salaries of the Academic and State College Departments be so charged as to debit the income of the Land Scrip Fund with one half of the Salary of the Secretary and Treasurer.
Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved, That Professor Charbonnier and Cumming with the approval of the Prudential Committee be authorized to loan to the College at Dahlonega such broken and useless pieces of apparatus and such pieces as are not needed in the University.
The Board then took a recess to attend the Commencement Exercises in the College Chapel, where the usual public speaking by members of the Senior Class took place, the various Degrees announced, and Diplomas delivered, after which the Board returned to the Library, and adjourned to 4 oclock this afternoon.
Wednesday 4 P.M. August 2, 1876.
The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Jackson submitted the following resolution, which was adopted, and gave rise to the 5th Resolution of the final Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline as already recorded.
Resolved, That if the Prudential Committee on consultation with Professors Rutherford and Charbonnier shall find it absolutely

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necessary to increase the mathematical force of the Georgia State College they be authorized to employ such force at an expense not to exceed $1,000 to be paid out of the Land Scrip Fund.
Mr. Harris, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings called up his Report, which was adopted, and is as follows: Athens, July 28, 1876 To the Hon. Board of Trustees University of Georgia,
Gentlemen,
The Committee on Buildings and Grounds respectfully report, that for the year just closed, the sum of $1,822.92 had been expended in repairs and improvements upon College Buildings, Dwellings Houses and grounds belonging to the University.
Much the larger proportion of this sum has been paid for general repairs upon the residence lots of Profs Morris, Willcox, Mell, and Rutherford, the remainder, for recovering the Ivy Building, repairs of the stair way of the Library and for grading and sodding the grounds and terraces in front of Moore College.
The main College Buildings, as well as the residences of the Professors named, are now in a fair State of preservation, but it will be necessary during the ensuing year to expend at least $250 for furniture fixtures in the recitation rooms of Prof. Morris and Rutherford, in addition to the constantly recurring demands for repairs upon the residence lots and the buildings used specially for educational purposes.
The work done on the grounds in front of Moore College,

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while it has added much to the appearance of that part of the College Campus falls far short of what was desired and intended. Whenever the requisite funds can be afforded, plans already designed for further improvement of these grounds, will be carried out.
The Committee earnestly recommend that whatever appropriation may be made for general purposes of improvement, may include as liberal an allowance as can be afforded for this special object.
Without venturing to suggest what specific sum should be set apart for objects embraced in this Report, since it is important to force [face] the numerous contingencies occurring every year, your Committee would respectfully recommend that it be as large as the means at command will justify, devolving upon those having these interests in charge, to make the most judicious distribution of the fund, amongst the various objects to which it is to be applied.
Respectfully submitted. Young L.G. Harris Chairman
Col L.H. Charbonnier, President of the State College asked leave of absence to visit France next year, which absence may extend from July 1, 1877 to the first
Wednesday of October of the same year, and leave was granted as requested, on motion of Mr. Mitchell.
The Board on motion went into the election of a Trustee of till [to fill] the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. F. Phinizy,

(pge 644) missing 643
when Hon. A.T. McIntyre of Thomasville was duly elected. Mr. H.G. Hammond, Attorney General, was duly re-elected Alumni Trustee by the Alumni Society, for four years, from this date, to wit, to the close of the first Wednesday of August 1880.
Mr. Cobb, Chairman of the Committee on the Law Department having on the first day of the Session submitted the Report of that Department, the same was adopted as is as follows.
University of Georgia
July 22, 1876
To Rev. Henry H. Tucker D.D. LLD.
Chancellor
Sir,
I have the honor to report that the whole number of students connected with the Law Department of the University during the year now closing, amounts to six of whom four have completed the course and are entitled to the Degree of Bachelor of Law, viz. J. Harvey Turner, Hudson A. Jenkins, Barton Edmonds Thrasher, and Samuel Jackson Hale.
There are two members in the Junior Class.
The annual course in Parliamentary Law by Rev. P.H. Mell, D.D. LL.D. and in Medical Jurisprudence by R.M. Smith M.D. has been enjoyed by the Law Students and others. These instructions are given by oral as well as written lectures, and are gratuitous, for which these gentlemen are entitled to the gratitude of the students and of the authorities of the corporation.
All of which is respectfully submitted.

(pge 645)
W.L. Mitchell
Mr. Yancey submitted a series of resolutions contemplating the adjournment of the Board to Atlanta on the second Tuesday of December next, and on the motion to adopt them required the yeas and nays, and upon a call of the members it appeared that those who voted in the affirmative are Messers. Screven [Scriven] , Holt, Yancey, Billups, and Lewis, 5, and that those who in the negative are Messers Hull, Crawford, Thomas, Harris, Gresham, Lawton, Cobb, Jackson, and Mitchell, 9.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That it is very desirable to have the mineral Waters of this State carefully analyzed, not only qualitatively, but quantitatively; and that the same be done, from time to time, by the Professor of Chemistry, as the way may be opened; and when completed, be published in some suitable manner as may be hereafter prescribed; Provided the same shall not cost the Board any thing, or interfere with the Professors duty.
Mr. Thomas submitted the following resolution which was adopted.
Resolved,
That there ought to be a Standing Committee on Apparatus, so that this Board may know that the valuable property now owned by the Institution, is properly cared for, and that correct Inventories [are maintained?]. As this will require considerable time, the

(pge 646)
Prudential Committee shall be made our Standing Committee on Apparatus.
Mr. Gresham submitted the following resolution, which was adopted.
Resolved,
That the Treasurer be instructed to invest any surplus funds belonging to the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts after paying the appropriations from that fund in Bonds of the State of Georgia until the further order of this Board, and until the investment amounts to the sum of 250,000 dollars.
The President appointed as the Board of Visitors to the North Georgia Agricultural College to attend its Commencement in 1877 Messers. Billups, Holt and Cobb. Mr. Yancey introduced some resolutions at the early part of the Session which he now called up, contemplating the purchase of Mr. Lewis Library for the use of our Branch Department at Dahlonega, and which on motion of Mr. Jackson were amended.
The following is the resolution adopted.
Resolved,
That a Committee of three be appointed to enquire as to the propriety of purchasing Mr. Lewis Library, as certain [ascertain] upon what terms it can be bought, and report at our next annual meeting, and that the Board of visitors already appointed to attend the next Commencement at Dahlonega be that Committee.
Mr. Holt submitted the following resolution which was
(pge 647)
adopted.
Recognizing the importance of exercise in English Composition the Chancellor is hereby instructed to require that original compositions be submitted for criticism monthly by the students of each class upon subjects to be assigned them; the compositions to be marked according to merit and to be embodied in the circulars and to be estimated in the general average standing.
Mr. Harris was added to the auditing Committee, which now consists of S. Thomas, Chairman, and Messers. Yancey and Harris.
The President appointed the Standing Committees as follows:
1. Committee on Finance-
Messers. Thomas, Chairman, Brown, Crawford, McIntryre, Lawton, and Smith.
2.
Committee on Library-Messers. Cobb, Chairman, Hall, Holt, Pierce, Rutherford, and Stephens.

3.
Committee on Buildings and Grounds-Messers. Harris, Chairman, Seward, Beckwith, Mitchell, and Holt.

4.
Committee on Law Department-Messers. Cobb, Chairman, Jackson, Billups, Gordon, and Hammond.

5.
Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture. Messers. Yancey, Chairman, Lewis, Barrow, and Screven [Scriven] .

6.
Committee on Apparatus. Messers. Mitchell, Chairman, Thomas, Yancey, Cobb, Harris.

(pge 648-649)
The report of the Finance Committee was taken up, amended, adopted, and is as follows:
The undersigned, in behalf of the Finance Committee submits the following Report.
Through the Auditing Committee, the usual Examination has been made of the Treasurers accounts for the past fiscal year, from which it appears that the Receipts from all sources, on account of the University, including the appropriation of $5000 received from the State on account of the Apparatus Fund, were $41,820.99 purchase of Apparatus in part, were $39,449.63 and a balance in the hands of the Treasurer of $4,989.24 which is made up in part of the unexpended balance of the Apparatus Fund to wit, $1,499.02 and the Library Fund, to wit, $920.00 which have been appropriated to the purchase of Apparatus and Books not yet received and therefore not drawn out of the hands of the Treasurer, leaving after deducting, these two sums in the hands of the Treasurer, available for current expenses a cash balance of $2,570.24.
Of the above expenditure, $15,206.96 were made on account of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and were charged to the income of the Land-Scrip Fund, leaving a balance to the Credit of the State College from the income of last year of $2,707.18 from which if there be deducted the balance of $531.15 due the General Fund as appears from the Report of the Finance Committee of last year on account of advances heretofore made the State College, there will remain

(pge 650)
a balance now due the Land-Scrip Fund from the General Fund of $2,176.03 which your Committee recommend be liquidated by the transfer of that amount of the General Fund to the credit of the Land Scrip Fund.
From the foregoing statements, it appears, leaving out the transactions on account of the Apparatus Fund, that the income for the last fiscal year was $622.34 in excess of the expenditures, and that the expenditures were $49.63 in excess of the appropriations.
The Committee further Report that the $5000 first installment of the appropriation made by the State for the purchase of Apparatus for the Chemical, Philosophical, and Engineering Departments of the State College was judiciously expended under the direction of the President of the State College to the extent of $3,500.98 for the purposes contemplated, an itemized statement of which, with proper vouchers was submitted, leaving an unexpended balance in the hands of the Treasurer belonging to this Fund, as heretofore stated of $1,499.02.
The Committee in the further discharge of the duty of their appointment, submit the following statement of the assets of the University together with the usual estimate of Income and Appropriations for the next Collegiate year.
Assets of the University.
Bonds of the State of Georgia, 8 c/o Do Do Do Do, 7 c/o In hands f Governor, paying 7 c/o $ 96,000.00 56,000.00 90,202.17
(pge 651) Total $242,202.17
Terrell Endowment Bonds of the State of Georgia 7 c/o Bonds of the Geo. R.R. & Bkg. Co. 7 c/o 16,000.00 4,000.00 $ 20,000.00
General Funds. Cash balance in hands of Treasurer Bonds of the State of Georgia 8 c/o Bonds of Ga. R.R. & Bkg. Co. $ 2,590.24 3,000.00 5,000.00 $ 10,590.24
Bonds of Clarke County, 7 c/o Bonds of City of Athens, 8 c/o 500.00 100.00 $ 11,170.24

To which add debt of State of Ga. 8 c/o 100,000.00
$111,170.24
Estimated Incomes
Amount of payment by State 8,000.00
Interest on General Fund in Bonds 633.00
Rents of Professors Houses 1,800.00
Tuition Fees 6,000.00
Interest on Terrell Endowment 1,400.00
Interest on Land Scrip Fund 17,914.14
$ 35,747.14

