Southern Highlander, 1955 September, Volume 42, Issue 3

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September 1955

MR. MARTIN BRINGS INSPIRING MESSAGE
The Berry Schools and College held their first Staff Convoca tion of the fall term on the evening of September 5th, with Mr. William McChesney Martin, of Washington, making the principal address. Mr. Martin is Chairman of the Federal Reserve System, and was recently elected Chairman of Berry's Board of Directors and Acting President of the Schools and College.
Berry has been fortunate through the years in bringing to the campus speakers of note who bring messages of inspiration to the staff and students, but Mr. Martin's speech was one of the most inspiring ever made from Berry's platform.
He began his remarks by saying: "I want to talk with you simply, directly and informally about my hopes and aspirations for Berry.
"These Schools have a heritage that is unshakeable. They are built on the Rock of Ages. The founder of these Schools, whom I was privileged to know, had faith in God and believed in the dignity of labor. In truth and in fact the spirit of Christ evolves in her progressive program. Miss Berry was one of our country's pioneers in education and that is the reason these Schools occupy their unique place in education today.
"The spirit of co-operation given me from the staff and students has been remarkable, encouraging and inspiring. In coming to these Schools at this time I truthfully say that I feel a real sense of com mitment. Berry offers opportunities for the training of the heart and hand, as well as the head. These three things are more impor tant in education today than ever. I am convinced that we must continue to offer this threefold training, and in so doing we shall send out men and women who will render sacrificial service to our needy world.
"I want to leave this thought with you. The torch has been given to us. Let us carry it forward, remembering that the Scrip ture teaches us that `all things work together for good to them that love the Lord.'"

The Southern Highlander
Vol. 42 September, 1955 No. 3
Founded by Miss Martha Berry January 13, 1902
Mount Berry, Floyd County, Georgia
Berry Schools are eleemosynary institutions. Gifts are tax exempt according to federal law.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES Wm. McChesney Martin, Jr.
Washington, D. C. _ Chairman Philip Weltner, Atlanta __ Vice-Chairman M. G. Keown, Mount Berry_ Treasurer Dr. Harmon Caldwell, Mrs. Virginia Camp bell Courts, Dr. James G. K. McClure, Nel son Macy, Jr., Robert F. Maddox, E. W. Moise, John A. Sibley, G. Lamar Westcott, George Winship, R. W. Woodruff.
Published by The Berry Schools, Inc.,
at Mount Berry, Georgia
Printed and Published quarterly at Mount

ledge, with a firm belief that the two go hand in hand. Theory is valuable; so is practical experience. It takes both to give the student a well-rounded education.
Friends of Berry have supported the Schools in this program for years, and may sometimes wonder whether Berry is getting results with the funds they invest in these boys and girls.
As President Wilson said, "Money devoted to it (education) yields a singular increase to which there is no calculable end.''
We know the number of boys and girls we educate, what they have studied, and what they are doing now. We know that they have jobs and are supporting themselves and their fami
lies.
But how many lives have they touched? What would they have been had they not come to Berry?
One of our high school teachers told the story of a boy who had no home. He had never had anyone interested in him before he came to Berry. He couldn't write a correct sentence, and
used been con-

GIFT BLANK
Please find enclosed my gift of $., to be used for Operating Expenses Endowment

down prove i the : the busiterest

Scholarship Fund

'fairs.

Building Fund Name . Street . City . Zone. State .
Please make checks payable to the BERRY SCHOOLS, and mail to MOUNT BERRY, GEORGIA.

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age to age," Woodrow Wilson wrote from the penitentiary, and lives which

in 1901.

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Berry begins its fifty-third year in September, taking boys and girls and offering them an opportunity to earn their education. The Berry program

useful, positive lives?
Berry has always tried to spend both sides of each dollar. Our one aim has been to give as many young people

is based on work and academic know-

continued on page four

Page Three

MR. MARTIN BRINGS INSPIRING MESSAGE

The Berry Schools and College held their first Staff Convoca tion of the fall term on the evening of September 5th, with Mr. William McChesney Martin, of Washington, making the principal address. Mr. Martin is Chairman of the Federal Reserve System, and was recently elected Chairman of Berry's Board of Directors and Acting President of the Schools and College.

Berry has been fortunate through the years in bringing to the campus speakers of note who bring messages of inspiration to the staff and students, but Mr. Martin's speech was one of the most inspiring ever made from Berry's platform.

He began his remarks by saying: "I want to talk with you simply, directly and informally about my hopes and aspirations for Berry.

"These Schools have a heritage that is unshakeable. They are built on the Rock of Ages. The founder of these Schools, whom I was privileged to know, had faith in God and believed in the dignity

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The Southern Highlander
Vol. 42 September, 1955 No. 3
Founded by Miss Martha Berry January 13, 1902
Mount Berry, Floyd County, Georgia
Berry Schools are eleemosynary institutions. Gifts are tax exempt according to federal law.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Wm. McChesney Martin, Jr. Washington, D. C. _ Chairman
Philip Weltner, Atlanta .. Vice-Chairman M. G. Keown, Mount Berry_ Treasurer
Dr. Harmon Caldwell, Mrs. Virginia Camp bell Courts, Dr. James G. K. McClure, Nel son Macy, Jr., Robert F. Maddox, E. W. Moise, John A. Sibley, G. Lamar Westcott, George Winship, R. W. Woodruff.
Published by The Berry Schools, Inc., at Mount Berry, Georgia
Printed and Published quarterly at Mount Berry, Georgia. Entered as Second Class Mail Matter at Mount Berry, Georgia, Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mail ing at special rates of postage provided for by section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917. Author ized July 24, 1918.
Printed by Students on the School's Press
HOW MUCH IS AN EDUCATION WORTH?
"Education is a thing of infinite usury. Money devoted to it yields a singular increase to which there is no calculable end, an increase in perpe tuity--an increase of knowledge, and therefore of intelligence and efficiency, touching generation after generation with new impulses, adding to the sum total of the world's fitness for affairs-- an invisible but intensely real spiritual usury beyond reckoning, because com pounded in an unknown ratio from age to age," Woodrow Wilson wrote in 1901.
Berry begins its fifty-third year in September, taking boys and girls and offering them an opportunity to earn their education. The Berry program is based on work and academic know

