Southern Highlander, 1960 September, Volume 47, Issue 5

THE BERRY SCHOOLS BULLETIH

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PRESIDENT'S REPORT: THE BERRY PROGRAM 1959-60

It is my privilege, as president of Berry College and of Mount Berry School for Boys, to issue this report on The Berry Program 1959-60. It is prepared for all friends who through their interest and support of many different kinds have added to our dy namically growing educational pro gram which seeks to contribute to the physical, mental and spiritual needs of our students.
Friends of Berry have always par ticipated in a program which endeavors to instill in the consciousness of all who come our way a philosophy of service, inspired by the life of the great Teacher who, 2000 years ago, believed that we are here "not to be ministered unto but to minister."

Whether you, the reader, are a long time or recent friend, student or alum nus (a), faculty member or former faculty member, trustee or former trustee, you have reason to take pride in your accomplishments here. The assistance of each one of you is in valuable and deeply appreciated.
A few of you will remember your help to Miss Berry when she founded the Boys' Industrial School in 1902. Many of you joined with her in reward ing undertakings during the forty re maining years of her life. Others of you have become interested in Berry since 1942. We are grateful to each of you for your confidence through the years.

THE BERRY SCHOOLS
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FOUNDED IN 1902 BY MARTHA BERRY

THE BERRY SCHOOLS BOARD OF TRUSTEES

william mc chesney martin, jr. chairman

JOHN A. SIBLEY.

. vice chairman

WILLIAM R. BOWDOIN

HARMON W. CALDWELL

VIRGINIA CAMPBELL COURTS

RICHARD EDGERTON

JOHNSON HEAD

INEZ HENRY

HOWELL HOLLIS

A. W. LEDBETTER, SR.

NELSON MACY, JR.

JOHN MADDOX

ARTHUR N. MORRIS

LEE PRICE

JOHN C. WARR

G. LAMAR WESTCOTT

ROBERT W. WOODRUFF

This publication was printed by students at The Berry Schools Printing Services.

THE BERRY SCHOOLS BULLETIN

Vol. 47. No. 5.

September 1960

The Berry Schools Bulletin is published six times yearly--once in March, twice in April, once in June, once in September and once in December--by The Berry Schools, Inc., Mount Berry, Georgia. Secondclass postage paid at Mount Berry, Georgia.

Several good friends have recently left us, after generously making pro visions for Berry in their wills. We honor their memories along with those who have gone before them and we pledge to comply with their provisions so that no confidence of theirs shall be misplaced.
We also at this time recall with ap preciation the dedicated lives of long time staff members whose contributions of time and money will always be memorials to their work. Several have left our ranks only recently and we miss them.
For fifty years now, Dr. S. H. Cook has served Berry well and in many capacities. As special advisor to the president and the trustees for the past three years, he has been of invaluable help to Berry. To him we give special thanks at the beginning of his fiftyfirst year of service.
Let me say to each of you, "Thank you for your interest and your sup port, regardless of when it began." Upon the solid foundation of the past we are building the future of Berry College and Mount Berry School for Boys, and we recognize our debt to you, our friends.

THE STUDENTS
The students are the most impor tant element of Berry College and Mount Berry School for Boys. It was for them that these educational insti tutions were founded and it is for them that they continue to grow.
Each student has the opportunity to become competent in his academic field and to benefit by an excellent general educational background. Upon graduation he should have the confi dence and courage that come with sound preparation.
From example, instruction and prac tice he should have mastered the abil ity to think wisely, to solve his prob lems effectively, to feel at home and to progress in his changing society, to be personally reliable and respon sible, and to be able to project his ideas and convictions clearly for the bene fit of others. He should possess a prac tical, optimistic attitude toward life based on a workable religious philos ophy.
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JOHN R. BERTRAND PRESIDENT THE BERRY SCHOOLS

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To produce graduates with the qualities of leadership, industriousness and unequivocal Christian character istics is the task which Berry College and Mount Berry School for Boys have been going about vigorously.