The following estimate of Expenditures, embracing only such items as are seemed indispensible, is submitted, for which it is recommended specific appropriations be made:
(pge 652)
Estimated Expenditures.
Salaries $ 30,200
Annual Catalogues 250
Music 200
Advertising & Printing 500
Insurance 200
Hire of Servants 600
Agricultural Dept. 100
Postage 120
Stationary [Stationery] 150
Fuel 150
Repairs 2,500
Incidentals 300

$ 35,270
The proportion of the above estimated under the present arrangement to be charged to the income from the Land Scrip Fund, may be stated as follows:
Salaries $ 13,233.33
Ann. Catalogue in print 125.00
Advertising & Prints 250.00
Music 100.00
Servants 300.00
Agricul. Dept. 100.00
Stationery 75.00
Fuel 75.00
Postage 60.00
(pge 653)

Incidentals 150.00 Total $ 14,468.33
In the foregoing statements, it will be observed that there are no estimates of Receipts or Expenditures for Library Fees or Room Rents, as the receipts of the former are appropriated for the purchase of Books and of the latter to repairs of the Dormitory Buildings.
Your Committee would again earnestly call the attention of the Board to, the significant fact, that whilst the income of the Land Scrip Fund upon the present basis of expenditures would admit of a larger development, the expenditure under, the present arrangement on account of the Academical Department is largely in excess of the income of that Department; and as the advances made from the General Fund to put the State College into operation have now been refunded, the situation imperatively demands contraction, and a reduction in the expenditures of the Academical Department; or the small surplus belonging to the General Fund will soon be absorbed.
As under the plan of organization of the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, originally adopted by the Board, there remains to be provided for the subjects of Natural History, Physiology and Geology, and the income of the Land Scrip Fund for the next Collegiate Year will admit of some expansion, as the most economical and effective manner of fulfilling the obligations of the Board and popularizing the University, your Committee recommend a limited appropriation for the purpose of

(pge 654)
procuring the services of eminient [eminent] Non-Resident Professors of Lecturers who have made these subjects a specialty, to deliver a course or courses of Lectures of a popular character (which shall be free to the public) upon such of these subject as may be deemed advisable.
Respectfully submitted,
S. Thomas, Chairman.
The Board adjourned sine die.
Wm. L. Mitchell Signed by order of the Board
Secretary Mark A. Cooper
Vice-President
(pge 655)

University of Georgia Athens, July 27, 1877.
The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in stated annual session is [in] the College Library at 10 oclock A.M. and was called to order by the Senior Trustees present, in the absence of the President and Vice-President.
Upon calling the roll the following members answered to their names:
Mr. Lewis, Chairman, Messers, Mitchell, Yancey, Vason, Jackson, Pierce, Crawford, Billups, Hall, Thomas, Beckwith, Cobb, Gresham, Hull, Harris, and McIntyre, and during the session at Athens the following members appeared and took their seats, Messers. Hill, Gordon, and Cooper, and upon adjourning to Atlanta to

(pge 655a)
complete the business of the Board, and during the Session there, the following members appeared to took their seats, Messers, Jenkins, President, Brown, Toombs, Seward, Smith, Hammond, Scriven, Lawton, Stevens, and Speer. Excuses were made and sustained for Messers. Barrow and Miller.
Bishop Pierce made the opening prayer.
The minutes of the last meeting were read, and at the suggestion of Mr. Yancey his paper in reference to adjournment to Atlanta was ordered to be inserted as an Amendment to the minutes so as to show upon what the yeas and nays were taken. The following is the paper:
Resolved, That when the Board of Trustees adjourn, it stand adjourned to meet in Atlanta, in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol on the Second Tuesday of December next, to consider the expediency of change in the organization of all the Departments of the University, and especially change in the organization of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts.
Resolved, That a Committee of Three be appointed to suggest to the Board, at said adjourned meeting, such changes in said organizations as may occur to them.
Resolved, That the Secretary be directed to notify such members of the Board as are now absent of this motion.. Aug. 2nd, 1876 Yancey.
Mr. Yancey also suggested, That the Resolution submitted by Mr. Lewis as to philosophical instruments to be given to the North Georgia Agricultural College, which contains the words

(pge 656)
broken and useless have these words stricken out, which was agreed to, and the minutes of the last meeting were confirmed as amended.
The Chancellor then read his annual Communication, and distributed printed copies to the members present. The accompanying Documents were also read and together with the Communication were referred to the appropriate Standing Committees:
The annual communication is as follows: CHANCELLORS REPORT, University of Georgia 1877
To the Honorable the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia:
Gentlemen: At the end of the third year of my administration, I have the honor to appear before you again with my Annual Report.
Number of Students.
Franklin College State College of Agriculture Law Department Total in Athens 61 29 11 161
At Dahlonega In Medical Department Total number of students 235 46
In all Departments 442.

You will perceive a marked decline in most of the Departments. In Franklin College the number of students is fifteen less than last year; in the State College of Agriculture the number is

(pge 657)
thirty two less; at Dahlonega only ten less; in the Medical Department eighteen less. In the Law Department there has been a small increase. The most noticeable falling off has been in the State College, which is more than double the decline in Franklin College. The main reason for this general decline in almost all Departments may doubtless be found in the depressed condition of the finances of the country. I think that nearly or quite all the Colleges of the Southern States have had a similar experience and some of the most popular of them have declined in numbers much more largely than we have done. I am informed by Professor Waddell, who has taken some pains to ascertain the facts in the case that our relative position, in regard to other Colleges, is quite as good as it has usually been.
Certain it is, at any rate, that for several years past all other interests, besides that of education have been depressed and steadily declining; and we have no reason to complain that we are not an exception to the universal law. Nor can anything be more unfair than to single out our failing prosperity, as if it were an isolated fact, when in truth we are only keeping company with all other institutions and all other interests, not only on our own continent, but in the whole civilized world.
In addition to the general causes of decline above referred to, there are certain specific causes, peculiar to ourselves, which have lead to some loss, and which I shall state before I

(pge 658)
close. After all, the decrease in numbers, so far as it is bona fide, is not half so great as we are apt to imagine. It is a common way of putting the facts, to say that, in 1869, the number of students was 347, and now it is only 161; thus showing a frightful decrease; and a stranger knowing nothing of the facts, except what has been just stated, might justly suppose that the University had met with enormous loss in the respect and confidence of the people.
All this ellusion [illusion] vanishes when the fact is stated that, of the 347 students, a large number were not college students proper, but maimed soldiers, why being unable to support themselves otherwise, were anxious to prepare themselves for the business of teaching, and why not only received tuition free, but why, in addition to this, received twenty-five dollars per month paid by the State. Let the same conditions be proposed now and hundreds would be glad to accept the offer, even for the sake of the twenty-five dollars per month, without the tuition. Yet we are apt to compare together the numbers 347 and 161 without taking the other factors into the account; and thus we are led to a conclusion very unfavorable to the present condition of the University, and at the same time very unjust, and utterly unsupported by facts. The truth is that notwithstanding our decreasing numbers, the falling off has been most unfairly stated; we are doing quite as well as most other institutions, and our decline is owing to causes which are, for the most part, beyond all human control. The reasons why the loss in the State College

(pge 658-659)
is so much greater than in the Franklin College, I believe to be as follows, to wit:
1.
This Department is patronized chiefly by Agriculturists, and the money pressure is felt more severely by these than by any other class of citizens.

2.
This Department has disappointed public expectation; and the reason of this is that the public expectation has been unreasonable. It seems to have been imagined that an unlettered youth, if sent here could be so instructed that in a couple of years he would not only learn all about practical agriculture, but that he would become thoroughly versed in all the sciences that bear on that branch of industry. In point of fact such a student learns very little about either. Practical agriculture can be learned much better on a farm than in any institution of learning. The sciences which bear upon it, such as Natural Philosophy, Geology, Chemistry, Natural History, Botany and Zoology, can be taught advantageously only to those who have at least a fair knowledge of the ordinary branches of elementary education.

Certain attainments in Mathematics are generally admitted to be necessary; but it is a popular error to suppose that any special prominence should be given to Mathematics. Unless a student has had enough general literary culture to be able to use books to advantage, to used intelligently, together ideas readily from the printed page, it is in vain to expect him to make rapid progress in the severer branches of knowledge, or

(pge 659)
in any branch. The student must also have had such previous training that he can readily understand what he hears; and must also be reasonably expert in the use of the pen so that he can take notes of oral lectures. Without these qualifications no student is prepared to profit by such instructions as ought to be given in college.
Many of the students of the State College have not the preliminary education above described. Consequently we have adopted our instructions to their necessities. Some of them study Arithmetic, many of them begin the study of Algebra with us, and many fail to furnish [finish] it. A large number of them study the veriest elements of the English languages; so great was the necessity for instruction in this department, that a new Professorship was actually created to supply the demands. Of course it is very little of Scientific Agriculture and nothing at all of Philosophy and Chemistry, that students of this class can learn. This is not the fault of the University. We can not do otherwise than teach these students what they are obligated to learn, before they can learn anything else. When after a year or two they return to their parents, and it is discovered that they have learned nothing but, what they might have been taught as well, or better in a common academy at home saving the expense of board and travel there is deep disappointment. Thus the Institution loses its hold in the public confidence and becomes unpopular. For this evil there are two remedies, one is to raise the standard of qualifications for admission,

(pge 660)
the other is to educate the public mind and let the people understand that there is no royar [royal] road to learning, no short hand method of instruction, no peculiar privilege to agriculturists, and that it takes as long to educate a man thoroughly for that profession, as for any other. The people must be taught that all preliminary education is substantially the same; whether for lawyers, physicians, preachers, farmers, merchants, manufacturers, or for any other pursuit in life, in other words that a certain amount of general culture is necessary to fit a man for anything. Students must acquire this, either before they come here or after; and if after it will consume much of their time before they reach those sciences, the study of which is the special object of their coming to the University. The first of these remedies will reduce the number of students for a time at least, instead of increasing it; for several years there will perhaps be a public ortory [oratory] against it, but eventually it will meet with popular approbation; but whatever results may be it has the great advantage of being right. The second remedy will operate but slowly at best; it will of course, meet with the opposition which is always made both to sober views and to progress. But we must remember that to promote the cause of sound learning, and to lead the popular mind in the right direction, in educational matters, at least is the great mission of this University. We must be patient and persevering and willing to bear public reproach if necessary, looking for our reward to the approbation of our own consciences and to