ledge, with a firm belief that the two go hand in hand. Theory is valuable; so is practical experience. It takes both to give the student a well-rounded education.
Friends of Berry have supported the Schools in this program for years, and may sometimes wonder whether Berry is getting results with the funds they invest in these boys and girls.
As President Wilson said, "Money devoted to it (education) yields a singular increase to which there is no calculable end."
We know the number of boys and girls we educate, what they have studied, and what they are doing now. We know that they have jobs and are supporting themselves and their fami
lies.
But how many lives have they touched? What would they have been had they not come to Berry?
One of our high school teachers told the story of a boy who had no home. He had never had anyone interested in him before he came to Berry. He couldn't write a correct sentence, and thought profanity was normally used in conversation. He had never been taught any principles or proper con
duct.
He came to Berry, buckled down to his studies, and began to improve because of his association with the other boys and the interest of the teachers. Today, he is a young busi nessman, who takes an active interest in his church, and community affairs. What was his education worth?
There are thousands of stories we could tell you about Berry boys and girls. And these stories are all the more interesting because they are true.
Who knows how many lives these young people will touch? Who knows what inspiration they will give to others from the vast store of inspiration they have received. Who can tell the in fluence for good they will have and how much money they will save the country by saving men and women from the penitentiary, and lives which would have been wrecked made into useful, positive lives?
Berry has always tried to spend both sides of each dollar. Our one aim has been to give as many young people
continued on page four

Page Three

BERRY OPENS FOR 54th YEAR SEPTEMBER 5; 500 STUDENTS EARN TUITION THIS SUMMER

Berry Schools and College opened interiors of some of the buildings are for the 54th year on September 5, being cleaned and repaired, as well

with nearly 1,000 boys and girls enroll ed, coming from nine different states, half of them working during the sum mer to earn their tuition and expenses for the coming school year.
This fall, 75 of the young people will begin their work for their tuition. More than 80% of the Berry boys and girls earn their expenses here by their own efforts.
When the classes ended last May, the Berry boys and girls started the next day on the summer program. Although the fruit and berry crops were killed in a late freeze, the boys started the farm and garden crops to raise the vegetables for the tables, and for canning. It has been hot here during the past summer, but the boys have gone early to the fields, and worked late through the hot days, and their efforts have made a rich harvest.
The girls have worked very hard, too, in the kitchens, cooking 1500 meals a day, and taking pride in their work. Even on the hotest days, when the heat of the stoves ran the temperature to 115 degrees in the kitchens and cannery, the girls have worked with out complaining, preparing delicious meals, and preserving vegetables for winter use.
Through generous gifts of friends, we have accumulated enough in our building fund to build another staff

as painted. The grounds, too, have been cleaned,
grass pulled out of flower and shrub bery beds, and dead limbs pruned. Plans are being made to plant addit ional trees to replace trees which are dead. The Dutch Elm disease has claimed a number of our fine old elms which line some of the drives about the Berry campus.
In the barns, pens have been cleaned and scraped for painting. The dairy barn, which was built by Berry boys from brick and tile they made, has been painted and repaired. Some parts of the barn were repaired and the steam lines cleaned and repaired. The fences around the pastures have been mended.
The dormitory furniture, which has been used by generations of Berry boys and girls, has been refinished, and the window trim of the buildings
repainted. It has been a busy summer; much
needed work has been done, and the boys and girls have worked long and faithfully at it. It is with a sense of accomplishment that they begin their school work, and they begin their classes with eagerness and earnest purpose. They have worked to earn the opportunity to attend classes, and they now work to learn all they can in order to prepare themselves for
their future work.

cottage. The boys have cut the lumber at our own sawmill, done the carpen try, installed the electrical and plumb ing fixtures, and made cabinets for the kitchen, and done all the necessary work. In addition to providing a much needed cottage, the boys have gained invaluable experience, for no matter

Worth of Education?
from page three
the best education possible with the funds we have. We do hope you are pleased with the results, and feel that your investment in young lives has paid large dividends.

how much theory one has in building, Mr. Willis A. Sutton, former Super

there are problems which will arise intendent of Schools in Atlanta, and

which were not covered in books, and a former editor of the Readers' Digest

one must have experience and initi once said: "Some people say that edu

ative to solve them.

cation costs too much. I say it is not

"Cleanliness is next to Godliness," education, but ignorance that costs too

might be taken for a motto at Berry. much. This one institution, the Berry

During the summer, some of the build Schools, has saved the country more

ings have been painted, and the trim than it can ever cost if it is maintained

on other buildings touched up. The a thousand years."

