Achievement differences of kindergarten students from the alternative and conventional child day care delivery systems, 1988

Collection:
Atlanta University and Clark Atlanta University Theses and Dissertations
Title:
Achievement differences of kindergarten students from the alternative and conventional child day care delivery systems, 1988
Creator:
Popwell, Emma Jean Pace
Contributor to Resource:
Foster, Madison
Date of Original:
1988-05-01
Subject:
Degrees, Academic
Dissertations, Academic
Location:
United States, Georgia, Fulton County, Atlanta, 33.749, -84.38798
Medium:
dissertations
theses
Type:
Text
Format:
application/pdf
Description:
Degree Type: thesis
Degree Name: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Date of Degree: 1988
Granting Institution: Atlanta University
Department/ School: School of Social Work
The study explored whether combinations of alternative child care arrangements and sociodemographic characteristics were associated with kindergarten achievement similar to the common effects for formal preschool intervention programs. The achievement of preschool nonattenders was compared within the group by the place of child care (in- home or away from home), and among comparison groups (no preschool group, school system preschool group and non-school system preschool group). A sample of 1,456 kindergarten students was selected from among 23 schools. There were 573 students with no preschool, 11:9 from the school system preschool program and 73!: students from the non-school system preschool programs. A Child Care Questionnaire mailed to parents of the no-preschool students was used to collect information on the description and the educational dimensions of the alternative child care arrangements used by parents during the day on weekdays, the year preceding child's enrollment in kindergarten. The results of preassessment and post assessment performance on the Ready Steps Language Survey, the reading and mathematics minimum skills, Getting Ready to Read, progression status, and the California Achievement Tests were used as measures of achievement. The findings indicated that certain combinations of sociodemographic characteristics and educational dimensions of the alternative child care arrangements were associated with a high level of kindergarten achievement, and that kindergarten students with this combination of variables in the alternative child care settings demonstrated a level of achievement equal to the average for students within the same schools who attended formal preschool programs. There was no significant difference in achievement within the no-preschool group, and differences among the comparison groups were identified at preassessment and post assessment in favor of the preschool group.
Metadata URL:
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12322/cau.td:1988_popwell_emma_j_p
Language:
eng
Holding Institution:
Clark Atlanta University
Rights:
Rights Statement information

Locations