(pge 661)
the verdict of the next generation.
I beg the Board to bear in mind, that while I have spoken of the reasons why the Agricultural Department has fallen off more than any other, I have no fault to find with its management, by officers in charge. On the contrary President Charbonnier and his colleagues have discharged their duties faithfully and efficiently. It affords me great pleasure to say that they have done all that was possible. The evils spoken of are of a kind that they cannot correct. The raising of the standard is a thing to be ordered by this Board. The education of the popular mind is a work for us all to engage in, and in which patience must have her perfect work. Leaving now the consideration of this Department I proceed to discuss the affairs of the University in general. If I should point out some great and crying evils I think I can suggest adequate remedies. Some of my facts maybe startling, and some of my theories possibly more so. But I am prepared to substantiate the former, and think that I can show the latter to be true and practical. At any rate I beg for myself an impartial hearing. So far as I know, there are no prejudices in any way, nor any pet schemes to mislead me. I have no personal ends to subserve; and I speak simply as a native Georgian, who loves his States and his people; as a man who has given most of his life to the education of youth; as one who by reason of his office, has had better opportunities than any one else to watch and to know the exact working of affairs in the University of Georgia; and as a conscientious man, who feels bound to give the results of his observation, experience and life long study to those who have committed for three years the most important trusts to his care.
I shall offer some sweeping criticisms, but it is done in no unkindness, nor with any disrespect; nor do I intimate nor believe that the motives of any are less pure than my own. I shall propose some radical changes, but the more

(pge 662)
radical they are the more they are to be desired, if only they are for the better; and in my opinion an entirely new departure is called for by sound wisdom as well as by the popular voice.
I begin by a recital of the evils to be remedied.
The great decline in the number of the students is not owing wholly to financial causes. It arises partly from the fact that public confidence in the Institution is shaken by the perpetual changes made in its management. This begets a feeling of unrest, disquiet and suspicion. Where everything is unstable, it is natural to suppose that something is wrong and radically wrong. A line of policy is no sooner adopted than it is set aside and another is put in its place. There is too much legislation. In innumerable instances it matters but little what the law is, so it is only permanent[?]. If wholesome regulations were adopted once for all or at least for a decade, and if these were left untouched, things would soon adjust themselves to each other and confidence would be restored. It is believed too by the public that the Faculty are mere tenants at will ---liable to be displaced at any moment, either with a cause or without; and every year speculation is rife as to who will compose the faculty for the succeeding year. The friends of certain parties hope to find places for them in the Faculty by displacing others and this makes every officer a target for the shafts of the envious, many things are said the object of which is merely to empty a chair that it may be filled by another, but the effect f which is to damage the whole Institution. If this outcry is ignored, then the public are led to believe that the Institution is not properly officered; if it listened to then a role of never ending change is inaugurated, and the management of the Institution passes from the hands of the Trustees to those of anonymous and of course irresponsible writers in the newspapers. While an officer is here, a cry is made by interested outsiders

(pge 663)
to have him dismissed; when he is dismissed, or made so uncomfortable that he resigns, a cry is made by his friends to have him back. Thus it is that the officers are more like lodgers at a hotel than like citizens with a domicil[e]. The people seeing this uncertainly in the tenure of office, suppose it to arise from a want of confidence in the officers and consequently they too lose confidence and are unwilling to patronize the Institution. The only remedy for this is for the Board to see that the chairs are filled by suitable men and to let this public understand that no change will be made. Indeed as a choice of evils it would be better to retain a small proportion of incompetent officers, on paramount conditions that [than] that the whole institution should be rocked by perpetual earthquakes. But this is not necessary. The Board can always judge of an officers by his work. If he does it well he should be retained at all hazards and in spite of any clamor that may be raised against him. If he shows himself to be incapable or negligent, or unadapted to his position he should be promptly displaced without regard to the displeasure which such action might give to his friends and however numerous his friends might be. The public should learn that the decisions of this Board are unaffected by outside influences, and that they are supreme and final. Another evil is that there is not enough discretion left with the Faculty as to the management of the internal affairs of the Institution. For example; year after year the request has been made that the pernicious system of giving medals in the Societies be abolished, but the system still remains, and like a running sore saps the strength of the Institution. I do not ask that it be abolished; I ask for more than this or I respectfully suggest that in regard to this, and all other matters of purely domestic management, the Faculty be left to their discretion. Another enormous evil that we have to contend with is that we have too many Professors. The needless expenditure of money which this involves is comparatively a small matter. It is indeed a serious thing

(pge 664)
to throw away five or six thousand dollars; but this is worse than thrown away. The men who are here must be provided with work, and in order to do this the number of studies must be increased. This must result in one of two ways; either the amount of labor imposed upon the student is more than he can possibly perform, or the amount of time given to each study is so small that he can accomplish little or nothing in any. I here exhibit to the Trustees a schedule of the studies of the Junior Class and I venture to say that there is not an experienced educator in the world who will say that this schedule is wise adapted to the wants of any student. It is very broad it is true, but any one must see that what is gained in breadth is lost in depth. I exhibit also the schedule of study for all the other classes and though some of them are much less objectionable than others, yet several of them, especially of the higher classes are in condition like that of a farm whose owner has over cropped himself, none of whose fields are well cultivated and whose harvest will not pay for his labor. It would be better to have fewer fields. Ten Professors and two Tutors, the latter at small salaries would be the most ample supply for all the students we are likely to have in the next ten or twenty years. One of these Professors might be and ought to be the presiding officer. I know of but one Institution in the United States where the presiding officer is not provided with work as a teacher; and whatever the experience of other institutions may be I can certainly say that since I have been chancellor here I could have filled a Professors chair with the greatest ease. This is the first official announcement of this fact that I have made to the Trustees as a body; but I have mentioned it to various individuals of the Board, many times. While speaking of the presiding officer, it is pertinent that I should refer to the discipline. As I wish to speak of this more fully in another place,

(pge 665)
I will say at present nothing more than that, during the present term, I have had no trouble with the discipline whatever. What might have been the case if I had not been armed with the fasces [sic] and if I had not occupied the highest place in the Institution and worn the highest honors and dignity in the power of the Board of Trustees to bestow, I will not say, nor is it becoming under present circumstances for me to discuss the policy which it will be seen that I refer to.
But perhaps the greatest of all the evils we have to contend with is the incongruous, unintelligible, and bewildering system which we call the University System. Let it be understood that I speak of this system as we have it here and not as it may exist in other institutions. Observe, too that when the university system is under consideration, the question to be discussed is not one of merit nor of demerit, but of adaptation. We are not to decide whether universities are or are not, valuable and great; but simply this: is a university adapted to the wants of the youths who are likely to come under our charge. In old countries Universities have been developed in process of centuries, as a supply to fill a demand which arose in the nature of things. Of course they have their mission and a great and glorious mission it is.
But suppose one of these great institutions were taken up by the roots and transplanted in the soil of Georgia; would it flourish? Of course it would be useless to propound this question to those who know nothing about University education for their opinions would be worth nothing. Nor need it be asked of those who do know, for there is no room for difference of opinion and there can be but one answer to the question. Confessedly then all we can do is to imitate; and imitators seldom succeed in copying anything but defects. A system which is the outgrowth of our own necessities

(pge 666)
however inferior it may be to some others intrinsically is often all the best for us. American institutions are the best for the American people and a Georgia College is the best place for a Georgia boy. The University system so called as we have it is a hybrid; it is an attempt to engraft the foreign growth on the Georgia stock. The two things are incompatible and the mongrel result as we have it is inferior to either of the originals. It seems to come under the curse of that law of nature which abhors miscegenenation. That ours is a real University in the proper sense of the term I suppose no one would pretend to suggest. That it is not a College, nor equal to what it was when it was a College, all who know its real character must be painfully aware. The theory of a University is that a student may enter what class he pleases whether he is qualified or not; the case of the Faculty being directed only to this, that he shall not graduate unless worthy. It is immaterial say the advocates of this system, who comes in but all important as to who goes out. So we place our standards at the end of the course and not at the beginning. True we have not adopted this theory in full, as a theory but in practice we come very near to it. We have students with us to whom we have taught the Greek alphabet; and others to whom we have given their first lesson in Latin. These students after remaining with us one year enter the Sophomore class. Thus it will be seen that our standards are lower than they were thirty and forty and fifty years ago. These students graduate in three yeas after they enter the Sophomore class and thus it will be seen that however diligent they may be it is impossible for them to be equal in scholarship to the graduates of the college in its earlier or even in its earliest days. Thus the standard of scholarship is declining and has been lower since they new system has been

(pge 667)
introduced than it ever was before; and the tendency of that system is to depress it lower and still lower. The evils which arise from this state of things are many. In the first place, we degrade the character of our own Institution; while the rest of the world is advancing we retrograde. In the second place we do an injury to the students because boys of this class can be better taught at an academy than at college. In the third place we injure the parents of these students for we put them to needless expense to get for their sons inferior education. In the fourth place we make war on all the good academies in the State by accepting students who ought to be in said academies and we discourage competent teachers by robbing them of the patronage which rightfully belongs to them. In the fifth place we work against our own interest for when the academies are broken up and the teachers driven from the field we have destroyed our own source of supply and can do nothing more than keep up a respectable academy ourselves. Thus the institution actually retards the cause of education in the State instead of promoting it. It may be replied that we have not broken up many schools, because we have not many students. Perhaps it is fortunate that this is true, still the fact remains that we are in competition with mere academies and that our influence so far as it goes is against them. The rivalry is as discreditable to us as it is injurious to them. Of course it will be easy to reply to all that I have said by denying the facts. But this I declare, that since I have been connected with the institution, no student has ever been denied admission for want of scholarship; and many have been here in the State who were almost wholly illiterate and many in Franklin College not vastly better; and in this condition I found the Institution when I came to it three years ago. Another objection to the University system with us is, that it allows students to select their own studies; and such youths as we have are

(pge 668-669)
not usually competent to do this, nor in most cases are their parents competent to do it for them. It is well known that in these latter days children too often control their parents and not the reverse as was formerly the case. Thus a mere lad is master of the situation. He comes here and seclects [sic] his studies from mere whim or caprice, or more frequently he selects those which he thinks will cost him the least labor. True many of the students study for degrees and this brings them into something like a curriculum; but many do not and even a few of this kind demoralize other students and put the Faculty to infinite and unnecessary pains. The only remedy that I see for all these evils is to abandon the system that led to them and go back to whence we came to the Old American College System which up to this time has never been improved upon, and which I doubt not will remain substantially the same until the end of time. Of course changes will be made as time advances but the genius of the system will remain. The old classical system which came down to use from our fathers, like the common law where of the memory of man runeth not to the contrary and which is the perfection of reason has more educative power and produces a more symmetrical development and better fit a man for practical life than any substitute for it that [than] has ever been devised. It comes to us with the prestige of antiquity and is all the better for being old. Learning is but acquaintance with truth and truth is ancient of days. It comes to us with the prestige of antiquity and is all the better for being old. Learning is but acquaintance with truth and truth is ancient of days. It comes to us with the imprimatur of success. For centuries past it has given to the world almost all its great scholars and great thinkers. It is the mother of all English literature. What parentage must that be which has produced such magnificent offspring! Virtually, it is the mother of all modern literature in the world. Take away what classical literature has done for the world and I might almost say that there would be nothing left.