Page Four

BERRY ALUMNI
RECEIVE HONORS
News of honors to Berry graduates is constantly being received at Berry. These honors show that Berry gradu ates are well trained, and work at their jobs. We want to share this news with you who have made their educa tion and opportunities possible. '*
One Berry graduate was named "circuit preacher of the year" by the North Georgia Methodist Conference. He has taken a group of churches in the mountain area of North Georgia, and built them up, winning his honor.
Another Berry graduate, who is in charge of physical education was in vited to join a national educational organization for her work in organiz ing her department, and her unusual ability for working with her students. She was also named on the board of the organization's publication.
A Berry man who studied denistry after his graduation from Berry, and served as a dental missionary to Korea and China, was honored with the pre sentation of a plaque by the Georgia Dental Society. He has now retired. Four of his brothers also attended Berry.
Another was one of the top winners in an essay contest sponsored by the International Association of Personnel Workers.
Another Berry boy who married a Berry girl, was named foreman of the month by the publication of his com pany. He was an orphan, having to make his own way in the world since he was ten years old. After he attend ed Berry, he served in the Air Force during World War II. In addition to their work--his wife teaches in the local school--they raise chickens, gar den, and have refinished old furniture which they have bought for their home.
One Berry graduate, a farmer, was elected administrator for the local hospital, and in one year, had added $8,000 to the hospital funds.
Many Berry boys have come by, either on their way to foreign service, or on their way to service overseas. One boy, who has just returned, taught English to the Japanese in addition to his other duties.

Occasionally, someone brings a real tribute to a Berry girl or boy. Not long ago a Berry staff member was visiting in a rural district, and one of the women of the community came up and said, "I want to thank you for training so many boys and girls at Berry. Not many years ago, we didn't know what to do to improve our com munity. We wanted to do better but didn't know how. When Mrs. -, who finished at Berry moved in, we began to call on her for help. She's not the bossy kind that knows every thing; she waits for you to ask her, but when you ask her, she never lets you down.
"We've called on her for everything from sewing and cooking demonstra tions, to playing the piano in church, teaching Sunday School, getting up programs, helping raise money to im prove the school--we've called on her for everything and even with her family, and doing all her own work, she manages to find time to help in the community. If you-all have got any more trained like her, I know the communities down here would like to have them."
And of all the honors we have told you about, we feel that the honor and respect that Berry graduates hold in their communities are the greatest tributes to our training.
It seems akin to the Master's, "Well done thou good and faithful servant."
PLEASE SEND US NAMES
OF THOSE WHO MIGHT HELP
Berry is supported by freewill con tributions from people all over the country. Many have been told of the work being done here by friends, and many have visited Berry to see for themselves.
We have never had a paid agent in the field working for Berry. Various staff members have gone out from time to time and spoken to groups, telling the story of Berry. Those who have heard the story tell others, and others have arranged for the story of Berry to be printed in various newspapers and magazines.
You may be assured that each dollar contributed to Berry goes directly into
continued on page eleven

Page Five

Martha Berry, Pioneer in Human Engineering

By Carolyn Second Prize Winner in the John A. Sibley Essay Contest

Silently, she walked along the moun tain trail, pushing aside the bushes as she climbed higher up the rocky little path. Forest creatures scampered here and there into the mountain lau rel and wood doves stopped their coo ing as the little lady walked beneath huge oak trees deeper into the hushed silence of the untouched wood.
One little ground squirrel watched her as she came to the end of the trail and stepped out into the clearing upon a huge rock. Statue-like and queenly, she stood there, almost breathless, not so much from the walk up the trail, but because of what she saw. The little squirrel came shyly to the rock, and standing beside her, saw only the vast expanse of trees below. To the one standing beside him, there was more to be seen than the vastness of the wooded hills below. She saw with great hope a place where youth would laugh and love and learn together. Looking upward, she beheld the light and warmth of the sun and knew that just as the tall, green trees had grown beneath its care, people, too, might grow tall and firm in its warmth.
Closing her eyes, she felt the pound ing of her heart and realized that that which she sought to do would not be easy. Quietly then, she sensed a strange, new Power behind her own will and she knew she was not alone in her search.
Yes, while others about her were building castles in the air, Martha Berry built a school. Gay, laughing, crowds claimed her friends, but deep meditation sought a heart that was willing and claimed it through God for the thousands of young people Miss Berry was never to know.
With her dream in her heart, Martha Berry set out to build the school that would bridge the gap between ignorance and happiness for the children in the surrounding hills. Her friends could not understand why she, who had everything to be desired, would want to waste her time on these "backwoods"

children who would probably never amount to anything. It is true that Miss Berry did have everything a fashionable young lady would want, but as long as she knew there were children who had no home, no educa tion, and no future, she might well have been the same, for her heart would not let her forget.
Having given her heart and her life to the task before her, Miss Berry used land given her by her father and started teaching a small group of child ren in a little log cabin surrounded by trees. How fitting it was that she should begin her ministry by teaching stories from the Bible--an humble beginning that was to hold great sig nificance in the years to come. Martha Berry traveled far and near in search of friends who wanted to share her dream. Though she often returned without funds which she sought and needed, she never returned empty handed. No! She came back with more she had possessed before. So great was her belief in this dream that she was not willing that it should die un born. Day after day, the storms of uncertainty showered down upon the small log cabin, while within sat one who knew that tomorrow the sun would erase the marks of today. When asked if she had fears that her school would never live, Miss Berry's head came up and she stood the full length of her small stature, then replied, "I have stepped out on a plank of faith." Surely she must have wobbled upon it many times, but never did it wobble beneath her. This was true because God was leading this great march which has proved triumphant.
In 1902, after a long hard struggle, Miss Berry's dream came to life with the founding of the Berry Schools. Martha Berry knew the source of Power behind her achievements and stealing away, she returned to her quiet, wooded place of worship and meditation. This time there was no one there to see her kneel in humble gratitude to the Master of her life.

