Southern Highlander, 1964 March, Volume 51, Issue 1

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THE BERRY SCHOOLS BOARD OF TRUSTEES

WILLIAM MCCHESNEY MARTIN, JR.chairman WILLIAM R. BOWDOIN . . . .vice chairman

HARMON W. CALDWELL VIRGINIA CAMPELL COURTS RICHARD EDGERTON ALEX P. GAINES JOHNSON HEAD INEZ HENRY HOWELL HOLLIS A. W. LEDBETTER JOHN MADDOX WALTER MANN JULIAN MCGOWIN

ARTHUR N. MORRIS JOHN A. SIBLEY HAL SMITH JOHN C. WARR G. L. WESTCOTT
R. W. WOODRUFF
Honorary
GROVER M. HERMANN NELSON MACY, JR.

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About the Cover
Berry's annual spring tour and open house is scheduled this year for Sunday, April 12. Men and women students at Berry provide visitors with information about the campuses during the tour and open house. Cover coed Becky Miller, a senior majoring in elementary education and Miss Berry College of 1963, was one of the spring tour hostesses last year.

Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation
1. Date of Filing. October 1, 1963. 2. Title of Publication. The Berry Schools Bulletin. 3. ' Frequency of Issue. Five times yearly: in March, April, June, September and December. 4. Location of Known Office of Publication. Mount Berry, Floyd County, Georgia 30149. 5. Location of the Headquarters or General Business Offices of the Publisher. Mount
Berry, Georgia. 6. Names and Addresses of Publisher, Editor and Managing Editor.
Publisher. The Berry Schools, John R. Bertrand, secretary of the corporation, Mount Berry, Georgia. Editor. Max A. Schaible, Mount Berry, Georgia. Managing Editor. Robert L. Lattimore, Mount Berry, Georgia. 7. Owner. The Berry Schools is the incorporated name of Berry College and Berry Academy (formerly Mount Berry School for Boys), private educational institutions on the college and secondary levels, respectively. Ownership and control are vested in a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. The institutions are non-profit and eleemosynary. 8. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees and Other Security Holders Owing or Holding 1
Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities. None.

THE BERRY SCHOOLS BULLETIN



March 1964



Vol. 51 No. 1

The Berry Schools Bulletin is published five times yearly--in March, April, June, September and December--by The Berry Schools, Mount Berry, Georgia. Second-class postage paid at Mount Berry, Georgia 30149. This publication was printed by students at the Berry Printing Services.

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The men above, from left--Dr. S. H. Cook, dean emeritus, advisor to the president and acting president from 1951 to 1953; Dr. John R. Bertrand, president since 1956, and Dr. G. Leland Green, president emeritus (president from 1926 to 1944)--represent more than 100 years of continuing service to Berry.

Conversation on a
Spring Afternoon

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On a sunny spring afternoon under an open Georgia sky, the conversation on the campus took a turn toward the significant contributions Berry has made to the world of today.
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The mayor of Mount Berry, silver-haired Sam Henry Cook, who first came to Berry as dean in 1910 and served as acting president from 1951 to 1953, spoke of the "material beauty" Berry has given through its students. He recalled Georgia author Corra Harris' remark "that when she saw curtains in the win dow and grass and flowers in the yard in North Georgia, she knew someone from that house had been to The Berry Schools." Dr. Cook placed equal em phasis on another contribution Berry has made through its students: "spiritual beauty--through high ideals of character and ethics and a knowledge of the civic beauty of good citizenship."
Dr. G. Leland Green, distinguished president emeritus who came to Berry in 1920 as Berry's first president from the presidency of the Vermont School of Agriculture, echoed Dr. Cook's remarks by expressing his "great happiness and satisfaction" in the "success of Berry graduates and their contribution to

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? 1 ' Conversation. . .
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good citizenship and excellent

morals in all walks of life."

Dr. Green termed the "moral and religious

training" and the "notable perfection and inclusiveness of the general education

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program" two of Berry's most

significant contributions. "I agreed with

Miss Berry most heartily," Dr. Green

continued, "that moral and religious training

should be given to all students who

entered Berry, and each student took Bible

courses, attended Sunday services

and participated in frequent religious

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Conversation
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programs." The result of such programs, Dr. Green pointed out, is a combination of "kind ness, courtesy and democracy . . . yes, a real obeying of the Ten Commandments. And cer tainly the world needs nothing so much at the present time." The results obtained from the "perfection and inclusiveness of Berry's general program" are topped by the accreditation of the high school at Berry in 1923 by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the subsequent accreditation of Berry College by the same body in 1957, Dr. Green elaborated.
The president of Berry since 1956, Dr. John R. Bertrand, who came to Georgia from the University of Nevada, commented on the "spirit of innovation . . . the educational pioneering" and the "totality of the three-fold educational program of academic achievement, religious em phasis and work experience" as Berry's significant contributions to today's society. "No pioneer has an easy time in trying to reach and carry out his objectives," Dr. Bertrand said, "and Martha Berry was in every respect a true pioneer as well as a genuine educator. She actively sought out and brought to her schools the most am bitious and promising young people, and they cooked meals on wood stoves and used mules to pull the plows. Inevitably there came change, and as the time changed--as the South changed--
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so did Martha Berry. What made those earli est days of Possum Trot so excellent was not the log cabin--it was the youth, the faculty and the founder. People--not buildings--make character and institutions," Dr. Bertrand said.
Dr. Bertrand concurred fully with Drs. Cook and Green in the importance of Berry's con tinuing contribution in its religious program. The president also commented on the signifi cance of work experience in connection with the total Berry program.
"Work experience wisely chosen and skill fully directed can help build character and at the same time provide valuable vocational experiences to the present and future needs of Berry students. Every high principle and noble idea upon which Berry was founded must be guarded and retained as the insti tution moves toward the fulfillment of its destiny--to be as unique, as distinguished, as nationally recognized in its much larger world

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of 1964 as it was in its founding year of 1902. It is improbable," Dr. Bertrand said, "that Berry could ever become `just another school'. It will become the great academy
and the great college of its potential."