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Without letters even science itself would be helpless.
The tendency of the University system with us is to break down classical learning or at least to throw it into the back-ground, and into the shade. It allows a lad in his teens to substitute his taste and his judgment for the combined wisdom of the great thinkers of the world for many generations. How are the mighty fallen when the experience and the scholarship of the ages are trampled on by boys! True they have men to help them, but it is melancholy to see a man who has derived all his culture and all his power from that very system lift up his hand to smite the breast that nourished him. Having graduated myself nearly forty years ago, I still claim no particular college, but rather the college system as my Alma Mater and I know that I shall meet with some sympathy in this Board in defending the common mother of us all. This it is that puts us all in the great brotherhood of letters all over the world. It is a significant fact to which I have more than once called attention, that notwithstanding all the outcry for scientific education, so called, the number of graduates in the old Bachelor of Arts course is usually more than twice as great as all the others put together. Thus we perceive that what seems to be popular clamor is, after all not an index of real public opinion. A few men make all this ado. The great mass of the people have not been misled by these new fangled notions and fanciful degrees and when they come to send their sons to college notwithstanding all the inducements to run after strange gods are true to the old classical curriculum. Certainly if I had the power I should make this the leading feature of the University.
Still from regard to the opinion of some, and to the necessities of others, I should have two curriculums, or possibly three. The second should be the same as the first except that greater prominence should be given to scientific studies and modern languages and less to the classics; the third if allowed

(pge 670-671)
should be the same as the second except that agriculture should take the place of some other study and modern languages might be substituted for Latin and Greek. The student might be allowed to select his course; but in any case his curriculum should be fixed from beginning to end nor should he be allowed materially to vary it.
If the students who come to us were men, mature and educated, such as those who repair to the Universities of Europe, nothing that I have said would be applicable. But as students are mere boys, uneducated boys and to put them on a University course is simply a burlesque. The students of the great German Universities have graduated in the Gymnasia and these correspond to our colleges. We copy their superstructure, but we have not laid their foundation; like all copyists we have made a fatal mistake. We should do well to go back to first principles and develop our institutions gradually, according to the demands of the country. Another great trouble that we have to contend [sic] with is the fact that we have two distinct organizations, tied in some respects; certainly it is to their mutual disadvantage in some other respects. Of course we may expect perpetual jealousies, perpetual revalries [rivalries], perpetual envyings and perpetual attempts on the part of each to get the advantage of the other. If the two Institutions were wholly disconnected, possibly some good might arise from from [sic] generous emulation; but whatever might be the case then it is certain that a house divided against itself cannot stand. Aside from these evils and even if there were unbroken harmony between the two Institutions the inconvenience arising from their strange union must be much like that of the Siamese twins each of whom was a burden to the other.

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We have also two sets of students: they are side by side yet they are not one body; nor do they stand on the same footing. Some pay tuition and some do not. If this had reference to individuals merely as such no harm would ensue; the fact that one individual student does or does not pay is either not known or not noticed. But when there is a whole class of students who as a class are known to be on the free list there is always a liability to foolish feelings and foolish speeches on both sides; and folly is almost sure to be the precursor of something worse. We have been very fortunate thus far in keeping the peace but any one at all acquainted with the nature of boys must see that we are dealing with explosive elements.
Perhaps the greatest trouble of all in this connection is the imaginary trouble in the minds of the people. They imagine and they willimagine that the Land-scrip fund is
raided on by Franklin College. They imagine and they will imagine that the Faculty measure out different treatment to the two different sets of students. They imagine and they are determined to continue to imagine that the social status of a State College student is inferior to that of a Franklin College student. They imagine and will forever imagine that the instruction given to the two classes of students is not equally valuable and that the State College students are put off, as it were to the second table.
They imagine and nothing can keep them from imagining innumerable other things which my own imagination is not fertile enough to suggest. There is not the slightest ground for any of these foolish notions; but they are entertained nevertheless, and it is impossible to eradicate them from the public mind. When in the earlier part of this report I was giving reasons for the greater decline in the State College Department than any other I

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neglected to state this, which may have as much influence as any other cause and perhaps more.
It may be replied that all this is nothing but prejudice. That is very true and the fact that it isnothing but prejudice is what makes it so hard to combat. Reasonable objections could be met, by reasonable explanations, or concessions, but prejudice is immovable and unconquerable. In the mean-time interested parties take advantage of these prejudices as well as of such infortunate [unfortunate] facts as we can neither deny nor remedy and use them to the injury of the Institution striving to make it unpopular and hoping at some future day to have a redistribution of the fund or perhaps to have the State College removed to some other place. All these difficulties we have had to encounter and the prospect is that so long as present arrangements continue this is a war in which there will be no discharge. We may look for trouble without end.
Now for all the difficulties springing out of the union of the two Colleges and for many others that have been named I propose a remedy. I propose a new departure. True I have said that we have taken too many new departures already and that perpetual change has been a cause of perpetual sorrow. But I propose a change now because public opinion demands it, because the interests of the University require it and because when made it will make future changes to a great extent unnecessary. The plan which I am about to propose has been suggested to me by none nor have I suggested it to any. It is the offspring of my own meditations; I have kept my own counsel; I have neither sought nor taken advice; I have acted on my own judgement [judgment] ; I risk myself on my scheme and I am willing to stand or fall as it may meet the approval of disapproval of this Board of Trustees and of the people of Georgia. I propose that so far as practicable we blend the two institutions in one and that we throw open wide our

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doors to the sons of Georgia and offer free tuition to all! That free tuition is practicable I shall hereafter demonstrate. I have counted the cost and know whereof I affirm.
Look for a moment at the results. All lines of demarcation real or imaginary between different classes of students would be forever obliterated. All would be on the same conditions and on the same level. Having two or perhaps three curriculum each student could take his choice. Any could take the scientific or agricultural course if they preferred it, but it would be forced upon none. The rich and the poor would have the same opportunity. The grand old classical curriculum with its time honored degree of Bachelor of Arts would be accessable to the son of the farmer or of the mechanic on the same terms with the sons of statesmen and millionaires.
There would be no rival institutions eyeing each other with suspicion lest some undue advantage might be taken. No one could say the Landscript Fund was misapplied or that any other fund was misused, when tuition in all the arts and in all the sciences is offered free to everybody. No one could complain that injustice was done him when the doors are thrown wide open and all are invited to enter. No one could say that distinctions were made between different classes of students if there were only one class of students here. With the curriculums marked out there would be no clashing of studies such as we have now and which perplexes the officers, embarrasses the students and confuses everybody. Indolent boys could not evade hard work by selecting easy studies as they do now. The same amount of labor just enough and no more would be imposed on all alike; and we should not have some frolicking with light labor and others impelled by poverty or by ambition, agonized in spirit and ruined in health by the effort to do four years work in two. The course

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of study would be marked out by wisdom and experience, not by ignorance, folly[,] love of ease nor mere caprice.
This discipline would be easy. The student who pays always feels his keeping and thinks that he is entitled to peculiar privileges, or at least that the Faculty, who are supposed to need his money will bear with him as they would not with others on that account. When there is nothing paid and nothing received pecuniary considerations cannot enter. The faculty would be independent; the student dependent. There would be no temptation on the latter to imagine peculiar claims.
The military feature could be insisted on and carried into effect with ease. As matters now stand it is almost impossible so far as relates to Franklin College students to enforce this regulation. Not only would the change be one of intrinsic merit, but it would be popular. The people with the acclaim would praise a system so broad, so liberal and so grandly catholic. We should have the honor of being the first in the Southern States and one of the first in the United States to do so noble a thing. Various plans have been suggested for popularizing the University; but nothing on earth could be so popular as to throw open hospitable doors and proclaim that learning is free. A grand scheme of unification was proposed a few years ago, but it failed because it was impracticable. But to unify the Franklin College and the State College is not impracticable. If some distinctness or organization be necessary for technical or legal reasons that could be arranged for without interfering with the general plan proposed. Of course the point will be raised that with tuition free we should have so many students that we should not be able either to instruct or to accommodate them. In reply to this I have to say that when tuition was offered gratis to Confederate soldiers whose name was legion and when besides

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this their expenses were paid, that is when they were actually hiredto attend the number who availed themselves of the offer was not so large but that they were all accommodated and taught. I reply further by saying that with proper standards of admission confined to citizens of Georgia the number of students would probably not be for a time at least, so large as it is now. As the cause of education advances in the State the number of Students properly qualified to enter such an institution as this would doubtless increase; and in course of time some new arrangements would have to be made. But if we can manage the affairs of our own generation with success we may fairly trust the next generation to manage theirs.
For the present and for some years to come we have means enough to instruct and accommodate all the properly qualified students that Georgia is likely to produce. Should the pressure upon us become too great for our means all we have to do is to raise the standard of scholarship and thus reduce the numbers to any point we please. The danger is on the other side. The danger is that carried away with the popular idea that numbers are the criterion of merit we shall be tempted as now to let down the standards so low as to put the Institution on a level with mere academies and high schools.
Here it may be proper for me to say what the standard of admission should be. Let us inquire to what point could an average student be thoroughly instructed in a good academy such as mightbe had (whether there really be such or not) in almost any county [sic] town in Georgia. Three or four experienced teachers could fix on that point with a very fair approach to exactness. Let X represent that point. Then at the point X let the standard for admission to College be fixed. For if the student be higher than this point there will be a hiatus in education. There will be certain culture which the schools cannot

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give and which the College will not; and hence complete education could be had only by going out of the State. If the standard be below the point X then the University will be as now the rival of the academies and competing unrighteously with them for patronage. Now if the standard should be neither higher nor lower than the point X that is the point at which it should be fixed. If this standard should be established and above all if its should be adhered to rightly as it ought to be the number of students for some years would be much smaller than it is now. Of course this would excite a certain amount of popular discontent. The University would be pronounced a failure; for in these days of sensationalism everything is called a failure which does not make a great show and a great noise. Doubtless many grievous things would be said which it would be hard to bear. But no one need ever advocate a good cause unless he has the spirit of a martyr. Our duty would be to bear the obloquy and to maintain the cause of sound learning at all hazards. Posterity would do us justice.
If for any reason it should be urged that we had set our standard too high we could easily reply by saying that at Dahlonega our standard is lower; and if the standard thereis too high we can refer to the common schools where education begins with the alphabet. Thus would every grade of education be provided for from the lowest to the highest without a missing link; and the University would be as it ought to be at the head of all and in competion [sic] with none. If the University should have only fifty students or only twenty and yet maintain its rank and its dignity and its integrity it would be more worthy or [of] respect and would be of more value to the State than with hundreds of students who ought to be at high schools or at common schools where they could be better taught. A great and powerful Institution like this ought to lead and educate the public mind; and the people should be taught that the