Page Six

Perhaps it was in the stillness of this very moment that she took as the school promise, this verse from Isaiah: "I, the Lord, do keep it; I will water it every moment lest any hurt it; I will keep it night and day." And God has surely kept it through the years. From the small log cabin with red clay roads as its only entrance, has come tall, strong buildings upon a campus unusual in its simplicity and unequaled in its beauty. The beautiful entrance has truly been the Gate of Opportunity for thousands who have been given, upon entering it, the keys to happiness through self-realization. Many come in and countless others go out to in fluence and serve as citizens all over the South. Instilled within their lives

is the dignity of labor, the beauty of simplicity, the spark of learning, and the burn of Christianity.
There is living evidence of Miss Berry's work. Although her tired body was laid to rest in 1942, she is as much alive today as you and I. She lives within each student at Berry now and within those who have gone from the school. Her life of purity is reflected in the clear blue pools all over the campus, and she stands as deep rooted as the giant oaks that keep a silent vigil over her grave beside the chapel. Martha Berry has gone on, but not without blazing the trail on which thou sands of youths set out each year to follow in the steps of Martha Berry, pioneer in human engineering.

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Students Enjoy Gardening

Page Seven

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Experimenting in the Labor atory to prove knowledge gained in classes and at work--

EVERY EFFORT IS MADE TO CORRELATE WORK AND STUDY

Students majoring in Indus trial Arts have actual experi ence in making furniture in Berry's Shops--
Page Eight

Eager minds prompt

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eager hands to reach for hooks--

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Boys learn many valuable and practical lessons in livestock programs--

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Barstow Memorial Library

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is one of our most artistic and

useful buildings--made of na

tive stone and built by Berry

boys--

Page Nine

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Proposed Addition to Memorial Library

LIBRARY ADDITION NEEDED AT BERRY

One of the most pressing needs at Berry is an addition for the Memorial Library. The present library was built in 1926, when Berry was a high school, and when the college was ad ded no funds were available for in creasing the library.
We now have about 700 boys and girls at Berry College, and facilities are needed for them to study, for storing books, and for work space where books can be repaired and re bound. The present library building is only one-third as large as we need.
The architects have drawn plans for the addition, which fit in nicely with the present building, and which will include all the space we need.
In a survey which was made last year by a group of educators, the library addition was listed as the most urgent need. While the work being done at Berry is standard college work, we must improve the library to provide proper opportunities to
these boys and girls. When these young people have
worked very hard to earn their chance to get an education, we feel that we must make every effort to give them as good education as they could get anywhere. To do this, we must pro vide them with reference books, peri

odicals, and books in which they can do research, and develop their knowl edge.
The addition would make a lovely, useful memorial to some friend or loved one. Through the years to come, it would serve young people who seek knowledge, and perpetuate the mem ory of someone who loved young peo ple.
The building will cost approximately $250,000, and will be built of enduring materials. If you would like to con tribute toward this urgently needed building, you will be helping to meet the needs of our young people and helping them in a special way.
YOUR GIFT TO BERRY
is an investment in the future of deserv ing boys and girls.
REMEMBER BERRY IN YOUR WILL

Page Ten

Please Send Names
from page five
the work here. There are no commissionts to be paid, or high salaries of organizers and agents to be met. Those who represent Berry are friends who give their services, or staff members who take on extra work in order to tell others the Berry story.
Perhaps you may have a friend, or know someone who might be interested in these boys and girls. We have made it a policy never to reveal the sources who give us names, unless the person who gives the name requests it. Some times, a friend will feel that the person he wishes interested in Berry will be more inclined to read the literature if he knows a mutual friend is interested. In other cases, when someone suggests the name of someone he has read about in a newspaper or magazine article, or

knows casually, it may be the desire of the donor of the names to be anony mous. We will respect your wishes in the matter.
Berry has been supported through the years by people who can give small gifts. The majority of the gifts to Berry come in the amounts of $10 and $25. We should be especially glad to add to our list the names of anyone interested in educating boys and girls, and who believe in teaching them that work is honorable and necessary for a successful life, and one in which ser vice to others is paramount.
If you prefer to give Berry literature to a friend and talk to him personally about Berry, we shall be more than glad to send extra copies of the South ern Highlander, or other booklets about Berry. A request on a postal card will be answered promptly.

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Grand March on Mountain Day Page Eleven

My Legacy from Martha Berry

By Reba

Third Prize Winner in the John A. Sibley Essay Contest

"At the heart of the cyclone tearing the sky as did Thorneau, believed that "The

And flinging the clouds and the towers by, cost of a thing is the amount of life

Is a place of central calm

that must be exchanged for it." Per

So here in the roar of mortal things

haps Miss Berry realized that we would

I have a place where my spirit sings

not strive as hard if we were as other

It's the hallow of God's palm."

ordinary colleges where one may pay

-- Edwin Markham
When I first saw Berry this poem came spontaneously to my mind for truly Berry is in the hallow of God's palm.

his way with money. She realized that we would appreciate more our educa tion upon realizing that we were ex changing a part of our lives for it; not a part of the lives of our parents and through great sacrifice might be

Without God's great hands helping able to pay our way through college,

the kind, firm courageous hands of but we, ourselves were exchanging

Miss Berry to mold, shape and make our lives for it.

Berry into what she is today, we

I don't think Miss Berry realized

students would not have a legacy how many legacies she was to have

from our alma mater.

willed by giving birth to her dream.