Berry College enrollment for the 1959-60 academic year totalled 664, and the enrollment at Mount Berry School for Boys was 219. There were

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103 graduating seniors in the Berry College class of 1960, and 50 were graduated from Mount Berry School for Boys.
An increasing number of students who gain admission possess admirable academic potential. This, however, is not our sole criterion, for prospective students worthy of a Berry education may be discovered outside a narrow band of academic norms. We continue to state frankly that we always con sider the spiritual and moral values of a student as well as the academic, staying keenly conscious of his atti tudes and ambitions.
It is noteworthy that many of the Berry College alumni elect to continue their education in graduate study. For example, 77 per cent of the 1960 gradu ates in physics and chemistry accepted offers of grants-in-aid. Other gradu ates of these departments qualified but elected to teach for at least one year. The records are consistent with those of graduates of other years.
It brings a feeling of satisfaction and reassurance to note the responses and accomplishments of many of the students we have selected and with whom we have worked.

THE FACULTY The accomplishments of the students
are dependent to a great extent upon the excellence of the faculty. An edu cational institution must have more than books and buildings. It is a fac ulty which makes a college come alive.
The members of Berry's faculty are stimulating to the student body, to one another, to neighboring church and community groups, and to an everwidening circle of contacts throughout this and other countries. Their intel lectual alertness and industry are dem onstrated by their campus activities both in and out of the classroom and by their professional interests and scholarly pursuits beyond the cam pus.
Particularly commendable is the personal interest the faculty members show for the individual students. This often produces not only an enviable student-teacher relationship, but estab lishes significant and enduring friend ships.
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AVERAGE 1960-61 BERRY COLLEGE NINE-MONTH SALARY* COMPARISONS WITH OTHER GEORGIA COLLEGES

Rank
Professor Associate Professor Assistant Professor Instructor

Berry College
Amount
$6,000 5.500 4.500 4,300

Nearby Four-Year State College
Amount
$7,600 5,600 5,400 4,900

Nearby Four-Year State College
Amount
$7,200 6,100 5,400

University
Amount
$8,500 7,100 6,300 4,800

* Including Berry College value of perquisites (e.g., housing, meals where applicable). Figures rounded off to nearest hundred dollars.

Berry College faces the great prob lem of securing and keeping an excel lent faculty with offers of an inade quate salary. Many promising and ef fective teachers are attracted to Berry because of its beauty, organization, program and ideals. But often because of personal obligations or the rising cost of living, these persons are compelled to accept more remunerative offers elsewhere.
Obviously, increases in salary con tinue to be a primary need. A three per cent increase in faculty salaries goes into effect the 1960-61 fiscal year. But we still must trade on the devotion and loyalty of faculty--admittedly an injustice which must be overcome if we are to attain our goal.
In order to achieve our purpose in providing the right education for our students, we must have a faculty which is a model of excellence to them. And the faculty must be kept here. We have taken a step in this direction. There is much more to do.
ACADEMIC PROGRAM
Preparations are underway to pro vide four quarters of instruction in the 1961-62 academic year. This revision has special advantages for coordination

of the student-teacher program in con nection with the public schools of the community and also for the preserva tion of the essential values of the workexperience plan.
The quarter system will tighten the calendar of classroom instruction and will make it possible for a greater number and variety of courses to be offered. We are pleased with the pros pects as we enter final planning to effect transition.
Much of the academic program for last year was a continuation of the work of the previous year and years of the immediate past. Classes and laboratories were conducted; social and cultural activities were related to the academic to provide well-rounded experience; students were counseled; new students entered; the Class of 1960 was graduated. Most of this is rather familiar and may give the im pression of a prosaic routine, but this is education in action and it is the most important catalyst whereby our plans become realities.
It should be noted that neither the college nor the high school curriculum has remained static. New courses have been added and after consideration others have been deleted. Credits are now accepted for the TV Continental Classroom and our limited evening