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the merit of our institution consists, not in its numbers, but in the kind of instruction that it imparts. For a time the popular breeze would perhaps be against us and demagogues would doubtless make full use of their opportunity; but in the end the good sense of the people would be sure to come to the rescue and eventually the high character of the Institution would be sure to command their respect, their confidence and their affection. All this it may be said is very fine but is the scheme practicable? Where is the money to come from to support this liberal system? Now then to the facts and figures. The income of the University of Georgia as estimated by the Treasurer of 1876 for the ensuing, that is the present year omitting the estimated receipts for tuition fees was $29582.14 and the estimate for the year before that with the same omission was $29329.14. Now let us not take the largest of these sums nor even the average sum, let us take the lowest sum which is $29329.14 and let this be assumed as the income of the University.
The outlay might be a follows, it wit: Ten Professors at $2000 each $20000.00 Extra pay for presiding officer 750.00 Extra pay for President of State College 250.00 Two tutors at $750. each 1500.00 Secretary, Treasurer, Librarian etc. 1000.00 Dahlonega (same as heretofore) 1500.00 Catalogues and printing (same as last year) 750.00 Music (same as last year) 200.00 Insurance (same as last year) 200.00 Servants hire (same as last year) 600.00 Agricultural Department (same as last year) 100.00

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Postage (same as last year) 120.00 Stationary [Stationery] (same as last year) 150.00 Fuel (same as last year) 150.00 Incidentals (same as last year) 300.00 Repairs (less than last year) 759.14
Total expenses $ 29329.14 Total income 29329.14 Balance Nothing.
It will be seen that nearly all the items of current expenditure are the same as last year. The number of Professors is reduced but the salaries are the same except that of the presiding officer which is somewhat increased as it ought to be for he is expected to fill a professors chair, besides discharging the duties of the executive office. If there should be no president of the State College the extra pay for that officer might fall into the contingent fund. Two tutors are provided for at small salaries. I so [do] not know the amounts now paid to the Treasurer and Librarian, but I presume that the sum I have named one thousand dollars would be sufficient. All the remaining items such as printing, insurince [sic] servants hire etc etc are exactly the same as last year except the single item of repairs. Last year the estimate for this purpose was $2500, whereas in the estimate above made it is only $759.14. But the former sum was unusually large and the latter I have no doubt taking one year with another would suffice. But if I am mistaken in this then I can suggest a plan for increasing the fund. Let every student be required to pay an annual matriculation fee of ten dollars as is the practice now at Dahlonega and to which no one objects. Half of this fee (five dollars) should go to the fund for repairs. If we had only one hundred students (and if

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proper standards of admission were enforced we should probably not have more) five hundred dollars could be added to the sum already named for repairs and the aggregate would amount to $1259.14 which I am sure would be enough.
Furthermore if in case of emergency we should need more funds we could go with a good grace to the Legislature and ask for it; and such I have no doubt would be the hold of the University on popular affection, that no Legislature would refuse. The public mind has heretofore been possessed with the idea that the benefit of the University is wholly or chiefly to the rich; but when tuition is free and all distinctions are broken down, few would be so unreasonable as to urge this stale objection or to refuse help in case it should be needed. Finally if nothing else would meet the case we could reduce the number of professorships. In the foregoing scheme I have allowed for ten professors and two tutors. I did this in order to be profusely liberal. Nine professors and two tutors would be enough to sustain an Institution of as high grade as is needed anywhere in the Southern States. Thus by dropping one professor two thousand dollars a year would be added to the fund for current expenses and this would be enough and more than enough. Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees I have set before you plainly and faithfully many great and crying evils now existing in the University of Georgia and have also presented a plan which will I believe remedy most or all of them. Whatever you may think of the views presented, I am sure you will give me credit for honesty and sincerity and for a fereless [sic] and conscientious discharge of what I believe to be duty. I have criticized measures and not man. If a word has escaped me to which the most sensitive could take exception I beg forgiveness for that word. It is surely needless for me to assure you gentlemen that I have meant no discourtesy to those who differ with me and I take it for granted that all such will accord to

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me the same privilege of opinion and independence of thought which they claim for themselves. The worst that can be said of me is, that I am mistaken; and if it so be that this is true then I comfort myself with the assurance that I am at least in good company for I know that my views are shared in the main by many of our wisest and best men. With the utmost respect I submit what I have said to your candid consideration.
I have said but little as to the special history of the Institution for the past year. There is indeed not much to be said. The vacant Professorship of Greek I take it for granted will be immediately filled. The present arrangement I need scarcely say is in the highest degree unsatisfactory. But I must not be understood to reflect on the slightest degree on the learning skill or fidelity of the estimable officers who have conducted these Departments. They have done the best that could be done under the circumstances. The Medical Department has fallen off very largely in the number of students, there being only 46 this year against 64 last year, and this too although the Institution is more fully officered and better equipped than ever before. I can account for this immense decline only by the general financial condition of the country. I was prevented by domestic affliction from attending the Commencement. I spent several days on a visit to the department at Dahlonega. The exercises of the Institution were suspended during the whole period of my stay that I might have opportunity to give personal instruction to the students. They were all assembled together and I occupied the whole of each day so far as it was practicable. The Institution is more fully supplied with teachers than heretofore and is doing a great and good work. Too much credit can not be given to the faithful officers there who labor with zeal and enthusiasm on very adequate salaries. I have said before and I now repeat that I

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think every effort ought to be made to secure legislative aid for this valuable Department.
It is due to the students in Athens that I should say that they have been remarkable [remarkably] diligent and attentive to their duties. Their intercourse with the officers has been uniformly respectful polite and becoming. Anything like insubordination among them is a thing unknown and I think I can say with truth that I have never made a request with which they have not promptly and cheerfully complied. It is due also to them and to the Institution that I should say that while it is true that many of them rank but low in point of scholarship it is also true that some of them rank very high and would compare favorable [favorably] with the students in any college in the United States.
In regard to order and discipline I do not know that I can do better than to refer you to the records of the Faculty. An examination of these will show that the aggregate attendance of the students for the last three years has been five hundred and ninety three; and that of this number only one has been dismissed by action of the Faculty for misconduct. Such a record as this I am sure can challenge comparison with that of an [sic] other college in the world. It may be suggested that the reason why students have not been dismissed for misconduct is that needed discipline has not been enforced. To meet this I refer to the records of the City Court which will show the number of students fined for misbehavior on the streets has been vastly less for the last three years than formerly. I refer also the Chief of Police who will assure you that the number of cases of disorder that come under his observation has been gradually but steadily growing smaller for the last three years and that the last two years have been the most quiet he ever saw. I refer also to the citizens of Athens generally who all know that the shouting and yelling which in former

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times disturbed the peace almost every day and the crowds that formerly blockaded the sidewalks have not been witnessed for the last two years. I refer to the resident Trustees who I know will corooberate [sic] the statements just made. I refer you the Faculty who will assure you that the hideous noises which formerly caused almost constant disturbance have almost entirely ceased; and that whereas what are known as college tricks such as unhinging gates, cutting bell ropes, greasing blackboard etc were once very prevalent there has been but one case of the kind in three years and that was nearly three years ago; and that whereas at prayers students were formerly so disorderly that at times the speaker could scarcely be heard and so irreverent as even to smoke cigars in the chapel during divine service and in the presence of the Faculty, there is now as good order in the chapel as is usually found in any of our churches. I refer you to the officers and citizens living on and near the campus who will assure you that at night universal and almost uninterrupted quiet prevails. I refer you to the Report of the Board of Visitors. I have not seen that report nor have I had the least hint as to what it contains. But I know that it was composed of capable and impartial men selected by the Governor from various parts of the State and that they spent eight days in Athens pressing their inquiries in regard to the condition of the Institution and in all possible direction; and without knowing their verdict I know so well the facts in the case that I refer to it with confidence.
Finally I beg to say that my relations with every member of the Faculty including those who have left the Institution since I came to it have been uninterruptedly agreeable; that I have regarded myself as in loco parentis to the students and that they seem to have reciprocated by kindly feelings; and that all the domestic affairs of the Institution have been orderly[,] pleasant,

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and homelike. Now I close the record. If aught that I have said or done be regarded as demoralizing to the youth of Athens I am ready to drink the hemlock.
Praying the blessing of God on the University and on the Trustees and on their present deliberations I have the honor to be gentlemen.
Your obedient servant, Henry H. Tucker Chancellor.
University of Georgia July 17, 1877.
The Chancellor made a supplemental Report as follows:
To the Honorable The Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.
Gentlemen,
The Report which has just been presented was some days ago in order that I might have time to have in printed. Since then, certain other matters have matured, and render necessary the present supplemental Report.
The Faculty recommend that the Degrees specified below be conferred on the
persons to whose names they are attached respectively, viz. Master of Arts James C. Hinton
Bachelor of Arts. William W. Black, C. Murphy Candler, James S. Hamilton Jr., Alexander R. Lawton Jr., Artemas O. Murphy, Alonzo C. Riley, Robert A. Simpson, William H. Thompson, W. Stokes Walker.

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Bachelor of Science.
W. Remus MacIntyre, Eli M, Malette
Bachelor of Chemical Science. George R. Alexander.
Bachelor of Agriculture. George W.P. Coats, Bliss Woodward, William W. Gay.
Bachelor of Engineering. Benjamin W. Butler, Edward H. Dorsey, Albert D. Smith, Orville L Greene, John E. Witherspoon.
Bachelor of Philosophy. William M. Howard, M. Young McIntyre.
Bachelor of Law. William Y. Atkinson, Andrew J. Cobb, Wallace W. Fraser, Robert M. Holley, Darling J. Knotts, Hamilton McWhorter, Henry B. Mitchell, Wm. Sylvanus Morris, Moses M. Smith, and Seaborn L. Weaver.
It is proper to say that several students came here with the intention of taking the bachelor of Arts Degree, but for insufficient scholarship or other reasons changed their plans and sought other Degrees.
I herewith submit the following Documents:
1.
A report on the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts by President Charbonnier.