My legacy from Martha Berry is Berry, though still an infant in age

that of "A mission with a challenge." is an adult in accomplishments; though

My mission is to teach, not necessarily she is young she is a very wise child.

in schools, but in everyday life; not It is not of wonder that visitors marvel

necessarily from books, but from the over Berry and her advancement for

storage of beautiful and treasured safe- we who are part of her marvel, too.

kept memories in my heart. My leg It is not easy to understand how one

acy demands that I teach all whom I log cabin could be transformed in

can to help promote the well-being thirty-three short years into such a

of my nation's people.

large number of buildings until one

In my legacy of mission comes the motto of our college, "Not to Be Ministered unto, but to Minister." When I think of the many years Martha Berry spent ministering to her dream of the' Berry Schools, I realize my unworthiness to claim my legacy from the great dream to which she gave birth. What great courage she had to have endured all the disappoint

realized who the transformer was. As one of our visitors said, "The trans former was God through Miss Berry." I think it was God's desire to have established an institution where one might live in the beauty of nature-- to see and appreciate more His creation. I think He used Miss Berry as a channel to establish such a place in the hallow of His palm.

ments that came by her endless efforts As I progress toward my senior to establish a great institution where year in college, I progress with the

everyone may learn, where everyone imprint of the Berry Seal on my heart might inherit a legacy from her--a and mind. When I shall go out the

legacy of progress or advancement. "Gate of Opportunity" in the very

It was part of her goal that no one dwell in ignorance, but that all might have an equal opportunity to learn. So she founded an institution where anyone who willed might overcome

near future I shall go with my legacy of missions from Miss Martha Berry. But I shall not go as empty handed as I came, for I go forward to serve in the world with a better stored mind

his barriers to knowledge.

and a courageous heart.

Perhaps Martha Berry had David When I shall leave the hallow of

Thorneau's philosophy in mind when God's palm from which I have so she established the basis on which a greatly profited, I shall leave reluc

student may enter Berry Schools. She, tantly, though I shall take with me

Page Twelve

a great part of her that cannot ever be forgotten.
Our schools began with God. He guided her through stress and storm and blessed her above all her dis couragements. That was not without purpose. With the blessing came a responsibility to be a college in the midst of colleges. The duty of us students is to give leadership not along the old pathways, but to blaze new trails to the betterment of our school, community, state and nation. Upon the realization of this duty, we, as did Miss Berry years ago when her dream was young, still lift our eyes unto the hills from whence cometh our help--to Him who has been our help in years past, and who is our hope for the years to come.
From my legacy from Martha Berry comes also courage. Courage to begin to do something toward actual accom plishment of my heart's desire. I have learned not to draw back in fear or misgiving when there is something to

meet, but to venture forth, knowing that I have the infinite power of God within me. I draw upon these inner powers in surmounting the challenges I meet. I have learned from the life of Martha Berry that my being, too, is in God and that through Him I can meet every experience with courage.
From our Berry seal, I have learned much. That seal, which symbolizes the Berry Schools, also symbolizes my goal in life. From the cabin which symbolizes simplicity, I have learned to dwell in simplicity for those who are happiest are those who live simple lives. From the Bible which of course, symbolizes religion, I have learned to commune with God more intimately-- to commune with Him through nature-- through the blossoming dogwoods, the stately trees, and the simple little happy wild flowers. From the plow, which symbolizes labor, I have learned that the things one most appreciates in life are the things for which he truly works.

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Girls Singing Ballads in Costume Page Thirteen

MR. SIBLEY WELCOMES NEW STUDENTS AND STAFF AT FIRST JOINT CHAPEL

Mr. John A. Sibley, Chairman Trust Company of Georgia, Atlanta, long-time friend and trustee of Berry, and Chairman of the Board for four teen years, thrilled the staff and stu dents, alike, in his joint Chapel speech, on Saturday, September 10th. This was the first Joint Chapel of the sea son and Mr. Sibley spoke to nearly a thousand boys and girls and some two hundred staff members, their wives and friends. In voicing his belief in the Berry Schools Mr. Sibley said:
"With reference to being a member of Berry's Board of Trustees, I would rather be a trustee of this institution than any school I know. If I were a teacher I would enjoy teaching these young people more than any I know of, and if I were young again I would prefer to be a student at Berry to any other school.
"The founder of these Schools took as the motto for Berry, `Not to be Ministered unto; but to Minister. Now, it is easy to take a great motto, to inscribe it on the walls of buildings and to talk about it; but it is another matter to live the motto. Miss Berry was a great person and built a great School, not because she chose a great motto but because she lived that motto.
"Her aim was to develop Christian citizenship through the educational process. She blended in a harmo nious whole the training of mind, the development of the spiritual in sight and understanding, and the ac quisition of physical skills through work. She dealt with these three basic capacities not as warring and conflict ing claims for a student's time, but as a happy educational trinity march ing hand in hand.
"We are unwilling to rest on the achievements of by-gone days. Our job is to improve and enrich our in tellectual pursuits, deepen our spirit ual insight and understanding, and make more fruitful our work exper iences. That is a challenging and rewarding job. It is your privilege to study, to work and to worship here--a combination of activities that lead