classes, and regular courses that have been added include those as diversified as Christian ethics, electronics and new courses in drawing and painting.
We have evaluated and shall con tinue to study and revise the curricula of both schools with the purpose of keeping them timely and forward-look ing. We have maintained and intend to continue a favorable faculty to stu dent ratio, comprehensive physical facilities, and a wholesome atmosphere for learning and morale. All these ele ments will continue to contribute to a happy, sensible educational experience for each student and will produce grad uates who are capable and eager to serve mankind.
RELIGIOUS LIFE
Berry College and Mount Berry School for Boys are intensely Christian. A full-time minister serves as chap lain of the institution and as minister of the campus.
In order to complete their require ment for graduation, all students take courses in religion which help them grow in knowledge and understanding. The instruction is scholarly and rev erent.
The weekly worship service is one of the nuclei of the religious program. Blending features of formal liturgical worship and informal free worship, the same kind of interdenominational service has continued throughout the years on the campus.
Within beautiful chapels conducive to worship and the nourishment of lofty ideals, those who enter find them selves lifted to new levels of under standing of the ways of God and man. Inspiring devotional music sets a mood of reverence. Many of the students participate in the presentation of this music, and some are preparing them selves for further service in the realm of sacred music.

A Religious Emphasis Week is held each autumn. Also, to enable students to hear and have contact with a variety of religious leaders and excellent preachers, a prominent visi ting minister is brought to the campus once a month. Arrangements are being made for such visitors to conduct dis cussion and counseling sessions in ad dition to their formal messages.
Other opportunities for students to take an active part in the religious life of the campus are provided by chapel services and vespers, the meal time devotionals, the religious club, and the YMCA and YWCA activities.
All of the emphases on religious life are important, but the success of the religious program of any institu tion is largely dependent upon the devotion and cooperation of the admin istrators, faculty and students. We are constantly striving toward maintaining and improving the significant spiritual atmosphere of the college and school for boys.
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WORK EXPERIENCE
It is traditional at Berry College and Mount Berry School for Boys for students to assist in the maintenance and operation of the plant. The workexperience program is an integral part of the general education program.
Thus, an unusual program empha sizes constructive and productive work. Much of the work on the campus can be done by students who in this way learn the merit of work with a worthy purpose. The students often develop skills that serve them well later on in life. Many graduates look back upon the work experience at Berry as an outstanding educational extra as well as a means to earn funds to help meet the costs of their education.
All students work each week at an assigned job. Assignments are made under the supervision of the dean of students at the college and the prin cipal at the school for boys. Student preference and vocational and avocational benefits are given maximum consideration.
Students are not required to work each summer, but a number of quali fied students are employed for jobs essential on the campus during this period. This work helps them earn some of the necessary funds for their education the following year.
The work-experience program con tinues to be a strong, immeasurably valuable and essential feature of edu cation at Berry College and the Mount Berry School for Boys.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, I960

INCOME EDUCATION AND GENERAL
Student Fees . $295,923 Endowments . 441,667 Donations . 188,690 Miscellaneous . 26,379
Total Education and General . $952,659
AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES Residence Halls . $100,171 Food Services . 314,406 Medical Services . 34,640 Faculty Housing . 40,129
Total Auxiliary Enterprises. $489,346
INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENTS, net profit . $14,366
TOTAL INCOME .$1,456,371

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A severe ice storm hit the campus in March 1960, causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage to forest income in the next two or three years.