2.
A report on the Law Department by Professor Mitchell.

3.
A report on the Library by Prof. Browne.

4.
A Paper prepared by Professor White and which at his request is laid before you.

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Each of these Documents explains itself. Respectfully submitted, Henry H. Tucker Chancellor. July 27, 1877.
The Reports of the Prudential Committee and of the Committee on Laws and Discipline were read and laid on the table.
On motion of Mr. Yancey,
The thanks of the Board, for the many donations and favors bestowed upon the Chemical Department under Prof. White, amounting to about eight hundred in number, were given to the donors, and Professor White requested to communicate the same to them, and for this purpose the Secretary will furnish the Professor with a copy of this action of the Board.
Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee on Finance submitted his Report and moved that it be on the table, except so much thereof as Contemplates dispensing with some of the Professors that said portion be referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline. The motion was agreed to.
Mr. Cobb, Chairman of the Committee on the Law Department made his Report, and moved that it lie on the table, which was agreed to.
The Chair appointed the Standing Committee on Laws and Discipline, to wit, Messers Hull, Beckwith, Jackson, Crawford, Gresham and Billups.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, Bishop Pierce was added to the said Committee. The Board then adjourned to 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
Saturday July 28, 1877
The Board met according to adjournment.
A letter of Gov. Brown, on the subject of an adjournment to Atlanta was

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read; and one of Gov. Jenkins on the same subject had been previously read, and the views of members expressed thereon, and the subject was temporarily suspended.
Mr. Mitchell submitted the following Resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, That Col. Price, President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College be invited to present in person any views he desires, to this Board touching the interests of education in that Department of the University, and that His Honor, Judge Jackson and Mr. Hull, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline be a Committee to invite him to appear at once, before the Board.
A Communication from R.M. Orme to Mr. Jenkins, President of the Board offering to sell to the Institution a file of the Southern Recorder from 1820 to 1870, 50 volumes, complete, for five hundred dollars was read and laid on the table.
Mr. Yancey submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, that Col Price, President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia College be invited to be present during any consideration of matters in relation to the interests of that Institution: And the Secretary of this Board advise of such time or times as they shall occur.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell the subject of Degrees to be conferred by the North Georgia Agricultural College under their amended Charter was referred to the Standing Committee on Laws and Discipline.
Col. Price, was introduced to the Board by the Committee appointed for the purpose and proceeded at once to address the Board and explained many points seemingly misunderstood and gave general satisfaction.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell,

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The Degrees were conferred on the Students as specified in the Chancellors Supplimental [Supplemental] Report.
The following Resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That when this Board shall adjourn on Wednesday next, it stand adjourned, to meet in Atlanta at the Kimball House, on Thursday, the next day, August 2, 1877 at 7 P.M.
Messers. Billups and Cobb were appointed the Committee to invite distinguished gentlemen to seats on the stage.
On motion of Dr. Pierce, The Board ordered the Sophomore and Junior Exhibitions to begin at 9 A.M. on Monday and Tuesday, their respective days, and that the Orator of the Demosthenean and Phi-Kappa Societies, and the Alumni Orator, follow the said Exhibitions, or occupy a suitable hour in the afternoon of those days, at discretion, and as said Orators shall prefer.
The Reports of the Committees on Apparatus, and on the Law School were taken up, and on motion of their respective Chairmen Messers. Mitchell and Cobb were adopted and are as follows:
The Committee on Apparatus beg leave to submit the following
Report:
During the collegiate year a considerable number of models and pieces of apparatus have been purchased and some presents made to the collection on hand, a detailed statement of which is submitted through the Chancellor.
Prof. L.H. Charbonnier, President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts has Furnished An inventory of everything in his Department of Engineering and expect to add thereto by purchases during his present trip to Europe.
Prof. H.C. White has also furnished An inventory of the many articles

(pge 690-691)
in his Department which he has arranged with artistic taste and which is kept in the very best style of neatness and order and for which he deserves the Commendation of the Board.
Prof. M. Cumming has in like manner furnished An Inventory of the Apparatus in Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, many of the articles being old[,] some out of order and unfit for use and others though used still seriously injured and requiring repairs. The whole aspect of this Apparatus is unpleasant and especially in contrast with the other two which are so tastefully and cleanly kept and well displayed.
It will be seen by the Reports of the Treasurer and the Finance Committee that there is still on hand of [in] the Apparatus Fund the sum of $9,182.12 and therefore the Committee ask no appropriation for any of these Departments except a small appropriation of $100.00 to buy the annual supply of Chemicals for the Department of Chemistry and which is all that will be required in the judgement of the Professor for the next Collegiate year.
The Committee submit the following
Resolutions: Resolved
That the sum of one hundred dollars be inserted in the appropriation Bill by the Finance Committee for the purpose of purchasing Chemicals for the Chemical Department, for the year 1877-1878.
Resolved That the Board will go in a body and inspect the Apparatus in Moore College at such hour as may suit the convenience of the Trustees.
All of which is respectfully submitted
Wm. L. Mitchell Friday July 27th, 1877. Chairman of the Committee on Apparatus

(pge 691-692)
University of Georgia July 21st, 1877.
To
Rev. Henry H. Tucker D.D. LL.D.
Chancellor.
Sir,
I have the honor to report that the whole number of students connected with the Law Department of the University during the Collegiate year, now near its termination amounts to Thirteen of whom Ten are entitled to the Degree of Bachelor of Law viz: William Y. Atkinson, Andrew J. Cobb, Wallace
W. Fraser, Robert M. Holley, Darling J. Knotts, Hamilton McWhorter, Henry B. Mitchell, William Sylvanus Morris, Moses M. Smith, and Seaborn L. Weaver.
There are three members in the Junior Class. Rev. P.H. Mell, D.D. LL.D. and Robert M. Smith M.D. have enlarged their courses and extended their periods of instruction in their respective Branches of Parliamentary Law and Medical Jurisprudence. Their Zeal is highly to be commended and the country is under obligations to them for their gratuitous services in aiding to elevate one of the most important of the liberal professions.
All of which is respectfully submitted
Wm. L. Mitchell.
Bp. Beckwith requested to be excused from attendance after to-day, and his request was granted.
The Board then adjourned to Monday morning 8 oclock, notice being first given that Bp. Pierce would preach the Commencement Sermon.
Monday, July 30, 1877. The Board met according to adjournment, and took a recess to attend the

(pge 692-693)
Sophomore Prize Declamation on [in] the College Chappel, after which the Board returned to the Library, and the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted thro Mr. Hull, the Chairman, their Report as follows:
The Committee on Laws and Discipline have considered the Chancellors Report and other matters referred to them and as the result of their deliberations beg to submit the following resolutions:
1st
. The keeping of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts separate and distinct as an organization, is required by the agreement between the State and the University and should be maintained.
2nd
. There shall be for the University of Georgia an Honorary Chancellor as provided by resolution of the last annual meeting adopted July 31, 1876, and the office of Vice-Chancellor, to be filled by the Board, and he shall be chairman of the Faculty and be assigned to one of the Professorships.
3rd
. The following shall be the Professorship in in Franklin College, to be paid from the general funds of the University.
1.
A Professorship of the Greek and Latin Languages.

2.
A Professorship of Metaphysics, Ethics, and Belles Lettres.

3.
A Professorship of Political Science and History.

4.
A Professorship of Mathematics.

5.
A Professorship of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, to which is attached to

the Terrell Professorship. 4th
. The following shall be the organization of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts:
1. President, and Professor of Applied Mathematics, Engineering and Military Tactics.
2.
A Professorship of Modern Languages.

3.
A Professorship of General and Applied Chemistry.

(pge 693-694)
4.
A Professorship of Natural History including Zoology and Botany.

5.
A Professorship of English Language and Literature.

6.
An adjunct Professorship of Mathematics.

7. A Professorship of Physics including Agriculture and Horticulture, which chair shall be filled by the Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy.
8.
[no text provided]

9.
Lectures may be procured from eminent men on special subjects under the

direction of the Prudential Committee. 5th
. The Faculty shall consist of the Professors and Adjunct Professors of the two Colleges, and in all the meetings, the Vice-Chancellor shall preside, and in his absence, the President of the State College.
6th
. All students who shall enter either Franklin College or the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts shall have the privilege of attending all the lectures
and recitations of the Professors in either of the Colleges without distinction and shall be
fully entitled to all the benefits of the University. 7th
. If any Professor in either College shall be found to need assistance in the performance of the duties of his Chair, the Faculty are authorized to assign the duty of such assistance to any other Professor of either College.
In conformity to the foregoing programme, the following Resolutions are submitted: 8th
. The Chair of the Professors of Latin and Greek are united. 9th
. The Chairs of the Professors of Metaphysics and Ethics, and of Belles Lettres are united. 10th. An election shall be held for a Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy.

(pge 694-695)
The Committee also submit and recommend the following Resolutions: 11th. The subject of a return to the Curriculum System and the abandonment in whole or in part of what is known as the University System shall be referred to a select Committee of five to report thereon at the next annual meeting, consulting the Faculty as to said Report. 12th. A higher standard of qualification for admission to the State College shall be established. What that standard shall be, is referred to the Faculty. 13th . Upon the certificate of the President of the North Georgia Agricultural College that a young man there graduating has undergone a satisfactory examination in all the studies required by the University of Georgia for a Bachelors Degree in any named Department, such graduate shall be entitled to receive such Degree from the University. 14th. There is appropriated to the North Georgia Agricultural College for the ensuing twelve month the sum of one thousand five hundred dollars, if in the treasury, in addition to the two thousand dollars contracted to be paid for it.
Respectfully submitted-Wm. H. Hull Chairman.
In the original report the Professorship of Political Science and History was placed in the State College, and by unanimous consent changed to Franklin College and is so presented in this Record. 4th) Also in the original Report, the Professorship of Agriculture was incorporated with Natural History.
On motion of Mr. Hull, the Chairman, the Report was taken up by sections and its various Items adopted nem. con. except the 4th Item of the 4th. Paragraph in relation to a Professor of Agriculture and Natural History, Geology,

(pge 695-696)
which Mr. Yancy [Yancey] insisted should be divided between two Professors, and action on this Item was deferred to the meeting in Atlanta.
The 12th. Section was adopted fully and finally.
Having gone through the Report by sections and Items, Mr. Gresham moved to adopt the Report as a whole except as above specified, and pending the discussion on his motion, and for further time for conference moved to lay his motion to adopt on the table for the present, which motion prevailed.
The Boards then took a recess to repair to the Chapel to hear Hon. A.O. Bacon, Speaker of the House of Representative, the literary Orator before the literary Societies, after which the Board returned to the Library and resumed business.
Mr. Yancy [Yancey], Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture submitted his Report which was taken up and adopted, and is as follows:
The Committees report the usual experiments in the application and testing of fertilizers on corn, cotton, oats, wheat, potatoes. Of twelve fertilizers on cotton in accordance with the rules of the Department of Agriculture which has furnished them free of charge. These have been applied in quantities of 50, 100, 200, 250, 300, 400, 500, 550 pounds per acre.
Experiments in subsoiling and composting have also been conducted. The land has been fertilized before by various kinds of fertilizers and no record having been preserved of what has been used and in what quantity and on what portions of land, the results will not have the accuracy which is desirable. It is recommended that the open field of the farm property having been uncultivated for years be enclosed by fence so as to have fresh land where accurate experiments to be recorded hereafter accurately upon a Book to be kept for that purpose, may be started at once.