to wisdom, self-control, independence and success.
"We have been thinking about some fundamentals in our educational pro gram, may we turn our thoughts to three things that are fundamental to our life and prosperity--land, water and trees. They are interrelated and indispensable.
"The land is God's greatest gift to man, next to life itself. Without land and the fruits thereof human life could not exist on this planet. We owe our material prosperity to the land, our food, our clothes and the raw materials out of which we create our wealth.
"Here at the Berry Schools you live close to the soil. You will find a double satisfaction, first in helping to enrich these acres upon which you live and work, and secondly, you will par ticipate each year in bringing out of the soil a new harvest and new wealth. In so-doing I hope you will develope an appreciation for the soil--an atti tude that will become a part of your life, regardless of the vocation or profession to which you may be called.
"Co-equal in importance with the land is ample water. A function of the earth is to act as a reservoir for storage of the water and as a pipeline to feed underground water to the streams and rivers. Trees aid the earth in performing this function. Our trees heal our eroded lands and con serve our rainfall.
"Here at Berry you have an oppor tunity to observe and participate in the work of a great forest domain. You have an opportunity to come in contact with proper forest manage ment, to learn first-hand the great value of trees. I hope each of you will embrace this opportunity, viewing a tree not merely in terms of dollars but understanding its significance in the larger sense of a healer of lands, and a preserver of water and as a friend of man."
Miss Berry believed in planting trees almost as much as she believed in sowing seeds for the development of Christian character.

Page Fourteen

OPPORTUNITIES . . .

Joe

Joyce

Dear Sir: Joe is an excellent young man in
every way. He has an excellent atti tude and is a most desirable student who is making all "A" grades, and has a great desire to get a college education but he is not financially able to go to school.
His father is about 70 years old, and they still have three children at home. They own no property.
From the above information, you will see that the boy will not have any money but he is a willing worker.
I have lots of confidence in this young man making good. I know he is the kind of boy that you will be proud to have at your school.
Very truly yours, F. C. J. Principal
Ruby
Dear Sir:
Berry College has been highly re commended to me by Students who are attending the college and by my high school advisor.
I would like to attend Berry because I believe it offers me the best opportu nity to receive a degree from college, with the opportunity to work to pay my expenses.
Yours sincerely,
Ruby
Recommendation:
I have known Ruby for about two years, and she has worked for me for 18 months. She is badly in need of money. I recommend her highly from all angles. I have read much of Berry Schools and think you will be very good for her, and I think she will be good for you. She makes A's in school, and I don't think she will be able to attend school anywhere else, as her father has all he can do to make a living for his family. She will justify your help.

Dear Sir: My foremost reasons for desiring to

enter Berry College are that it will be

within my means, if I can work my

way through; I value Berry's fine re

putation and high Christian standards

and I believe that through my own

efforts and working my way, I shall

be able to reach my goal of Christian

service.

*

I very deeply respect Berry's fine

reputation and high Christian stand

ards. To me both of these mean a lot

and I will be glad to share them with fellow students.
My goal in life is to contribute to the welfare of mankind and to better it.

Very truly yours,

Joyce

Recommendation: Joyce is an active worker in our church, and is capable of speaking and leads in prayers. The family income is small, and they would not have enough money to pay her expenses. She works in the school lunch room to pay for her lunches, and is capable of any task put before her. She deserves a chance, and is the material that Berry can help make into something worthwhile.

J. G. Pastor

Barbara
Dear Sirs:
I want to attend Berry because I am financially unable to go anywhere else. I would like to work in the summer and if possible, enter in June. Berry offers the things I expect of a college--religion is emphasized, there is not much "formal" social life, and also accredited. It is well known over the world and is respected by all. I have visited Berry's grounds and like them well. I would feel honored to be able to obtain my college education there.
I think I want to major in elemen tary teaching and Berry offers an ex cellent course in this field.

Page Fifteen

I am active in school, church and community work. At church I play the piano, teach the beginners in vacation Bible School in the summer, and am substitute teacher of the primary class. At school this year I am president of several clubs, and help in the office. In the community I help with the an nual fair, annual barbecue in the com munity on the Fourth of July and help in whatever other ways I can.
Last summer I worked on our coun ty newspaper, and received some experience and also learned how to get along with many types of people.
I love music and hope to get some in while at Berry. I am a rather energetic person and get much pleasure from helping others.
I might mention, as another of my personal characteristics, my love for nature as God gave it to us. I often wish I could paint the different sea sons and scenes. I noticed art listed, and am looking forward to it.
I do want to enter Berry and hope I will be selected.
Sincerely yours, Barbara
Barbara has been highly recommend ed by two Berry graduates who live in the community.
John
Dear Gentlemen: Why I want to enter Mount Berry
School is because it has Christian fellowship with God. And people like myself can't do very much at home and would like to finish high school and college up there.

end of school. John's older brother was forced to leave school against his desire at the age of 16 to work the farm in order that his father could have more time to drink and loaf. John will suffer the same experience if he doesn't have an opportunity to get away.
It is commendable that he is inter ested enough to want to get away from this and do something for himself. Your school can mean much to a boy who has the desire to be a good man and give something to his community.
Sincerely,
C. M. Teacher
Frederick
Dear Sir: You will find Frederick an excep
tionally fine boy in spite of the fact that he has not had a good home life. I have had considerable experience with his family. His mother died sev eral years ago and his father has mar ried again. I understand that the first marriage was happy but this time it is most unpleasant at home. Both the father and the step-mother drink.
Frederick has been working part time while going to high school, and that has interfered with his attending church. I am sure that his higher edu cation will have to come from his own initative.
I will personally appreciate any con sideration which you could give him.
Sincerely, K. F. J., pastor

Yours truly, John
Dear Sir: If ever a child needed a new home
life and environment, this is the one. He has ambition to be a much better man than his father, but as long as he remains at home he will not be able to acquire this ambition.
His family feels that as soon as one is large enough to begin plowing then it is time to stop school and that is the