The Present and the Future
by Dr. Thomas W. Gandy
Vice President and Director of Development Berry College and Berry Academy

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Berry College and Berry Academy have a fascination about them that I have not found in other school situa tions in which I have worked. Last summer I came back to my Alma Mater in an administrative role to find that I am even more interested and challenged than I was as a student. The administration is strong; the faculty is energetic and proficient; the students are industrious; the alumni are enthusiastic, and the campus is beautiful as always. It's good to be back home.
Berry has been built from financial assistance pro vided by thousands of people who found the ideals of Berry interesting and challenging. Miss Berry's goal of a three-fold program of academic proficiency, challenging work and religious experience is as good for 1964 as it was for 1902 when she founded the schools.
You have been hearing about our ten-year program of growth and expansion. Growth, in our case, means strength for the future. We want to keep the college and academy relatively small--yet large enough to provide a balanced program for our students. Planned enrollment for the college by 1973 is 1,500 students and 300 students for the academy. This will mean 1,800 places for top-notch students who want and need an education. The board of trustees has set a goal of $20,000,000 to provide additional facilities, faculty salaries and scholarships which will be necessary for this growth.
An exceptionally fine start has been made, and I am confident that with the continuing help of all who are concerned about Berry we can reach this goal.
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In the fall of 1962, a motion picture entitled "Years of Challenge" was completed. Filmed on the Berry cam pus, the 29-minute, 16mm motion picture in full color and sound portrays the present day institution's program and touches on Berry's heritage. Since its release, there have been more than 120 showings across the nation before an estimated audience of approximately 8,700 persons. The film is available free for the asking, postpaid both ways and is easily handled in its shipping case. It would provide any one of you with a vicarious visit to Berry.
Berry is dedicated to the task of providing for the present and preparing for the future. Most of us are aware of the tremendous explosion of knowledge and the rapid changes taking place within almost every field of knowledge. We are also aware of the population explosion, and we know there are more young people of college age who want and need a college education than at any other time in our history. Berry must be ready to fulfill its responsibility to these young people at any given time. Miss Berry saw to it that the schools were adapted to the times during each of the 40 years in which she was di rector. We can do no less.
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Dr. Inez Henry
Assistant Vice President Berry College and Berry Academy
Years of Growth

Dear Friends,
Have you ever wished you might start on a trip and go from one com munity to another for the trip's dura tion? This morning I find myself wish ing I could go to each of you and talk with you about your memories of Berry and its years of growth.
As I write this message from my office, I look from the windows and see the first definite signs of Spring with the budding elm trees which line the drive leading from the Gate of Oppor tunity to the administration building. Soon the lawns will be green and the gold of the forsythia and daffodils will glisten in the rays of sunshine on our campus. I also see happy young people going busily to and fro to their classes and their work experience. I see stately buildings, beautifully laid out roads, walkways and plantings.
This is Berry today, the Berry for which Martha Berry, students, faculty, staff and friends have dreamed and worked, the Berry in which you have believed and invested. It is the Berry

I have known and watched grow for four decades.
Many varied scenes flash through my memory now. Thousands of young men and women pass in review, many who now have homes and families showing evidence of harmony and Christian fortitude. Hundreds of com munities loom before me, happier and better because of the influence of Berry and our alumni. Church bells toll, school doors open, industrial plants and professional offices thrive with ideals and standards of Berry's influence. This is our American heritage in its rightful environment, the kind that makes for a more peaceful world.
Many familiar faces of Berry friends flash into my mind. Some I have known for decades, and some a shorter time. To all of you we owe a debt of grati tude, a debt we cannot repay; you, however, can take satisfaction in know ing that your investments are paying in human dividends.
The signs of spring reassure us of the newness of life as we reverently
(continued on back cover)

observe the 22nd anniversary of the death of Martha Berry. Recent deaths of several friends have saddened us. I am thinking especially of Mrs. E. J. Bellinger, whom I knew for almost 40 years. She lived in New York State but made several trips to Berry, gave generously of her self, her means, and she shared her friends with Berry. It was in the home of Mrs. Bellinger that I first began assembling the material for Miracle in the Mountains, the book on Martha Berry's life on which I col laborated with Harnett Kane.
Through the book many new friends have come to know Berry. Something of Berry goes when a dear friend goes. A part of my own life goes also. Still, their influence and goodness linger in our lives and on our campus.
So, to you who have built Berry, you who are near and far, your thoughts, your interests, your contributions, your prayers give us strength and confidence as we walk the "plank of faith." These things have supported and steadied many faltering feet at Berry through changing years and a changing world.
May the assurance of the promise, "Because I live, ye shall live also," bring to each of your hearts the bless ings of the Easter season.
Faithfully yours,

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Enclosed is my contribution of $_ for the continuing programs of Berry College and Berry Academy.
Name __
Street and Number _._
City (zone) and State_
Please make checks payable to The Berry Schools and mail to Mount Berry, Georgia 30149. Contributions are deductible in accordance with Federal In come Tax provisions.

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