EXPENDITURES

EDUCATION AND GENERAL

Administration . $ 79,557 Student Services . 42,784

Public Services . 71,409 General Expense . 137,649 Instruction

Berry College School for Boys

$254,430 52,433

Libraries Berry College School for Boys

$306,863
$34,065 6,350

306,863

$40,415

40,415

Operation and Maintenance of the Physical Plant. 159,968

Total Education and General. $838,645

AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES
Residence Halls . $113,162 Food Services . 355,035 Medical Services . 34,640 Faculty Housing . 41,091

Total Auxiliary Enterprises. $543,928

ADDITIONS TO CAPITAL INVESTMENT . 11,394

CONTINGENCY . 14,096
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TOTAL EXPENDITURES .$1,408,063

DEVELOPMENT When you make a contribution to
Berry, you are making a multiple investment in the future of America.
With the conviction of the practical idealist, you more than likely look about you and know that America's fu ture will soon be in the hands of gener ations of young people yet to be edu cated. Therefore, you and others like you are eager to give of your posses sions and to share a part of your better selves to insure that the education of as many young people as possible may be thorough and wholesome.
With scholarly concern and patriotic zeal, your attention doubtless goes immediately to the classroom. You sense the crying need for greater in tellectual and spiritual attainment on the parts of individuals everywhere.
You become aware of high idealism at Berry, of excellent instruction which is being constantly improved to serve a developing region. You see up-todate equipment, recent additions to library shelves, visual and audio aids to education, and conscientious teachers who are the backbone of an educa tional institution anywhere. You say, "Because I cared enough to invest in young people at Berry, I now have greater confidence in the future of our country and, therefore, of the world."
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Dana Hall, named for its principal benefactor Charles A. Dana, was dedicated in September 1959.

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As a lover of nature, you are invest ing in the area of natural resources and in their development and pre servation. Berry's expansive campus is truly beautiful. Productive pine for ests, native shrubs and colorful flow ers, cattle, sheep, swine and poultry, wildlife, orchards, gardens, fields and green lawns will doubtless impress you and awaken in you finer appre ciation of living things and of nature's bountiful possibilities. As you contem plate them, it will be with the con sciousness that much care and many generous gifts are needed for Berry to continue to offer through the years these natural advantages to her stu dents and her friends.
From the purely practical approach, you will note Berry's physical plant-- unusually beautiful and solid edifices in a secure state of repair. Residence halls and dining halls, libraries and chapels, walks and roads--all are parts of our lovely campus. You may con sider the well-lighted classrooms, the water flowing from the mountain res ervoir to serve a thousand purposes, the numerous maintenance supplies and the many hours of necessary labor, and you can conclude that because of your gift some portion of this plant continues in excellent condition.

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BERRY COLLEGE
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And wherever you meet Berry alumni, you will contact adventurous scientists and reliable business men and women; you will see children in structed by competent teachers; you will read and hear messages from keen minds inspired by the Christian ideal of service. Then you will experience the deep, inner realization that, in part, because of you and the gener osity of many like you, young men and women on the Berry campus will con tinue to get increasingly excellent pre paration for world citizenship.
You will feel that you have invested wisely and well. And the dividends will accrue through the years, un squandered and unspent, because they will be in the minds and hearts of edu cated people--immeasurable returns on your multiple investment.

SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Here is my contribution of $_ for the continuing program of The Berry Schools.
Name .___________.____
Street and Number ___
City (zone) and State______ Please make checks payable to The Berry Schools and mail to Mount Berry, Georgia. Contributions are deductible in accordance with Federal Income Tax provisions.

Visitors to the campus are welcome. A registration and infor mation desk is located in Hoge Building for the convenience of guests. However, in the interest of student welfare and Sabbath observance, we encourage our friends to make arrangements with the president's office if they find it more convenient to visit on Sunday.
The schools are served by the Rome, Georgia, telephone ex change, and The Berry Schools switchboard number is 232-5374. Mail should be addressed to Mount Berry, Georgia.

To Chattanooga

To Dalton, Ga

The Berry Schools Mount Berry, Georgia
Rome, Georgia
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411
To Atlanta

411 To Birmingham

27 To Columbus, Ga.

For more information about any phase of Berry College or Mount Berry School for Boys, please address your inquiries to the President, The Berry Schools, Mount Berry, Georgia.

Locations