In spite of the deplorable circum stances of his home life, Fredrick has never been out of place at school or in his community. He is kind, thought ful, polite and courteous. His charac ter and moral standing are good. He has demonstrated to everyone that he intends to make something of himself in spite of the environment in which he has been reared. For the past year, he has been working until 2: 00 a.m. on Saturday nights to pay his own way.
B. D., teacher

Page Sixteen

Lula
Dear Sirs:
I was born in *** county near Cross Roads Store, where I still live. Both my parents are now dead, and left five children all under 16. When my Moth er died, my Father had to be Mother and Daddy for us. I had to keep house and go to school since I was the next oldest girl. My Daddy died in 1954, so my oldest married sister moved in with us to stay and try to send me on to school so I could finish.
I try to be cheerful at all times. I try to do things like my advisors would have it done. I am willing to do any thing that would make a real good school. I think we'll have one if we work together.
I have worked at home in the field, so I am used to hard work.
Please let me know that you can take me.
Sincerely, Lula
Her superintendent recommends her as: "A happy type who has not been spoiled. She is a hard worker, and this is a case of absolute need. If she can get a chance she will make good. Lula is one of those rare persons whose disposition and courage gives inspirato all who come in contact with her."
Earline
Dear Sir:
I am a farm girl and have lived on the farm all my life. I am 20 years of age and would like very much to start the career of my choice which is to become a school teacher.
Therefore since my father cannot afford to send me to school I choose to work my way through. I have always won'ted to come to Martha Berry even before I entered high school. The reason I choose Berry is because it seems to settled so down to earth for the country boys and girls and I read so many interesting things about the school and the faculty mem bers in the catalog. There's no doubt that I hope to be attending one of the best schools. It also offers many varities of subjects which I would like to

study, especially English, music and Bible.
Since father is a farmer and has no monthly income I request to work out all my expense.
I promise to do my very best in everything and try to please you in every way.
Respectively yours,
Ear line
Norman
Dear Sir: I want to come to Martha Berry to
finish high school, then enter your college. When I am at home, I have to stay out to work so much of the time that I can't pass all of my work. I feel that if I could be in school all the time, I would be able to learn so much more.
I want to become a preacher when I have finished college. I want to get my college work there, for I haven't enough money to go through college without working. I would work hard to come up to all your expectations for me.
Sincerely, Norman
His teacher writes: I wish I could sit down and talk with you about this boy. I admire his ambition very much. He has had very little opportunity to attend school. His is a large family, poor, and he has been needed at home to help. I would like to see him have the advantage of the opportunities you offer. His pastor writes: I would like to highly recommend Norman to you. He is one fo the most conscientious boys I have known. He comes from a family of 12 children. Norman has had a hard time, but I don't believe he will ever give you one bit of trouble and am satisfied he will devote him self very laboriously in order to pre pare himself for the job God has called him to do. Many good reports have come to me about your School. May God's richest blessings be upon you and your fine School.
Sincerely, W. H.

Page Seventeen

THESE ARE SOME OF OUR NEEDS
THE BUILDING FUND
Cottages--Our boys could build several much needed faculty cot tages, if we only had funds. The boys cut timber, and saw it in our sawmill. We have gone as far as we can without funds to buy nails, cement, roofing, fixtures, and other things we can not make at Berry. We desperately need about six cottages, which will not only furnish places for our staff members to live, but will give our industrial arts boys practical experience in carpentry, plumbing, electrical work, masonry, roofing, and all other building skills. We would be happy to name the cot tage for any friend or loved one.
Refrigeration Plant--One of our greatest needs is for a freezing plant where the Berry girls could preserve the foods which the Berry boys raise. This summer we will grow several tons of fruits, vegetables, and meat, some of which can be eaten fresh, but the majority will have to be canned or sold. At present it is not possible to butcher enough of one kind of meat to feed all the boys and girls without having spoilage. With the freezing unit, the meat could be safely stored, and used as needed. The vege tables would not only taste better but would have more vitamins, and be more healthful. A gift of $50,000 would build this greatly needed freezing plant.
Library Addition--Built in 1926 when Berry was a high school, our library has not grown as much as the Schools. An addition to our Memorial Library would have enough space for reading rooms for the boys and girls, and enough stack space for books. This would be a lasting memorial, and would meet one of our most urgent needs.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Endowment--Berry has built up a small endowment through the years largely through bequests and Endowed Scholarships. You may endow a Scholarship for $5,000, or a Day at Berry for $2,500, and you may name them in honor of anyone you wish. A gift to the Endowment Fund will help perpetuate the work Berry does through the years to come, and will also perpetuate the name of someone dear to you.
Retirement--In these days when people everywhere stress security it is hard to realize that Berry workers continue to "stand by" giving their best years of youth and strength for barely a living wage and no promise of retirement funds when they can work no longer. Any amount for the retirement fund would be a Godsend.
Page Eighteen

Working Scholarships--Each year we walk further on the "plank of Faith," and accept boys and girls who are anxious to get an education. They come to Berry and work to earn their tuition, room and board. But, we must find friends who believe that these boys and girls will be worth an investment of $150 a year to their country when they are graduated from Berry. The records of our graduates show the value of our training. We hope that you will believe in these young people and help them with as much as you can afford toward a working scholarship.

MISCELLANEOUS NEEDS

Academic Costumes--Many of our friends have sent academic robes and hoods to be worn by our seniors and faculty members, and they were a great addition to our commencement exercises. We can still use more robes of all kinds, bachelors, masters, and doctors, and any kind of hood, as well as caps. If you have any academic costumes stored, we can put them to good use.