(pge 696-697)
Some repairs are needed on the stable, and barn, and some slight changes are desirable in the fences so as to render the plots of land more regular. The wagon and harness are nearly worn out and should be repaired or replaced. Several acres of land of virgin soil may also be brought, by clearing, into cultivation. Some improved impliments [implements] should be purchased. For these purposes an appropriation of five hundred dollars in [is]asked, so much as may be necessary only will be used.
The general appearance of the crops is equal to any in this section.
Respectfully Submitted, Ben. C. Yancey, Chairman.
The Board then adjourned to 8 oclock to-morrow morning.
Tuesday, July 31, 1877.
The Board met according to adjournment, and took a recess to attend the Junior Exhibition of original speeches in the College Chapel, after which, the Board returned to the Library and resumed business. Messers. Hill, Gordon, and Cooper appeared and took the chair. The Chair filled the Committee on Honorary Degrees, which consists of Chancellor Tucker, Messers. Hill and Hull. Mr. Jackson submitted the following Resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, That the sum of five hundred dollars heretofore appropriated at the informal meeting of the Board be and the same is hereby confirmed, and the Treasurer is instructed to pay said sum of money to Hon. D.W. Lewis, President of the South Georgia Agricultural College to be applied by him for the benefit of that Department of this University.
The Board now adjourned till the afternoon to the chapel to hear the Alumni Orator, Rev. Thomas A. Hoyt of Nashville, Tenessee [Tennessee], whose address was to

(pge 698)

be delivered this afternoon at 5 oclock.
Tuesday, July 31, 1877. 6 P.M.
The Board met according to adjournment.
Mr. Cobb, Chairman of the Committee on the Library submitted his Report, which on his motion was laid on the table.
The Board then adjourned till 9 oclock to-morrow morning.
Wednesday, August 1, 1877. Commencement day.

The Board met according to adjournment.
The Report of the Committee on Buildings was on motion of Mr. Harris, taken up, and during its consideration, the Committee on Honorary Degrees begged to have the privilege of presenting their Report, for which purpose the Report of Mr. Harris was suspended, and the Committee on Honorary Degrees reported and their Report was unanimously adopted and is as follows:
University of Georgia. Athens, Ga. Aug. 1, 1877.
To the Board of Trustees, Univ. of Ga. The Committee on Honorary Degrees beg leave respectfully to recommend that the following Degrees be conferred, to wit,
Doctor of Divinity on Rev. Thos. A. Hoyt, and
Doctor of Laws on Col. Wm. L. Mitchell. Respectfully submitted,
H.H. Tucker Chairman.

The Reports on Buildings and on the Library were then adopted

(pge 699)
and are as follows:
To the Board of Trustees.
The Committee on buildings respectfully report that in consequence of our limited means the repairs made during the year just closed have been confined to such improvements as were absolutely necessary. The very attentive inspection of Buildings has caused repairs to be made upon the houses occupied by Professors as the [they] have needed, and these are all at present in tolerable good order. The roof of Prof. Waddells house is much decayed and will require renewal before winter. The fencing around the lots has received proper attention and is generally in good order.
The Chancellors house and lot now occupied by Dr. Smith is in ordinary condition and is used mainly as a boarding house. If this property should again be needed for a College officer is would require thorough repairs involving the expenditure of not less than $500.
The terraces and grading in front of Moore College have passed the winter without damage and the work is considered permanent. It is very desirable that a special appropriation should be made for planting shade trees, completing the grading and sodding of the entire space in front of Moore College and for the general improvement of the fencing and grounds of the University. One Thousand dollars expended in this way would greatly improve and beautify the College Campus. The ordinary repair of Professors houses, recitation rooms, fencing etc for the ensueing [ensuing] year will probably require Eight of [or] Ten hundred Dollars including a new roof for Professor Waddells house.
Your committee invite the Special attention of the Board to the condition of the Building known as the University High School and regret having to state that this property forms an exception to the general fair Condition of the University

(pge 670) 700
buildings. It is in very bad order and unless its dilapidation is speedily arrested it will become valueless to the Institution. All the iron about the roof; valleys, gutters, and leaders has rusted out and must be renewed. The tower is much decayed, open to the weather and the whole lower part of it requires to be made anew. The slate covering of the tower is out of repair and does not protect that part of the building.
Very recently the Inspector of buildings in company with a reputable contractor from the city of Augusta made a very careful examination of the roof of this building and such was its condition that the contractor declined undertaking to patch or repair it on any terms, alleging that he could not warrant the work if it was done. The only way therefore of renewing the roof with the same material would be to take off the slate entirely and relay with new slate, the old being for the most part unfit for use, and this would not be advisable as the roof is considered too flat for slate. A tin roof would perhaps be the best unless objectionable on the score of expense. With gutters and leaders complete it would cost about $1000. A slate roof would cost about $1200. It is believed that the roof can be made tight and the building secure, by the use of good cypress shingles the cost of which with valleys etc. would be about $700.
Besides the roof other things are necessary to make the building fit for the occupation of a family. Some of the sash are out and many lights broken while the plastering is most if not all off the rooms [and] must be replaced and white-washed. In addition to all of which the two story iron verandas on either side of the front entrance to the building are in a state of ruinous decay and if the floors and other wood work of these structures are not replaced with sound material the iron work will soon fall. These verandas might be dispensed with perhaps without serious detriment to the appearance or convenience of the building but if they are to be retained it will cost not much below five hundred

(pge 701)
dollars to put them in good order. As it now stands the house is scarcely habitable, and is rapidly going to ruin. The water pours in through the roof on the floors and penetrates through the walls; and when it is remembered that the mortar used in the construction of these walls was of a most inferior quality it may be safely affirmed that the storms of another winter will absolutely endanger the safety of the building. Assuming the cost of a shingle roof to be $700, it will require not less than $600 additional to make the other necessary repairs, exclusive of the Verandas so that $13000 at least will be required to refit this building for use. The greater part of this sum is absolutely necessary for the preservation of the property.
Owing to the heavy expenses which these repairs could involve the Prudential Committee have thought best to defer any action in the premises until the views of the Board could be obtained. Unless this property can be appropriated to the establishment of a preparotory [preparatory] school; or your wisdom can devise some other mode of utilising [utilizing] it, your Committee venture to suggest the propriety of disposing of it at private sale under such terms and conditions as you shall prescribe.
Respectfully Submitted Young L.G. Harris Chairman July 27th., 1877.
The Committee on the Library beg leave to report.
1.
That the Library has been admirably kept by Professor Brown [Browne] and that his report shows the whole number of books now in the Library and we recommend that a Catalogue of the same be printed as soon as the funds of the University will permit, under the supervision as it has been well said, A library without a good catalogue is door closed with knob broken off.

2.
We endorse his recommendation that no book shall be taken from the Library.

(pge 702)
3.
His report shows that the books need rearrangement badly and we recommend that the sum of -----dollars be appropriated for that purpose.

4.
We endorse the Librarians recommendation that he be allowed to appoint two assistants from meritorious students who shall have free Tuition in Franklin College or State College.

5.
We recommend that the librarian be authorized to exchange any duplicate books for broken sets that may in his judgement be advisable provided he can do so on advantageous terms.

We herewith submit the report of Col. Charbonnier showing the manner in which the money received has been expended which shows that every cent is properly accounted for and properly expended, as has always been the case with all funds entrusted to his judicious care.
In conclusion we think the thanks of the Board is due Prof. Browne for the efficient and successful manner in which he has discharged his duties.
Lamar Cobb Chairman
James Jackson. )
) Committee
J.A. Billups )
Mr. Harris submitted a resolution on relation to the sale of the University High School property, for which Mr. Lewis offered the following resolutions as a substitute, which was adopted:
Resolved, That the Prudential Committee be instructed to advertise the High School and lands adjacent for sale with a view to invest at a more convenient point, making necessary improvements in the mean time, and report to this Board a year hence.
The Board took recess to attend the Commencement exercises in the College Chapel where the Degrees as bestowed by the Board and already recorded, were publicly conferred by the Chancellor, and the exercises of the University
(pge 703-704)
were adjourned to the first Wednesday in October next.
The Board then returned to the Library, and Mr. Billups submitted two verbal resolutions which were adopted:
1st
. That the Faculty be instructed to preserve order in the Chapel during the
Speaking at Commencement. 2nd
. That the law as to Secret Societies be amended so as to require each student before entering the University to be pledged not to be a member of such Society while a student in this Institution.
Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee on Finance, moved to take up his Report, which was agreed to, and on his motion, the sum total of the Salaries of the officers in both Franklin and the State Colleges were stricken out, with a view to re-insert the correct amount as the subject of Salaries may be settled by the Board, before its final adjournment.
Mr. Billups moved to disagree to so much of the Report as recommends that Mr.
W.W. Lumpkins Salary be made equal to other professors, which motion first and then the whole Report were laid on the table for the present. The Board then adjourned, as heretofore resolved, to meet in Atlanta at the Kimball House, to-morrow, at 7 P.M. to complete its unfinished business and attend to all the interests of the University.
Atlanta, Georgia. Kimball House. August 2, 1877. 7 P.M.
The Board met according to adjournment. Messers. Jenkins, Smith, Toombs, Stephens, Brown, Seward, Hammonds, Scriven, and Lawton appeared and took their seats.
Mr. Jenkins, the President of the Board took the chair. Mr. Emery Speer was presented as an Alumni Trustee for the next four years

(pge 704-705)
beginning this day and ending the first Wednesday of August 1881, and as such took his seat.
On the motion of Mr. Lewis,
Messers. Jenkins, Stephens, Toombs Cooper, and Brown were added to the Committee on Laws and Discipline, and the motion of Mr. Gresham to adopt their report as a whole was taken up and the Report referred to the enlarged Committee as now constituted.
Mr. Coopers Resolution in relation to the Chancellor was referred to the same Committee.
The Board then adjourned to 6 P.M. to-morrow.
Atlanta, August 3, 1877. 6 P.M. Kimball House.
The Board met according to adjournment.
Mr. Jenkins, the President of the Board, in the chair.
Mr. MacIntyre, had leave of absence after to-night.
The Board took a recess till 8 oclock this evening, when it resumed business, and Mr. Hull, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline made their Report, and moved to take it up and consider it by sections, and Items, which was agreed to.
The first section was adopted nem. con. without alterations.
The second section was discussed and altered in committee to read 2nd . That the Chancellors office shall be one of honor and distinction without salary.
The following recommendation of the said Committee was adopted..
The Committee recommend that the subject embraced in the 2nd and 5th Resolutions of the Report be referred to the annual meeting of the Board to be held in Athens on the Friday before the first Wednesday of August next, and