Books--Our young people would enjoy magazines, books, and other materials to read, and we hope that we will be able to have good, interesting literature for them. Many of our friends are sending magazines weekly, monthly, and at other regular intervals, but we can always use more. We love to use them in the library, in the sitting rooms, and other places where lem.

GIFTS TO BERRY ARE DEDUCTIBLE
-- FOR --

iters in the offices and in the typing ills for trained typists and secretaries, larly like Berry-trained beys and girls, business machines on which to give
ig-
ways need additional dishes and addij to teach our students to make the as possible and it adds a great deal t dishes and silver to set the tables

INCOME TAX PURPOSES

ien, carpentry, drawing, mechanical, at you are not using, can be used at
:e.

Is of electrical equipment can be used d a laboratory to teach our girls the of appliances, and any gift would c mixers; sewing machines; irons; , toasters; waffle irons; vacum cleaners; or other equipment will be very helpful.

HSF Gifts are deductible for income tax purposes '^32
Anything sent to The Berry Schools is deeply appreciated, and a good use is found for everything contributed.

THESE ARE SOME OF OUR NEEDS

THE BUILDING FUND

Cottages--Our boys could build several much needed faculty cot tages, if we only had funds. The boys cut timber, and saw it in our sawmill. We have gone as far as we can without funds to buy nails, cement, roofing, fixtures, and other things we can not make at Berry. We desperately need about six cottages, which will not only furnish places for our staff members to live, but will give our industrial arts boys practical experience in carpentry, plumbing, electrical work, masonry, roofing, and all other building skills. We would be happy to name the cot tage for any friend or loved one.

Refrigeration Plant--One of our greatest needs is for a freezing plant where the Berry girls could preserve the foods which the Berry boys raise. This summer we will grow several tons of fruits, vegetables, and meat, some of which can be eaten fresh, but the majority will have to be canned or sold. At present it is not possible to butcher enough of one kind of meat to feed all the boys and girls without having spoilage. With the freezing unit, the meat could be safely stored, and used as needed. The vege tables would not only taste better and be more healthful. A gift of $ needed freezing plant.

Library Addition--Built in 1926 wher library has not grown as much ai our Memorial Library would he rooms for the boys and girls, and This would be a lasting memoria most urgent needs.

WON'T YOU
REMEMBER

SCHOLARSl

BERRY

Endowment--Berry has built up a s years largely through bequests an may endow a Scholarship for $5,00 and you may name them in hono to the Endowment Fund will ha does through the years to come, name of someone dear to you.

IN YOUR WILL

Retirement--In these days when people everywhere stress security it is hard to realize that Berry workers continue to "stand by" giving their best years of youth and strength for barely a living wage and no promise of retirement funds when they can work no longer. Any amount for the retirement fund would be a
Godsend.

Page Eighteen

Working Scholarships--Each year we walk further on the "plank of Faith," and accept boys and girls who are anxious to get an education. They come to Berry and work to earn their tuition, room and board. But, we must find friends who believe that these boys and girls will be worth an investment of $150 a year to their country when they are graduated from Berry. The records of our graduates show the value of our training. We hope that you will believe in these young people and help them with as much as you can afford toward a working scholarship.
MISCELLANEOUS NEEDS
Academic Costumes--Many of our friends have sent academic robes and hoods to be worn by our seniors and faculty members, and they were a great addition to our commencement exercises. We can still use more robes of all kinds, bachelors, masters, and doctors, and any kind of hood, as well as caps. If you have any academic costumes stored, we can put them to good use.
Books--Our young people would enjoy magazines, books, and other materials to read, and we hope that we will be able to have good, interesting literature for them. Many of our friends are sending magazines weekly, monthly, and at other regular intervals, but we can always use more. We love to use them in the library, in the sitting rooms, and other places where students can easily find them.
Typewriters--We need typewriters in the offices and in the typing room. There are many calls for trained typists and secretaries, and business firms particularly like Berry-trained boys and girls We need typewriters and business machines on which to give them the necessary training.
Dishes and Silverware--We always need additional dishes and addi tional silverware. We try to teach our students to make the dining room as attractive as possible and it adds a great deal when they have the right dishes and silver to set the tables properly.
Tools--All kinds of tools, garden, carpentry, drawing, mechanical, and anything you have that you are not using, can be used at Berry to a good advantage.
Electrical Equipment--All kinds of electrical equipment can be used at Berry. We have started a laboratory to teach our girls the proper use of all kinds of appliances, and any gift would be most useful. Electric mixers; sewing machines; irons; washing machines; ironers; toasters; waffle irons; vacum cleaners; or other equipment will be very helpful.
BSP Gifts are deductible for income tax purposes
Anything sent to The Berry Schools is deeply appreciated, and a good use is found for everything contributed.

WILL . .
"Wish or desire; inclination; pleasure . .
J<HIS is part of the definition of a will found in the dictionary. And how dif ferent it is from our usual conception of a will. Usually we think of wills in connection with death, and are reluc tant to dwell on the possibility long enough to be sure our wishes and de sires are recorded.
If we stop to think that it is a pleas ure to help others; that even after we are gone, we can continue to help wor thy boys and girls, and through them perpetuate our spirit, our hopes and ideals, then the idea of a will is a joy. Through the ages to come, because of our wishes and desires, inclinations, and because it was our pleasure, young people will find a source of hope and opportunity.
May it be your inclination and pleasure to
REMEMBER BERRY IN YOUR WILL.

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