(pge 705-706)
that the operation of the resolution of July 31. 1876 on the subject of the Chancellorship be suspended until said meeting.
The 3rd Section with its Items was adopted, except the 2nd Item, the consideration of which was postponed to the next stated annual meeting.
The 4th Section with its Items was adopted, except as hereafter specified. Pending the discussion on this section, Mr. Yancy having the floor, Mr. Stephens requested him to suspend his remarks and consent that the 10th Section, be taken up, which being agreed to, Mr. Stephens moved the adoption of the 10th Section, and that being done, he moved to go into the election of a Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, which was agreed to, and he nominated Col. Charles C. Jones Jr. who was elected, and his election declared unanimous on Mr. Stephens motion; after which, the Board returned to the consideration of the 4th Section, Mr. Yancy on the floor. The question was, what to do with the chairs of Physics and of Agriculture and Horticulture, and on a motion to add physics to Natural Philosophy, Gov. Brown added the following amendment and the motion and amendment were adopted.
To wit, And that the duties of both said Professorships be distributed between and performed by Professors Charbonnier, Little, and White without additional compensation, so long as they hold their present Chairs, or until a Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy shall be elected and accepts.
The 5th Section was laid over till the next meeting.
The 6th, 7th, 8th, and 11th sections were adopted, and the 9th was postponed to the next annual meeting.
The Committee of five under the 11th resolution of the Report are Messers. Stephens, Chairman, Brown, Hull, Yancy [Yancey] , and Lawton.
The 13th & 14th sections were adopted and the Report disposed of for this

(pge 706-707)
Session of the Board.
Mr. Yancey then moved to reconsider the first Section, which provides for keeping the two Colleges distinct, while avowing himself in favor of the section, and called for the yeas and nays, which are as follows: Yeas, Messers, Yancey, Cobb, Speer, Hall, and Seward. 5. Nays, Messers. Jenkins, Harris, Smith, Vason, Gordon, Screven [Scriven] , Lewis, Brown, Lawton, Crawford, Mitchell, and Jackson. 12 And so the motion to reconsider was lost.
Dr. George Little was unanimously elected Professor of Natural History including Zoology, and Botany, Mineralogy and Geology with the regular salary of $2,000.00 and the sum of $1000 was put at his disposal or so much thereof as may be necessary to procure the services of a competent person to take charge of the experimental farm under his direction and control.
In disposing of the Chancellorship for the ensuing year, Gov. Brown proposed these words be added, which was agreed to, to wit, This shall not change the status or salary of the Chancellor till said date, but he shall discharge such duties as Professor as may be assigned to him by this Board. And he proposed to assign to him Logic: and Genl. Gordon added, Aesthetics, Composition, and Lectures on such subjects as the Chancellor may select for himself and deem valuable to the Students in any of the Departments. Mr. Harris moved to strike out Logic as belonging to DR[Dr.]. Mell, and Logic was stricken out upon the vote, and the motion of Genl. Gordon was adopted.
On the motion to reconsider the minutes and which was agreed to, a motion was made to add Agriculture and Horticulture to Natural History, and then a motion to lay that motion on the table, and the yeas and nays were called for, and are as follow: Yeas, Messrs. Yancey, Speer, and Hall. 3.

(pge 707-708)
Nays, Messers. Jenkins, Seward, Smith, Harris, Cobb, Tombs, Hull, Crawford, Lawton, Gordon, Jackson, Lewis, Screven [Scriven] Brown, Vason, and Mitchell. 16. So the motion to lay on the table did not prevail, and Agriculture and Horticulture were added to the chair of Natural History.
Mr. Hull submitted the following resolution, which was adopted:
Resolved, That the Faculty are authorized on their discretion to appropriate one or both of the College Dormitory Buildings for sleeping and study rooms for students who may procure day boarding elsewhere, provided existing contracts shall be respected.
General Gordon, General Lawton, and Mr. Speer were appointed a Committee to consider the policy of introducing into he Institution, Military organization and discipline.
Mr. Speer was added to the Prudential Committee on motion of Mr. Cobb. On motion of Mr. Yancey,
It was determined that any definciency [sic] of funds to meet the necessary wants and the salaries be divided among the Professors pro rata.
The Secretary read the letter of Mr. Stevens Thomas resigning his trusteeship, and he was unanimously requested to withdraw the same.
The Proposition of Mr. Orme was respectfully declined.
The Chairman of the Select Committee of Five to report on the relation of the University to the State, and whether the University is subject to ordinary legislation and on other subjects of interest, stated that he had prepared a paper and read it to individuals of the Committee, but had been unable to procure a meeting of his committee and that there was quite a diversity of views among them and beg that the Committee be discharged; whereupon Mr. Lewis stated that he had read the paper and desired its preservation, and moved that the

(pge 708-709)
Committee be continued for another year and report at the next stated annual meeting, which motion was agreed to, and the Committee continued for another year.
This Board hereby gives its consent to such an amendment of our Charter as to make the President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College exofficio a member of this Board.
The Report of the Finance Committee was taken up and adopted, except so much as contemplates an increase of Prof. W.W. Lampkins salary, which on motion was disagreed to.
The Secretary was instructed to fill the blanks in the light of our legislation at this session.
The Finance Report is as follows:
The undersigned, in behalf of the Finance Committee, submits the following Report.
The usual examination of the Treasurers accounts for the past fiscal year has been made by the Auditing Committee, from which it appears, that the receipts from all sources, including the appropriation of $10,000.00 received from the State on account of the Apparatus Fund were $44,758.61, and the expenditures including the purchases of Apparatus were $30,043.54 with the balance in the hands of the Treasurer of $14,031.16 which is composed in part of the unexpended balance of $660.00 belonging to the Library Fund and the unexpended balance of $9,182.12 belonging to the Apparatus Fund, leaving after deducting these two amounts available for current expenses, in the hand of the Treasurer a cash balance of $4,189.04 of which $3,404.96 belongs to the Land Scrip Fund and the remainder $784.08 to the General Fund.
Of the above expenditures $10,085.21 were made on account of the State

(pge 709-710)
College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and were charged to the income of the Land Scrip Fund, leaving to the credit of the State College from the income of the past year, a surplus of $1228.93 which with the transfer from the general fund to the Land-Scrip Fund of $2,176.03 due by the former to the latter as appears in the Report of the Finance Committee of last year, makes, as before stated, a cash balance in the hands of the Treasurer, belonging to the Land-Scrip Fund of $3,404.90.
From the foregoing statements, it appears, leaving out the transactions on account of the apparatus Funds, that the receipts of the past fiscal year were $1031.97 in excess of the expenditures, and the expenditures were $1543.36 less than the appropriations, notwithstanding the unexpected diminution in Tuition Fees, which amounted to only $4,350.00 having fallen below the estimate by the sum of $1650.00.
As the entire amount of the appropriation by the State for the purchase of Apparatus for the Chemical, Philosophical, and Engineering Departments of the State College, has been received, the President of the State College has been authorized during his temporary absence in Europe to expend, or to provide the the expenditure of most of the second payment of $5000.00 between the Engineering and Chemical Departments and to collect information as to the balance of the Apparatus to be purchased, having due regard to the wants and requirements of the several Departments to be provided for by the appropriation.
The Committee submits the following Statements of the assets of the University, together with the usual estimates of Income and Appropriations for the next Collegiate
year.
(pge 711) Vested Funds of the University Land-Scrip F und.
Bonds of the State of Ga. 8 o/o 7 o/o In the hands of the Governor paying 7 o/o $ 96,000.00 56,000.00 90,202.17

$242,202.17
Terrell Endowment, Bonds of the State of Ga. 7o/o $16,000 Ga. R.R. & Bkg Co. 7 o/o 4,000 20,000.00
General Fund Bonds of the State of Ga, 8 o/o $3,000 Ga. R.R. Co. 7 o/o 5,000 Clark Co. 7 o/o 500 City of Athens 8 o/o 100 Debt of State of Ga. 100,000
108,600.00
To which add available cash balance in hands of Tr. 4,189.04
Making a Grand Total of $374,991.21
Estimated Income. Annual Payment of the State 8,000 Int on Bonds of Genl Fund 633 Rents of Professors Houses 1,600 Tuition Fees 5,000 Interest on Terrell Endowment 1,400
Land-Scrip Fund 17,914.14 $ 34,547.14

(pge 712)
Estimated Expenditures. Salaries as at present arranged (26,850) 29,350. Annual Catalogue 300. Advertising and Printing 400. Music 120. Insurance 200. Servants 600. Agricultural Department ($500 appropriated) 100. Postage 175. Stationary 100. Fuel 175. Repairs 3,000. Chemicals 100. Incidentals 300.
$34,920.
The proportion of the above estimates to be charged to the income from the Land-Scrip Fund may be stated as follows:
Salaries ($14,575) 15,975.
Annual Catalogue in part 150.
Advertising and Printing 200.
Music 75.
Hire of servants 300.
Agricultural Department ($500. appropriated) 100.
Postage 87.50
Stationery 50.00
Chemicals 100.00
Fuel 87.50
Incidentals 150.00
$17,275.00
(pge 713)

To the above estimates of expenditures for salaries the Committee recommend that there be added the sum of $400. increase in the Salary of the Professor of English Language and Literature, (which will be paid out of the Land Script Fund) placing him thereby upon equal footing with the other Professors, as has been done in other cases, under similar circumstances.
To these estimates it is proper to remark, if the plan adopted at the last annual meeting of increasing the educational Corps of the Scientific Department, is to be continued, there should also be added such sum as may be appropriated for the purpose of procuring the services of eminent non-resident Professors or Lecturers, who have made a specialty of such subjects as are not now provided in the Plan or organization of the State College.
In conclusion, your Committee would call attention to the gratifying fact, that the disbursements on account of the Academic Department for the past year have been less than the receipts by the sum of $63.04. This result differing from the results of the past few years is to be attributed to the diminution in salaries on account of the vacancy in the Greek Professorship, and the unusual small out-lay for repairs which amounts to only $780.82 and which was $1719.18 less than the specific appropriations for that purpose, otherwise the expenditures would have far exceeded the income of the Department.
As the condition of the College Buildings and grounds, however, is such as to require a much larger expenditure than usual for the next year, to put them in proper order, and preserve them from decay, and as the means to accomplish this object can only be obtained from the income of the Academic Department,